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Associate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet

Associate Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Extensive experience in nursing and nurse education including informational teaching and research in support of upgrading nurse qualifications and nursing practice. Provided leadership in academic and university governance in senior positions within the university sector.

Research Expertise
I am currently a member of three active research teams at the University of Newcastle and I have established links with senior medical and health professionals to conduct research in palliative care, cancer research and complementary therapies. Much of my research work has been as a principal researcher of multidisciplinary teams. Examples of this research: * 2004 Hydration and Nutrition at the end Stage of Life (Victorian Registration Board). Awarded jointly with Denise Brookes (Unit Manager Palliative Care Unit) and Professor M. Ashby (Monash Medical Centre). Duration of project: 2 years. *2005 Nurses' and Doctors' perceptions and attitudes of patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life in a palliative care setting. New Staff Grant. The University of Newcastle. Research team members include Dr Isabel Higgins and Milly Sneesby and Dr Phillip Good from the Mater Hospital. *2005 RIB Grant - Attitudes of health care staff regarding older people. Shared with Dr Isabel Higgins. *2006 Grant applications submitted with 3 colleagues (Dr Isabel Higgins, Dr Phillip Good and Milly Sneesby) for Margaret Mitchell Grant and Wig Week Grant . Investigation of Nurses' and Doctors' perceptions and attitudes towards patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life in an acute care setting. In 2009 I undertook two projects in Northern Thailand with Thai nursing colleagues to investigate the use of complementary therapies in patient care: (i) Complementary Therapies in Rehabilitation:A Thai Perspective. (ii) An exploratory pilot study of the health benefits of selected complementary therapies used during the rehabilitation of brain and spinal injury patients in Thailand. Results of these studies have been submitted to professional journals for publication.

Teaching Expertise
I have over 20 years of teaching experience in tertiary institutions (at five different universities) both in Australian and overseas. I have also had extensive experience in the health care industry and the corporate environment.

Administrative Expertise
I have broad experience as a program coordinator, course coordinator, Deputy Head of School and Head of School in the tertiary education sector. In each of my positions I have been responsible for academic policy development and implementation, management of large enrolments in undergraduate and post-graduate programs, monitoring of student progress, and marketing of nursing programs for the community. For example in 2004 I was Undergraduate Convenor of the Bachelor of Nursing and in 2005 Postgraduate Convenor. Both of these positions involved curriculum development, review of teaching and learning practices, working with teaching staff and collaboration with domestic and international partners (John Hunter Hospital, Hunter New England Heatlh and Hartford, Hong Kong). In 2008 I was appointed Deputy Head of School of Nursing and Midwifery with responsibility for administrative matters including staffing. In 2010 I was appointed Head of School (Associate Professor level) for the 12-month period in the absence of the designated Head of School. Following the completion of this role as Head of School, I have returned to the position of Deputy Head of School (Admin). In 2011 the University fo Newcastle has seconded me for a position as Student Experience and Engagement Coordinator to work within the School of Nursing and Midwifery and Faculty of Health. This position in 0.5 of my total load and involves the work accross the three campusus (Callaghan, Ourimbah and Port Macquarie).

Collaborations
Palliative care, in particular feeding and hydration in terminally ill patients. Chronic illness Attitudes of nurses to the older person Cancer nursing Complementary Therapies-Relaxation, massage, meditation, visualisation Wellness and wellbeing for health professionals and the community. Stroke-Complementary therapies


Qualifications

  • PhD, James Cook University
  • Diploma in Nurse Education, Lincoln College of Health Sciences
  • Bachelor of Arts (Social Science), La Trobe University
  • Master of Education, University of New England

Keywords

  • Aged Care
  • Cancer nursing
  • Complementary therapies
  • Palliative care
  • Teaching and Learning

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111199Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified10
180199Law not elsewhere classified10
111099Nursing not elsewhere classified80

