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Ms Nola Ries

Associate Professor

Newcastle Law School

Healthcare policy and practice: What’s law got to do with it?

A lauded authority on health law, Nola Ries brings an evidence-based approach to investigating law’s impact on health systems, professional practices and individual behaviour.

Nola Ries

Nola’s interests in healthcare were sparked early in her university studies, learning about the social determinants of health and political and economic influences on health policy-making. After gaining legal qualifications, Nola practiced law, mainly doing litigation work for a provincial health department in her native Canada.

“People would bring legal claims against the government, saying its policy and funding decisions violated their rights to access healthcare,” she states.

“These cases involved arguments about the evidence for and against certain services or programs.”

Nola recalls cases involving screening and treatments for cancer and early intervention therapy for kids with autism.

“There were hard questions about how government should spend its healthcare budget,” she adds.

These cases inspired Nola to take a brief educational leave from her legal practice.

“I undertook a postgraduate degree at the University of Alberta and wrote a thesis on the constitutional law issues related to the cases I’d been involved in professionally.”

She credits the mentorship she had at the university’s Health Law Institute with putting her on a research track.  Tackling a variety of research projects, Nola built on her diverse interests in public health, genetics, biomedical research and health system reform.  She also taught at the University of Victoria and kept up part-time legal practice and consulting work.

Australia bound

“My research took me to Sydney in 2004,” she says.

“I presented work on constitutional rights and access to healthcare at the World Congress on Medical Law.”

“I loved Australia so much and wanted to come back!”

A decade later, Nola said yes to a job at the University of Newcastle.

“A few things attracted me to the job,” she says.

“The Law School has a highly-regarded clinical legal education program and I’m a huge advocate of combining real-world experience with academic study.”

She also saw great potential for collaborations with researchers in the Faculty of Health and Medicine and at the Hunter Medical Research Institute.

“Plus, I love the beach and year-round cycling.”

Heard and respected

As a prolific researcher and writer, Nola has a number of solo and collaborative projects on the go.

She is working on several initiatives focused on advance personal planning and end-of-life care for older adults and people with serious illnesses.

“It’s important for those who have a diagnosis of dementia,” she elaborates.

“At an early stage they are encouraged to get their affairs in order in anticipation that, at some point, they will lose the ability to make choices, such as where they want to live and what kind of healthcare they do or don’t want.”

Acknowledging a “gap” between what the law enables people to do and what people actually do, Nola is looking to bring together different areas of expertise and bridge meaningful connections between health and legal fields.

“There are some fantastic researchers at this University working on dementia and quality of life issues,” she says.

“So I’m teaming up with them to figure out how we can best support people to exercise their rights to plan ahead.”

“It’s vital they take the time to see a lawyer and write up their documents and talk to family members and friends about their wishes.”

“These papers need to be in the hands of healthcare providers too.”

Transformative intent

A master at multitasking, Nola is also in the process of examining the legal aspects of health service delivery.

“There’s always talk about system reform as governments are really concerned about budgets and how healthcare uses more and more of taxpayers’ money,” she says.

“I’m interested in innovation – how we can move people to preventative care instead of acute care and how nurses and allied health professionals can work in a broader scope of practice.”

“We need to figure out legal factors that impede or support the health workforce in delivering safe and high-quality care.”

As a member of the Health Services Research and Innovation Group in the Faculty of Business and Law, Nola is investigating these questions.

Awarded an Australian Fellowship in Health Services and Policy Research in late 2015, Nola is also working on the provision of low-value medical treatments.

“There’s a global initiative called ‘Choosing Wisely,’ which encourages doctors to think more critically about the services they recommend to patients,” she explains.

“We want them to be asking lots of questions – Is it likely to help? What is the evidence for it? Is it even necessary?”

“Health professionals are sometimes motivated to send people to screenings because they’re worried about missing something and being sued.”

“So I want to determine how the law affects this clinical relationship and develop ways to help shift our culture of overmedication.”

Also awarded Faculty funding at the end of last year, Nola and a handful of her colleagues are set to launch a Priority Research Initiative on Evidence-based Law and Practice in 2016.

Nola believes that legal scholarship and practice can learn from the evidence-based movement in other disciplines, especially medicine.

“We will focus on robust research methods and knowledge translation work to strengthen the evidence base for law reform and professional practices,” she says.

