Dr Coralie English

Dr Coralie English

Associate Professor

School of Health Sciences

Raring to go: Second chances and a roadmap to recovery

Passionate and pioneering, Associate Professor Coralie English is focused on helping stroke survivors to regain their ability to walk and staying healthy in the long term.

Coralie English

There's a lot to be said for small things making a big difference. Associate Professor Coralie English's research in the health sciences arena is no exception – a single, literal step for one stroke patient equals a 'giant leap forward' for collective rehabilitation and brain recovery efforts across the country.

"My work is divided into two streams," the energetic academic shares.

"I develop and test models of physiotherapy service provision and examine the impact of sedentary behaviours on people's wellbeing after stroke."

"The latter is intertwined with a lack of activity, particularly in hospital settings, and a need to practise tasks regularly to get better at walking and everyday jobs."

Realising that exercise is "especially important" for long-term survivorship, Coralie is similarly determined to create "better, detailed and nuanced guidelines" for those who can't do what is currently recommended.

"We're all supposed to exercise for 30 minutes 5 times a week, but most of us don't," she clarifies.

"Achieving this is even harder if you have a disability or suffer from fatigue and depression, which are common conditions after stroke."

"I want to figure out how much physical activity is necessary to see some health benefits."

"Will we see improvements if patients sit a bit less and move a little more often?"

The more the merrier

Coralie's research career began in 2000, when she undertook a PhD at the University of South Australia. Though previously enjoying "making a difference" by "helping people get back on their feet" as a physiotherapist working in local rehabilitation centres, she soon found that life as a clinical physiotherapist raised more questions than it satisfactorily answered.

"Standard practice back then was to have a single, one-on-one physiotherapy session each day," she explains.

"But I often wondered whether having physiotherapy offered in groups would be more beneficial for stroke survivors."

"So I decided to compare the two delivery methods."

An innovative initiative, Coralie's study eventually became pilot data for a multi-centre randomised control trial. Completed in 2014, the larger project sought to determine the pros – if any – of conducting therapy sessions individually, in groups and on weekends.

"Our feeling was that providing a little bit extra on weekends might not be as effective as providing a lot more therapy, but in groups such as circuit classes, throughout the working week," she recalls.

"We were able to dramatically increase the amount of time patients spent with a physio when therapy was provided in group circuit classes."

"It didn't matter in terms of their degree of recovery of walking, however." 

"This is partially because they didn't spend extra time practising walking or being on their feet outside of these sessions."

Coming in with one question and spawning "a million" others, Coralie confesses she didn't quite get the answer she was hoping for.

"We still don't know what factors drive how much activity people are able to do in hospital," she acknowledges.

"But it's vital we identify and address them."

Use it or lose it

Coralie stayed on at the University of South Australia after receiving her doctorate in 2006, opting to renew her academic appointment and build creative collaborations with the influential Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health in Melbourne. A master at multitasking, the stroke recovery researcher also took on a Postdoctoral Training Fellowship with the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 2010. 

Under the guidance of one of her greatest mentors, Professor Julie Bernhardt, her postdoctoral work focused on understanding sedentary behavior of stroke survivors.

"We did a big systematic review, an observational study and a randomised control trial to see whether we could encourage stroke survivors to "sit less and move more," Coralie asserts. 

Changing scenery, changing lives

"Ready to move" and work with different people almost a decade later, Coralie joined the University of Newcastle in July 2015. The Associate Professor is newly and contentedly affiliated with some of the Hunter's most accomplished, internationally renowned minds in stroke recovery research.

"The region also boasts an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, held in conjunction with the Florey Institute in Melbourne," she comments.

"It's great to be here!"

Hitting the ground running, Coralie is already preparing for a number of exciting research ventures. The biggest, and perhaps most impressive, will see the prolific publisher lead a laboratory-based study on sedentary behaviour in stroke survivors in early 2016. Funded by a National Stroke Foundation Seeding Grant, the ambitious trial will seek to break up prolonged sitting times and encourage small but significant increases in light physical activity.

"Participants will come in and sit for six hours straight," she explains.

"We'll measure their blood pressure every hour and take regular blood samples to investigate reductions in cardiovascular risk markers."

"Then they'll come back again and do the same thing, only this time they'll get up and go for a short walk every half an hour for 3 minutes."

"The final visit will involve the participants doing some simple standing manoeuvres, such as squats and knee lifts every half an hour."

Replicating similar works conducted by the prestigious Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Coralie is simultaneously looking to shift the focus onto wider disease prevention and treatment.

"Researchers there have already shown that even short bursts of exercise can have huge benefits where glucose and insulin metabolism and cognitive function are concerned," she reveals.

"We're expecting the results to be even greater for our group as they're starting off at a worse health status than those who were used in the original experiment."

Hoping to use data collected to "leverage" larger amounts of financial support in the months and years to come, Coralie admits it "would be really good" to expand the project to look at different types of activity breaks for different types of stroke survivors.

"It's definitely a goal of mine," she affirms.

"I'd like to eventually be able to say that if you can't walk independently, if you can at least stand up x amount every x minutes, you will be healthier and reduce your risk of having another stroke."

An educator dedicated to honing her craft, Coralie is also working with a University Postdoctoral Fellow on developing a national longitudinal study of recovery of walking after stroke.

"There's very little contemporary information and Australian-specific information about this," she discloses.

"So we're aiming to engage clinicians from around the country and collect a core dataset."

Harnessing collective energy

Extending her network even further, Coralie is simultaneously developing several national and international collaborations. What began as informal meetings at a coffee shop during a stroke conference in 2014 has since rapidly evolved into an ACTIOnS group, for example, with the social scholar and 16 others joining forces to harmonise outcome measures and refine research strategies in stroke recovery.

"I'm part of a subgroup of the World Stroke Organisation too," she declares.

"I love finding the best people to work with to answer a given question."

Coralie English

Raring to go: Second chances and a roadmap to recovery

Associate Professor Coralie English is passionate about improving the health and well-being of stroke survivors through physical activity. Her research program

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

One in six Australians will have a stroke in their lifetime, and a third of these people will be left with persistent disability. A/Prof Coralie English is passionate about improving the health and well-being of stroke survivors through physical activity. Her research program focuses on the role of exercise, physical activity and task-specific intensive training in stroke recovery and long-term survivorship. 

