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Dr Mariko Carey

Senior Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Broad experience, broad applications

Dr Mariko Carey is using her transdisciplinary experience to research and implement optimal care for an array of health conditions and practices.

Dr Mariko Carey

“I’ve got a student doing some really fantastic research looking at improving bowel cancer screening in  general practice, and another one doing some really interesting work looking at patients’ adherence to physiotherapy.

“I do like the variety.

“That’s one of the interesting things about behavioural science. There are of course specific settings and diseases, but key behavioural science principles can be translated and adapted across just about all of them.”

After studying at the University of Melbourne for her Bachelor of Science and Professional Doctorate in Psychology, Mariko went on to work in a number of part-time roles which gave her significant experience across a number of areas .

Mariko gained some key skills regarding clinical evidence and its translation when she worked within the National Institute of Clinical Studies (which later became part of the National Health and Medical Research Council, NHMRC ). At the time, it was Australia’s peak organisation for implementing evidence based practice.

“I learned a lot when I was there about the policy side of things.”

Having also worked clinically as a psychologist, Mariko has an important insight into the public health system.

“I was working with people with chronic diseases."

“That's what allowed me to see first-hand the sort of challenges that patients face, as well as the challenges health care professionals face in trying to deliver high quality care. That got me interested in looking at the interface between research and policy.”

Transdisciplinary teamwork

Although she was always interested in research, the career pathways were never quite as clear for research as they were for a practising psychologist. It wasn’t until Mariko started working within a transdisciplinary cancer team at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre that she learned how to navigate the research environment.

“That was a really interesting place to learn about research. Because we were located in a hospital there was a really good link with the clinical services, so we got to see how problems that arise in clinical care can be related to research and vice versa.”

An international reputation

Later on, Mariko was successful in applying for a Research Fellow position with Laureate Professor Rob Sanson-Fisher and UON’s Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour.

In 2015, she was awarded an NHMRC TRIP (Translating Research into Practice) Fellowship, and is more than happy to continue her vital work within the prestigious research group.

“Newcastle has a really excellent reputation for behavioral science. So when that initial research role came along that was a very attractive opportunity – to be able to work with people that are internationally renowned in this area."

“While I was still very interested in cancer and wanted to continue that, I wanted to get some experience in a broader range of things as well.”

Mental health care beyond the consultation room

Mariko was recently granted NHMRC funding for a research project designed to improve diagnosis and care for mental health patients.

The project is based on some of her previous research, which showed that around 50 per cent of people with elevated depression scores aren’t identified as having depression by their general practitioner (GP).

“I think the main issue is that depression is a relatively common but often people will go to see their GP for another reason."

“Depression might not be the primary reason you're going to see your doctor. It might be because you have chronic disease or a cold or infection … but when GPs have got someone in front of them who's asking for help for a particular problem, it’s difficult for them to also identify all of these other possible issues within that 15 minute consultation.”

Instead, Mariko’s project will see patients being screened for their mental health before their consultation even begins.

“We'll be looking at the impact of screening using a self-completed screening instrument in the waiting room."

“That will be done via an online survey which will generate automatic feedback to the patient and their GP.”

While similar research has been conducted in the US, this is the first time that mental health screening practices such as these have been looked at in the Australian context.

In this randomised control trial, half of the participating clinics will be randomised to the current standard of care and half to the screening intervention.

“Another benefit of the screening is that we’re able to ask people about preferences for their health care."

“There are lots of different types of treatment, from psychological therapies to medication."

“If someone has a particular preference for their treatment and it’s not being offered to them, then sometimes that can be another barrier to them getting help.”

At the coalface of translation

“Unfortunately a lot of the investment in health and medical research is lost because there's a failure to effectively transfer it into routine practise."

“It's quite a complex area that involves identifying the barriers to translation and trying to develop strategies to produce change at the individual level but also at the system level."

“We work with patients, health care providers but also the health care organisations."

“We have to make sure the organisations have the tools and the systems and the processes to support our health professionals in delivering high quality care.”

Broad experience, broad applications

Dr Mariko Carey is a NHMRC Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellow working within the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, UON.

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Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Dr Mariko Carey is a NHMRC Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellow working within the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle. Key research interests include health behaviour interventions, measurement of patient reported outcomes, multidisciplinary care, systems of care, evidence-based practice and quality of care. Her work has a strong focus on developing interventions to improve quality of care, behavioural and psychosocial outcomes for people with chronic diseases, including cancer.Dr. Carey has produced over 100 publications over the course of her career. Recent studies include a study of health risk behaviours of over 3,000 general practice patients, a NHMRC-funded study assessing psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients across 13 medical oncology treatment centres; and a NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial to test an educational intervantion to improve adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations among first-degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer. Dr Carey has worked as part of teams which have attracted approximately $6 million in competitive research funding.

Teaching Expertise
Dr. Carey's main contribution to teaching is through supervision of Research Higher Degree students. She has supervised 4 students to completion and has 6 current students. In 2011 she received the Newcastle University Postgraduate Association's (NUPSA) Supervisor of the Year Award. She has also contributed to communication skills training for medical students on topics such as informed consent and preparation for potentially threatening medical interventions. 

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Psychology (Health), University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • cancer
  • chronic disease
  • communication skills training
  • evidence-based practice
  • patient information
  • preventive care
  • psychosocial
  • quality of care
  • survivorship

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 15
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 55

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2007 - 1/12/2008 Senior Research Fellow The Cancer Council Victoria
Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer
Australia
1/10/2003 - 1/05/2007 Research Assistant/ Fellow Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Supportive Care Research Group
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Waller AE, Boyes A, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Screening and Assessment for Unmet Needs', Psycho-Oncology, Oxford University Press, New York 369-377 (2015) [B2]
DOI 10.1093/med/9780199363315.003.0046
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Amy Waller

Journal article (116 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: a description of public health research output and citation.', Eur J Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Amy Waller, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, John Wiggers
2016 Suzuki E, Mackenzie L, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, D Este C, Asada H, Toi M, 'Acceptability of a Touch Screen Tablet Psychosocial Survey Administered to Radiation Therapy Patients in Japan', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23 485-491 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, International Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Studies in western clinical settings suggest that touch screen computer surveys are an acceptable mode of collect... [more]

© 2015, International Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Studies in western clinical settings suggest that touch screen computer surveys are an acceptable mode of collecting information about cancer patients¿ wellbeing Purpose: We examined the acceptability of a touch screen tablet survey among cancer patients in Japan. Methods: Eligible patients (n = 262) attending a university hospital radiation therapy (RT) department were invited to complete a touch screen tablet survey about psychosocial communication and care. Survey consent and completion rates, the proportion and characteristics of patients who completed the touch screen survey unassisted, and patient-reported acceptability were assessed. Results: Of 158 consenting patients (consent rate 60¿% [95¿% CI 54, 66¿%] of eligible patients), 152 completed the touch screen computer survey (completion rate 58¿% [95¿% CI 52, 64¿%] of eligible patients). The survey was completed without assistance by 74¿% (n = 113; 95¿% CI 67, 81¿%) of respondents. Older age was associated with higher odds of having assistance with survey completion (OR 1.09; 95¿% CI 1.04, 1.14¿%). Ninety-two percent of patients (95¿% CI 86, 96¿%) felt that the touch screen survey was easy to use and 95¿% (95¿% CI 90, 98¿%) agreed or strongly agreed that they were comfortable answering the questions. Overall, 65¿% (95¿% CI 57, 73¿%) of respondents would be willing to complete such a survey more than once while waiting for RT treatment. Conclusions: Although patient self-reported acceptability of the touch screen survey was high, self-administered touch screen tablet surveys may not be entirely appropriate for older cancer patients or possibly for patients with lower educational attainment.

DOI 10.1007/s12529-015-9502-2
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Peek K, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, 'Physiotherapists¿ perceptions of patient adherence to prescribed self-management strategies: a cross-sectional survey of Australian physiotherapists', Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-7 (2016)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupPurpose: Physiotherapists often prescribe self-management strategies for their patients. However, the effectiveness of... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupPurpose: Physiotherapists often prescribe self-management strategies for their patients. However, the effectiveness of these strategies in improving patient outcome is related to the rate of patient adherence. The aims of this study were to explore physiotherapists¿ views on the importance and perceived rates of patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies; the perceived importance of methods physiotherapists can employ to aid patient adherence and the barriers to employing these methods. Method: A cross-sectional web-based survey was emailed to 808 physiotherapist members of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. To maximize response rates, two reminder emails were utilized. Results: In total, 352 physiotherapists completed the survey (response rate 44%). A majority of physiotherapists (89%) believed that patient self-management strategies were important in improving patient outcomes; however, the mean perceived rate of patient adherence across all strategies was only 67%. Physiotherapists reported that there were a number of important methods that can be employed to aid patient adherence such as providing patient education and allowing time for patient practice; with minimal perceived barriers to employing these methods. Conclusions: Results indicate that physiotherapists perceive that patient outcomes can be positively impacted by patient adherence to a range of self-management strategies. Physiotherapists should be encouraged to implement into their routine clinical practice evidence-based methods to aid patient adherence.Implications for RehabilitationPhysiotherapists believe that patient self-management strategies are important for improving patient outcomes, however, the perceived rates of patient adherence could be improved.Physiotherapists should adopt a collaborative approach with their patients to address any barriers to adherence to positively impact on patient outcome.Physiotherapists perceive that there are a number of modifiable characteristics which determine patient adherence including patient self-efficacy, physiotherapist communication skills and the complexity of the self-management strategy.Methods that physiotherapists can employ to positively influence patient adherence may include individualizing the strategy to the patient, education and supplementary written information.