Along with Nola’s expertise in health law, the research group includes experts in international law, family law, criminal law and commercial law.

“We don’t want legislation to just sit on the books and have no impact. Or worse, have a negative impact on people’s lives. We want laws to help create conditions to achieve desired health, social, environmental and economic goals.”

More about Nola's Career

Related links

Nola Ries

Healthcare policy and practice: What’s law got to do with it?

A lauded authority on health law, Nola Ries brings an evidence-based approach to investigating law’s impact on health systems, professional practices and indivi

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Canadian trained lawyer with experience working in Canada, the UK and Australia. I practiced in areas of constitutional, administrative and human rights litigation. I taught with the Faculty of Law and School of Health Information Science at the University of Victoria (Canada) and was a research associate with the Health Law Institute, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta. I have been a visiting lecturer with the Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania and held a Senior Research Fellowship with the Global Public Health Unit, University of Edinburgh.

My research and teaching activities focus on health law, privacy law, research ethics, regulation of new health technologies, and legal aspects of health system reform. I have authored over 60 articles, book chapters and major reports and am co-editor of Public Health Law and Policy in Canada. I have co-edited volumes on health law and policy for the International Encylopaedia of Laws: Medical Law and Halsbury’s Laws of Canada.

I have provided consulting services to governmental and not-for-profit organisations in Canada, including the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Conference Board of Canada, the federal Department of Justice, the Canadian Policy Research Networks and the national Panel on Research Ethics. I have served on several health research ethics boards and as a member of a Professional Practice and Standards Committee for a national health practitioner association.

Research Expertise
During a decade of academic research in Canada, I obtained competitive research funding from diverse sources including the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence Program, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, and Canadian Blood Services. I regularly worked in multi-disciplinary teams involving researchers in law, health sciences, public health, medicine, and social sciences. I also supervised research assistants and trainees.

Teaching Expertise
I have ten years of university teaching experience and have taught courses in areas of health law and policy, public law, introduction to law and legal process, and legal issues in health informatics. I have delivered courses and seminars via distance education using various online learning tools and have experience in practical legal advocacy training. I regularly supervised Juris Doctor students in directed research and writing on a variety of health law topics. In addition to university teaching, I have regularly presented at conferences, workshops and continuing education events for audiences that included lawyers, health clinicians and researchers, and community members.

Administrative Expertise
I engaged in a number of community service activities in Canada. I was a member of the Advisory Board for the creation of a new School of Public Health and Social Policy at the University of Victoria (Canada). I served on health research ethics boards with a local health region and a major teaching hospital to provide expertise on health and privacy law. I was a consultant to Canada’s Panel on Research Ethics to provide advice on a major reform of the national policy statement on the ethical conduct of research involving humans. I advised the Ethical, Social and Legal Issues Advisory Committee for the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. In 2014, I served as a member of the National Professional Practice Standards Committee for Occupational Therapy Australia.


Qualifications

  • Juris Doctor, University of Victoria - Canada
  • Master of Public Administration, University of Victoria - Canada
  • Master of Laws, University of Alberta - Canada

Keywords

  • Governance of health research
  • Health law and policy
  • Law and public health
  • Law, genomics and new technologies
  • Legal aspects of health system reform
  • Legal research
  • Public law
  • Regulation of health professions

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 20
180199 Law not elsewhere classified 60
160508 Health Policy 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
Newcastle Law School
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Ries NM, Public Health Law and Policy in Canada, LexisNexis Canada, Scarborough, Ontario (2013) [A4]
2009 Castle D, Ries NM, Nutrition and Genomics: Issues of Ethics, Law, Regulation & Communication, Elsevier, Burlington, MA (2009) [A3]

Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ross N, Ries NM, Meredith J, Campbell S, 'Local to Global: Incorporating Overseas Work and Study in the Law School Curriculum', The Globalisation of Higher Education - Developing Internationalised Education, Research and Practice, Palgrave McMillan, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Nicola Ross
2017 Turner A, Ries NM, Baker A, 'Mental Health and Substance Use', Ethics in Mental Health-Substance Use, Routledge, USA (2017)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2014 Ries N, 'Health Professionals and the Organisation of Healthcare: Current Trends', Routledge Handbook of Medical Law and Ethics, Routledge, Abingdon, UK 100 (2014) [B1]
2014 Bailey TM, Ries NM, Bobinski MA, Renke WN, Francescutti L, Strome TL, et al., 'Public Health (2014 Reissue)', Halsbury's Laws of Canada, LexisNexis Canada, Markham, Canada 109-342 (2014) [B2]
2014 Bailey TM, Ries NM, Bobinski MA, Renke WN, Francescutti L, Strome TL, et al., 'Public Health (2014 Reissue)', Halsbury's Laws of Canada, LexisNexis Canada, Markham, Canada 109-342 (2014) [B2]
2013 Ries NM, 'Legal Aspects of the Blood System in Canada', Public Health Law and Policy in Canada, 3rd ed., LexisNexis Canada, Scarborough, Ontario 285-321 (2013) [B1]
2013 Ries NM, 'Legal Foundations of Public Health in Canada', Public Health Law and Policy in Canada, 3rd ed., LexisNexis Canada, Scarborough, Ontario 7-35 (2013) [B1]
2013 Ries NM, von Tigerstrom B, 'Law and the Promotion of Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity', Public Health Law and Policy in Canada, LexisNexis Canada, Scarborough, Ontario 439-489 (2013) [B1]
2012 Ries NM, 'Human Health Care: The Promise of Animal Biotechnology', Designer Animals: Mapping the Issues in Animal Biotechnology, University of Toronto Press, Toronto 159-188 (2012) [B1]
2011 Ries NM, 'Charter Challenges', Canadian Health Law and Policy, 4th ed., LexisNexis Canada, Markham, Ontario 615-651 (2011) [B1]
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (42 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Ries NM, Thompson K, Lowe M, 'Including People with Dementia in Research: An Analysis of Australian Ethical and Legal Rules and Recommendations for Reform', Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, forthcoming (2017)
2017 Ries NM, 'Law Matters: How the Legal Context in Canada Influences Interprofessional Collaboration', Journal of Interprofessional Care, (2017)
DOI 10.1080/13561820.2017.1310495
2016 Ries NM, 'Innovation in Healthcare, Innovation in Law: Does the Law Support Interprofessional Collaboration in Canadian Health Systems?', Osgoode Hall Law Journal, 54 87-124 (2016) [C1]
2016 Ries NM, 'Prescribe With Caution: The Response of Canada¿s Medical Regulatory Authorities to the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis', McGill Journal of Law and Health, 9 (2016)
2016 Ries NM, Johnston B, McCarthy S, 'Legal education and the ageing population: Building student knowledge and skills through experiential learning in collaboration with community organisations', Adelaide Law Review, 37 495-522 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Shaun Mccarthy
2016 Ries NM, 'Lawyers and Advance Care and End-of-Life Planning: Enhancing Collaboration between Legal and Health Professions', Journal of Law and Medicine, 23 887-906 (2016) [C1]
2016 Nicol D, Bubela T, Chalmers D, Charbonneau J, Critchley C, Dickinson J, et al., 'Precision Medicine: Drowning in a Regulatory Soup?', Journal of Law and the Biosciences, 3 281-303 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/jlb/lsw018
Citations Web of Science - 3
2016 Ries NM, Johnston B, McCarthy S, 'Technology-Enabled Legal Service Delivery for Older Adults: What Can Law Learn from TeleHealth? Findings from an International Review of Literature', Elder Law Review, 10 1-14 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Shaun Mccarthy
2016 Ries NM, Douglas M, Simon J, Fassbender K, 'Doctors, Lawyers and advance care planning: Time for innovation to work together to meet client needs', Healthcare Policy, 12 12-18 (2016) [C1]

Health organizations in Canada have invested considerable resources in strategies to improve knowledge and uptake of advance care planning (ACP). Yet barriers persist and many Can... [more]

Health organizations in Canada have invested considerable resources in strategies to improve knowledge and uptake of advance care planning (ACP). Yet barriers persist and many Canadians do not engage in the full range of ACP behaviours, including writing an advance directive and appointing a legally authorized decision-maker. Not engaging effectively in ACP disadvantages patients, their loved ones and their healthcare providers. This article advocates for greater collaboration between health and legal professionals to better support clients in ACP and presents a framework for action to build connections between these typically siloed professions.