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - Associate ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/11/2006 - 28/02/2007Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
FellowCollege of Nursing
Australia
1/01/2011 - Deputy Head of SchoolUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2010 - 1/12/2010Head of SchoolUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2009Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2009Deputy Head of SchoolUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/12/2006LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/05/2005 - 1/12/2005LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2005 - 1/05/2005LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/07/2004 - 1/12/2004LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/02/2004 - 1/06/2004LecturerUniversity of Technology Sydney
Australia
1/01/2003 - Membership Palliative Care Special Interest Group
Australia
1/01/2002 - Membership Complementary Therapies Special Interest Group
Australia
1/01/2002 - 1/12/2003Registered Nurse/Div 1 NurseMonash Medical Centre (Clayton)
Australia
1/01/2002 - 1/12/2003Senior LecturerMonash University
Australia
1/06/2001 - 1/06/2002Clinical Learning and Development ManagerMayne Health
Australia
1/01/1999 - MembershipAustralian Complementary Health Association
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/12/2000Registered NurseAlbury/Wodonga Private Hospital
Australia
1/01/1994 - 1/05/2001Post Graduate and Undergraduate Co-ordinatorLa Trobe University
Australia
1/01/1993 - 1/12/1993Registered NurseArmidale District Hospital
Australia
1/01/1990 - 1/12/1993LecturerUniversity of New England
1/01/1990 - 1/05/2001LecturerLa Trobe University
Australia
1/01/1987 - 1/12/1989LecturerLa Trobe University
Australia
1/01/1978 - Membership RCNA
Australia

Awards

Recognition

YearAward
2010Leadership Award
University of Newcastle
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (6 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Van Der Riet PJ, Pitt VL, 'Caring for a person requiring palliative care', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 244-263 (2013) [B2]
2012Levett-Jones TL, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Teaching and learning', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 558-586 (2012) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Bourgeois S, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Caring', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, N.S.W. 504-520 (2012) [B2]
2011Van Der Riet PJ, Pitt VL, Blyton GM, 'Nursing care of clients experiencing loss, grief and death', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 90-106 (2011) [B2]
2010Bourgeois S, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Caring', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 464-481 (2010) [B2]
2010Levett-Jones TL, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Teaching', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 517-545 (2010) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
Show 3 more chapters

Journal article (49 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015van der Riet P, Maguire J, Dedkhard S, Sibbritt D, 'Are traditional Thai therapies better than conventional treatment for stroke rehabilitation? A quasi-experimental study', European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 7 16-22 (2015)

Introduction: Worldwide, stroke is the principal cause of adult disability and second leading cause of death. Traditional and complementary therapies such as yoga, tai chi, massage and herbal therapies are widely used to treat a variety of illnesses in developing countries and recent research has shown that they may be of some benefit in stroke rehabilitation. Methods: A quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study that recruited 40 stroke patients from Thung Bo Paen rehabilitation centre (treatment group) and Lampang hospital (control group), located in Northern Thailand. Measures included activities of daily living (ADLs), involving Barthel Index scores, and pain, emotion and sleep scores. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the changes in Barthel Index scores in patients from the two treatment locations, where patients from Thung Bo Paen showed greater improvement compared to patients from Lampang hospital (. p=. 0.020). However, there were no significant differences between the changes in pain scores (. p=. 0.492), emotion scores (. p=. 0.671) or sleep scores (. p=. 0.197) in patients from the two treatment locations. Conclusions: Patients receiving traditional Thai therapies had significant improvements in ADLs at 3 months compared to conventional treatments. Future research on the use of traditional Thai therapies for stroke recovery should be conducted using a RCT, to avoid biases such as the differences in baseline measures, and should also contain an evaluation of cost, because if both approaches are shown to be equivalent, the next issue to be addressed is which approach is more cost effective.