DOI 10.1080/09638288.2016.1212281
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2016 Jayakody A, Bryant J, Carey M, Hobden B, Dodd N, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions utilising telephone follow up in reducing hospital readmission within 30 days for individuals with chronic disease: A systematic review', BMC Health Services Research, 16 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Rates of readmission to hospital within 30 days are highest amongst those with chronic diseases. Effective interventions to reduce unplanned read... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Rates of readmission to hospital within 30 days are highest amongst those with chronic diseases. Effective interventions to reduce unplanned readmissions are needed. Providing support to patients with chronic disease via telephone may help prevent unnecessary readmission. This systematic review aimed to determine the methodological quality and effectiveness of interventions utilising telephone follow up (TFU) alone or in combination with other components in reducing readmission within 30 days amongst patients with cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes. Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were conducted for articles published from database inception to 19th May 2015. Interventions which included TFU alone, or in combination with other components, amongst patients with chronic disease, reported 30 day readmission outcomes and met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care design criteria were included. The titles and abstracts of all identified articles were initially assessed for relevance and rejected on initial screening by one author. Full text articles were assessed against inclusion criteria by two authors with discrepancies resolved through discussion. Results: Ten studies were identified, of which five were effective in reducing readmissions within 30 days. Overall, the methodological quality of included studies was poor. All identified studies combined TFU with other intervention components. Interventions that were effective included three studies which provided TFU in addition to pre-discharge support; and two studies which provided TFU with both pre- and post-discharge support which included education, discharge planning, physical therapy and dietary consults, medication assessment, home visits and a resident curriculum. There was no evidence that TFU and telemedicine or TFU and post-discharge interventions was effective, however, only one to two studies examined each of these types of interventions. Conclusions: Evidence is inconclusive for the effectiveness of interventions utilising TFU alone or in combination with other components in reducing readmissions within 30 days in patients with chronic disease. High methodological quality studies examining the effectiveness of TFU in a standardised way are needed. There is also potential importance in focusing interventions on enhancing provider skills in patient education, transitional care and conducting TFU.

DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1650-9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Paul C, Rose S, Hensley M, Pretto J, Hardy M, Henskens F, et al., 'Examining uptake of online education on obstructive sleep apnoea in general practitioners: A randomised trial', BMC Research Notes, 9 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects up to 28 % of the adult population in Western countries. The detection and management of OSA by general pr... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects up to 28 % of the adult population in Western countries. The detection and management of OSA by general practitioners (GPs) can be poor. The study aimed to examine what influence enhanced invitations had on uptake of on-line learning modules for OSA by GPs, and whether recent referrals of patients to sleep specialists influenced uptake. Methods: Practicing GPs in regional Australia were identified and randomised to receive either an enhanced or standard invitation letter to a new on-line education module for OSA. The enhanced letter included indication that the module was eligible for professional accreditation and described the prevalence and burden of sleep disorders. Some included extra emphasis if the GP had recently referred a patient for diagnostic investigation of OSA. Two reminder letters were sent. Results: Of 796 eligible GPs who received the letters, sixteen (2 %) accessed the website and four completed the modules over the four-month study period. GPs who received an enhanced invitation letter were not significantly more likely to access the website compared to GPs who received the standard invitation letter. Recent referral of a patient for diagnostic investigation was also not a significant factor in influencing use of the module. Conclusion: GP interest in on-line education about OSA appears low, and emphasis of relevant recent past patient(s) and the opportunity for professional education points was not successful in increasing engagement. There is a need to identify effective approaches to improving the detection and management of OSA in general practice.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2157-5
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Frans Henskens
2016 Carey M, Boyes A, Noble N, Waller A, Inder K, 'Validation of the PHQ-2 against the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in a large sample of Australian general practice patients', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 22 262-266 (2016) [C1]

© La Trobe University 2016.There is increasing interest in the use of brief screening tools to improve detection of depression in the primary care setting. The aim of the present... [more]

© La Trobe University 2016.There is increasing interest in the use of brief screening tools to improve detection of depression in the primary care setting. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of the two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) against the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for detecting depression among general practice patients. A cross-sectional sample of 3626 adults attending 12 Australian general practices was recruited. Participants completed the PHQ-2 and PHQ-9 via a touchscreen computer. Depression was defined as a PHQ-9 score =10. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated. The PHQ-2 had good overall accuracy relative to the PHQ-9 for discriminating between cases and non-cases of depression, with an AUC of 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.90-0.93). The PHQ-2 threshold of =3 was the best balance between sensitivity (91%) and specificity (78%) for detecting possible cases of depression. For clinical use, the optimal threshold was =2, with only 2% of possible cases missed.

DOI 10.1071/PY14149
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Kerry Inder, Allison Boyes
2016 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Co-occurring depression and alcohol misuse is under-identified in general practice: A cross-sectional study.', J Health Psychol, (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1359105316643855
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Paul C, Williamson A, Bradstock K, Campbell HS, 'Prevalence and associates of psychological distress in haematological cancer survivors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 4413-4422 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.Purpose: To explore outcomes of psychological distress, including anxiety, depression and stress, amongst adult haematological cancer su... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.Purpose: To explore outcomes of psychological distress, including anxiety, depression and stress, amongst adult haematological cancer survivors, with a specific focus on potential differences between rural and urban survivors. Methods: One thousand four hundred fourteen urban and rural survivors were recruited from five Australian population-based cancer registries and completed a self-report pen-and-paper survey on their well-being, including the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale 21-item version. Results: A quarter of survivors were identified as reporting above normal levels of anxiety and depression, respectively, and almost one fifth (17¿%) reported above normal levels of stress. There were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of rural and urban survivors reporting above normal levels of anxiety, depression, or stress. Survivors who had experienced financial burden due to their cancer or were of middle age had higher odds of reporting multiple domains of psychological distress, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed during middle age or who experience increased financial burden as a result of their diagnosis may require additional support and care with regards to psychological distress.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3282-3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, 'The impact of loss of income and medicine costs on the financial burden for cancer patients in Australia', Journal of Community and Supportive Oncology, 14 307-313 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Frontline Medical Communications.Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fu... [more]

© 2016 Frontline Medical Communications.Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fully deliver best practice care. Objective To identify nonuse or nonpurchase of cancer-related medicines due to cost, and to describe the perceived financial burden of such medicines and associated patient characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional pen- And-paper questionnaire was completed by oncology outpatients at 2 hospitals in Australia; 1 in regional New South Wales and 1 in metropolitan Victoria. Results Almost 1 in 10 study participants had used over- The-counter medicines rather than prescribed medicines for cancer and obtained some but not all of the medicines prescribed in relation to their cancer. 63% of the sample reported some level of financial burden associated with obtaining these medicines, with 34% reporting a moderate or heavy financial burden. 11.8% reported using alternatives to prescribed medicines. People reporting reduced income after being diagnosed with cancer had almost 4 times the odds (OR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.1-12.1) of reporting a heavy or extreme financial burden associated with prescribed medicines for cancer. Limitations Study response rate, narrow survey population, self-reported survey used. Conclusion This study identifies that a number of cancer patients, especially those with a reduced income after their diagnosis, experience financial burden associated with the purchase of medicines and that some go as far as to not use or to not purchase medicines. It seems likely that limiting the cost of medicines for cancer may improve patient ability to fully participate in the intended treatment. Funding Cancer Council NSW, National Health and Medical Research Council, and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Australia.

DOI 10.12788/jcso.0273
Co-authors Chris Paul, Allison Boyes
2016 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, 'A systematic review of patient-practitioner communication interventions involving treatment decisions.', Patient Educ Couns, (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.010
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Macrae F, Cameron E, Hill D, D'Este C, et al., 'Can a print-based intervention increase screening for first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer? A randomised controlled trial.', Aust N Z J Public Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12579
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2016 Paul CL, Cameron E, Doran C, Hill D, Macrae F, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Experiences of colorectal cancer patients in the 2-years post-diagnosis and patient factors predicting poor outcome.', Support Care Cancer, 24 4921-4928 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3348-2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2016 Peek K, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, Carey M, 'Interventions to aid patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies: A systematic review', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 102 127-135 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.Background: Physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies are an important adjunct to 'hands on' treatment. However, treatment o... [more]