2014 Ries NM, Caulfield T, 'Obesity Policy: The Way Forward', Health Law Review, 22 28-32 (2014)
2014 Nicol D, Hagger M, Ries NM, Liddicoat J, 'Time to Get Serious about Privacy Policies', Federal Law Review, 42 149-179 (2014) [C1]
2013 Ries NM, 'What Is the Role of Regulation in the Management and Prevention of Obesity?', Current Obesity Reports, 2 327-332 (2013) [C2]
DOI 10.1007/s13679-013-0068-5
2013 Ries NM, 'Nudge or Not? Can Incentives Change Health Behaviours?', Healthcare Papers, 12 37-41 (2013)
2013 Ries NM, Fisher KJ, 'The Increasing Involvement of Physicians in Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Considerations of Professional Regulation and Patient Safety', Queen's Law Journal, 39 273-299 (2013) [C1]
2012 Ries NM, 'Financial Incentives for Weight Loss and Healthy Behaviours', Healthcare Policy, 7 23-28 (2012) [C1]
2012 Ries NM, 'Legal and Policy Measures to Promote Healthy Behaviour: Using Incentives and Disincentives to Control Obesity', McGill Journal of Law & Health, 6 1-40 (2012) [C1]
2011 Master Z, Ries NM, Caulfield T, 'Balancing Efficiency and the Protection of Research Participants: Canadian Allergy/Asthma Researchers¿ Perspectives on the Ethics Review of Multi-Site Health Research', Journal of Clinical Research & Bioethics, 02 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2155-9627.1000104e
2011 Rachul CM, Ries NM, Caulfield T, 'Canadian Newspaper Coverage of the A/H1N1 Vaccine Program', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 102 200-203 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Ries NM, von Tigerstrom B, 'Legal Interventions to Address Obesity: Assessing the State of the Law in Canada', UBC Law Review, 43 361-416 (2011) [C1]
2011 Arrandale VH, Brauer M, Brook JR, Brunekreef B, Gold DR, London SJ, et al., 'Exposure assessment in cohort studies of childhood asthma', Environmental Health Perspectives, 119 591-597 (2011) [C1]

Background: The environment is suspected to play an important role in the development of childhood asthma. Cohort studies are a powerful observational design for studying exposure... [more]

Background: The environment is suspected to play an important role in the development of childhood asthma. Cohort studies are a powerful observational design for studying exposure-response relationships, but their power depends in part upon the accuracy of the exposure assessment. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss issues that make accurate exposure assessment a challenge and to suggest strategies for improving exposure assessment in longitudinal cohort studies of childhood asthma and allergies. Data synthesis: Exposures of interest need to be prioritized, because a single study cannot measure all potentially relevant exposures. Hypotheses need to be based on proposed mechanisms, critical time windows for effects, prior knowledge of physical, physiologic, and immunologic development, as well as genetic pathways potentially influenced by the exposures. Modifiable exposures are most important from the public health perspective. Given the interest in evaluating gene environment interactions, large cohort sizes are required, and planning for data pooling across independent studies is critical. Collection of additional samples, possibly through subject participation, will permit secondary analyses. Models combining air quality, environmental, and dose data provide exposure estimates across large cohorts but can still be improved. Conclusions: Exposure is best characterized through a combination of information sources. Improving exposure assessment is critical for reducing measurement error and increasing power, which increase confidence in characterization of children at risk, leading to improved health outcomes.

DOI 10.1289/ehp.1002267
Citations Scopus - 14
2011 Ries NM, Rachul C, Caulfield T, 'Newspaper reporting on legislative and policy interventions to address obesity: United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom', Journal of Public Health Policy, 32 73-90 (2011) [C1]

This article analyzes the content of articles in major newspapers in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom that discuss legislative and policy measures to control obes... [more]

This article analyzes the content of articles in major newspapers in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom that discuss legislative and policy measures to control obesity. The aim was to identify and compare measures that attract media attention in the three jurisdictions: the tone of print media coverage, the characterization of obesity, and attitudes toward government interventions to address obesity. We collected 360 articles published between January 1989 and April 2009 in 12 major newspapers: 83 were published in the United States, 85 in Canada, and 192 in the United Kingdom. Articles in the three jurisdictions discussed the nature and causes of obesity in similar terms, but revealed differences in attitudes toward obesity and toward legal and policy interventions to control rising obesity rates. Obesity is reported principally as a lifestyle problem, but articles state (in varying proportions) that individuals, governments, and industry all share a role in addressing modern environments to promote healthier choices. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