DOI10.1016/j.eujim.2014.01.011
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJane Maguire
2014Stone TE, Francis LM, van der Riet P, Dedkhard S, Junlapeeya P, Orwat E, 'Awakening to the other: Reflections on developing intercultural competence through an undergraduate study tour', Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 521-527 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1111/nhs.12139
2014Gillan PC, Jeong S, van der Riet PJ, 'End of life care simulation: A review of the literature', Nurse Education Today, 34 766-774 (2014) [C1]

Background: Simulation is an evolving pedagogical approach to teaching in many undergraduate nursing curricula, however, there is little published literature on end of life care simulation as an effective means of teaching nursing students about end of life care. Literature review aims: To examine available literature on end of life care simulation. Review methods: An extensive literature search on end of life care simulation in the undergraduate nursing curriculum was conducted in CINAHL, Mosby's Index, Cochrane Database, Scopus, Eric via Proquest, and Medline. 6 research articles and 10 descriptive articles published between 2009 and 2013 that met the selection criteria are included in the review. Findings: Findings of these 16 articles are reported under 4 main themes: 1) Increased knowledge of end of life care through 'experiential learning'; 2) Impact of family presence on student learning; 3) the Debriefing imperative, and 4) Methodological issues raised from studies. Conclusion: The findings of the studies reviewed support end of life care simulation as a strong and viable pedagogical approach to learning for its positive effects on knowledge acquisition, communication skills, self-confidence, student satisfaction and level of engagement in learning. However, the important factors including psychological safety of students and the costs involved require careful consideration. Research on the use of simulation in nursing is still in its infancy, further research using various research designs is required to adequately explore the issues surrounding end of life care simulation. © 2013.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.005
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2014Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: a randomised controlled trial.', Contemporary nurse, 5231-5255 (2014)
DOI10.5172/conu.2014.5231
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2014Gillan PC, van der Riet PJ, Jeong S, 'End of life care education, past and present: A review of the literature', Nurse Education Today, 34 331-342 (2014) [C1]

Background: Research on end of life care education suggests that undergraduate nursing students are largely unprepared to provide end of life care to dying patients and their families. Although there have been attempts to address the issue of lack of preparedness, little is known on how to improve this. Literature Review Aims: To examine how end of life care education has been delivered to undergraduate nursing students and to critically discuss the research on modes of delivery and teaching strategies. Review Methods: An extensive literature search on end of life care education in the undergraduate nursing curriculum was conducted in CINAHL, Mosby's Index, Cochrane Database, Scopus, Eric via Proquest, and Medline. 18 research papers published between 1984 and 2012 that met the selection criteria are included in the review. Findings: Findings of these 18 articles are reported under two main themes: Modes of End of Life Education Delivery and End of Life Care Education Initiatives. Conclusion: This review highlights issues with end of life care education and suggests that end of life care simulation is an innovative strategy that may help to prepare undergraduate nursing students to provide quality end of life care. © 2013.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.06.009
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2014van der Riet P, Rossiter R, Kirby D, Dluzewska T, Harmon C, 'Piloting a stress management and mindfulness program for undergraduate nursing students: Student feedback and lessons learned', Nurse Education Today, (2014)

Background: Widespread reports of high stress levels and mental health problems among university student populations indicate the use of interventions to facilitate stress reduction and support student resilience and wellbeing. There is growing evidence that regular mindfulness practice may confer positive health benefits and reduced stress levels. Objectives: The aim of this pilot project was to explore the impact of a seven-week stress management and mindfulness program as a learning support and stress reduction method for nursing and midwifery students. Setting: The program was conducted at a large regional university in Australia. Participants: Fourteen first-year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students agreed to attend the program and to participate in a follow-up focus group. Method and Design: A descriptive qualitative design was utilised to examine the impact of the program. A semi-structured focus group interview was conducted with a thematic analysis undertaken of the transcript and process notes. Results: Ten students completed the research component of this project by participating in the focus group interview. Three main themes capture the participants' experience: attending to self, attending to others and attending to program related challenges. Data indicate a positive impact on sleep, concentration, clarity of thought and a reduction in negative cognitions. Participants also identified challenges related to timetabling, program structure and venue. Conclusions: Overall, this pilot program enhanced the participants' sense of well-being. Despite the challenges, benefits were identified on a personal and professional level. Valuable feedback was provided that will be used to further develop and expand stress management and mindfulness programs offered to students attending this university. © 2014.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.05.003
Co-authorsRachel Rossiter
2014Van der Riet P, Jitsacorn C, Junlapeeya P, Dedkhard S, Thursby P, 'Nurses' stories of a 'Fairy Garden' healing haven for sick children', Journal of Clinical Nursing, (2014) [C1]