Career summary

A/Prof English completed her undergraduate training as a Physiotherapist at the University of South Australia, and she worked as a clinician, predominately in the area of stroke and spinal cord injury rehabilitation for many years before commencing her academic career. She was awarded a PhD in 2006 from the University of South Australia, and worked as an academic and research fellow there between 2006 and 2015. During this time, A/Prof English also held a NHMRC Postdoctoral Training Fellowship (2010-2014) through the Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health in Melbourne (while remaining based in Adelaide). She continues to hold an ongoing Senior Research Fellow honorary position with the Florey.

In July 2015, A/Prof English joined the University of Newcastle. She now leads a team of researchers within the Translational Stroke Research Program in the Priority Research Centre for Neuroscience and Mental Health (CTNMH), Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) and teaches into the Physiotherapy Program at the University of Newcastle. She holds an appointment as a Senior Research Affiliate within the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery. This exciting partnership is a joint collaboration between HMRI and the Florey and brings together Australia’s leading stroke rehabilitation and recovery researchers to drive excellence and build capacity in this space. 

A/Prof English contributes to national and international professional committees, including

Research Expertise

  • Understanding the impact of sedentary behaviour and prolonged sitting in people with stroke.
  • Developing and testing interventions to reduce sitting time in people with stroke, both during rehabilitation and in long-term survivorship.
  • Measurement of sitting time and physical activity using body worn sensors and accelerometers.  
  • Developing and testing effective models of providing intensive task-specific training for people with stroke, including group circuit class therapy and 7-day week therapy.
  • Understanding drivers of sitting time and physical activity in hospital settings, and in long-term survivorship.
  • Understanding post-stroke fatigue and the role of physical activity in this condition.
  • Use of wearable activity monitors to increase physical activity levels of stroke survivors in hospital and in the community.
  • Driving excellence in practice in physiotherapy for stroke rehabilitation.

Resources

  • English C and Hillier S, Circuit Class Therapy Intervention Manual (ISBN 978-1-922046-01-7) available here


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy)(Hons), University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • Physical activity
  • Physiotherapy
  • Rehabilitation
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Sitting time
  • Stroke
  • Walking

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110317 Physiotherapy 30
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) 30
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases) 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
28/06/2015 -  Senior Research Fellow (adjunct) University of South Australia
Australia
14/10/2014 -  Senior Lecturer (adjunct) University of Tasmania
Australia
1/07/2014 -  Senior Research Fellow (honorary) Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Australia
1/07/2010 - 30/06/2014 Postdoctoral Research Fellow Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health
Australia
1/02/2006 - 28/06/2015 Senior Lecturer University of South Australia
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/09/2007 - 2/08/2008 Physiotherapist Neurophysiotherapy Services
Australia
1/02/1997 - 31/01/2004 Physiotherapist

Included several senior and managerial roles

Royal Adelaide Hospital
Health Department of South Australia
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2007 Ruth Grant Award for Postgraduate Research
Australian Physiotherapy Association
1996 Cardiorespiratory Undergraduate Award for Research
Australian Physiotherapy Association

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy. Are they effective?
2010 Scybala, Sarcopenia and Supermen. The importance of physical activity after stroke
2010 Scybala, sarcopenia and superman. The importance of physical activity after stroke

Panel Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Practical ways to increase dosage of practice in stroke rehabilitation

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2015 Exercise prescription after stroke
2014 Circuit class therapy and 7-Day Week Therapy for Increasing Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy. Results of the CIRCIT Trial
2014 Enhancing mobility outcomes after stroke
2013 Is 7-day week therapy effective for stroke survivors
2013 Practical Ways to Increase Practice
2012 Improving mobility after stroke
2003 Is task-related circuit training an effective means of providing rehabilitation to an acute stroke sample
Is National Neurological Physiotherapy Conference 
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 English CK, 'Group Circuit Class Therapy for Stroke Survivors - A Review of the Evidence and Clinical Implications', Group Circuit Class Therapy for Stroke Survivors - A Review of the Evidence and Clinical Implications, Intech - Open Access Publisher, Online (2012)