DOI 10.1057/jphp.2010.39
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Ries NM, 'Regulating Public Health Risks: Case Studies of Food Allergens and Transfusion Transmissible Infections', Health Law Journal (Canada), 19 1-44 (2011) [C1]
2010 Ries NM, Hyde-Lay R, Caulfield T, 'Willingness to pay for genetic testing: A study of attitudes in a canadian population', Public Health Genomics, 13 292-300 (2010) [C1]

Background: This article reports results of a 2008 telephone survey of approximately 1,200 residents of the Province of Alberta, Canada. The majority of respondents reside in urba... [more]

Background: This article reports results of a 2008 telephone survey of approximately 1,200 residents of the Province of Alberta, Canada. The majority of respondents reside in urban centers, have some post-secondary education, and report annual family income near or above the Canadian average. The goal was to explore attitudes and interest regarding different types of genetic tests. Methods: Respondents were asked about their willingness to pay for tests to gain information about genetic factors related to manageable conditions, serious, unpreventable disease, healthy food choices, psychiatric conditions, going bald (asked of men only), and gaining weight. The price categories were CAD 0, CAD 1-499, CAD 500-1,999 and CAD 2,000+. Respondents were also asked about factors that would motivate interest in genetic testing, such as availability of treatment, curiosity, and reproductive decision-making. They were also asked if the public health insurance system should pay for certain types of tests. Results: Across all test categories, few respondents expressed willingness to pay more than CAD 500 out of their own pocket. 62% stated that the public health insurance system should pay for genetic tests for manageable conditions and opinion was divided about whether the government should fund tests for serious, unpreventable conditions and tests to inform healthy eating choices. Conclusion: The principal motivator for interest in genetic testing was to learn clinically relevant details to inform health-related decisions. Curiosity about genetic risk had only a modest impact on consumer interest. In general, younger respondents (18-35 years) expressed somewhat greater willingness to pay than older respondents, especially those 65 and older. © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

DOI 10.1159/000253120
Citations Scopus - 13
2010 Ries NM, Legrandeur J, Caulfield T, 'Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: Responses from studies in six countries', BMC Medical Ethics, 11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6939-11-4
Citations Scopus - 40
2010 Weir M, Morin K, Ries N, Castle D, 'Canadian health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nutritional genomics', British Journal of Nutrition, 104 1112-1119 (2010) [C1]

Nutritional genomics has reached the public through applications of the Human Genome Project offered direct to consumers (DTC). The ability to pursue nutrigenetic testing without ... [more]

Nutritional genomics has reached the public through applications of the Human Genome Project offered direct to consumers (DTC). The ability to pursue nutrigenetic testing without the involvement of a health care professional has received considerable attention from academic and policy commentators. To better understand the knowledge and attitudes of Canadian health care professionals regarding nutritional genomics and nutrigenetic testing, qualitative research in the form of focus group discussions was undertaken. Four key themes emerged: (1) concerns over DTC testing; (2) lack of health care professional competency; (3) genetic scepticism and inevitability; (4) expectation of regulation. Together, they indicate that health care professionals have little knowledge about nutritional genomics and hold contradictory attitudes towards genomics in general, and to nutritional genomics in particular. Respondents argue in favour of a delivery model where health care professionals act as intermediaries. They are also aware of their lack of competency to provide such services. To ensure greater public protection, respondents cite the importance of more stringent regulatory oversight of DTC genetic testing. Whether such an approach is necessary to address the various ethical and social issues raised by nutrigenetic testing remains an open debate. Copyright © The Authors 2010.

