Ms Alison Zucca

Research Student

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Alison is a Senior Research Officer with the Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP, the Behavioural Research Unit of the Cancer Council NSW). She has been involved in behavioural research in relation to cancer since 2002. Alison assists in the co-ordination and implementation of research projects and the writing of scientific reports and papers.

Research Expertise
Alison is currently working on several research projects in the area of cancer survivorship. The key project is the Cancer Survival Study, a longitudinal study following over 1400 cancer survivors until 5 years post-diagnosis. The Cancer Survival Study explores the well-being of cancer survivors across a variety of outcomes including physical and emotional health, positive growth, work-related and employment issues, lifestyle issues, relationships and social support and coping styles. Alison is interested in the moderators of well-being, including coping styles, and in 2008 completed her Research Masters degree exploring coping in two samples of cancer patients who are 6 months and 5 years post-diagnosis.


Keywords

  • Carcinogenesis
  • Oncology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 50
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Boyes AW, Proietto A, 'Does screening for physical and psychosocial symptoms vary between medical oncology treatment centres?', Psycho-Oncology, 25 521-528 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Our aim is to examine whether provider screening for physical and emotional symptoms, as reported by medical oncology outpatient... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Our aim is to examine whether provider screening for physical and emotional symptoms, as reported by medical oncology outpatients, varies across medical oncology treatment centres. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 716 patients attending the outpatient medical oncology department of six public cancer treatment centres across five Australian states participated. Four patient-report survey items explored how often patients were specifically asked by clinical staff at the treatment centre about their (i) emotional distress (anxiety, distress and depression), (ii) pain, (iii) fatigue and (iv) other physical symptoms (e.g. nausea and constipation). Asking at less than half of all appointments was classified as infrequent screening. Results No significant associations were found between treatment centre and symptom screening for emotional distress (p = 0.65), pain (p = 0.21), fatigue (p = 0.95) and other physical symptoms (p = 0.40). The proportion of patients who were regularly screened versus infrequently screened was significantly higher for physical symptoms than emotional symptoms (p < 0.001): 36% infrequently screened for emotional distress (range: 33-45%), 15% infrequently screened for pain (range: 9-21%), 16% infrequently screened for fatigue (range: 15-19%) and 11% infrequently screened for other physical symptoms (range: 5-17%). Conclusions No significant variation in symptom screening was found across treatment centres. While the majority of patients received recommended care, treatment centres must continue to improve symptom screening rates, particularly for emotional distress. However, screening is only the first step and must be accompanied by the offer of help and provision of help to relieve patient suffering.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3948
Co-authors Amy Waller, Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Bryant J, Zucca A, Brozek I, Rock V, Bonevski B, 'Sun Protection Attitudes and Behaviours Among First Generation Australians with Darker Skin Types: Results from Focus Groups', Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 17 248-254 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10903-013-9900-y
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Zucca AC, Fradgley EA, 'Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: Why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment', Patient Preference and Adherence, 9 831-835 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimens... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients¿ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient¿s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article¿s objectives are to: 1) use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2) to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension. Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension. Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include the Lung Information Needs Questionnaire and the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. In relation to physical comfort, only patients can report the severity of physical symptoms and whether medications provide adequate relief. Patient-reported measures that investigate physical comfort include the Pain Care Quality Survey and the Brief Pain Inventory. Using patient-reported measures to regularly measure patient-centered care is critical to identifying areas of health care where improvements are needed.

DOI 10.2147/PPA.S81975
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Fradgley E, Regan T, 'Medical Oncology Patients: Are They Offered Help and Does It Provide Relief?', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 50 436-444 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to r... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to relieving patient suffering. Objectives The objective is to describe the proportion of patients experiencing treatable cancer-related symptoms who reported 1) a health care provider at the treatment center offered assistance for their symptom, 2) they accepted the assistance offered, and 3) the assistance relieved suffering. Variation in symptom management among treatment centers also was examined. Methods A survey was done with 528 medical oncology outpatients recruited from six treatment centers. Eight items explored management of prevalent, burdensome, and treatable cancer-related symptoms: pain, fatigue, other physical side effects, and emotional distress. Participants were asked about symptom management provided at the clinic from where they were recruited. Questions referred to the last occasion the patient experienced the symptom. Results Fewer patients were offered help to relieve fatigue (44%) and emotional distress (57%), than pain (90%) and other physical side effects (84%). In most cases, help was not offered as clinic staff were not aware of the patient's symptom. Although the vast majority of patients accepted the help that was offered, more patients accepted help for physical symptoms (pain, 97%; fatigue, 95%; and other side effects, 98%) than emotional symptoms (87%). When care was provided, most patients experienced at least a little relief from pain (99%), fatigue (94%), and emotional distress (96%). Symptom management did not vary significantly by treatment center (P = 0.073). Conclusion Quality improvement initiatives must focus primarily on improving providers' awareness of their patients' symptoms and ensuring that patients are subsequently offered help.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.04.018
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Timothy Regan, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2015 Zucca AC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Waller A, Carey M, Grady A, Mackenzie L, 'Life expectancy discussions in a multisite sample of australian medical oncology outpatients', Medical Journal of Australia, 203 405.e1-405.e7 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of informat... [more]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of information about life expectancy; and 2) sociodemographic, clinical and psychological factors associated with patients¿ perceptions of whether they received too little, too much, or the right amount of information about life expectancy. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Eleven large Australian medical oncology treatment centres. Participants: A total of 1431 medical oncology outpatients participated (81% consent rate). Eligible patients were approached between September 2012 and May 2014. Main outcome measures: Patients indicated whether the information about life expectancy they received aligned with their preferences. Results: Almost one in four patients (24%) received too little information, 4% received too much, and 50% received all the information they wanted; 22% of patients neither wanted nor received information about life expectancy. Patients were more likely to receive too little information if they were not in remission (odds ratio [OR], 1.77), did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 3.64), or were anxious (OR, 1.48) or depressed (OR, 1.48). Patients had greater odds of receiving too much information if they were younger (OR, 1.45), had more advanced cancer (OR, 2.01) or did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 4.42). Conclusions: That fact that 28% of cancer patients did not receive their desired level of information about life expectancy highlights the difficulties associated with discussing this sensitive topic. To ensure that life expectancy discussions correspond with patient preferences, clinicians should routinely ask patients whether they want to know this information, in what format, and at which level of detail.