© 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.Background: Physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies are an important adjunct to 'hands on' treatment. However, treatment outcomes are likely to be related to whether patients adhere to the prescribed strategy. Therefore, physiotherapists should be aware of adherence aiding interventions designed to maximise patient outcomes underpinned by quality research studies. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the interventions used to aid patient adherence to all physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies. Data sources: The search included the databases CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PSYCINFO, SPORTSDiscus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro and Mednar for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in a peer reviewed journal from inception to November 2014. Data extraction and synthesis: Data were extracted using a standardised form from twelve included RCTs for patient adherence rates to self-management strategies for interventions used to aid patient adherence and usual care. Two independent reviewers conducted methodological quality assessment. Results: Twelve different interventions to aid patient adherence to exercise were recorded from twelve fair to high quality RCTs. Potential adherence aiding interventions include an activity monitor and feedback system, written exercise instructions, behavioural exercise programme with booster sessions and goal setting. Conclusion and implications of key findings: Despite a number of studies demonstrating interventions to positively influence patient adherence to exercise, there is insufficient data to endorse their use in clinical practice. No RCTs examining adherence aiding interventions to self-management strategies other than exercise were identified, indicating a significant gap in the literature. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO CRD42015014516.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.10.003
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2016 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Boyes AW, Proietto A, 'Does screening for physical and psychosocial symptoms vary between medical oncology treatment centres?', Psycho-Oncology, 25 521-528 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Our aim is to examine whether provider screening for physical and emotional symptoms, as reported by medical oncology outpatient... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Our aim is to examine whether provider screening for physical and emotional symptoms, as reported by medical oncology outpatients, varies across medical oncology treatment centres. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 716 patients attending the outpatient medical oncology department of six public cancer treatment centres across five Australian states participated. Four patient-report survey items explored how often patients were specifically asked by clinical staff at the treatment centre about their (i) emotional distress (anxiety, distress and depression), (ii) pain, (iii) fatigue and (iv) other physical symptoms (e.g. nausea and constipation). Asking at less than half of all appointments was classified as infrequent screening. Results No significant associations were found between treatment centre and symptom screening for emotional distress (p = 0.65), pain (p = 0.21), fatigue (p = 0.95) and other physical symptoms (p = 0.40). The proportion of patients who were regularly screened versus infrequently screened was significantly higher for physical symptoms than emotional symptoms (p < 0.001): 36% infrequently screened for emotional distress (range: 33-45%), 15% infrequently screened for pain (range: 9-21%), 16% infrequently screened for fatigue (range: 15-19%) and 11% infrequently screened for other physical symptoms (range: 5-17%). Conclusions No significant variation in symptom screening was found across treatment centres. While the majority of patients received recommended care, treatment centres must continue to improve symptom screening rates, particularly for emotional distress. However, screening is only the first step and must be accompanied by the offer of help and provision of help to relieve patient suffering.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3948
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Amy Waller, Alison Zucca
2016 Forshaw KL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Boyes AW, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparing patients for medical interventions: A systematic review of the psychometric qualities of published instruments', Patient Education and Counseling, 99 960-973 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objective: Preparing patients for medical interventions improves patient outcomes and is an ethical and legal imperative. This review examines the cha... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objective: Preparing patients for medical interventions improves patient outcomes and is an ethical and legal imperative. This review examines the characteristics and psychometric properties of published instruments which assess patients' preparation for medical interventions. Methods: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched from the date of their inception to November 2015. Data-based publications describing the development or validation of a self-report instrument designed to assess the quality of adult patients' perceived preparation for a medical intervention were included. Results: Nine publications described the development or validation of seven instruments which met inclusion criteria. The psychometric qualities of the instruments varied. None met all of the accepted criteria for psychometric rigour. Although the Satisfaction with Cancer Information Profile met the highest number (n = 5) of the defined psychometric properties, the study sample size was less than 100. Overall, content validity of the included instruments was the most frequently assessed criteria. Conclusion: Few instruments have been specifically developed to assess patients' self-reported preparation for medical interventions. Of the available instruments, none demonstrated adequate rigour across essential psychometric properties. Practice Implications: The need to develop instruments examining patient preparation for medical interventions is apparent given the limitations of the instruments reviewed.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.008
Co-authors Alix Hall, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Mansfield E, Walsh J, 'Improving self-management of cancer risk factors, underscreening for cancer and depression among general practice patients: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.', BMJ Open, 6 e014782 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014782
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Boadle D, 'The first step in ensuring patient-centred quality of care: ask the patient.', Eur J Cancer Care (Engl), (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12435
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2015 Grady A, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Mazza D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'GP detection of health risk factors among general practice patients at risk of primary and secondary stroke', Family Practice, 32 336-342 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; ... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; therefore, identification of risk factors by GPs is critical. Objectives. To compare the following among general practice patients with and without a history of stroke or heart disease: (i) self-reported prevalence rates of lifestyle risk factors; (ii) accuracy of GP detection of patient-reported risk factors and (iii) average proportion of patient-reported risk factors detected by GPs. Methods. Consecutive patients attending a participating general practice clinic were invited to participate in a cross-sectional touchscreen survey assessing lifestyle risk factors in 2010-11. The GP of each consenting patient completed a corresponding survey assessing the patient's risk factors. Demographic characteristics of patients and GPs were obtained. Results. Data from 51 GPs and 564 patients were analysed. Patients without a history of stroke or heart disease reported significantly higher rates of smoking (12%) and risky alcohol consumption (56%) than patients with a history of stroke or heart disease (6% and 36%, respectively). Low sensitivity of GP detection of risk factors was found for all risk factors for all patients. Patients with a history of stroke or heart disease have a significantly higher mean proportion of risk factors detected by their GP compared to patients without a history of stroke or heart disease (P = 0.00). Conclusion. Given low sensitivity and specificity of GP detection of risk factors among patients, alternate methods of identification are needed. Research is required to determine strategies to facilitate secondary care of patients with a history of stroke or heart disease by GPs.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv024
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Fradgley E, Regan T, 'Medical Oncology Patients: Are They Offered Help and Does It Provide Relief?', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 50 436-444 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to r... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to relieving patient suffering. Objectives The objective is to describe the proportion of patients experiencing treatable cancer-related symptoms who reported 1) a health care provider at the treatment center offered assistance for their symptom, 2) they accepted the assistance offered, and 3) the assistance relieved suffering. Variation in symptom management among treatment centers also was examined. Methods A survey was done with 528 medical oncology outpatients recruited from six treatment centers. Eight items explored management of prevalent, burdensome, and treatable cancer-related symptoms: pain, fatigue, other physical side effects, and emotional distress. Participants were asked about symptom management provided at the clinic from where they were recruited. Questions referred to the last occasion the patient experienced the symptom. Results Fewer patients were offered help to relieve fatigue (44%) and emotional distress (57%), than pain (90%) and other physical side effects (84%). In most cases, help was not offered as clinic staff were not aware of the patient's symptom. Although the vast majority of patients accepted the help that was offered, more patients accepted help for physical symptoms (pain, 97%; fatigue, 95%; and other side effects, 98%) than emotional symptoms (87%). When care was provided, most patients experienced at least a little relief from pain (99%), fatigue (94%), and emotional distress (96%). Symptom management did not vary significantly by treatment center (P = 0.073). Conclusion Quality improvement initiatives must focus primarily on improving providers' awareness of their patients' symptoms and ensuring that patients are subsequently offered help.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.04.018
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Timothy Regan, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca
2015 Waller A, Forshaw K, Bryant J, Carey M, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparatory education for cancer patients undergoing surgery: A systematic review of volume and quality of research output over time', Patient Education and Counseling, 98 1540-1549 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objective: To determine the volume and scope of research output examining preparation of patients for people undergoing cancer-related surgical treatm... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objective: To determine the volume and scope of research output examining preparation of patients for people undergoing cancer-related surgical treatment, and the impact of pre-operative education on patient outcomes and health care utilisation. Methods: Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO databases were systematically searched. Eligible papers were coded as data-based or non-data-based. Data-based papers were further classified as descriptive, measurement or intervention studies. Methodological quality and effectiveness of intervention studies were assessed using Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria. Results: We identified 121 eligible papers. The number of publications significantly increased over time. Most were data-based (n = 99) and descriptive (n = 83). Fourteen intervention studies met EPOC design criteria. Face-to-face interventions reported benefits for anxiety (5/7), satisfaction (1/1), knowledge (3/3) and health care costs (1/1). Audio-visual and multi-media interventions improved satisfaction (1/1) and knowledge (2/3), but not anxiety (0/3). Written interventions were mixed. Conclusion: Descriptive studies dominate the literature examining preoperative education in oncology populations, with few rigorous intervention studies. Pre-operative education can improve satisfaction, knowledge and reduce anxiety. Practice implications: Further work should be directed at multi-modal interventions, and those that include the caregiver, given their role in assisting patients to prepare and recover from surgery.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.05.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amy Waller, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Regan T, Carey M, Bryant J, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sitas F, Tracey E, 'Prevalence and correlates of current smoking among medical oncology outpatients', Psycho-Oncology, 24 1258-1264 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatmen... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatment and puts individuals at risk of secondary cancers. Data on the prevalence and correlates of smoking among cancer patients are critical for successfully targeting smoking cessation interventions. Aims To explore among a sample of medical oncology outpatients (a) the prevalence of self-reported current smoking and (b) the demographic and psychosocial factors associated with self-reported smoking. Methods A heterogeneous sample of cancer patients aged 18 years or over was recruited from 1 of 11 medical oncology treatment centres across Australia. Patients completed a survey assessing the following: smoking status; socio-demographic, disease and treatment characteristics; time since diagnosis; anxiety; and depression. Factors associated with self-reported smoking were examined using a univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression. Results A total of 1379 patients returned surveys and 1338 were included in the analysis. The prevalence of current smoking was 10.9% (n=146). After adjusting for treatment centre, patients aged 65 years and older and those without health concession cards were significantly less likely to smoke. Patients diagnosed with lung cancer and those without private health insurance were more likely to smoke. Discussion A minority of cancer patients reported continued smoking at an average time of 13 months post-diagnosis. Patients, who are younger, have been diagnosed with lung cancer and have lower socioeconomic status are at-risk groups and represent important targets for smoking cessation advice and intervention.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3893
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Amy Waller, Timothy Regan
2015 Grady AM, Bryant J, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Levi CR, 'Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: A cross-sectional survey', BMC Research Notes, 8 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Grady et al.Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments suc... [more]

© 2015 Grady et al.Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasminogen Activator. This study aimed to identify among emergency physicians, (1) rates of agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke care; and (2) individual and hospital factors associated with high agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use. Methods: Australian fellows and trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey assessing perceptions of tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Demographic and hospital characteristics were also collected. Results: 429 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded (13% response rate). Almost half (47.2%) did not agree with any statements regarding the benefits of tissue Plasminogen Activator use for acute stroke. Perceived routine administration of tissue Plasminogen Activator by the head of respondents' emergency department was significantly associated with high agreement with the evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Conclusions: Agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke is not high among responding Australian emergency physicians. In order for tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment to become widely accepted and adopted in emergency settings, beliefs and attitudes towards treatment need to be in accordance with clinical practice guidelines.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1242-5
Co-authors Chris Levi, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Mackenzie LJ, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'A cross-sectional study of radiation oncology outpatients' concern about, preferences for, and perceived barriers to discussing anxiety and depression.', Psycho-oncology, 24 1392-1397 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3806
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong
2015 Paul CL, Carey ML, Russell G, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Zwar N, 'Prevalence of FOB testing in eastern-Australian general practice patients: What has a national bowel cancer screening program delivered?', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 39-44 (2015) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2015.Issues addressed The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was introduced in Australia in 2006, offering free immunochemi... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2015.Issues addressed The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was introduced in Australia in 2006, offering free immunochemical Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) to persons aged 50, 55 or 65. The study aimed to examine the prevalence of self-reported screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using the FOBT and factors associated with not having an FOBT. Methods A cross-sectional study of Australian general practice patients aged 50 and over with no personal history of CRC completed a health risk survey while waiting for scheduled appointments between November 2010 and November 2011. Results A total of 5671 patients from 12 practices were approached to participate. Of the 4707 eligible patients (adults attending for care who understood English and were capable of providing informed consent), 4062 (86%) consented to participate, with 2269 eligible to complete the FOBT items. Approximately half (52%) of participants reported ever having an FOBT. More than one-third (39.7%) of the sample reported having an FOBT in the prior three years. Those who recalled receiving a mailed kit as part of the NBCSP were five times more likely to report being screened. Those less likely to report screening were aged 50-59 years, were female and had been diagnosed with a form of cancer other than CRC. Conclusions There is justification for the extension of the NBCSP to ensure a majority of the age-appropriate population is screened for CRC. So what? Further work is needed to identify whether high rates of screening are achievable using the mailed-kit approach, and how to increase participation by females, those aged 50-69 years and those diagnosed with other cancers.