Aims and objectives: To report on the stories of registered nurses and nurse administrators in a Thai hospital that recently constructed a healing haven environment called a 'Fairy Garden' to support the formal and informal activities of sick children. Background: While there has been some research into healing environments in health for adults, there has been no qualitative research into healing environments such as natural gardens for children. Design: Narrative inquiry was selected to capture the holistic notion of the participant's experience. Clandinin's narrative inquiry framework involving three dimensions sociality, space and temporality was used to analyse the data. Methods: Eight nurses (including two head nurses, three ward nurses and three nurse administrators) were interviewed in three separate focus groups between November 2011-June 2012. Results: Findings included storylines/threads of happiness, relaxation and calmness, imagination, spirituality and cooperation in reporting observed responses of sick children to the 'Fairy Garden'. Importantly, play was seen as a distractor from the children's pain and illness, with the children's ward no longer viewed as simply a clinical hospital site. Rather the opportunities that were afforded to children to interact with the 'Fairy Garden' environment expanded their hospital experience to include play, social interaction and educational activities. Conclusion: The Nurses' stories capture numerous storylines and threads in which the 'Fairy Garden' becomes an environment beyond the constraints of the hospital ward. Storylines indicate increased acceptance and adherence to treatment as the 'Fairy Garden' opens up alternatives for children, especially those children long term in the hospital. Children exhibit behaviours that suggest the 'Fairy Garden' supports psycho-social and physical benefits that improve their hospital stay and provide potential for improved clinical outcomes. Relevance to clinical practice: Designed hospital environments need to consider the addition of natural and activity spaces to support sick children and their families. Reports from nurses caring for children indicate benefits of the natural environment outside the clinical area. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI10.1111/jocn.12637
2014Higgins I, van der Riet P, Sneesby L, Good P, 'Nutrition and hydration in dying patients: The perceptions of acute care nurses', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23 2609-2617 (2014)
DOI10.1111/jocn.12478
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2014Higgins I, van der Riet P, Sneesby L, Good P, 'Nutrition and hydration in dying patients: The perceptions of acute care nurses', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23 2609-2617 (2014) [C1]

Aims and objectives: To explore the perceptions of nurses regarding the provision and nonprovision of medical nutrition and hydration during the end stage of life when death is imminent in the acute care setting. Background: When people are dying, they often experience a loss of appetite and desire for drinking which are natural processes at this time. The cessation of eating and drinking challenges both family members and clinical staff. This article builds on previous studies that describe the perceptions of medical doctors and palliative care nurses regarding medical nutrition and hydration during the end stage of life when death is imminent. Design: Qualitative descriptive design. Methods: This study included three focus group meetings with ten nurses in an acute care setting in medical, oncology and haematology units. An interview schedule was used to guide the discussions. Results: The main theme to emerge from this study was 'finding a comfort space/ambiguous spaces of unrest' that included four subthemes: (1) limited involvement in decision-making, (2) comfort vs. discomfort, (3) uncertainty and (4) the comfort of withdrawing treatment. Finding a comfort space captures the challenges nurses faced when speaking about the concerns of patients and family. In this space, there were ambiguities that created unease and unrest: a reluctance to talk about death; a reluctance to engage with the patient and the family. Conclusions: Acute care nurses need to be more cognisant of the palliative approach to care and become more engaged with decision-making during the end stage of life when death is imminent. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses in acute care settings need to be involved in decision-making and advocate for patients and family during the dying phase. Nurses in acute care need better understanding about the palliative approach to care and nutrition and hydration for people who are dying. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI10.1111/jocn.12478
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2014Haydon G, van der Riet P, 'A narrative inquiry: How do nurses respond to patients' use of humour?', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, 46 197-205 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.5172/conu.2014.46.2.197Author URL
2014Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: a randomised controlled trial.', Contemp Nurse, 5231-5255 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.5172/conu.2014.5231Author URL
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2014Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: A randomised controlled trial', Contemporary Nurse, 48 76-87 (2014) [C1]