Journal article (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Meretoja A, Acciarresi M, Akinyemi RO, Campbell B, Dowlatshahi D, English C, et al., 'Stroke doctors: Who are we? A World Stroke Organization survey.', Int J Stroke, 1747493017701150 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1747493017701150
2017 English C, Hillier SL, Lynch EA, 'Circuit class therapy for improving mobility after stroke', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background: Circuit class therapy (CCT) offers a supervised group forum for people after stroke to practise... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Background: Circuit class therapy (CCT) offers a supervised group forum for people after stroke to practise tasks, enabling increased practice time without increasing staffing. This is an update of the original review published in 2010. Objectives: To examine the effectiveness and safety of CCT on mobility in adults with stroke. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched January 2017), CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library, Issue 12, 2016), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2017), Embase (1980 to January 2017), CINAHL (1982 to January 2017), and 14 other electronic databases (to January 2017). We also searched proceedings from relevant conferences, reference lists, and unpublished theses; contacted authors of published trials and other experts in the field; and searched relevant clinical trials and research registers. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including people over 18 years old, diagnosed with stroke of any severity, at any stage, or in any setting, receiving CCT. Data collection and analysis: Review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias in all included studies, and extracted data. Main results: We included 17 RCTs involving 1297 participants. Participants were stroke survivors living in the community or receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Most could walk 10 metres without assistance. Ten studies (835 participants) measured walking capacity (measuring how far the participant could walk in six minutes) demonstrating that CCT was superior to the comparison intervention (Six-Minute Walk Test: mean difference (MD), fixed-effect, 60.86 m, 95% confidence interval (CI) 44.55 to 77.17, GRADE: moderate). Eight studies (744 participants) measured gait speed, again finding in favour of CCT compared with other interventions (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19, GRADE: moderate). Both of these effects are considered clinically meaningful. We were able to pool other measures to demonstrate the superior effects of CCT for aspects of walking and balance (Timed Up and Go: five studies, 488 participants, MD -3.62 seconds, 95% CI -6.09 to -1.16; Activities of Balance Confidence scale: two studies, 103 participants, MD 7.76, 95% CI 0.66 to 14.87). Two other pooled balance measures failed to demonstrate superior effects (Berg Blance Scale and Step Test). Independent mobility, as measured by the Stroke Impact Scale, Functional Ambulation Classification and the Rivermead Mobility Index, also improved more in CCT interventions compared with others. Length of stay showed a non-significant effect in favour of CCT (two trials, 217 participants, MD -16.35, 95% CI -37.69 to 4.99). Eight trials (815 participants) measured adverse events (falls during therapy): there was a non-significant effect of greater risk of falls in the CCT groups (RD 0.03, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.08, GRADE: very low). Time after stroke did not make a difference to the positive outcomes, nor did the quality or size of the trials. Heterogeneity was generally low; risk of bias was variable across the studies with poor reporting of study conduct in several of the trials. Authors' conclusions: There is moderate evidence that CCT is effective in improving mobility for people after stroke - they may be able to walk further, faster, with more independence and confidence in their balance. The effects may be greater later after the stroke, and are of clinical significance. Further high-quality research is required, investigating quality of life, participation and cost-benefits, that compares CCT with standard care and that also investigates the influence of factors such as stroke severity and age. The potential risk of increased falls during CCT needs to be monitored.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD007513.pub3
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Lynch EA, Borschmann K, Callisaya ML, Fini NA, Janssen H, Johnson L, et al., 'Activity monitors for increasing physical activity in adult stroke survivors', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To summarise the av... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To summarise the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of commercially available wearable devices and smart phone applications for increasing physical activity levels for people with stroke.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012543
2017 Janssen H, Dunstan DW, Bernhardt J, Walker FR, Patterson A, Callister R, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke (BUST-Stroke).', Int J Stroke, 12 425-429 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1747493016676616
Co-authors Robin Callister, Amanda Patterson, Rohan Walker, Neil Spratt
2016 English C, Healy GN, Coates A, Lewis L, Olds T, Bernhardt J, 'Sitting and Activity Time in People With Stroke', PHYSICAL THERAPY, 96 193-201 (2016)
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20140522
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2016 Gomersall SR, Maher C, English C, Rowlands AV, Dollman J, Norton K, Olds T, 'Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3568-x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Lewis LK, Rowlands AV, Gardiner PA, Standage M, English C, Olds T, 'Small Steps: Preliminary effectiveness and feasibility of an incremental goal-setting intervention to reduce sitting time in older adults', Maturitas, 85 64-70 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.Objective This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effectiveness and feasibility of a theory-informed program to reduce sitti... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.Objective This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effectiveness and feasibility of a theory-informed program to reduce sitting time in older adults. Design Pre-experimental (pre-post) study. Thirty non-working adult (=60 years) participants attended a one hour face-to-face intervention session and were guided through: a review of their sitting time; normative feedback on sitting time; and setting goals to reduce total sitting time and bouts of prolonged sitting. Participants chose six goals and integrated one per week incrementally for six weeks. Participants received weekly phone calls. Outcome measures Sitting time and bouts of prolonged sitting (=30 min) were measured objectively for seven days (activPAL3c inclinometer) pre- and post-intervention. During these periods, a 24-h time recall instrument was administered by computer-assisted telephone interview. Participants completed a post-intervention project evaluation questionnaire. Paired t tests with sequential Bonferroni corrections and Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for all outcomes. Results Twenty-seven participants completed the assessments (71.7 ± 6.5 years). Post-intervention, objectively-measured total sitting time was significantly reduced by 51.5 min per day (p = 0.006; d = -0.58) and number of bouts of prolonged sitting by 0.8 per day (p = 0.002; d = -0.70). Objectively-measured standing increased by 39 min per day (p = 0.006; d = 0.58). Participants self-reported spending 96 min less per day sitting (p < 0.001; d = -0.77) and 32 min less per day watching television (p = 0.005; d = -0.59). Participants were highly satisfied with the program. Conclusion The 'Small Steps' program is a feasible and promising avenue for behavioral modification to reduce sitting time in older adults.

DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.12.014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 MacIsaac R, Ali M, Peters M, English C, Rodgers H, Jenkinson C, et al., 'Derivation and Validation of a Modified Short Form of the Stroke Impact Scale.', Journal of the American Heart Association, 5 (2016) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2016 English C, Shields N, Brusco NK, Taylor NF, Watts JJ, Peiris C, et al., 'Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: A meta-analysis of individual patient data', Journal of Physiotherapy, 62 124-129 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association.Questions: Among people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke, does additional weekend physiotherapy and/or occupational the... [more]

© 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association.Questions: Among people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke, does additional weekend physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy reduce the length of rehabilitation hospital stay compared to those who receive a weekday-only service, and does this change after controlling for individual factors? Does additional weekend therapy improve the ability to walk and perform activities of daily living, measured at discharge? Does additional weekend therapy improve health-related quality of life, measured 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation? Which individual, clinical and hospital characteristics are associated with shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay? Design: This study pooled individual data from two randomised, controlled trials (n = 350) using an individual patient data meta-analysis and multivariate regression. Participants: People with stroke admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Intervention: Additional weekend therapy (physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy) compared to usual care (5 days/week therapy). Outcome measures: Length of rehabilitation hospital stay, independence in activities of daily living measured with the Functional Independence Measure, walking speed and health-related quality of life. Results: Participants who received weekend therapy had a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay. In the un-adjusted analysis, this was not statistically significant (MD -5.7 days, 95% CI -13.0 to 1.5). Controlling for hospital site, age, walking speed and Functional Independence Measure score on admission, receiving weekend therapy was significantly associated with a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay (ß = 7.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 13.4, p = 0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in Functional Independence Measure scores (MD 1.9 points, 95% CI -2.8 to 6.6), walking speed (MD 0.06 m/second, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.04) or health-related quality of life (SMD -0.04, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.19) at discharge. Discussion: Modest evidence indicates that additional weekend therapy might reduce rehabilitation hospital length of stay. Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12610000096055, ACTRN12609000973213. [English C, Shields N, Brusco NK, Taylor NF, Watts JJ, Peiris C, et al. (2016) Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 124-129].

DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2016.05.015
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2016 Cumming TB, Packer M, Kramer SF, English C, 'The prevalence of fatigue after stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Stroke, 11 968-977 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, © 2016 World Stroke Organization.Background: Fatigue is a common and debilitating symptom after stroke. The last decade has seen rapid expansion of the research literatu... [more]

© 2016, © 2016 World Stroke Organization.Background: Fatigue is a common and debilitating symptom after stroke. The last decade has seen rapid expansion of the research literature on post-stroke fatigue, but prevalence remains unclear. Aims: To estimate post-stroke fatigue prevalence and to identify the contributing factors to fatigue, by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. Summary of review: We included all studies of adult stroke survivors that used a recognized assessment scale for fatigue (search date September 2014). Two reviewers independently reviewed all full texts for inclusion. Data were extracted by one reviewer and independently cross-checked by a second. Risk of bias was evaluated using a critical appraisal tool. From an overall yield of 921 studies, 101 full text papers were screened, and 49 of these met inclusion criteria. The most widely used measure of fatigue was the Fatigue Severity Scale (n = 24 studies). Prevalence estimates at a cut-off score of > or = 4 were available for 22 of these 24 studies (total n = 3491), and ranged from 25 to 85%. In random effects meta-analysis, the pooled prevalence estimate was 50% (95% CI 43¿57%), with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 94%). Neither depression status nor time point post-stroke explained the heterogeneity between studies. In post-hoc analysis, fatigue prevalence was found to be lower in the four Asian studies (35%; 95% CI 20¿50; I2 = 96%). Conclusions: Our results confirm that fatigue is a widespread issue for stroke survivors, although it may be less prevalent in Asia. Further research is needed to explain the wide variability in prevalence estimates between studies.

DOI 10.1177/1747493016669861
Citations Web of Science - 1
2016 English C, Healy GN, Coates A, Lewis LK, Olds T, Bernhardt J, 'Sitting time and physical activity after stroke: physical ability is only part of the story', TOPICS IN STROKE REHABILITATION, 23 62-68 (2016)
DOI 10.1179/1945511915Y.0000000009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Bennett L, Luker J, English C, Hillier S, 'Stroke survivors' perspectives on two novel models of inpatient rehabilitation: seven-day a week individual therapy or five-day a week circuit class therapy', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 38 1397-1406 (2016)
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2015.1103788
2016 Lewis LK, Hunt T, Williams MT, English C, Olds TS, 'Sedentary Behavior in People with and without a Chronic Health Condition: How Much, What and When?', AIMS PUBLIC HEALTH, 3 503-519 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3934/publichealth.2016.3.503
2016 English C, Healy GN, Olds T, Parfitt G, Borkoles E, Coates A, et al., 'Reducing Sitting Time after Stroke: A Phase II Safety and Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial Presented in part as a poster to the European Stroke Organization, April 17-19, 2015, Glasgow, United Kingdom; And Stroke 2015 (a combined conference of the Stroke Society of Australasia and Smartstrokes NSW), September 1-5, 2015, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97 273-280 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.Objective To test the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of reducing sitting time in stroke survivors. Design Randomized c... [more]

© 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.Objective To test the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of reducing sitting time in stroke survivors. Design Randomized controlled trial with attention-matched controls and blinded assessments. Setting Community. Participants Stroke survivors (N=35; 22 men; mean age, 66.9±12.7y). Interventions Four counseling sessions over 7 weeks with a message of sit less and move more (intervention group) or calcium for bone health (attention-matched control group). Main Outcome Measures Measures included safety (adverse events, increases in pain, spasticity, or fatigue) and feasibility (adherence to trial protocol). Secondary measures included time spent sitting (including in prolonged bouts =30min), standing, and stepping as measured by the thigh-worn inclinometer (7d, 24h/d protocol) and time spent in physical activity of at least moderate intensity as measured by a triaxial accelerometer. The Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults was used to describe changes in use of time. Results Thirty-three participants completed the full protocol. Four participants reported falls during the intervention period with no other adverse events. From a baseline average of 640.7±99.6min/d, daily sitting time reduced on average by 30±50.6min/d (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8-54.6) in the intervention group and 40.4±92.5min/d in the control group (95% CI, 13.0-93.8). Participants in both groups also reduced their time spent in prolonged sitting bouts (=30min) and increased time spent standing and stepping. Conclusions Our protocol was both safe and feasible. Participants in both groups spent less time sitting and more time standing and stepping postintervention, but outcomes were not superior for intervention participants. Attention matching is desirable in clinical trials and may have contributed to the positive outcomes for control participants.

DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.10.094
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Thorp AA, Kingwell BA, English C, Hammond L, Sethi P, Owen N, Dunstan DW, 'Alternating sitting and standing increases the workplace energy expenditure of overweight adults', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 13 24-29 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.Background: To determine whether alternating bouts of sitting and standing at work influences daily workplace energy expenditure (EE). Methods: Twenty-... [more]

