Mrs Jodie Marquez

Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Master of Applied Management (Health), University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate in Health Promotion, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • electric brain stimulation
  • neurology
  • physiotherapy
  • rehabilitation
  • stroke

Languages

  • Spanish (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
110699Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Marquez J, van Vliet P, Mcelduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): Does it have merit in stroke rehabilitation? A systematic review', International Journal of Stroke, 10 306-316 (2015)

Transcranial direct current stimulation has been gaining increasing interest as a potential therapeutic treatment in stroke recovery. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to collate the available evidence in adults with residual motor impairments as a result of stroke. The primary outcome was change in motor function or impairment as a result of transcranial direct current stimulation, using any reported electrode montage, with or without adjunct physical therapy. The search yielded 15 relevant studies comprising 315 subjects. Compared with sham, cortical stimulation did not produce statistically significant improvements in motor performance when measured immediately after the intervention (anodal stimulation: facilitation of the affected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·05, P=0·71; cathodal stimulation: inhibition of the nonaffected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·39, P=0·08; bihemispheric stimulation: standardized mean difference=0·24, P=0·39). When the data were analyzed according to stroke characteristics, statistically significant improvements were evident for those with chronic stroke (standardized mean difference=0·45, P=0·01) and subjects with mild-to-moderate stroke impairments (standardized mean difference=0·37, P=0·02). Transcranial direct current stimulation is likely to be effective in enhancing motor performance in the short term when applied selectively to patients with stroke. Given the range of stimulation variables and heterogeneous nature of stroke, this modality is still experimental and further research is required to determine its clinical merit in stroke rehabilitation.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12169
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Mark Parsons
2015Marquez J, van Vliet P, Mcelduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): Does it have merit in stroke rehabilitation? A systematic review', International Journal of Stroke, 10 306-316 (2015)

Transcranial direct current stimulation has been gaining increasing interest as a potential therapeutic treatment in stroke recovery. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to collate the available evidence in adults with residual motor impairments as a result of stroke. The primary outcome was change in motor function or impairment as a result of transcranial direct current stimulation, using any reported electrode montage, with or without adjunct physical therapy. The search yielded 15 relevant studies comprising 315 subjects. Compared with sham, cortical stimulation did not produce statistically significant improvements in motor performance when measured immediately after the intervention (anodal stimulation: facilitation of the affected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·05, P=0·71; cathodal stimulation: inhibition of the nonaffected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·39, P=0·08; bihemispheric stimulation: standardized mean difference=0·24, P=0·39). When the data were analyzed according to stroke characteristics, statistically significant improvements were evident for those with chronic stroke (standardized mean difference=0·45, P=0·01) and subjects with mild-to-moderate stroke impairments (standardized mean difference=0·37, P=0·02). Transcranial direct current stimulation is likely to be effective in enhancing motor performance in the short term when applied selectively to patients with stroke. Given the range of stimulation variables and heterogeneous nature of stroke, this modality is still experimental and further research is required to determine its clinical merit in stroke rehabilitation.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12169
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Mark Parsons
2014Hubbard IJ, Evans M, McMullen-Roach S, Marquez J, Parsons MW, 'Five years of acute stroke unit care: Comparing ASU and non-ASU admissions and allied health involvement', Stroke Research and Treatment, (2014) [C1]

Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525) and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826). The study's primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days), and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016). There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=-8.233; P=0.0000) and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall's ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall's Stroke Unit and allied healthcare. © 2014 Isobel J. Hubbard et al.

DOI10.1155/2014/798258
Co-authorsIsobel Hubbard, Mark Parsons
2014Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: A randomised controlled trial', Contemporary Nurse, 48 76-87 (2014) [C1]

Falls amongst older people is a global public health concern. Whilst falling is not a typical feature of ageing, older people are more likely to fall. Fall injuries amongst older people are a leading cause of death and disability. Many older people do not do regular exercise so that they lose muscle tone, strength, and flexibility which affect balance and predispose them to falls. The management of falls in residential care settings is a major concern with strategies for prevention and monitoring a focus in this setting. Yoga and tai chi have shown potential to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults. They also have potential to improve pain and quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting a three-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) with frail older people in a residential care setting to test the hypothesis that a 14-week modified tai chi or yoga programme is more effective than usual care activity in improving balance function, quality of life, pain experience and in reducing number of falls. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in the occurrence of falls. Yoga demonstrated a slight decrease in fall incidence; quality of life improved for the tai chi group. Only the yoga group experienced a reduction in average pain scores though not statistically significant. The findings of the study suggest it is possible to safely implement modified yoga and tai chi in a residential care setting and evaluate this using RCT design. They show positive changes to balance, pain and quality of life and a high level of interest through attendance amongst the older participants. The results support offering tai chi and yoga to older people who are frail and dependent with physical and cognitive limitations.

Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Isabel Higgins
2013White JH, Bynon BL, Marquez J, Sweetapple A, Pollack M, ''Masterstroke: a pilot group stroke prevention program for community dwelling stroke survivors'', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 35 931-938 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.3109/09638288.2012.717578Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass S, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus of feedback and instructions in the treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', MANUAL THERAPY, 18 458-467 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.math.2013.07.002Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Suzanne Snodgrass
2013Marquez J, van Vliet P, Mcelduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): Does it have merit in stroke rehabilitation? A systematic review', International Journal of Stroke, (2013)

Transcranial direct current stimulation has been gaining increasing interest as a potential therapeutic treatment in stroke recovery. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to collate the available evidence in adults with residual motor impairments as a result of stroke. The primary outcome was change in motor function or impairment as a result of transcranial direct current stimulation, using any reported electrode montage, with or without adjunct physical therapy. The search yielded 15 relevant studies comprising 315 subjects. Compared with sham, cortical stimulation did not produce statistically significant improvements in motor performance when measured immediately after the intervention (anodal stimulation: facilitation of the affected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·05, P=0·71; cathodal stimulation: inhibition of the nonaffected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·39, P=0·08; bihemispheric stimulation: standardized mean difference=0·24, P=0·39). When the data were analyzed according to stroke characteristics, statistically significant improvements were evident for those with chronic stroke (standardized mean difference=0·45, P=0·01) and subjects with mild-to-moderate stroke impairments (standardized mean difference=0·37, P=0·02). Transcranial direct current stimulation is likely to be effective in enhancing motor performance in the short term when applied selectively to patients with stroke. Given the range of stimulation variables and heterogeneous nature of stroke, this modality is still experimental and further research is required to determine its clinical merit in stroke rehabilitation. © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

DOI10.1111/ijs.12169
CitationsScopus - 3
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Paulette Vanvliet
2013Downs S, Marquez J, Chiarelli P, 'The Berg Balance Scale has high intra- and inter-rater reliability but absolute reliability varies across the scale: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 59 93-99 (2013) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsPauline Chiarelli
2012Downs S, Marquez JL, Chiarelli PE, 'Balance outcomes from two small rural hospitals', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 275-280 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsPauline Chiarelli
2007White JH, Alston MK, Marquez JL, Sweetapple AL, Pollack MR, Attia JR, et al., 'Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors: Function Is Not the Whole Story With Quality of Life', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88 1140-1146 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.apmr.2007.06.003
CitationsScopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authorsChris Levi, John Attia
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass SJ, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus in motor learning for musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsPaulette Vanvliet, Suzanne Snodgrass
2013Marquez J, Van Vliet P, McElduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): is it effective as a stroke therapy?: a systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Paulette Vanvliet
2013Miller J, Marquez J, Van Vliet P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A randomised controlled trial to investigate the effects on upper limb function in chronic stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Paulette Vanvliet
2012Marquez JL, Kempton A, Alston M, 'The effect of exercise on mood disturbance in chronic stroke', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
2012Marquez JL, Hollingsworth SE, Lancaster M, 'It's all just stroke and mirrors! The clinical implementation of mirror therapy to restore lower limb function and mobility following stroke and traumatic brain injury', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
2012Conley A, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Fulham WR, Lagopoulos J, Karayanidis F, 'Sustained effects of anodal tDCS over the dominant motor cortex on response preparation processes', Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: ACNS-2012 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Mark Parsons
2012Conley A, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Lagopoulos J, Karayanidis F, 'Effects of anodal tDCS over the primary motor cortex on response preparation and execution', Combined Abstracts of 2012 Australian Psychology Conferences, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2012Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Sibbritt DW, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez JL, 'Yoga and tai chi for fall prevention in residential care: A feasibility study', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, Glasgow, Scotland (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Isabel Higgins
2012Bynon B, White JH, Marquez J, Pollack MR, 'Master Stroke: A mixed methods study exploring the experience of community dwelling stroke survivors in a pilot, group stroke prevention program', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants8
Total funding$63,827

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20142 grants / $4,500

Quantifying Physical, Cognitive and Social Activity Early After Stroke$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez, Ms Heidi Janssen, Miss Hannah Smith, Doctor Neil Spratt, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Associate Professor Louise Ada
SchemeHonours Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301144
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

European Stroke Conference, Nice, France, 6-9 May 2014$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400464
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20131 grants / $21,460

ERF Teaching Relief - Marquez - Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and recovery of upper limb function following stroke$21,460

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez, Professor Darren Rivett
SchemeEquity Research Fellowship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1200946
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20123 grants / $21,867

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): A new modality in stroke rehabilitation$17,367

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez, Professor Mark Parsons, Associate Professor Jim Lagopoulos, Associate Professor Frini Karayanidis, Professor Paulette Van Vliet
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101038
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Exploring the experience of post stroke depression in community dwelling stroke survivors; a mixed methods study$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding bodyNational Stroke Foundation
Project TeamMiss Alexandra Dickson, Ms Jennifer White, Mrs Jodie Marquez
SchemeHonours Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200732
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

European Stroke Conference, Lisboa Congress Centre, 22 25 May 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200501
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20111 grants / $9,500

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): The potential to improve stroke recovery$9,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez, Professor Mark Parsons, Associate Professor Frini Karayanidis
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000942
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20101 grants / $6,500

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): The potential to improve stroke recovery$6,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamMrs Jodie Marquez
SchemeEarly Career Researcher (Equipment) Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1001072
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014The Berg Balance Scale - Determining its Usefulness in the Elderly
Occupational Health & Safety, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Mrs Jodie Marquez

Position

Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Emailjodie.marquez@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4921 2041

Office

RoomHC20
BuildingHunter Building
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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