Falls amongst older people is a global public health concern. Whilst falling is not a typical feature of ageing, older people are more likely to fall. Fall injuries amongst older people are a leading cause of death and disability. Many older people do not do regular exercise so that they lose muscle tone, strength, and flexibility which affect balance and predispose them to falls. The management of falls in residential care settings is a major concern with strategies for prevention and monitoring a focus in this setting. Yoga and tai chi have shown potential to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults. They also have potential to improve pain and quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting a three-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) with frail older people in a residential care setting to test the hypothesis that a 14-week modified tai chi or yoga programme is more effective than usual care activity in improving balance function, quality of life, pain experience and in reducing number of falls. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in the occurrence of falls. Yoga demonstrated a slight decrease in fall incidence; quality of life improved for the tai chi group. Only the yoga group experienced a reduction in average pain scores though not statistically significant. The findings of the study suggest it is possible to safely implement modified yoga and tai chi in a residential care setting and evaluate this using RCT design. They show positive changes to balance, pain and quality of life and a high level of interest through attendance amongst the older participants. The results support offering tai chi and yoga to older people who are frail and dependent with physical and cognitive limitations.

Co-authorsJodie Marquez, Isabel Higgins
2014Dowse EM, van der Riet P, Keatinge DR, 'A student's perspective of managing data collection in a complex qualitative study.', Nurse Res, 22 34-39 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.7748/nr.22.2.34.e1302Author URL
2014Rossiter RC, Day J, McDonald VM, Hunter S, Jeong S, Van Der Riet P, et al., 'Redefining old: Optimising health and wellbeing', Hong Kong Journal of Mental Health, 40 59-72 (2014) [C1]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong, Rachel Rossiter, Isabel Higgins, Jenny Day, Jane Maguire, Vanessa Mcdonald
2013O'Brien AP, Bloomer MJ, Clark K, Martin T, Lock M, Pidcock T, et al., 'The Need for Rural and Regional Aboriginal Palliative Care Models', Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine, 3 (2013) [C3]
DOI10.4172/2165-7386.1000152
Co-authorsTony Obrien, Mark Lock
2013Gillan PC, Parmenter G, van der Riet PJ, Jeong S, 'The experience of end of life care simulation at a rural Australian University', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 1435-1439 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2012.11.015Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2013Gillan PC, Jeong S, van der Riet PJ, 'End of life care simulation: A review of the literature', Nurse Education Today, (2013) [C1]