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.Background: To determine whether alternating bouts of sitting and standing at work influences daily workplace energy expenditure (EE). Methods: Twenty-three overweight/obese office workers (mean ± SD; age: 48.2 ± 7.9 y, body mass index: 29.6 ± 4.0 kg/m2) undertook two 5-day experimental conditions in an equal, randomized order. Participants wore a "metabolic armband" (SenseWear Armband Mini) to estimate daily workplace EE (KJ/8 h) while working (1) in a seated work posture (SIT condition) or (2) alternating between a standing and seated work posture every 30 minutes using a sit-stand workstation (STAND-SIT condition). To assess the validity of the metabolic armband, a criterion measure of acute EE (KJ/min; indirect calorimetry) was performed on day 4 of each condition. Results: Standing to work acutely increased EE by 0.7 [95% CI 0.3-1.0] KJ/min (13%), relative to sitting (P =.002). Compared with indirect calorimetry, the metabolic armband provided a valid estimate of EE while standing to work (mean bias: 0.1 [-0.3 to 0.4] KJ/min) but modestly overestimated EE while sitting (P =.005). Daily workplace EE was greatest during the STAND-SIT condition (mean condition difference [95% CI]: 76 [8-144] KJ/8-h workday, P =.03). Conclusions: Intermittent standing at work can modestly increase daily workplace EE compared with seated work in overweight/obese office workers.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0420
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
2015 Galea SL, Lee M-J, English C, Ada L, 'Sedentary versus active behavior in people after stroke', PHYSICAL THERAPY REVIEWS, 20 1-7 (2015)
DOI 10.1179/1743288X14Y.0000000161
Citations Web of Science - 3
2015 English C, Bernhardt J, Crotty M, Esterman A, Segal L, Hillier S, 'Circuit class therapy or seven-day week therapy for increasing rehabilitation intensity of therapy after stroke (CIRCIT): a randomized controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 10 594-602 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/ijs.12470
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2015 Bernhardt J, English C, Johnson L, Cumming TB, 'Early Mobilization After Stroke Early Adoption but Limited Evidence', STROKE, 46 1141-1146 (2015)
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.007434
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2015 Gomersall SR, Norton K, Maher C, English C, Olds TS, 'In search of lost time: When people undertake a new exercise program, where does the time come from? A randomized controlled trial', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 18 43-48 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.01.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 English C, Veerbeek J, 'Is more physiotherapy better after stroke?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 10 465-466 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ijs.12474
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Gomersall S, Maher C, English C, Rowlands A, Olds T, 'Time Regained: When People Stop a Physical Activity Program, How Does Their Time Use Change? A Randomised Controlled Trial', PLOS ONE, 10 (2015)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0126665
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 English C, Manns PJ, Tucak C, Bernhardt J, 'Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors in People With Stroke Living in the Community: A Systematic Review', PHYSICAL THERAPY, 94 185-196 (2014)
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20130175
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 34
2014 English C, Bernhardt J, Hillier S, 'Circuit Class Therapy and 7-Day-Week Therapy Increase Physiotherapy Time, But Not Patient Activity Early Results From the CIRCIT Trial', STROKE, 45 3002-3007 (2014)
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.006038
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2014 English C, Hillier S, Kaur G, Hundertmark L, 'People with stroke spend more time in active task practice, but similar time in walking practice, when physiotherapy rehabilitation is provided in circuit classes compared to individual therapy sessions: an observational study', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 60 50-54 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2013.12.006
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2013 Gomersall SR, Rowlands AV, English C, Maher C, Olds TS, 'The ActivityStat Hypothesis The Concept, the Evidence and the Methodologies', SPORTS MEDICINE, 43 135-149 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-012-0008-7
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 39
2013 Ali M, English C, Bernhardt J, Sunnerhagen KS, Brady M, 'More outcomes than trials: a call for consistent data collection across stroke rehabilitation trials', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 8 18-24 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2012.00973.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2013 Kaur G, English C, Hillier S, 'Physiotherapists systematically overestimate the amount of time stroke survivors spend engaged in active therapy rehabilitation: an observational study', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 59 45-51 (2013)
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2012 Ali M, Bath P, Brady M, Davis S, Diener HC, Donnan G, et al., 'Development, expansion, and use of a stroke clinical trials resource for novel exploratory analyses', International Journal of Stroke, 7 133-138 (2012)

Introduction: Analysis of reliable registry data can direct future research to influence clinical care. Data from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive have been used to... [more]

Introduction: Analysis of reliable registry data can direct future research to influence clinical care. Data from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive have been used to test hypotheses and inform trial design. We sought to expand Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into a broader stroke resource with new opportunities for research and international collaboration. Methods: Using procedures initially developed for an acute stroke trial archive, we invited trialists to lodge data on rehabilitation, secondary prevention, intracerebral haemorrhage, imaging, and observational stroke studies. Results: We have extended Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into six subsections: Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Acute (n=28190 patients' data), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab (n=10194), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-intracerebral haemorrhage (n=1829), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging (n=1300), and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus (n=6573). Enrollment continues, with commitments for the contribution of six further trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, 13 trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab, and one registry to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus. Data on age, type of stroke, medical history, outcomes by modified Rankin scale and Barthel Index (BI), mortality, and adverse events are available for analyses. The Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive network encourages the development of young investigators and provides opportunities for international peer review and collaboration. Conclusions: Application of the original Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive concepts beyond acute stroke trials can extend the value of clinical research at low cost, without threatening commercial or intellectual property interests. This delivers valuable research output to inform the efficiency of future stroke research. We invite stroke researchers to participate actively in Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive and encourage the extension of Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive principles to other disease areas. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2011.00735.x
Citations Scopus - 44
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet
2012 Kaur G, English C, Hillier S, 'How physically active are people with stroke in physiotherapy sessions aimed at improving motor function? A systematic review', Stroke Research and Treatment, (2012)

Background. Targeted physical activity drives functional recovery after stroke. This review aimed to determine the amount of time stroke survivors spend physically active during p... [more]

Background. Targeted physical activity drives functional recovery after stroke. This review aimed to determine the amount of time stroke survivors spend physically active during physiotherapy sessions. Summary of Review. A systematic search was conducted to identify published studies that investigated the use of time by people with stroke during physiotherapy sessions. Seven studies were included; six observational and one randomised controlled trial. People with stroke were found to be physically active for an average of 60 percent of their physiotherapy session duration. The most common activities practiced in a physiotherapy session were walking, sitting, and standing with a mean (SD) practice time of 8.7 (4.3), 4.5 (4.0), and 8.3 (2.6) minutes, respectively. Conclusion. People with stroke were found to spend less than two-thirds of their physiotherapy sessions duration engaged in physical activity. In light of dosage studies, practice time may be insufficient to drive optimal motor recovery. © 2012 Gurpreet Kaur et al.