DOI 10.1071/HE14058
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2015 Zucca AC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Waller A, Carey M, Grady A, Mackenzie L, 'Life expectancy discussions in a multisite sample of australian medical oncology outpatients', Medical Journal of Australia, 203 405.e1-405.e7 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of informat... [more]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of information about life expectancy; and 2) sociodemographic, clinical and psychological factors associated with patients¿ perceptions of whether they received too little, too much, or the right amount of information about life expectancy. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Eleven large Australian medical oncology treatment centres. Participants: A total of 1431 medical oncology outpatients participated (81% consent rate). Eligible patients were approached between September 2012 and May 2014. Main outcome measures: Patients indicated whether the information about life expectancy they received aligned with their preferences. Results: Almost one in four patients (24%) received too little information, 4% received too much, and 50% received all the information they wanted; 22% of patients neither wanted nor received information about life expectancy. Patients were more likely to receive too little information if they were not in remission (odds ratio [OR], 1.77), did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 3.64), or were anxious (OR, 1.48) or depressed (OR, 1.48). Patients had greater odds of receiving too much information if they were younger (OR, 1.45), had more advanced cancer (OR, 2.01) or did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 4.42). Conclusions: That fact that 28% of cancer patients did not receive their desired level of information about life expectancy highlights the difficulties associated with discussing this sensitive topic. To ensure that life expectancy discussions correspond with patient preferences, clinicians should routinely ask patients whether they want to know this information, in what format, and at which level of detail.

DOI 10.5694/mja15.00596
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca, Lisa Mackenzie, Amy Waller
2015 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, Regan T, Bisquera A, 'Missed opportunities: General practitioner identification of their patients' smoking status', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general pract... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their patients' use tobacco. This study examined (i) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of general practitioner detection of smoking, and (ii) the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Methods: Eligible patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for an appointment with their general practitioner. Patients self-reported demographic characteristics, medical history, and current smoking status. Following the patient's consultation, their general practitioner was asked to indicate whether the patient was a current smoker (yes/no/unsure/not applicable). Smoking prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using patient self-report of smoking status as the gold standard. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Results: Fifty-one general practitioners and 1,573 patients in twelve general practices participated. Patient self-report of smoking was 11.3% compared to general practitioner estimated prevalence of 9.5%. Sensitivity of general practitioner assessment was 66% [95% CI 59-73] while specificity was 98% [95% CI 97-98]. Positive predictive value was 78% [95% CI 71-85] and negative predictive value was 96% [95% CI 95-97]. No general practitioner factors were associated with detection of smoking. Patients with a higher level of education or who responded 'Other ' were less likely to be detected as smokers than patients who had completed a high school or below level of education. Conclusion: Despite the important role general practitioners play in providing smoking cessation advice and support, a substantial proportion of general practitioners do not know their patient's smoking status. This represents a significant missed opportunity in the provision of preventive healthcare. Electronic waiting room assessments may assist general practitioners in improving the identification of smokers.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0228-7
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Timothy Regan
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Cancer Society.BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome mea... [more]

© 2015 American Cancer Society.BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Smits R, Henskens F, Wei A, et al., 'Protocol of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of a web-based information intervention with nurse-delivered telephone support for haematological cancer patients and their support persons', BMC Cancer, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatmen... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central.Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatment and their Support Persons. Psychosocial distress may be minimised by ensuring that patients are sufficiently involved in decision making, provided with tailored information and adequate preparation for potentially threatening procedures. To date, there are no published studies evaluating interventions designed to reduce psychosocial distress and unmet needs specifically in patients with haematological cancers and their Support Persons. This study will examine whether access to a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support reduces depression, anxiety and unmet information needs for haematological cancer patients and their Support Persons. Methods/Design: A non-blinded, parallel-group, multi-centre randomised controlled trial will be conducted to compare the effectiveness of a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support with usual care. Participants will be recruited from the haematology inpatient wards of five hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's lymphoma, Lymphoblastic lymphoma (B or T cell), or Diffuse Large B-Cell lymphoma and their Support Persons will be eligible to participate. Patients and their Support Persons will be randomised as dyads. Participants allocated to the intervention will receive access to a tailored web-based tool that provides accurate, up-to-date and personalised information about: cancer and its causes; treatment options including treatment procedures information; complementary and alternative medicine; and available support. Patients and Support Persons will complete self-report measures of anxiety, depression and unmet needs at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-recruitment. Patient and Support Person outcomes will be assessed independently. Discussion: This study will assess whether providing information and support using web-based and telephone support address the major psychosocial challenges faced by haematological patients and their Support Persons. The approach, if found to be effective, has potential to improve psychosocial outcomes for haematological and other cancer patients, reduce the complexity and burden of meeting patients' psychosocial needs for health care providers with high potential for translation into clinical practice.

DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1314-x
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens
2015 Peek K, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, Carey M, 'Patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies: A critical review', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 22 535-543 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd.Aims: To examine the published literature on patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies in order to describe: changes in ... [more]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd.Aims: To examine the published literature on patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies in order to describe: changes in the proportion of publications over time; methodological quality of non-intervention and intervention-based studies; types of measures used to assess patient adherence and the reported accuracy of those measures. Methods: A comprehensive search of eight electronic databases was conducted, covering the period from January 1995 to November 2014. Data were extracted and coded for the number and proportion of articles that were: i) non data-based; ii) data-based, no new data (reviews); iii) data-based, new data. The methodological quality of non-intervention and intervention publications was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool, and data were extracted regarding the type and accuracy of adherence measures reported in these publications. Results: A total of 80 relevant papers were identified. Of these, 49 non-intervention and intervention quantitative study designs underwent methodological assessment, with only 14 studies (29%) assessed as being of at least moderate quality. Fifty-three different measures of patient adherence were recorded from the 49 included studies, with only 5 of the 49 included studies (10%) reporting statistical evidence to support accuracy of the adherence measures applied. Conclusions: The results indicate that despite a trend towards intervention-based studies and reviews over the last 20 years, the methodological quality of studies on patient adherence could be improved. Accurate and standardised measures of patient adherence are needed for any future research involving patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies.

DOI 10.12968/ijtr.2015.22.11.535
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred c... [more]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Alix Hall
2015 Waller A, Carey M, Mazza D, Yoong S, Grady A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 65 e312-e318 (2015) [C1]

©British Journal of General Practice.Background: GPs are often a patient's first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact... [more]

©British Journal of General Practice.Background: GPs are often a patient's first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact on the quality of care delivered. Patients are well placed to make judgements about aspects of care that need to be improved. Aim: To determine whether general practice patients perceive that the care they receive is 'patient-centred' across eight domains of care, and to determine the association between sociodemographic, GP and practice characteristics, detection of preventive health risks, and receipt of patient-centred care. Design and setting: Cross-sectional survey of patients attending Australian general practice clinics. Method: Patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room to rate the care received from their GP across eight domains of patient-centred care. Patients also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and self-reported health risk factors. GPs completed a checklist for each patient asking about the presence of health risk factors. Results: In total1486 patients and 51 GPs participated. Overall, 83% of patients perceived that the care they received was patient-centred across all eight domains. Patients most frequently perceived the 'access to health care when needed' domain as requiring improvement (8.3%). Not having private health insurance and attending a practice located in a disadvantaged area were significantly associated with perceived need for improvements in care (P<0.05). Conclusion: Patients in general practice report that accessibility is an aspect of care that could be improved. Further investigation of how indicators of lower socioeconomic status interact with the provision of patient-centred care and health outcomes is required.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X684841
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Amy Waller
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Conigrave K, Lee K, Blunden S, Turon H, et al., 'Does a retrospective seven-day alcohol diary reflect usual alcohol intake for a predominantly disadvantaged Australian aboriginal population', Substance Use and Misuse, 50 308-319 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.Background: Alcohol disproportionately affects socially disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Metho... [more]

© 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.Background: Alcohol disproportionately affects socially disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Methods to assess alcohol intake for disadvantaged communities need to be able to capture variable or episodic drinking. The ability of a seven-day diary to capture typical consumption for a predominantly Aboriginal sample has not been assessed. Objective: One aim of this paper was to examine agreement between a seven-day retrospective diary and 'usual' drinking assessed by a modified version of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test question 3 (AUDIT-3m; two questions). Other aims were to describe drinking patterns as reported in the seven-day diary. Method: In 2012, consecutive adults attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service completed a cross-sectional health risk survey on a touch screen laptop (n = 188). Alcohol consumption questions included the retrospective diary and AUDIT-3m. Agreement was assessed using weighted kappa analysis. Results: There was good agreement between the two measures of consumption; however, the AUDIT-3m questions identified more current drinkers. Respondents who were drinkers (54%) tended to consume large amounts per drinking occasion: almost half (46%) of diary completers reported nine or more standard drinks on at least one occasion in the last week. Conclusions: The seven-day diary did not adequately capture variability in alcohol consumption common among this sample. Although the AUDIT-3m appeared acceptable, alternative approaches to assess usual or risky alcohol consumption, such as asking about specific drinking occasions, or allowing participants to respond in non-standard drink sizes, also need to be considered for indigenous and other disadvantaged communities.