Background: Simulation is an evolving pedagogical approach to teaching in many undergraduate nursing curricula, however, there is little published literature on end of life care simulation as an effective means of teaching nursing students about end of life care. Literature review aims: To examine available literature on end of life care simulation. Review methods: An extensive literature search on end of life care simulation in the undergraduate nursing curriculum was conducted in CINAHL, Mosby's Index, Cochrane Database, Scopus, Eric via Proquest, and Medline. 6 research articles and 10 descriptive articles published between 2009 and 2013 that met the selection criteria are included in the review. Findings: Findings of these 16 articles are reported under 4 main themes: 1) Increased knowledge of end of life care through 'experiential learning'; 2) Impact of family presence on student learning; 3) the Debriefing imperative, and 4) Methodological issues raised from studies. Conclusion: The findings of the studies reviewed support end of life care simulation as a strong and viable pedagogical approach to learning for its positive effects on knowledge acquisition, communication skills, self-confidence, student satisfaction and level of engagement in learning. However, the important factors including psychological safety of students and the costs involved require careful consideration. Research on the use of simulation in nursing is still in its infancy, further research using various research designs is required to adequately explore the issues surrounding end of life care simulation. Crown Copyright © 2013.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.005
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2013O'Brien AP, Bloomer MJ, McGrath P, Clarke K, Martin T, Lock M, et al., 'Considering Aboriginal palliative care models: the challenges for mainstream services', RURAL AND REMOTE HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsMark Lock, Tony Obrien
2012Van Der Riet PJ, 'Reflexivity :A mainstay in promoting rigor and trustworthiness in qualitative research. Philippine Journal of Nursing, 82: 28-32', Philippine Journal of Nursing, 82 28-32 (2012)
2012Van Der Riet PJ, Dedkhard S, Srithong K, 'Complementary therapies in rehabilitation: Nurses' narratives. Part 1', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21 657-667 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012Van Der Riet PJ, Dedkhard S, Srithong K, 'Complementary therapies in rehabilitation: Stroke patients' narratives. Part 2', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21 668-676 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012Sibbritt DW, Van Der Riet PJ, Dedkhard S, Srithong K, 'Rehabilitation of stroke patients using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies', Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 10 743-750 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 4
2011Van Der Riet PJ, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Complementary therapies in healthcare: Design, implementation and evaluation of an elective course for undergraduate students', Nurse Education in Practice, 11 146-152 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2010.10.002
CitationsScopus - 3
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Sneesby L, Satchell R, Good P, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Death and dying in Australia: Perceptions of a Sudanese community', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 67 2696-2702 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05775.x
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011Good PD, Sneesby L, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Medical officers in acute care settings: Their views on medically assisted hydration at the end of life', Journal of Palliative Care, 27 303-309 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2011Sibbritt DW, Adams J, Van Der Riet PJ, 'The prevalence and characteristics of young and mid-age women who use yoga and meditation: Results of a nationally representative survey of 19,209 Australian women', Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 19 71-77 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ctim.2010.12.009
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2011Van Der Riet PJ, 'Exemplar: Effleurage and petrissage: Holistic practice in Thailand', Contemporary Nurse, 37 227-228 (2011) [C3]
2011Van Der Riet PJ, 'Vipassana meditation: One woman's narrative', Collegian, 18 36-42 (2011) [C2]
DOI10.1016/j.colegn.2010.10.002
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2011Van Der Riet PJ, 'Complementary therapies in health care', Nursing & Health Sciences, 13 4-8 (2011) [C3]
DOI10.1111/j.1442-2018.2011.00587.x
CitationsScopus - 3
2010Van Der Riet PJ, 'Editorial - Partnerships in nursing', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 3 2 (2010) [C3]
2010Sneesby LB, Satchell R, Good P, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Death and dying in Australia: Perceptions of a Sudanese community', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 4-7 (2010) [C2]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05775.x
2009Ebert LM, Van Der Riet PJ, Fahy KM, 'What do midwives need to understand/know about smoking in pregnancy?', Women and Birth, 22 35-40 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.wombi.2008.11.001
CitationsScopus - 8
Co-authorsLyn Ebert
2009Levett-Jones TL, Kenny RP, Van Der Riet PJ, Hazelton MJ, Kable AK, Bourgeois S, Luxford Y, 'Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice', Nurse Education Today, 29 612-616 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2009.01.007
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsMichael Hazelton, Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2009Van Der Riet PJ, Higgins IJ, Good PD, Sneesby LB, 'A discourse analysis of difficult clinical situations in relation to nutrition and hydration during end of life care', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18 2104-2111 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02760.x
CitationsScopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2009Ebert LM, Freeman L, Fahy KM, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Midwives' interactions with women who smoke in pregnancy', British Journal of Midwifery, 17 24-29 (2009) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsLyn Ebert
2008Van Der Riet PJ, Good PD, Higgins IJ, Sneesby LB, 'Patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life', Australian Nursing Journal, 15 40 (2008) [C3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2008Van Der Riet PJ, Good PD, Higgins IJ, Sneesby L, 'Palliative care professionals' perceptions of nutrition and hydration at the end of life', International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 14 145-151 (2008) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 22
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2008Maclellan LI, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Conference review: Report on 1st NUS-UH Conference: Advanced Practice Nursing in Multi-Cultural Environments 28 May 2008 Singapore', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 1 39-40 (2008) [C3]
2007Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Slater LE, Peek C, 'The negative attitude of nurses towards older patients in the acute hospital setting: A qualitative descriptive study', Contemporary Nurse, 26 225-237 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.5172/conu.2007.26.2.225
CitationsScopus - 29Web of Science - 21
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2007Van Der Riet PJ, Brooks D, Ashby M, 'Nutrition and hydration at the end of life: Pilot study of a palliative care experience', Journal of Law and Medicine, 14 182-198 (2007) [C1]
2007Van Der Riet PJ, Brooks D, Ashby M, 'Family perceptions of nutrition differ from terminally ill', Australian Nursing Journal, 14 19 (2007) [C3]
2006Van Der Riet PJ, 'A palliative care story: negotiating the abject', Contemporary Nurse : A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession, 22 81-83 (2006) [C2]
2002Van Der Riet P, Waskul D, 'Abject embodiment', Symbolic Interaction Journal, 25 486-513 (2002) [C1]
1999Van Der Riet P, Mackey S, 'Therapeutic Massage: An Educational Program for Rural & Remote Workers in the Palliative Care Field', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 7 186-190 (1999) [C1]
1999Van Der Riet PJ, 'Massaged embodiment of cancer patients', The Australian Journal of Holistic Health, 6 4-13 (1999)
1998Van Der Riet P, 'The Sexual Embodiment of the Cancer Patient', Nursing Inquiry, 5 248-257 (1998) [C1]
1995Van Der Riet P, 'Massage and Sexuality in Nursing', Nursing Inquiry, 149-156 (1995) [C1]
1994van der Riet, 'Night Shift in ICU.', Contemporary Nurse, 3 95-96 (1994)
1993Van Der Riet PJ, '(1993). Effects of Therapeutic Massage on Pre- operative Anxiety in a Rural Hospital. Part One.', The Australian Journal of Rural Health, 1 11-16 (1993)
Show 46 more journal articles