DOI 10.1155/2012/820673
Citations Scopus - 27
2012 English C, Fisher L, Thoirs K, 'Reliability of real-time ultrasound for measuring skeletal muscle size in human limbs in vivo: a systematic review', CLINICAL REHABILITATION, 26 934-944 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/0269215511434994
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2012 English CK, Thoirs KA, Fisher L, McLennan H, Bernhardt J, 'ULTRASOUND IS A RELIABLE MEASURE OF MUSCLE THICKNESS IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS, FOR SOME, BUT NOT ALL ANATOMICAL SITES: A STUDY OF THE INTRA-RATER RELIABILITY OF MUSCLE THICKNESS MEASURES IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS', ULTRASOUND IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 38 368-376 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2011.12.012
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2012 Gomersall S, Maher C, Norton K, Dollman J, Tomkinson G, Esterman A, et al., 'Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 12 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-851
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2012 English C, Thoirs K, Coates A, Ryan A, Bernhardt J, 'Changes in fat mass in stroke survivors: a systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 7 491-498 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2012.00824.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 English C, 'Commentaries: Exercise perceptions among people with stroke: Barriers and facilitators to participation', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 18 530 (2011)
2011 English C, Hillier S, 'CIRCUIT CLASS THERAPY FOR IMPROVING MOBILITY AFTER STROKE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, 43 565-571 (2011)
DOI 10.2340/16501977-0824
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
2011 Hillier S, English C, Crotty M, Segal L, Bernhardt J, Esterman A, 'Circuit class or seven-day therapy for increasing intensity of rehabilitation after stroke: protocol of the CIRCIT trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 6 560-565 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2011.00686.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2010 English C, Hillier SL, 'Circuit class therapy for improving mobility after stroke', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2010)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD007513.pub2
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 18
2010 English CK, Hillier SL, 'Circuit class therapy for improving mobility after stroke (Protocol).', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD007513 (2010)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD007513.pub2
2010 English C, McLennan H, Thoirs K, Coates A, Bernhardt J, 'Loss of skeletal muscle mass after stroke: a systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 5 395-402 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00467.x
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 37
2009 English C, Hillier SL, 'Circuit class therapy for improving mobility after stroke', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2009)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD007513
2009 Elson T, English C, Hillie S, 'Increasing activity during therapy poststroke: The need for new solutions', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 16 177 (2009)
2009 Thoirs K, English C, 'Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness: intra-examiner reliability and influence of body position', CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, 29 440-446 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1475-097X.2009.00897.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2009 Elson T, English CK, Hillier SL, 'How much physical activity do people recovering from stroke do during physiotherapy sessions.', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 16 78-84 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 12
2008 English C, Hillier S, Stiller K, 'Incidence and severity of shoulder pain does not increase with the use of circuit class therapy during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: a controlled trial', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 54 41-46 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2008 Lynch E, Harling R, English C, Stiller K, 'Patient satisfaction with circuit class therapy and individual physiotherapy', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 15 167-173 (2008)

© 2008, MA Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved.The purpose of this observational study was to determine patients' levels of satisfaction with circuit class therapy and individual... [more]

© 2008, MA Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved.The purpose of this observational study was to determine patients' levels of satisfaction with circuit class therapy and individual physiotherapy sessions on a stroke rehabilitation unit.Forty-nine persons participated in both circuit class therapy and individual physiotherapy sessions as part of standard inpatient rehabilitation following stroke. A purpose-designed questionnaire was administered to investigate patient satisfaction.High degrees of satisfaction were reported with both methods of physiotherapy service delivery. Individual sessions were perceived as being more tailored to participants' goals, whereas participants reported that circuit classes offered a more supportive environment than the individual therapy sessions. Participants were satisfied with the amount of supervision and assistance provided in both forms of physiotherapy service delivery. No distinct advantage was seen for one form of therapy over the other in terms of patient satisfaction.

DOI 10.12968/ijtr.2008.15.4.29035
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 English CK, Hillier SL, Stiller KR, Warden-Flood A, 'Circuit class therapy versus individual physiotherapy sessions during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: A controlled trial', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 88 955-963 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.04.010
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 41
2007 Zanker K, English CK, Prideaux N, Luker J, 'Interdisciplinary circuit class therapy: an effective way of increasing therapy time on an acute stroke unit', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 14 483-488 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 3
2006 English CK, Hillier SL, Stiller K, Warden-Flood A, 'The sensitivity of three commonly used outcome measures to detect change amongst patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation following stroke', CLINICAL REHABILITATION, 20 52-55 (2006)
DOI 10.1191/0269215506cr877oa
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
1999 Blaney F, English CS, Sawyer T, 'Sonographic measurement of diaphragmatic displacement during tidal breathing manoeuvres - A reliability study', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 45 39-41 (1999)

The aim of this investigation was to establish a reliable method of measuring diaphragm movement during relaxed tidal breathing. This study follows a previous study in which test-... [more]

The aim of this investigation was to establish a reliable method of measuring diaphragm movement during relaxed tidal breathing. This study follows a previous study in which test-retest reliability was established for maximal breaths but not for tidal breaths. Twelve normal subjects were tested in a semi-reclined long sitting position. Sonographic measurements were taken for tidal breaths during four different patterns of breathing. All breaths were controlled for inspired volume. Testing was repeated one week later under the same conditions. The results showed that the method for measuring diaphragmatic movement at tidal breathing during a given pattern of breathing was reliable. This method will allow further investigation of the diaphragm during different breathing manoeuvres at tidal volume.

Citations Scopus - 4
Show 46 more journal articles

Review (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 English C, 'A useful site for consumers, families and busy clinicians', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY (2013)
2013 Mead G, Bernhardt J, English CK, 'Exercise after stroke', World Stroke Academy (2013)
2011 English C, 'Patients spend an alarmingly high proportion of the day sedentary', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (2011)
2011 English CK, ''Exercise perceptions among people with stroke: barriers and facilitators to participation' I', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (2011)
2011 English CK, 'Comment on: Is circuit class physiotherapy possible during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation? A feasibility trial', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (2011)
2011 English C, 'Was the effect of sitting time interpreted appropriately?', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY (2011)
2007 English CK, 'Circuit class therapy versus one-to-one therapy', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (2007)
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 4 more reviews