DOI 10.3109/10826084.2014.980951
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul
2015 Carey M, Noble N, Mansfield E, Waller A, Henskens F, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The role of ehealth in optimizing preventive care in the primary care setting', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion... [more]

Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion of the world's morbidity and mortality burden. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in identifying and managing modifiable health risk behaviors. However, these are often underdetected and undermanaged in the primary care setting. We describe the potential of eHealth to help patients and GPs to overcome some of the barriers to managing health risk behaviors. In particular, we discuss (1) the role of eHealth in facilitating routine collection of patient-reported data on lifestyle risk factors, and (2) the role of eHealth in improving clinical management of identified risk factors through provision of tailored feedback, point-of-care reminders, tailored educational materials, and referral to online self-management programs. Strategies to harness the capacity of the eHealth medium, including the use of dynamic features and tailoring to help end users engage with, understand, and apply information need to be considered and maximized. Finally, the potential challenges in implementing eHealth solutions in the primary care setting are discussed. In conclusion, there is significant potential for innovative eHealth solutions to make a contribution to improving preventive care in the primary care setting. However, attention to issues such as data security and designing eHealth interfaces that maximize engagement from end users will be important to moving this field forward.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3817
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Frans Henskens, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Carey M, Turon H, Goergen S, Sanson-Fisher R, Yoong SL, Jones K, 'Patients¿ experiences of the management of lower back pain in general practice: use of diagnostic imaging, medication and provision of self-management advice', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 21 342-346 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY14057
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Carey M, Yoong SL, Grady A, Bryant J, Jayakody A, Sanson-Fisher R, Inder KJ, 'Unassisted detection of depression by GPs: Who is most likely to be misclassified?', Family Practice, 32 282-287 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is importan... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is important to examine patient and GP characteristics associated with misclassification so that systems can be improved to increase accurate detection and optimal management for groups at risk of depression. Objective. To examine patient and GP characteristics associated with GP misclassification of depression for patients classified by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as depressed. Methods. A cross-sectional study within general practices in two states of Australia. GPs completed a one-page paper and pencil survey indicating whether they thought each patient was clinically depressed. Patients completed a computer tablet survey while waiting for their appointment to provide demographic information and indicate depression status. Chi-square analyses were used to determine whether patient and GP characteristics were associated with a false-negative and false-positive result. The probability of misclassification was modelled using Generalized Estimating Equations to account for clustering of patients. Results. Fifty GPs from 12 practices participated. GPs completed surveys for 1880 patients. Younger patients aged 25-44, and those with a health care card were less likely to have a false-negative assessment. Patients with 0-3 GP visits in the past 12 months, and those with private health insurance were less likely to have a false-positive assessment. GPs who worked five sessions or fewer per week were more likely to make false-positive assessments.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu087
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Carey M, Blunden S, Turner N, 'A randomised trial assessing the acceptability and effectiveness of providing generic versus tailored feedback about health risks for a high need primary care sample', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Noble et al.Background: Tailored feedback has been shown to be effective for modifying health risk behaviours and may aid the provision of preventive care by general pract... [more]

© 2015 Noble et al.Background: Tailored feedback has been shown to be effective for modifying health risk behaviours and may aid the provision of preventive care by general practitioners (GPs). However, provision of tailored patient feedback for vulnerable or socially disadvantaged groups is not well explored. The aims of this study were to examine the acceptability and effectiveness of providing generic compared to tailored feedback on self-reported health risk behaviours among a high need sample of people attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS). Methods: Participants attending two ACCHSs in regional New South Wales completed a touch screen health risk survey and received either generic or tailored health risk feedback. Participants were asked to complete an exit survey after their appointment. The exit survey asked about feedback acceptability and effectiveness. Self-reported ease of understanding, relevance and whether the generic versus tailored feedback helped patients talk to their GP was compared using Chi-square analysis; The mean number of survey health risks talked about or for which additional actions were undertaken (such as provision of lifestyle advice or referral) was compared using t-tests. Results: Eighty seven participants (36 % consent rate) completed the exit survey. Tailored feedback was rated as more relevant and was more likely to be shown to the participant's GP than generic feedback. There was no difference in the mean number of health risk topics discussed or number of additional actions taken by the GP by type of feedback. Conclusions: Tailored and generic feedback showed no difference in effectiveness, and little difference in acceptability, among this socially disadvantaged population. Completing a health risk survey and receiving any type of feedback may have overwhelmed more subtle differences in outcomes between the generic and the tailored feedback. Future work to rigorously evaluate the longer-term effectiveness of the provision of tailored health risk feedback for Aboriginal Australians, as well as other high need groups, is still needed. Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ANZCTRN12614001205628. Registered 11 November 2014.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0309-7
Co-authors Chris Paul
2015 Waller A, Forshaw K, Carey M, Robinson S, Kerridge R, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Optimizing Patient Preparation and Surgical Experience Using eHealth Technology.', JMIR medical informatics, 3 e29 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2015 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'Is identification of smoking, risky alcohol consumption and overweight and obesity by General Practitioners improving? A comparison over time.', Family practice, 32 664-671 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul C, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Russell G, Makeham M, 'Under the radar: A cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting', BMC Family Practice, 15 (2014) [C1]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concer... [more]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Method. GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. Results: GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs' detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Conclusions: GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is 'at-risk', computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care. © 2014 Paul et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-15-74
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Bryant J, Carey M, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Enablers of the implementation of tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke care: A cross-sectional survey', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Grady et al.Objective: To assess emergency physicians' perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Method: Aus... [more]

© 2014 Grady et al.Objective: To assess emergency physicians' perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Method: Australian fellows and trainees of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine completed a 57-item online survey assessing enablers to implementation of evidence-based practice across six domains: knowledge, skills, modelling, monitoring, feedback, and maintenance. Demographic and workplace characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were calculated to describe demographic and workplace characteristics of responders, and survey responses. Each domain received an overall score (%) based on the number of responders agreeing with all items within the domain.Results: A total of 429 (13%) Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded. 17.7% of respondents reported they and/or their workplace met all knowledge-related enablers, however only 2.3% had all skill-related enablers in place. Of respondents who decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment, 18.1% agreed that all maintenance-related enablers are in place at their hospital, compared to 6.6% for those who do not decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment. None of the respondents had all items in place cross all domains.Conclusions: Even when allowing for the low response rate, it seems likely there is a lack of individual and system enablers supporting the implementation of bestpractice stroke care in a number of Australian hospitals. Quality improvement programs could target all domains, particularly the skills-training and feedback emergency physicians receive, to aid implementation of tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment for acute stroke.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0114778
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Carey ML, Noble N, Paul CL, 'Evaluation of Systems-Oriented Public Health Interventions: Alternative Research Designs', ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEALTH, VOL 35, 35 9-27 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-032013-182445
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2014 Clinton-Mcharg T, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Williamson A, 'Anxiety and depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres: Prevalence and predictors', Journal of Affective Disorders, 165 176-181 (2014) [C1]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demo... [more]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with anxiety and/or depression. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients from three haematology clinics in Australia. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of haematological cancer were approached by a research assistant while waiting for their appointment and invited to participate in the survey. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and self-reported demographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results Questionnaires from 304 participants were returned. Twenty-seven percent of patients reported anxiety and 17% reported depression. Specifically, 15% reported anxiety without depression, 5% reported depression without anxiety, and 12% reported comorbid anxiety and depression. Participants who had to relocate to receive treatment had almost three times the odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression compared to those who did not have to move. Former smokers also had significantly higher odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression. Limitations The HADS is likely to have produced some false positives and false negatives when compared with gold standard structured clinical interviews for assessing psychological morbidity. Conclusions Approximately 20% of haematological cancer patients attending outpatient clinics may experience clinically significant levels of anxiety and/or depression. Providing additional tailored support to patients who have had to relocate for treatment, and to former smokers, may help to reduce anxiety and depression among these subgroups. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.04.072
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 254-255 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Cameron E, Rose S, Carey M, 'Assessment of family history of colorectal cancer in primary care: Perceptions of first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer', Patient Education and Counseling, 94 427-431 (2014) [C1]

Objective: First degree relatives (FDRs) of someone with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at increased risk of the disease. In this study we examine the factors associated with discuss... [more]

Objective: First degree relatives (FDRs) of someone with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at increased risk of the disease. In this study we examine the factors associated with discussing family history of CRC with a health professional. Methods: People with CRC, recruited through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry in Australia, were asked to refer FDRs to the study. Eight hundred and nineteen FDRs completed a telephone interview. Results: Thirty-six percent of FDRs recalled ever being asked about their family history of bowel cancer by a health professional. Factors associated with having this discussion were being aged 50-60 years, having a university education, being in the potentially high risk category, being very worried about getting bowel cancer and knowing that family history increases risk through discussions with family, friends or their own education. Conclusion: Despite evidence that doctor endorsement is a key factor in the uptake of CRC screening, our study shows that the majority of FDRs do not recall being asked by a health professional about their family history. Practice implications: There is a need to identify the most appropriate method to improve rates of health professional discussion of family history with relatives of CRC patients in order to improve screening rates. © 2013 The Authors.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2013.11.014
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assessing awareness of appropriate responses to symptoms of stroke', Patient Education and Counseling, 95 400-405 (2014) [C1]

Objective: The study explored (1) the level of awareness, and associates of greater awareness, of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms; and (2) actions ta... [more]

Objective: The study explored (1) the level of awareness, and associates of greater awareness, of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms; and (2) actions taken in response to potential stroke symptoms, among general practice patients. Methods: Patients attending general practice clinics in New South Wales, Australia completed a paper and pencil survey. Results: 308 participants returned the survey. 76% indicated they would call an ambulance within 10. min for 'difficulty speaking or understanding others, with blurred vision (in one eye), and face, arm or leg weakness or numbness (on one side of the body)'. Having a first degree relative with a history of stroke was significantly associated with greater awareness of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms. Of those reporting they had experienced 'dizziness, loss of balance or an unexplained fall' 80% did not call an ambulance at the time of experiencing this symptom. Conclusion: There appears to be high awareness of the appropriate response to take for stroke symptoms among this sample, however this does not translate into actions when individuals experience a potential stroke symptom. Practice implications: Education campaigns should be targeted towards individuals without a family history of stroke. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.03.007
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, 'A cross-sectional study examining Australian general practitioners' identification of overweight and obese patients', Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29 328-334 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such a... [more]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such advice. One reason may be that physicians do not identify their overweight and obese patients. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the extent that Australian general practitioners (GP) recognise overweight or obesity in their patients, and to explore patient and GP characteristics associated with non-detection of overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consenting adult patients (n = 1,111) reported weight, height, demographics and health conditions using a touchscreen computer. GPs (n = 51) completed hard-copy questionnaires indicating whether their patients were overweight or obese. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GP detection, using patient self-reported weight and height as the criterion measure for overweight and obesity. For a subsample of patients (n = 107), we did a sensitivity analysis with patient-measured weight and height. We conducted an adjusted, multivariable logistic regression to explore characteristics associated with non-detection, using random effects to adjust for correlation within GPs. RESULTS: Sensitivity for GP assessment was 63 % [95 % CI 57-69 %], specificity 89 % [95 % CI 85-92 %], PPV 87 % [95 % CI 83-90 %] and NPV 69 % [95 % CI 65-72 %]. Sensitivity increased by 3 % and specificity was unchanged in the sensitivity analysis. Men (OR: 1.7 [95 % CI 1.1-2.7]), patients without high blood pressure (OR: 1.8 [95 % CI 1.2-2.8]) and without type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.4 [95 % CI 1.2-8.0]) had higher odds of non-detection. Individuals with obesity (OR: 0.1 [95 % CI 0.07-0.2]) or diploma-level education (OR: 0.3 [95%CI 0.1-0.6]) had lower odds of not being identified. No GP characteristics were associated with non-detection of overweight or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: GPs missed identifying a substantial proportion of overweight and obese patients. Strategies to support GPs in identifying their overweight or obese patients need to be implemented. © 2013 Society of General Internal Medicine.