DOI 10.5694/mja15.00596
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2014 Paul CL, Bryant J, Turon H, Brozek I, Noble N, Zucca A, 'A narrative review of the potential for self- tanning products to substitute for solaria use among people seeking a tanned appearance', PHOTODERMATOLOGY PHOTOIMMUNOLOGY & PHOTOMEDICINE, 30 160-166 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/phpp.12103
Co-authors Chris Paul
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'Patient-centred care: Making cancer treatment centres accountable', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1989-1997 (2014) [C1]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which i... [more]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2221-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2013 Boyes AW, Girgis A, D'Este CA, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais C, Carey ML, 'Prevalence and predictors of the short-term trajectory of anxiety and depression in the first year after a cancer diagnosis: a population-based longitudinal study.', J Clin Oncol, 31 2724-2729 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.44.7540
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2013 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, 'The many faces of preventative care in the practice of oncology', Cancer Forum, 37 12-16 (2013) [C1]

Prevention in the oncology setting has traditionally focused on the progression of cancer, recurrence and development of new cancers. Increasingly, the focus has moved to a more h... [more]

Prevention in the oncology setting has traditionally focused on the progression of cancer, recurrence and development of new cancers. Increasingly, the focus has moved to a more holistic view of prevention that pursues prevention of suffering and maintaining quality of life. The cancer treatment team has the opportunity to play an active role in the promotion of healthy lifestyles for patients, and the relatives for whom the patient's cancer conveys risk. Assisting patients to adhere to 'non-cancer' care is important for their mortality and morbidity. Given patient's reluctance to disclose physical and emotional side-effects they may be experiencing, there is a need for health providers to regularly initiate discussions with their patients about their needs. Similarly, an oncology service that actively seeks to understand patient preferences will be better equipped to provide individualised care. A systems-minded approach to prevention may ensure that cancer care is organised to anticipate and to prevent of poor quality care. As the cancer treatment team will continue to play a more complex role in prevention, they must be supported by organisational factors that facilitate evidence-based practice.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2012 Walshe R, James EL, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Boyes AW, Zucca AC, Girgis A, Lecathelinais LC, 'Socio-demographic and medical correlates of the use of biologically based complementary and alternative medicines amongst recent Australian cancer survivors', Preventive Medicine, 54 23-26 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Allison Boyes, Erica James
2012 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Linden W, Girgis A, 'All's well that ends well? Quality of life and physical symptom clusters in long-term cancer survivors across cancer types', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 43 720-731 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2012 Boyes AW, Girgis A, D'Este CA, Zucca AC, 'Prevalence and correlates of cancer survivors' supportive care needs 6months after diagnosis: A population-based cross-sectional study', BMC Cancer, 12 150 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2012 Zucca AC, Lambert SD, Boyes AW, Pallant JF, 'Rasch analysis of the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale (mini-MAC) among a heterogeneous sample of long-term cancer survivors: A cross-sectional study', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 10 1-12 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2011 Boyes AW, Girgis A, D'Este CA, Zucca AC, 'Flourishing or floundering? Prevalence and correlates of anxiety and depression among a population-based sample of adult cancer survivors 6 months after diagnosis', Journal of Affective Disorders, 135 184-192 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2011 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Newling G, Hall AE, Girgis A, 'Travelling all over the countryside: Travel-related burden and financial difficulties reported by cancer patients in New South Wales and Victoria', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 298-305 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01232.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall
2010 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Lecathelinais LC, Girgis A, 'Life is precious and I'm making the best of it: Coping strategies of long-term cancer survivors', Psycho-Oncology, 19 1268-1276 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.1686
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2009 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais LC, 'Anxiety and depression among long-term survivors of cancer in Australia: Results of a population-based survey', Medical Journal of Australia, 190 S94-S98 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2009 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais LC, 'In reply: Anxiety and depression among long-term survivors of cancer in Australia: Results of a population-based survey', Medical Journal of Australia, 191 295 (2009) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Allison Boyes
Show 15 more journal articles