DOI 10.1017/S0007114510002035
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Caulfield T, Ries NM, Ray PN, Shuman C, Wilson B, 'Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: Good, bad or benign?', Clinical Genetics, 77 101-105 (2010) [C1]

A wide variety of genetic tests are now being marketed and sold in direct-to-consumer (DTC) commercial transactions. However, risk information revealed through many DTC testing se... [more]

A wide variety of genetic tests are now being marketed and sold in direct-to-consumer (DTC) commercial transactions. However, risk information revealed through many DTC testing services, especially those based on emerging genome wide-association studies, has limited predictive value for consumers. Some commentators contend that tests are being marketed prematurely, while others support rapid translation of genetic research findings to the marketplace. The potential harms and benefits of DTC access to genetic testing are not yet well understood, but some large-scale studies have recently been launched to examine how consumers understand and use genetic risk information. Greater consumer access to genetic tests creates a need for continuing education for health care professionals so they can respond to patients' inquiries about the benefits, risks and limitations of DTC services. Governmental bodies in many jurisdictions are considering options for regulating practices of DTC genetic testing companies, particularly to govern quality of commercial genetic tests and ensure fair and truthful advertising. Intersectoral initiatives involving government regulators, professional bodies and industry are important to facilitate development of standards to govern this rapidly developing area of personalized genomic commerce. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

DOI 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2009.01291.x
Citations Scopus - 51
2010 Ries NM, 'Ethics, Health Research, and Canada's Aging Population', Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue canadienne du vieillissement, 29 577-580 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0714980810000565
2010 Ries NM, Von Tigerstrom B, 'Roadblocks to laws for healthy eating and activity', CMAJ, 182 687-692 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.091403
Citations Scopus - 6
2009 Farrell J, Ries NM, Kachan N, Boon H, 'Foods and natural health products: Gaps and ambiguities in the Canadian regulatory regime', Food Policy, 34 388-392 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.foodpol.2009.01.002
Citations Scopus - 2
2009 Rodal R, Ries NM, Wilson K, 'Influenza Vaccination for Health Care Workers: Towards a Workable and Effective Standard', Health Law Journal (Canada), 17 297-337 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2009 von Tigerstrom B, Ries NM, 'Cancer Surveillance in Canada: Analysis of Legal and Policy Frameworks and Tools for Reform', Health Law Journal (Canada), 17 1-49 (2009) [C1]
2008 Ries NM, 'Piling on the Laws, Shedding the Pounds? The Use of Legal Tools to Address Obesity', Health Law Journal (Canada), 101-126 (2008) [C1]
2008 Spady D, Ries N, Ladd BD, Buka I, Osornio-Vargas AR, Soskolne CL, 'Governance Instruments That Protect Children's Environmental Health: Is Enough Being Done?', Environmental Law Review, 10 200-217 (2008) [C2]
DOI 10.1350/enlr.2008.10.3.022
2008 Ries NM, Castle D, 'Nutrigenomics and Ethics Interface: Direct-to-Consumer Services and Commercial Aspects', OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, 12 245-250 (2008) [D1]
DOI 10.1089/omi.2008.0049
2008 Farrell J, Ries NM, Boon N, 'Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A Systematic Analysis of Professional Responsibilities in Canada', Pharmacy Practice, 6 33-42 (2008) [C1]
2008 Hailey D, Jacobs PD, Ries NM, Polisena J, 'Reuse of single use medical devices in Canada: Clinical and economic outcomes, legal and ethical issues, and current hospital practice', International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 24 430-436 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0266462308080562
Citations Scopus - 14
2007 Ries NM, 'Growing Up as a Research Subject: Ethical and Legal Issues in Birth Cohort Studies Involving Genetic Research', Health Law Journal (Canada), 1-41 (2007)
2007 Ries NM, 'Food, Fat and the Law: A Comment on Trans Fat Bans and Public Health', Windsor Review of Legal and Social Issues, 2007 15-26 (2007)
2007 Castle D, Ries NM, 'Ethical, legal and social issues in nutrigenomics: The challenges of regulating service delivery and building health professional capacity', Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, 622 138-143 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2007.03.017
2006 Ries NM, 'Patient Privacy in a Wired (and Wireless) World: Approaches to Consent in the Context of Electronic Health Records', Alberta Law Review, 43 681-712 (2006)
2006 Ries NM, Caulfield T, 'First Pharmacogenomics, Next Nutrigenomics: Genohype or Genohealthy?', Jurimetrics: journal of law, science and technology, 46 281-308 (2006)
2006 Ries NM, 'Legal Rights, Constitutional Controversies, and Access to Health Care: Lessons from Canada', Medicine and Law: an international journal, 25 45-57 (2006)
Show 39 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Smith AN, Mitchell R, Ries N, Boyle B, 'Challenging the status quo in rural health workforce roles: risks versus benefits', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Caulfield T, Ries NM, 'Obesity Policy: The Way Forward - Submission to the Senate of Canada Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology', (2014)