Conference (17 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Gillan P, Van der Riet P, Jeong S, 'Undergraduate Nursing Students¿ Experiences with End of Life Care Simulation', https://custom.cvent.com/A96F1FCE15164661A466B58D03796161/files/c18eb203f5924b89896f9665085fb59d.pdf, Newcastle (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2013Crowfoot GM, Van Der Riet P, Maguire J, 'From symptom onset to doorway: Capturing the stories of patients with Transient Ischaemic Attack', International Journal of Stroke, Queensland (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsJane Maguire
2012Van Der Riet PJ, 'Valuing community engagement: A School of Nursing and Midwifery's committed approach', Engagement Australia Conference. Proceedings & Handbook, Brisbane, QLD (2012) [E3]
2012Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Sibbritt DW, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez JL, 'Yoga and tai chi for fall prevention in residential care: A feasibility study', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, Glasgow, Scotland (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsJodie Marquez, Isabel Higgins
2012Hickey N, Jeong Y-S, Van Der Riet PJ, Norton CA, 'The experiences of Australian students with international students from cultural and linguistically diverse backgrounds in a Bachelor of Nursing Program', 14th National Nurse Education Conference 2012. Speaker Abstracts, Perth, WA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong
2012Dowse EM, Keatinge DR, Van Der Riet PJ, 'The factors influencing, and the nature of their impact, on the child and family health nurse's ability to work in partnership with parents', 23rd International Nursing Research Congress, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
2012Haydon GC, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Humour in nursing', 2nd Australian Capital Region Nursing & Midwifery Research Conference. Conference Proceedings, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
2012Van Der Riet PJ, 'Reflexivity: A mainstay in promoting rigor and trustworthiness in qualitative research', 2nd International Conference on Qualitative Research in Nursing and Health, Manila, Philippines (2012) [E3]
2011Dedkhard S, Van Der Riet PJ, Srithong K, Sibbritt DW, 'The use of traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies to improve activities of daily living, mood and sleep patterns, and pain intensity of stroke patients over time', 6th International Congress on Complementary Medicine Research: Evidence-based Decision Making for Traditional and Integrative Medicine Abstracts (JTCM Supplement), Chengdu, China (2011) [E3]
2010Van Der Riet PJ, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Complementary therapies: Design, implementation and evaluation of an elective course for undergraduate nursing students', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Slater LE, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, 'It's not easy but so useful! Using discourse analysis to explore attutudes to older persons in acute care', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
2010Schultz A, Ngamvithayapong-Yana J, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Using research to change practice: A comprehensive view of health research utilization', First International Conference on Qualitative Research in Nursing and Health, Thailand, 2010, Chiang Rai, Thailand (2010) [E3]
2010Pitt VL, Van Der Riet PJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'Integrating palliative care into undergraduate nursing curriculum. The University of Newcastle's experience', Third National Palliative Care Education Conference, Brisbane, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Slater LE, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Age discrimination defies patient centred care in provision of acute care of the older person. extending knowledge through discourse analysis', The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, Paris, France (2009) [E3]
2008Maclellan LI, Gooley R, Greenwood M, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Nurse practitioner practice: A question of equity!', 1st NUS-UH Conference: Advanced Practice Nursing in Multicultural Environments: Programme, Singapore (2008) [E3]
2008Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeois S, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Exploring the information and communication technology skills of nursing students and graduates', NETNEP 2008: 2nd International Nurse Education Conference: Abstract Book, Dublin, Ireland (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Van Der Riet PJ, Higgins IJ, Sneesby M, Good PD, 'Does the provision and non-provision of medical nutrition and hydration at the end stage of life cause patient suffering?', The 18th International Nursing Research Congress Focusing on Evidence-Based Practice. Abstracts, Vienna, Austria (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins
Show 14 more conferences