DOI 10.1007/s11606-013-2637-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie, Serene Yoong
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'Patient-centred care: Making cancer treatment centres accountable', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1989-1997 (2014) [C1]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which i... [more]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2221-4
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller, Alison Zucca
2014 Carey M, Small H, Yoong SL, Boyes A, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence of comorbid depression and obesity in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014) [C1]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciproca... [more]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciprocal relationship between obesity and depression, there are limited data about the rates of depression among general practice patients who are underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese. Aim: To explore the prevalence of depression among underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese general practice patients. Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 Australian general practices. Method: Patients aged =18 years and older who were presenting for general practice care were eligible to participate. Consenting patients completed a touchscreen computer survey assessing self-reported weight and height. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with a score of =10 used to indicate possible depression. Results: Data were obtained from 3361 participants. The prevalence of depression was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.86 to 39.28) among underweight participants, 11% (95% CI = 8.5 to 14.0) among normal weight participants, 12% (95% CI = 0.9 to 15.2) among overweight participants, and 23% (95% CI = 17.8 to 29.0) among obese participants. The prevalence of depression was higher for women than for men across all weight categories except underweight. Conclusion: Weight and depression demonstrated a U-shaped relationship, with higher prevalence of depression observed among underweight and obese general practice patients. These conditions may act as red flags for opportunistic screening of depression in the general practice setting. ©British Journal of General Practice.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X677482
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Allison Boyes
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014) [C1]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Su... [more]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS). Cancer survivors [n = 1589, 612 (52%) men, mean age of 62.5 years, SD 11.5] 1-5 years post diagnosis and recruited through three Canadian population-based cancer registries were asked to pass a survey package on to their principal support person. Surveys were returned by 1183 support persons. The survey included the long form of the SPUNS, which contains 78 items. Fifty-two items were deleted using a combination of expert opinion and statistical criteria. Analysis of the remaining items revealed a five-factor structure. The original factors were retained with the exception of a merging of the personal and emotional needs subscales. Cronbach's alpha co-efficients for all subscales were =0.87, and intraclass correlation of domain scores of the short and long versions of the SPUNS were high. The SPUNS short form was able to discriminate between support persons of survivors who had (n = 147), and those who had not received treatment in the past month (n = 969). At just 26 items, it is likely to have strong clinical and research applicability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Recruitment of healthcare specialists', EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26 516-517 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12275
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul C, Courtney R, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Hill D, Simmons J, Rose S, 'A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a pre-recruitment primer letter to increase participation in a study of colorectal screening and surveillance', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-14-44
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Noble NE, Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Blunden SV, Stewart JM, Conigrave KM, 'A cross-sectional survey assessing the acceptability and feasibility of self-report electronic data collection about health risks from patients attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service', BMC MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND DECISION MAKING, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6947-14-34
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Jones KA, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Boyes AW, Paul C, et al., 'Comparison of a single self-assessment item with the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in general practice', Family Practice, 31 (2014) [C1]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and f... [more]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and follow-up. Objective: This study aimed to explore the utility of a single self-assessment item in identifying possible cases of depression in primary care by examining sensitivity and specificity with the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) at different thresholds. Design: Cross-sectional survey presented on a touchscreen computer. Participants. Adult patients attending 12 urban general practices in Australia completed a health status questionnaire (n = 1004). Main measures. Depression was assessed by the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for the single item using a PHQ-9 score of 10 or more as the criterion value. Key results. A total of 1004 participants (61% female, 48% aged 55 years or older) completed both the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. When using a threshold of mild depression or greater, the single item had adequate specificity (76%, 95% CI: 71-80%), with 76 out of every 100 people defined as non-depressed by the PHQ-9 also identified as not depressed by the single item. Sensitivity was high (91%, 95% CI: 84-95%), with the single item identifying 91 out of every 100 true cases (as defined by the PHQ-9). Conclusions: The single self-assessment item has high sensitivity and moderate specificity to identify possible cases of depression when used at a threshold of mild depression or greater. © The Author 2014.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu018
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Yoong SL, 'Agreement between HADS classifications and single-item screening questions for anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional survey of cancer patients.', Ann Oncol, 25 889-895 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu023
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2014 Carey M, Jones K, Meadows G, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Inder K, et al., 'Accuracy of general practitioner unassisted detection of depression.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 48 571-578 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413520047
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kerry Inder, Serene Yoong
2014 Tzelepis F, Rose SK, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Are we missing the Institute of Medicine's mark? A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures assessing quality of patient-centred cancer care', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must ... [more]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must be: 1) respectful to patients' values, preferences, and expressed needs; 2) coordinated and integrated; 3) provide information, communication, and education; 4) ensure physical comfort; 5) provide emotional support-relieving fear and anxiety; and 6) involve family and friends. However, whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) comprehensively cover these dimensions remains unexplored. This systematic review examined whether PROMs designed to assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care addressed all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and the psychometric properties of these measures.Methods: Medline, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Embase, CINAHL and Scopus were searched to retrieve published studies describing the development and psychometric properties of PROMs assessing the quality of patient-centred cancer care. Two authors determined if eligible PROMs included the six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and evaluated the adequacy of psychometric properties based on recommended criteria for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face/content validity, construct validity and cross-cultural adaptation.Results: Across all 21 PROMs, the most commonly included IOM dimension of patient-centred care was " information, communication and education" (19 measures). In contrast, only five measures assessed the " involvement of family and friends." Two measures included one IOM-endorsed patient-centred care dimension, two measures had two dimensions, seven measures had three dimensions, five measures had four dimensions, and four measures had five dimensions. One measure, the Indicators (Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), covered all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care, but had adequate face/content validity only. Eighteen measures met the recommended adequacy criteria for construct validity, 15 for face/content validity, seven for internal consistency, three for cross-cultural adaptation and no measure for test-retest reliability.Conclusions: There are no psychometrically rigorous PROMs developed with cancer patients that capture all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care. Using more than one measure or expanding existing measures to cover all six patient-centred care dimensions could improve assessment and delivery of patient-centred care. Construction of new comprehensive measures with acceptable psychometric properties that can be used with the general cancer population may also be warranted. © 2014 Tzelepis et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-41
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Bryant J, Boyes A, Jones K, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Fry R, 'Examining and addressing evidence-practice gaps in cancer care: A systematic review', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-rev... [more]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-reviewed cancer research output in the years 2000, 2005, and 2010.Methods: Eligible papers were published in English and reported on evidence-practice gaps in cancer care. The electronic database Medline was searched for three time periods using MeSH headings and keywords. Abstracts were assessed against eligibility criteria by one reviewer and checked by a second. Papers meeting eligibility criteria were coded as data-based or non-data-based, and by cancer type of focus. All data-based papers were then further classified as descriptive studies documenting the extent of, or barriers to addressing, the evidence-practice gap; or intervention studies examining the effectiveness of strategies to reduce the evidence-practice gap.Results: A total of 176 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications significantly increased over time, from 25 in 2000 to 100 in 2010 (p < 0.001). Of the 176 identified papers, 160 were data-based. The majority of these (n = 150) reported descriptive studies. Only 10 studies examined the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce discrepancies between evidence and clinical practice. Of these, only one was a randomized controlled trial. Of all data-based studies, almost one-third (n = 48) examined breast cancer care.Conclusions: While the number of publications investigating evidence-practice gaps in cancer care increased over a ten-year period, most studies continued to describe gaps between best evidence and clinical practice, rather than rigorously testing interventions to reduce the gap. © 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-9-37
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Boyes AW, Girgis A, D'Este CA, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais C, Carey ML, 'Prevalence and predictors of the short-term trajectory of anxiety and depression in the first year after a cancer diagnosis: a population-based longitudinal study.', J Clin Oncol, 31 2724-2729 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.44.7540
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alison Zucca, Catherine Deste
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Grady A, 'A systematic review of behavioural weight-loss interventions involving primary-care physicians in overweight and obese primary-care patients (1999-2011).', Public Health Nutrition, 16 2083-2099 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004375
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2013 Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Houlcroft LE, Turon HE, 'The impact of web-based approaches on psychosocial health in chronic physical and mental health conditions', Health Education Research, 28 450-471 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyt053
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Recruitment in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 42 9 (2013) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Cameron EC, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Access to Care and Impacts of Cancer on Daily Life: Do They Differ for Metropolitan Versus Regional Hematological Cancer Survivors?', Journal of Rural Health, 29 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jrh.12020
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Alix Hall, Chris Paul
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Psychological distress in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 21 1043-1051 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1624-3
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2013 Boyes AW, D'Este CA, Carey ML, Lecathelinais C, Girgis A, 'How does the Distress Thermometer compare to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for detecting possible cases of psychological morbidity among cancer survivors?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 21 119-127 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Allison Boyes
2013 Paul CL, Carey M, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Makeham M, Henskens F, 'Access to chronic disease care in general practice: The acceptability of implementing systematic waiting-room screening using computer-based patient-reported risk status', British Journal of General Practice, 63 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3399/bjgp13X671605
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong
2013 Hall A, Campbell HS, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, D'Este C, Burkhalter R, Carey M, 'Unmet needs of Australian and Canadian haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional international comparative study', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 22 2032-2038 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3247
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2013 MacKenzie LJ, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Do we get it right? Radiation oncology outpatients' perceptions of the patient centredness of life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2720-2728 (2013) [C1]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patien... [more]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patient preferences can be challenging for clinicians. The aims of this study were the following: (i) to examine cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure; and (ii) to explore agreement between cancer patients' preferences for, and perceived experiences of, life expectancy disclosure. Methods Cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment in metropolitan Australia completed a cross-sectional touchscreen computer survey including optional questions about their life expectancy disclosure preferences and experiences. Results Of the 208 respondents, 178 (86%) indicated that they would prefer their clinician to ask them before discussing life expectancy, and 30 (14%) indicated that they would prefer others (i.e. clinicians, family) to decide whether they were given life expectancy information. Of the 175 respondents who were classified as having a self- determined or other-determined disclosure experience, 105 (60%) reported an experience of life expectancy disclosure that was in accordance with their preferences. Cohen's ¿ was -0.04 (95% CI, -0.17, 0.08), indicating very poor agreement between patients' preferences for and perceived experiences of life expectancy disclosure (p = 0.74). Conclusions In light of patient-centred prognosis disclosure guidelines, our findings of a majority preference for, and experience of, a self-determined approach to life expectancy disclosure amongst radiation oncology patients are encouraging. However, poor agreement between preferences and experiences highlights that additional effort from clinicians is required in order to achieve a truly patient-centred approach to life expectancy disclosure. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3337
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Lisa Mackenzie
2013 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Gough K, Reece J, Krishnasamy M, Carey M, et al., 'A tailored, supportive care intervention using systematic assessment designed for people with inoperable lung cancer: A randomised controlled trial', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2445-2453 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3306
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity in adult Australian general practice patients', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 586-586 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12117
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong
2013 Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'Measuring psychosocial outcomes: is the consumer or the professional the best judge?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 22 281-288 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12048
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Agreement between self-reported and measured weight and height collected in general practice patients: a prospective study', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-38
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing Australian general practice patients' intention, reasons and preferences for assistance with losing weight', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-187
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, D'Este C, et al., 'A population-based cross-sectional study of colorectal cancer screening practices of first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-13-13
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2013 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia J, McEvoy M, 'Individual- and provider-level factors associated with colorectal cancer screening in accordance with guideline recommendation: a community-level perspective across varying levels of risk', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-248
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, John Attia, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2013 Paul CL, Piterman L, Shaw J, Kirby C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, et al., 'Diabetes in rural towns: effectiveness of continuing education and feedback for healthcare providers in altering diabetes outcomes at a population level: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 8 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-30
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, D'Este CA, 'Radiation oncology outpatient perceptions of patient-centred care: a cross-sectional survey', BMJ OPEN, 3 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001265
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer screening in Australia: A community-level perspective', Medical Journal of Australia, 196 516-520 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Macrae FA, Yoong SL, 'Community approaches to increasing colorectal screening uptake: A review of the methodological quality and strength of current evidence', Cancer Forum, 36 27-35 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2012 Carey ML, Anderson AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, 'How well are we meeting haematological cancer survivors' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making?', Patient Education and Counseling, 88 87-92 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Chris Paul, Amy Anderson, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis
2012 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, 'Development of cancer needs questionnaire for parents and carers of adolescents and young adults with cancer', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 991-1010 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Lambert SD, Smits RE, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'The unfulfilled promise: A systematic review of interventions to reduce the unmet supportive care needs of cancer patients', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 207-219 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Hall AE, 'Cancer patients' willingness to answer survey questions about life expectancy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 3335-3341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1477-9
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Cameron EC, 'Do cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes and perceptions of quality of care vary across radiation oncology treatment centres?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 384-389 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Paul CL, Carey ML, Anderson AE, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Courtney RJ, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'Cancer patients' concerns regarding access to cancer care: Perceived impact of waiting times along the diagnosis and treatment journey', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 321-329 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Anderson, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Cameron EC, Lynagh MC, Hall AE, Tzelepis F, 'Financial and social impact of supporting a haematological cancer survivor', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 169-176 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Alix Hall
2012 Carey ML, Noble NE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Mackenzie LJ, 'Identifying psychological morbidity among people with cancer using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: Time to revisit first principles?', Psycho-Oncology, 21 229-238 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Schofield P, Gough K, Ugalde A, Carey ML, Aranda S, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Cancer Treatment Survey (CaTS): Development and validation of a new instrument to measure patients' preparation for chemotherapy and radiotherapy', Psycho-Oncology, 21 307-315 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer risk assessment and screening recommendation: A community survey of healthcare providers' practice from a patient perspective', BMC Family Practice, 13 1-9 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, John Attia, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients', BMC Family Practice, 13 48 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2012 Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae F, Hill D, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Doran CM, 'Improving adherence to surveillance and screening recommendations for people with colorectal cancer and their first degree relatives: a randomized controlled trial', BMC Cancer, 12 62 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Shakeshaft A, 'Preliminary development and psychometric evaluation of an unmet needs measure for adolescents and young adults with cancer: The Cancer Needs Questionnaire - Young People (CNQ-YP)', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 10 1-11 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Buchan H, 'Data systems for assessing quality of cancer care: Are building blocks in place for person-centered care?', The International Journal of Person Centred Medicine, 2 334-340 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.5750/ijpcm.v2i3.246
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Russell G, Mazza D, Makeham M, et al., 'Touch screen computer health assessment in Australian general practice patients: A cross-sectional study protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-7 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Chris Paul, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kerry Inder, Catherine Deste
2012 Lambert SD, Harrison JD, Smith E, Bonevski B, Carey ML, Lawsin C, et al., 'The unmet needs of partners and caregivers of adults diagnosed with cancer: A systematic review', BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, 2 224-230 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2011 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Tracey E, 'Recruitment of representative samples for low incidence cancer populations: Do registries deliver?', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 11 1-9 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-11-5
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Carey ML, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, Inder KJ, Makeham M, 'Efforts to close the evidence-practice gap in the management of cardiovascular risk factors in general practice: Strategic or haphazard?', International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, 1 660-667 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Kerry Inder
2011 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Campbell S, Douglas HE, 'Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 152-162 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01211.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2011 Paul CL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Henskens FA, 'Improving access to information and support for patients with less common cancers: hematologic cancer patients' views about web-based approaches', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 e112 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1894
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Chris Paul
2010 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, Rainbird KJ, 'Measuring the psychosocial health of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors: A critical review', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 8 1-13 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-8-25
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2010 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lotfi-Jam K, Schofield P, Aranda S, 'Multidisciplinary care in cancer: Do the current research outputs help?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 19 434-441 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2009.01105.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey M, Mackenzie LJ, Hill D, Campbell S, Turner D, 'Reducing inequities in cancer care: The role of cancer registries', Cancer, 115 3597-3605 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cncr.24415
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2009 Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Measuring the unmet needs of those with cancer: A critical overview', Cancer Forum, 33 198-201 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Carey M, Buchan H, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'The cycle of change: Implementing best-evidence clinical practice', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 21 37-43 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzn049
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2008 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Carey M, Milshkin L, Duffy M, Ball D, Aranda S, 'Lung Cancer: Challenges and solutions for supportive care intervention research', Palliative and Supportive Care, 6 281-287 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1478951508000424
Citations Scopus - 38
2008 Jefford M, Karahalios E, Pollard A, Baravelli C, Carey M, Franklin J, et al., 'Survivorship issues following treatment completion: results from focus groups with Australian cancer survivors and health professionals', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2 20-32 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-008-0043-4
Citations Scopus - 60
2008 Lotfi-Jam K, Carey M, Jefford M, Schofield P, Charleson C, Aranda S, 'Non-pharmacological strategies for managing common chemotherapy side-effects: A systematic review', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 26 5618-5629 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2007.15.9053
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 50
2008 Schofield P, Jefford M, Carey M, Thomson K, Evans M, Baravelli C, Aranda S, 'Preparing patients for threatening medical treatments: effects of a chemotherapy educational DVD on anxiety, unmet needs and self efficacy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 16 37-45 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-007-0273-4
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
2007 Carey M, Schofield P, Jefford M, Krishnasamy M, Aranda S, 'The development of audio-visual materials to prepare patients for medical procedures: An oncology application', European Journal of Cancer Care, 16 417-433 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2006.00772.x
2007 Karahalios E, Baravelli C, Carey M, Schofield P, Pollard A, Aranda S, et al., 'An audiovisual information resource to assist in the transition from completion of potentially curative treatment for cancer to survivorship: a systematic development process', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 1 226-236 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-007-0022-1
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Love A, Nehill C, Wein S, ''Would you like to talk about your future treatment options?' discussing the transition from curative cancer treatment to palliative care', Palliative Medicine, 20 397-406 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1191/0269216306pm1156oa
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Aranda S, 'Psychosocial issues for people with advanced cancer: overcoming the research challenges', Cancer Forum, 30 18-21 (2006) [C1]
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Barriers to the provision of evidence-based psychosocial care in oncology', Psycho-Oncology, 15 863-872 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.1017
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2006 Carey M, Jefford M, Schofield P, Kelly S, Krishnasamy M, Aranda S, 'Development and evaluation of an audiovisual information resource to promote self-management of chemotherapy side effects', Supportive Care in Cancer, 14 361-368 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-005-0909-1
2005 Carey M, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Barriers to the provision of evidence-based psychosocial care in oncology', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 57 189-189 (2005)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2005 Holmes VM, Babauta ML, 'Single or dual representations for reading and spelling?', Reading and Writing, 18 257-280 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11145-004-8129-5
Show 113 more journal articles