Report (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Ries NM, 'The Ethical Allocation of Health Research Investments in Canada: Meeting the Needs of an Aging Population', Health Canada (2012)
2010 Ries NM, Einsiedel E, 'Online Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: Issues and Policy Options, Genomics, Policy & Society Policy Brief No. 3', Genome Canada (2010)
2010 Ries NM, 'Analysis of Privacy Policies and Practices of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies: Private Sector Databanks and Privacy Protection Norms', Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (2010) [R1]
2008 Hailey D, Jacobs P, Ries NM, Polisena J, Normandin S, Noorani H, et al., 'Reprocessing of single-use medical devices: Clinical, economic and health services impact', Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (2008) [R1]
2007 Prada G, Swettenham J, Ries NM, Martin J, 'Liability Risks in Interdisciplinary Care: Thinking Outside the Box', Conference Board of Canada (2007)
2007 Ries NM, Shelley JJ, 'Food, Health and Biotechnology: Consumer and Social Issues in Canada¿s New Food and Health Products Industries', Advanced Foods and Materials Network (2007)
Show 3 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $1,142,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $30,000

Action on Elder Abuse: A pilot project to improve screening and intervention through health-legal collaboration$30,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body NSW Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Ms Nola Ries, Associate Professor John Anderson, Doctor Elise Mansfield, Mr Shaun McCarthy
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700701
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20165 grants / $76,500

New Colombo Plan Student Mobility Grant$49,500

"From Science to Society: Genomics, stem cells and the future of medicine in Australia and Japan" The New Colombo Plan funding will support an intensive study trip to Japan for law students enrolled in a course on law and genetics.

Funding body: Commonwealth

Funding body Commonwealth
Scheme New Colombo Plan
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Priority Research Initiative in Evidence-Based Law and Practice$20,000

The Evidence-based Law and Practice Priority Research Initiative encompasses research activity in four thematic areas: Legal Education, Equity & Scholarship; Health, Justice & Social Affairs; Human Rights & International Affairs; and Business, Regulation & Compliance. The research includes robust doctrinal scholarship, innovative empirical methods, and linkages with external partners to strengthen the evidence base for law reform and professional practice.

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle
Scheme Priority Research Initiatives
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Internationalisation of Law Students' Learning$4,000

Seeking to internationalise its curriculum, Newcastle Law School has had significant success in obtaining competitive Commonwealth funding ($215,000 for 2016) to support our law students to undertake international study and work integrated learning (WIL) experiences in the Indo Pacific region. Between 2015/16, approximately 85 NLS students will complete courses with international experiences in Cambodia, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Cook Islands. This research project evaluates these international experiences, including perspectives of both students and staff, 

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Nicola Ross and Nola Ries

Scheme Teaching and Learning Seed Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Teaching & Learning Seed Grant: Developing a Technology-Enabled Legal Outreach Service$3,000

This seed grant supports developmental work for a technology-enabled legal outreach service to connect the University of Newcastle Legal Centre with rural, regional and remote communities in New South Wales.

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Shaun McCarthy and Nola Ries

Scheme Teaching and Learning Seed Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Australia-Japan Emerging Research Leaders Exchange Program$0

The Australia Japan Emerging Research Leaders Exchange Program (ERLEP) is targeted at mid-career researchers of both countries who are emerging leaders in the Science and Technology community.

The successful researchers undertake two weeks of institutional placements in agreed-upon priority S&T areas. This significant program is funded by the Department of Innovation, Industry and Science (DIIS) and the Japanese Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS), with ATSE and the Engineering Academy of Japan (EAJ) administering the program.

See: http://www.atse.org.au/content/international/australia-japan-emerging-leaders-program.aspx

Funding body: Department of Innovation, Industry and Science

Funding body Department of Innovation, Industry and Science
Scheme Australia-Japan Emerging Research Leaders Exchange Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20152 grants / $25,000

Asia Bound Short Term Mobility Project$21,000

This funding supported an intensive study trip to Japan for students enrolled in a course on law and genetics. Among other activities, the students participated in seminars on the legal, ethical and social aspects of genetic and stem cell research at the University of Tokyo Institute for Medical Science and the University of Kyoto Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences and visited Biobank Japan.