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'Web-based support for population-based medical research: Presenting the QuON survey system', HEALTHINF 2014 - 7th International Conference on Health Informatics, Proceedings; Part of 7th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, BIOSTEC 2014 (2014) [E1]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs,... [more]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs, perceived quality of care received, and priorities of health service interventions. Until quite recently, collection of survey data has been either paper-based, or achieved using computer software that largely duplicated paper-based processes with limited additional functionality. The authors investigate the use of web-based technology to support collection of such data from patients, including experiences and observations on enhanced/additional functionality made possible by its adoption. A novel software design termed QuON is presented, together with examples of its capabilities and uses in current research projects. Copyright © 2014 SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Mark Wallis
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'How Do Health Researchers Benefit From Web-Based Survey Systems?', Proceedings of e-Health 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Mark Wallis
2014 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Zucca A, 'A Multi-site Study to Explore Patient-identified and Prioritized Health Service Initiatives to Improve Oncology Outpatient Care: Are We Aiming for the Right Targets?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'LIFE EXPECTANCY DISCUSSIONS IN A MULTI-SITE SAMPLE OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2011 Ratcliffe F, Boyes A, Zucca A, Vallentine P, Friedsam J, 'TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUPS', JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2010 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, D'Este CA, 'Survivors' patterns of psychosocial adjustment over the first 2 years of the cancer trajectory', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2010 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, D'Este CA, 'It's been a journey, I am a survivor: Patterns of adjustment across the cancer trajectory', Psycho-Oncology (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2010 Boyes AW, Vallentine P, Zucca AC, Friedsam J, 'I look forward to the call: Evaluation of a telephone-based support group', Psycho-Oncology (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2009 Girgis A, Zucca AC, Boyes AW, ''It's been a journey, I am a survivor': Changes in psychosocial wellbeing over the first 12 months since a cancer diagnosis', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01253.x
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2009 Carveth S, Boyes AW, Vallentine P, Zucca AC, Friedsam J, 'Telephone support groups: Help or hinderance?', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2009 Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman JA, Zucca AC, Girgis A, ''The young ones': Psychosocial wellbeing and service utilisation of young cancer survivors', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall, Jenny Bowman
2009 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Hall AE, 'Travel all over the countryside: Travelling for cancer treatment in NSW and Victoria', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall
2009 James EL, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Paras LE, Lecathelinais LC, Eakin E, et al., 'Physical activity amongst Australian cancer survivors: Prevalence of activity, receipt of health professional recommendation, and survivors' preferences for the timing and delivery of programs', Psycho-Oncology (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/pon.1594
Co-authors Erica James, Chris Paul, Allison Boyes
2008 Boyes AW, Zucca AC, Girgis A, Lecathelinais LC, 'Comparing the psychosocial wellbeing of recent and long-term cancer survivors: Preliminary results of population-based studies', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2008 Friedsam J, Vallentine P, Batt G, Boyes AW, Zucca AC, 'Research endorsing psychosocial support and service provision: Telephone support group program, Cancer Council NSW', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2008 James EL, Eakin E, Girgis A, Reeves M, Paras LE, Boyes AW, Zucca AC, 'What are cancer survivors' priorities and preferences for lifestyle programs?', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Erica James
2007 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Lecathelinais LC, 'Use of coping strategies by recent versus long-term cancer survivors', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2006 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Lecathelinais LC, 'Coping strategies in long-term cancer survivors', Psycho-Oncology: Journal of the psychological, social and behavioral dimension of cancer (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2006 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais LC, 'Well-being of long-term cancer survivors: It's not all doom and gloom', Psycho-Oncology: Journal of the psychological, social and behavioral dimension of cancer (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
Show 16 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2002 Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, 'NSW Cancer Survival Study. Cancer Voices NSW Newsletter (Sydney)', ( issue.4): - (2002) [C3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Boyes AW, Zucca AC, 'Evaluation of Cancer Council NSW Telephone Support Groups: Satisfaction and Impact', Cancer Council NSW, 122 (2009) [R2]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
2005 Boyes AW, Zucca AC, Girgis A, 'Evaluation of the Cancer Council Helpline: Caller Satisfaction Survey', Cancer Council, NSW, 40 (2005) [R1]
Co-authors Allison Boyes
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $64,627

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $20,000

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Megumi Uchida, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Miss Alix Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20121 grants / $14,207

Improving cancer care for lymphoma: patients' perceptions of optimal care$14,207

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200212
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20111 grants / $30,420

Evaluation of Cancer Council NSW Legal Referral Service$30,420

Funding body: Law & Justice Foundation of New South Wales

Funding body Law & Justice Foundation of New South Wales
Project Team Doctor Allison Boyes, Ms Paula Vallentine, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100851
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Ms Alison Zucca

Positions

Research Student
Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Assistant
Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email alison.zucca@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420643

Office

Room HMRI Building, John Hunter Hospital West wing, Level 4
Building HMRI Building
Location Other

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