Conference (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, Hall A, Bisquera A, 'CANCER MEDICINE AFFORDABILITY AND FINANCIAL IMPACTS OF CANCER IN AUSTRALIA: IMPACTS ON DECISION-MAKING AND PERCEIVED FINANCIAL BURDEN', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Chris Paul, Alix Hall
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'Web-based support for population-based medical research: Presenting the QuON survey system', HEALTHINF 2014 - 7th International Conference on Health Informatics, Proceedings; Part of 7th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, BIOSTEC 2014 (2014) [E1]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs,... [more]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs, perceived quality of care received, and priorities of health service interventions. Until quite recently, collection of survey data has been either paper-based, or achieved using computer software that largely duplicated paper-based processes with limited additional functionality. The authors investigate the use of web-based technology to support collection of such data from patients, including experiences and observations on enhanced/additional functionality made possible by its adoption. A novel software design termed QuON is presented, together with examples of its capabilities and uses in current research projects. Copyright © 2014 SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mark Wallis, Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Asada H, et al., 'JAPANESE CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR DISCUSSING LIFE EXPECTANCY WITH THEIR RADIATION ONCOLOGIST', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu435.35
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'How Do Health Researchers Benefit From Web-Based Survey Systems?', Proceedings of e-Health 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Alison Zucca, Chris Paul, Mark Wallis
2014 Hall A, Nguyen S, Tran H, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'PATIENTS PERCEPTIONS OF WHAT MAY HAVE CAUSED THEIR CANCER: A CROSS-SECTIONAL INVESTIGATION OF VIETNAMESE RADIOTHERAPY CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, D'Este C, 'CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR INVOLVEMENT IN RESEARCH AND CONSUMER ACTIVITIES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2014 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'RADIATION ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS' CONCERN ABOUT, PREFERENCES FOR, AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO DISCUSSING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Lisa Mackenzie
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'LIFE EXPECTANCY DISCUSSIONS IN A MULTI-SITE SAMPLE OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2014 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'IS IDENTIFICATION OF SMOKING, RISKY ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IMPROVING? A COMPARISON OF DETECTION RATES IN AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 1982 AND 2011', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Bryant J, Mansfield E, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, 'CORRELATES OF THE DETECTION OF CANCER RISK FACTORS BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Alix Hall, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Boyes A, Jones K, Carey M, 'The Evidence-Practice Gap in Oncology: Are We Contributing to Implementation Science?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Tzelepis F, Rose S, Sanson-Fisher R, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey M, Paul C, 'A Systematic Review of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Assessing Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Inder KJ, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight or obese general practice patients', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Agreement between cancer patients and their radiation oncologist regarding diagnosis and prognosis disclosure experiences in Japan', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Suzuki E, Mackenzie LJ, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Acceptability of touch screen computer psychosocial survey to Japanese radiation therapy patients', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, D'Este CA, 'Anxiety and depression during radiotherapy treatment: a comparison of touchscreen computer administration of the hospital anxiety and depression scale and single-item self-report measures', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Perceptions of patient-centred cancer care during radiotherapy treatment: A cross sectional survey', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Perceptions of psychological distress in Japanese cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Japanese cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy discussions', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2011 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer screening in Australia: A community-level perspective', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: COSA 38th Annual Scientific Meeting Poster Abstracts (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.5694/mja11.10661
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Hall AE, 'Who should make disclosure decisions? Cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2010 Schofield P, Gough K, Carey ML, Ugalde A, Aranda S, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Cancer treatment survey (CaTS): A new instrument to assess the adequacy of communication to prepare patients for chemotherapy and radiotherapy', International Conference on Communication in Healthcare 2010 (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 White VM, Carey ML, Hill D, Ieropoli S, Giles GG, 'Understanding cancer patients' experiences of care: The Clinical Cancer Care Events Survey', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
2009 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Sharkey K, Krishnasamy M, Reece J, Carey ML, et al., 'Meeting needs of people with inoperable lung cancer through an innovative supportive care intervention: A randomised controlled trial', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01253.x
Show 22 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 44
Total funding $6,994,659