Funding body: Commonwealth Government

Funding body Commonwealth Government
Scheme Asia Bound Student Mobility Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Impact Case Study$4,000

This case study reported on the impact of a research initiative, Law and the Ageing Population: Supporting advance planning for future incapacity.

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team

Nola M Ries and Shaun McCarthy

Scheme Faculty of Business and Law Community Engagement and Research Impact Case Study
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $4,000

New Staff Grant$4,000

This New Staff Grant provided funding for a pilot project on the legal needs of older adults and involved law students in the delivery of community legal education seminars.

Funding body: Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Advance Care Planning Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunity Research Program $0

The multi-disciplinary research team is investigating the most effective methods to catalyse use of advance care planning (ACP) and studying its impact on health resource utilization and clinical outcomes. We are engaging with the legal profession to conduct research on lawyers' role in ACP.

Funding body: Alberta Innovates Health Solutions

Funding body Alberta Innovates Health Solutions
Scheme Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20101 grants / $150,000

Consent, Privacy and Property: An Analysis of Legal Principles and Rules Relevant to a National System for Blood, Organs and Tissues in Canada$150,000

This award was established to support a Canadian researcher conducting legal research related to the mission and mandate of Canadian Blood Services, including managing the blood and blood products supply.

Funding body: Canadian Blood Services

Funding body Canadian Blood Services
Scheme James Kreppner Fellowship in Blood System Studies
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20091 grants / $49,500

Analysis of Privacy Policies and Practices of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing Companies: Private Sector Biobanking and Privacy Protection Norms$49,500

This research analysed privacy issues in the context of direct-to-consumer (DTC) sale of genetic testing services. The researchers analyzed the privacy policies of 32 DTC genetic testing companies against the fair information principles developed by the Canadian Standards Association in the Model Code for the Protection of Personal Information and incorporated into the federal Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. See final report here: https://www.priv.gc.ca/resource/cp/2009-2010/p_200910_07_e.asp

Funding body: Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

Funding body Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Project Team

Nola M Ries and Timothy Caulfield

Scheme Contributions Program: Research and Knowledge Translation Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20063 grants / $807,500

Social Issues in Nutritional Genomics: The Design of Appropriate Regulatory Systems and Issues of Public Representations and Understanding$645,000

This multi-disciplinary research project culminated in a book, Nutrition and Genomics: Issues of Ethics, Law, Regulation and Communication (2009): http://store.elsevier.com/Nutrition-and-Genomics/isbn-9780123741257.

Funding body: Advanced Foods and Materials Network of Centres of Excellence

Funding body Advanced Foods and Materials Network of Centres of Excellence
Project Team

David Castle, Timothy Caulfield, Nola M Ries, et al

Scheme Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Use of Legal Interventions to Address Environmental Factors Implicated in the Obesity Epidemic: The Role of Law as a Public Health Tool $127,500

The research involved a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the use of legal and regulatory mechanisms to influence environmental factors believed to be related to obesity.

Funding body: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Funding body Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Project Team

Barbara von Tigerstrom, Timothy Caulfield and Nola M Ries

Scheme Contributions Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Moving Forward with Birth Cohort Research in Canada: The Legal and Ethical Foundations for the CHILD Study$35,000

Funding body: Allergy, Genes and Environment Network, a Network of Centres of Excellence

Funding body Allergy, Genes and Environment Network, a Network of Centres of Excellence
Project Team

Nola M Ries and Timothy Caulfield

Scheme Research Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Responding to Iatrogenic Harm: The Impact of Fault-Based Liability and Other Regulatory Mechanisms on the Disclosure of Adverse Events PhD (Law), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Australian Fellowship in Health Services Research and Policy

Fellowship in Health Services Research and Policy

October 2, 2015

Australian Fellowship in Health Services Research and Policy

Legalising medical cannabis: lessons from Canada’s policies

December 2, 2014

Nola Ries of the Newcastle Law School discusses lessons Australia can learn from Canadian cannabis policies

Ms Nola Ries

Position

Associate Professor
Newcastle Law School
Faculty of Business and Law

Contact Details

Email nola.ries@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7966
Fax (02) 4921 6931
Link Research and Innovation Cluster

Office

Room MC 173
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