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Bernhardt J, Dewey H, Langhorne P, Pandian J, Thijs V, Churilov L, et al., 'AVERT-DOSE (DETERMINING OPTIMAL EARLY REHABILITATION AFTER STROKE): A PLANNED INTERNATIONAL RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2016)
2016 Erickson K, Liam J, English C, Owen N, 'The Effect of Exercise and Sedentary Behaviour on the Older Adult', JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (2016)
2016 English C, Bernhardt J, Crotty M, Esterman A, Segal L, Watts J, Hillier S, 'Circuit Class Therapy Reduces Length of Rehabilitation Stay, But Weekend Therapy Does Not. An Exploratory Secondary Analysis of the CIRCIT Trial', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES (2016)
2015 English C, Bernhardt J, Crotty M, Esterman A, Hillier S, 'Time spent in physiotherapy sessions during sub-acute rehabilitation does not predict recovery of walking ability', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2015 English C, Healy G, Coates A, Olds T, Bernhardt J, 'Targeting sedentary behaviour and sitting time in stroke survivors. A new paradigm for addressing recurrent stroke risk', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2015 van Kessel G, Hillier S, English C, 'What are physiotherapists' attitudes and beliefs about the implementation of circuit class therapy and 7 day a week therapy? A qualitative study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2015 Packer M, English C, Cumming T, 'Fatigue after stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2015 English C, Coates A, Olds T, Healy G, Parfitt G, Borkoles E, Bernhardt J, ''Sit less, move more': A phase II safety and feasibility trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2015 Simpson D, Callisaya M, English C, Thrift A, Gall S, 'Exercise after stroke: The North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
2014 English C, Coates A, Olds T, Healy G, Bernhardt J, 'Exploring patterns of inactivity and use-of-time in People after Stroke (EPIPS)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Hundertmark L, English C, Hillier SL, Bernhardt J, 'What do Australian physiotherapists think about circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014)
2014 English C, Hillier S, Olds T, Coates A, Bernhardt J, 'Addressing the second highest risk factor for stroke. Are we sitting down on the job?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014)
2014 Hillier S, English C, Bernhardt J, Crotty M, Esterman A, Segal L, 'Circuit class and 7-day week therapy for increasing rehabilitation intensity of therapy after stroke (CIRCIT): Six month follow-up and cost analysis of the CIRCIT RCT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014)
2013 Crotty M, Sherrington C, English C, van den Berg M, 'Stroke rehabilitation - strategies to increase activity', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING (2013)
2013 English C, Manns P, Tucak C, Bernhardt J, 'From sitting to running: how active are stroke survivors across the activity continuum? A systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013)
2013 Schurr K, Scrivener K, English C, 'Practical ways to increase practice', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013)
2012 Lannin N, Ratcliffe J, Crotty M, English C, Levy T, Ada L, Sindhusake D, 'Feasibility study of a randomized controlled trial protocol to examine clinical and cost effectiveness of therapy after botulinum toxin-A in people with spasticity after stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2012)
2012 English C, Hillier S, Crotty M, Segal L, Bernhardt J, Esterman A, 'Circuit class therapy for Increasing Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy (CIRCIT). An ongoing randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2012)
2012 English C, Hillier S, 'The Six Minute Walk Test - is it a useful clinical measure for patients early after stroke?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2012)
Show 16 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 English C, 'Commentary', ( issue.2 pp.117-117): AUSTRALIAN PHYSIOTHERAPY ASSOC (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2017.02.008
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 27
Total funding $3,522,257

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20175 grants / $1,261,738

Reducing sitting time for secondary stroke prevention$520,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Coralie English
Scheme Future Leader Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600656
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Subproject:HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (17) Brain and Mental Health - PRC for Stroke and Brain Injury$356,551

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Michael Nilsson, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Doctor Andrew Bivard, Doctor Andrew Gardner, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Coralie English, Associate Professor Frini Karayanidis, Aprof JANE Maguire
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo GS170009
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

BUST-Stroke: 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke' a new paradigm for reducing recurrent stroke risk$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Coralie English, Ms Heidi Janssen, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Amanda Patterson, Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt, Professor David Dunstan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700572
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Determining the minimum dose of exercise required to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke survivors$19,863

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Coralie English, Ms Margaret Galloway, Ms Dianne Marsden, Professor Robin Callister, Dr Trevor Russell
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601123
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20164 grants / $400,522

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure (12-16) Brain and Mental Health Program – Stroke and Brain Injury$325,297

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Neil Spratt, Professor Mark Parsons, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Coralie English, Professor Michael Nilsson, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Doctor Andrew Bivard, Aprof JANE Maguire, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor John Attia
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600733
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

CosMed$35,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Coralie English, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Hunter Stroke Service Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601275
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

BUST-Stroke “Breaking Up Sitting Time after Stroke. A new paradigm for reducing recurrent stroke risk”$21,745

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Coralie English, Ms Heidi Janssen, Professor Neil Spratt
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600566
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Educator providing courses through CPDlife platform $18,480

Funding body: CPDLife

Funding body CPDLife
Project Team Doctor Coralie English
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601162
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20152 grants / $1,086,451

InTENSE: Intensive therapy after botulinum toxin injection for people with stroke.$1,036,713

This project aims to investigate the clinical benefits of providing intensive, evidence-based movement training plus anti-spasticity medication (BoNT-A) compared to anti-spasticity medication (BoNT-A) alone.

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Natasha Lannin

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Sitting less. A new paradigm for reducing recurrent stroke risk.$49,738

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Coralie English, Professor Robin Callister, Professor David Dunstan, Associate Professor Julie Bernhardt
Scheme Seed Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500587
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $3,000

Increasing intensity of stroke inpatient rehabilitation. A survey of Australian physiotherapists’ attitudes, perceived barriers and enablers to circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team

Laura Hundertmark

Scheme Honours Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20131 grants / $5,000

Sit less, move more. A randomised controlled trial of reducing sitting time in stroke survivors$5,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Scheme Grant Development Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20122 grants / $13,000

Sit less move more. A randomised controlled trial of reducing sitting time in stroke survivors$10,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Scheme Ten really good grants scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Stroke survivors perspectives on two novel models of inpatient rehabilitation$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team

Leanne Cavanagh

Scheme Honours Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20112 grants / $39,950

Sitting Time AfteR Stroke (STARS). A safety and feasibility study$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Scheme Nancy and Vic Meyers Prevention Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20103 grants / $649,000

Circuit Class Therapy and 7-day week therapy for Increasing Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy after Stroke. (CIRCIT) $503,500

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Susan Hillier

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20092 grants / $28,000

Coordinated multidisciplinary circuit class therapy$25,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)

Funding body St Vincent's Clinic Foundation (NSW)
Project Team

Melissa Brunner

Scheme Multi-disciplinary / patient focussed grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20081 grants / $10,000

Circuit class therapy for inpatient rehabilitation after stroke (CIRCIT).$10,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Susan Hillier

Scheme Ten really good grants scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20071 grants / $10,000

Measuring whole body skeletal muscle mass using ultrasound. A model prediction study$10,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Kerry Thoirs

Scheme Divisional Research Development Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20031 grants / $6,000

Is task-related circuit training an effective means of providing rehabilitation to an acute stroke sample?$6,000

Funding body Royal Adelaide Hospital
Scheme Allied Health Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20022 grants / $9,596

Is task-related training an effective means of providing rehabilitation to an acute stroke sample?$5,097

Funding body Royal Adelaide Hospital
Scheme Allied Health Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Is task-related training an effective means of providing rehabilitation to an acute stroke sample?$4,499