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $803,554

Improving outcomes for people with depression in community settings: A cluster RCT$803,554

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Mariko Carey, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Nicholas Zwar, Associate Professor Danielle Mazza, Professor Graham Meadows, Doctor Amy Waller, Professor Leon Piterman, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600063
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20163 grants / $2,478,540

Community prevention of cancer: building the evidence base for translation into policy and practice$2,203,987

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Adrian Bauman, Professor Chris Rissel, Doctor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran
Scheme Program Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500708
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of ‘Enable Me’: an e-health innovation for stroke survivors and support persons.$245,109

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Amy Waller, Doctor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Michael Pollack, Professor Chris Doran, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500867
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of ‘Enable Me’: an e-health innovation for stroke survivors and support persons.$29,444

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Amy Waller, Doctor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Dr Michael Pollack, Professor Chris Doran, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1501095
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20156 grants / $466,872

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $270,908

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Consultancy Tender: To assess needs and outcomes in relation to cancer control for people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged and have experienced cancer.$84,870

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Dr Jarad Martin, Dr James Lynam
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401189
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Improving the implementation of obesity guidelines in Australia: Practice, practitioner and patient challenges and opportunities.$50,000

Funding body: RACGP Foundation

Funding body RACGP Foundation
Project Team

Professor Danielle Mazza

Scheme Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd RACGP Foundation Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Health Exchange: acceptability of an electronic tailored chronic disease needs assessment tool$27,094

Funding body: NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)

Funding body NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mrs Amanda Jayakody, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Ms Eunice Simons
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401380
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Improving uptake of colorectal screening among primary care attendees.$17,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme PhD Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1400854
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Delivery of care, are we doing enough? An investigation in to the treatment provided for depression in Australian alcohol treatment centers. $17,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Ms Breanne Hobden
Scheme Ian Scott Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401254
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20147 grants / $304,116

Improving implementation of guideline recommendations for early detection and prevention of cancer in general practice$154,170

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300684
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees$37,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Elise Mansfield, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401420
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

End-of-life care: An investigation of advance care planning amongst haematological cancer patients$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Doctor Amy Waller, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301373
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$25,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Miss Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Megumi Uchida, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Miss Alix Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Reducing unnecessary staging imaging requests for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer$19,685

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Testing the impact of tailored feedback on primary care patients’ understanding of colorectal cancer risk, attitudes towards faecal occult blood tests (FOBT) and intentions to undertake FOBT screening$17,761

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $20,000

Reducing psychosocial burden among women diagnosed with breast cancer and their support persons: A randomised controlled trial of a web-based intervention.$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Charles Douglas, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Near Miss
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300705
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20125 grants / $456,079

Improving cancer treatment systems: An RCT of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$249,408

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100618
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving cancer treatment systems: evaluation of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$133,140

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100721
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Multiple substance use, mental health and other health risk behaviours among patients of Aboriginal Medical Services: Patient priorities for change and preferences for models of support$39,324

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mr Steve Blunden, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Kate Conigrave, Ms Natasha Noble
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200697
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Evaluating the acceptability of a web-based approach to improve knowledge transfer to general practice regarding care for sleep disorders $20,000

Funding body: Sleep Health Foundation

Funding body Sleep Health Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Doctor Jeffrey Pretto, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100881
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving cancer care for lymphoma: patients' perceptions of optimal care$14,207

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200212
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20117 grants / $1,427,334

A cluster randomised trial to test a systems based collaborative for type 2 diabetes among Indigenous Australians$542,240

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Sandra Eades, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Professor Paul Zimmet, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Mark Wenitong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100186
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The role of individual patient, social support and treatment centre variables in the psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients$494,604

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Professor Ian Olver, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1000303
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Data capture for the data commons.$200,000

Funding body: Australian National Data Service

Funding body Australian National Data Service
Project Team

A/Prof Frans Henskens

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Hunter Medical Research Institute, Health Behaviour Research Program$100,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Scheme Health Behaviour Research Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Type 2 Diabetes among Indigenous Australians Project$45,000

Funding body: Baker IDI

Funding body Baker IDI
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Sandra Eades, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Mark Wenitong
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001070
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Acceptability and feasibility of providing feedback to ACCHO patients and their GPs about patients' risky alcohol, tobacco and drug use.$34,490

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Kate Conigrave, Ms Jessica Stewart, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mr Steve Blunden, Associate Professor Christine Paul
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100306
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Support for visiting scholar in Primary Care Research (Prof Allen Dietrich) $11,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Scheme Visiting Scholar
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20107 grants / $137,285

Hunter Medical Research Institute, Health Behaviour Research Program, Post Doctoral Fellowship$55,800

Funding body: Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program

Funding body Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program
Scheme Post Doctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Tobacco control research infrastructure unit. $35,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Project Team

A/Prof Billie Bonevski

Scheme Strategic Infrastructure Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Delay in seeking treatment for symptoms of bowel cancer: a community survey of self-reported delay timeframes and triggers for seeking treatment among those aged 55+$21,485

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Mr Ryan Courtney, Conjoint Professor Cate d'Este, Associate Professor Mark McEvoy
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900147
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Cancer patients’ perceptions of the treatment decision making process and improvements needed for decisional support. $10,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Providing accessible support for the support persons of people with haematological cancers$7,500

Funding body: Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group

Funding body Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Anna Williamson
Scheme Pilot Study Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190650
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving psychosocial outcomes for haematological cancer patients: an RCT. $5,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Laureate Professor Rob Sanson-Fisher

Scheme Grant preparation funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Development of skills in health behaviour research. Winter internship scholarship$2,500

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Scheme Winter Internships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20095 grants / $792,057

Blood cancer survivors and support persons: A national survey of rural/urban unmet needs and psychological disturbance$518,838

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Professor Kenneth Bradstock, Dr Anna Williamson, Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0188899
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A web-based intervention to reduce distress and improve quality of life among young women with breast cancer. A RCT. $226,209

Funding body: Beyond Blue, Cancer Australia and National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body Beyond Blue, Cancer Australia and National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team

Victoria White

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations: exploring variations in care, barriers and triggers for change. A 12 month PhD Stipend$26,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Christine Paul

Scheme PhD Stipend
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Assessing health professionals’ and consumers’ perceptions about the role of treatment centre structures and processes in psychosocial outcomes for blood cancer patients. $14,869

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Dr. Tara Clinton McHarg

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Cancer patients’ assessments of the quality of psychosocial care. Where are the gaps in care and how do they relate to psychosocial well-being?$6,141

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20071 grants / $21,000

Patient expectations and preferences for follow up after treatment for lung cancer$21,000

Funding body: Western and Central Metropolitan Integrated Cancer Services

Funding body Western and Central Metropolitan Integrated Cancer Services
Project Team

Mary Duffy

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20061 grants / $87,822

A video resource to improve psychological adjustment after cancer treatment. $87,822

Funding body: Peter MacCallum Foundation

Funding body Peter MacCallum Foundation
Project Team

A/Prof Michael Jefford

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Co-Occuring Depression and Alcohol Misuse: A practice-based investigation
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Improving Uptake of Colorectal Screening Among Primary Care Attendees
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Patient Adherence to Physiotherapy Prescribed Self-Management Strategies
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Reducing High Rates of Unplanned Hospital Readmissions Among Aboriginal People with Chronic Disease
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Patient Perceptions of Potentially Threatening Interventions
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Patient-Centred Care in Cancer Treatment Centres
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD The Provision of Best-practice care: Examining Modifiable Barriers Along the Care Pathway for Stroke
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Patient-Centred Cancer Care: A Road Less Travelled. An Investigation in Australian Radiotherapy Settings
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Management of Excess Weight in Australian General Practice Patients: Informing Practice
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Cancer Survivors' Psychosocial Outcomes: A Population-Based Investigation of Anxiety, Depression and Unmet Needs at Six to Twelve Months Post-diagnosis
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure of Perceived Need for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

Obesity

Weighty Problem

November 1, 2013

In a region where 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, a new study conducted by University of Newcastle and HMRI researchers has found that doctors are falling short in detecting weight conditions, which may lead to inadequate assistance with managing weight.

Dr Mariko Carey

Position

Senior Research Fellow
Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email mariko.carey@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0702

Office

Building HMRI Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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