Funding body Physiotherapy Research Foundation
Scheme Seed Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed13
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.35
PhD1.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Breaking Up Sitting Time after Stroke: How Much Less Sitting is Needed (BUST-Dose) PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Masters Re-STAND: Reducing Sitting Time After Newly Diagnosed Stroke M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Investigating the minimum dose of exercise required to elicit a positive effect on fitness for stroke survivors. PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD An investigation of sedentary and exercise behaviour post stroke and factors contributing to this behaviour Physiotherapy, University of Tasmania Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours How does the culture of a stroke rehabilitation unit influence patients’ therapeutic physical activity levels outside therapy – an ethnographical approach Health, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2016 Honours Activity Monitors after Stroke Physiotherapy, Priority Research Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours Reactivity and minimum wear time in community dwelling stroke survivors Physiotherapy, Priority Research Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours Post-stroke fatigue. An individual patient data meta-analysis Physiotherapy, Priority Research Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Sitting time, physical activity and fatigue in stroke survivors-an observational cross sectional study. Health, University of South Australia Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Increasing intensity of stroke inpatient rehabilitation: a survey of Australian physiotherapists’ attitudes, perceived barriers and enablers to circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Testing the ‘Activitystat’ Hypothesis
&lt;p&gt;Key publications&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26023914" target="_blank"&gt;Gomersall S, Maher C, English C, Rowlands A, Olds T Time regained: When people stop a physical activity program, how does their time use change? A randomised controlled trial. PLOS ONE accepted 9th April 2015&lt;/a&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26023914" target="_blank"&gt;3. Gomersall S, Maher C, English C, Rowlands A, Olds T Time regained: When people stop a physical activity program, how does their time use change? A randomised controlled trial. PLOS ONE 2015 May 29;10(5):e0126665&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24602689" target="_blank"&gt;Gomersall S, Norton K, Maher C, English C, Olds T In search of lost time: When people start an exercise program, where does the time come from? A randomised controlled trial. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport Jan;18(1):43-8&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23329607" target="_blank"&gt;Gomersall SR, Rowlands AV, English C, Maher C, Olds, TS (2013) &amp;lsquo;The activitystat hypothesis: the concept, the evidence, and the methodologies&amp;rsquo;, Sports Medicine 43: 135-149&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23043381" target="_blank"&gt;Gomersall SR, Maher C, Norton K, Dollman J, Tomkinson G, Esterman A, English C, Lewis N, Olds TS (2012) &amp;lsquo;Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol&amp;rsquo;, BMC Public Health, 2012 Oct 8;12:851&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Human Movement, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2013 Honours Does Bont-A toxin improve the effectiveness of casting in improving range of movement in stroke survivors with spasticity Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Stroke survivors’ perspectives on two novel models of inpatient rehabilitation Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2011 Honours Ummm, about an hour? How accurate are physiotherapists at estimating therapy time in stroke rehabilitation?
&lt;p&gt;Key publications&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419915" target="_blank"&gt;Kaur G, English C, Hillier S (2013) Physiotherapists systematically overestimate the amount of time stroke survivors spend engaged in active therapy during inpatient rehabilitation: an observational study. Journal of Physiotherapy 59: 45-51 &lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.hindawi.com/journals/srt/2012/820673/" target="_blank"&gt;Kaur G, English C, Hillier S. (2012) "How physically active are people with stroke in therapy sessions aimed at improving motor function? A Systematic Review&amp;rdquo; Stroke Research and Treatment vol. 2012, Article ID 820673, 9 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/820673&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Principal Supervisor
2010 Honours Intra-rater reliability of sonographic measures and early changes in muscle thickness in individuals hospitalised after stroke
&lt;p&gt;Key publications&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22324054" target="_blank"&gt;English C, Fisher L, Thoirs K (2012) The reliability of real time ultrasound for measuring skeletal muscle size in human limbs in-vivo: A systematic review. Clinical Rehabilitation 26(10) 934-44 &lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22266233" target="_blank"&gt;English C, Thoirs K, Fisher L, McLennan H, Bernhardt J (2012) Ultrasound is a reliable measure of muscle thickness in acute stroke patients, for some, but not all anatomical sites Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology 38(3) 368-76 &lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours The reliability and feasibility of using ultrasound to measure skeletal muscle thickness in persons early after stroke
&lt;p&gt;Key publications&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22266233" target="_blank"&gt;English C, Thoirs K, Fisher L, McLennan H, Bernhardt J (2012) Ultrasound is a reliable measure of muscle thickness in acute stroke patients, for some, but not all anatomical sites Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology 38(3) 368-76 &lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Principal Supervisor
2007 Honours An observational analysis of activity levels during group circuit class therapy and individual physiotherapy sessions for stroke survivors receiving inpatient rehabilitation
&lt;p&gt;Key publications&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href="http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/36516011/how-much-physical-activity-do-people-recovering-from-stroke-do-during-physiotherapy-sessions" target="_blank"&gt;Elson T, English C and Hillier S: (2009) How much physical activity do people recovering from stroke do during physiotherapy sessions. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation 16 (2):78-84&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Physiotherapy, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 72
United Kingdom 7
United States 6
Canada 3
Sweden 3
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News

PhD Scholarship - Exercise and Lifestyle Support for Reducing Stroke Risk after TIA

March 28, 2017

A PhD scholarship is available for a student to investigate Exercise and lifestyle support for reducing stroke risk after TIA under the supervision of Associate Professor Coralie English and Dr Heidi Janssen.

UON Heart Foundation 2017 Research Funding

December 5, 2016

Five UON health researchers have been awarded highly competitive Heart Foundation Australia funding to investigate the causes, treatment and prevention of heart, stroke and blood vessel disease.

Dr Coralie English

ABC NEWS: World-first study looking at sedentary lifestyles of stroke patients

August 2, 2016

Dr Coralie English is leading a team of UON researchers who are investigating the health effects of a sedentary lifestyle on stroke patients.

World-first stroke trial led by UON researchers

World-first stroke trial led by University of Newcastle researchers underway in the Hunter

February 15, 2016

Stroke survivors who sit for long periods throughout the day could improve their health simply by performing short but frequent bouts of light physical activity.

Dr Coralie English

Position

Associate Professor
Physiotherapy Program
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email coralie.english@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8102

Office

Room HC-36
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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