Creative Work (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2009Van Der Riet PJ, Terminal dehydration: The experience and perceptions of end-of-life palliative care nutrition and hydration, - (2009) [J1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants11
Total funding$41,200

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $1,000

Nursing and Midwifery Leadership Conference 2015. Nurses and Midwives: Leading Change, celebrating success Perth WA 26-27 November 2015$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500840
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20141 grants / $2,000

Philosophy in the Nurse's World: Troubling Practice, Banff Canada, 25-27 May 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400210
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20121 grants / $2,000

Philosophy in the Nurse's World: Politics of Nursing Practice II Conference, Banff Canada, 13 - 15 May 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200412
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20111 grants / $2,000

Thinking qualitatively Workshop Series Canada, University of Alberta, 20 - 24 June 2011$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100766
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20101 grants / $2,000

International Conference Qualitative Research in Nursing Health, Wiang Inn Hotel Chiang Rai Thailand, 1 - 3 December 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000761
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20081 grants / $1,700

2nd Interntional Nurse Education Conference Research and Innovation in International Nurse Education, Dublin Ireland, 9/6/2008 - 11/6/2008$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188439
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20072 grants / $3,000

18th International Nursing Research Congress Focusing on Evidenced-Base Practice, Vienna, Austria, 11/7/2007 - 14/7/2007$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187673
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Nurses' and Doctors' perceptions and attitudes of patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life in an acute care setting$1,300

Funding body: Coalfields

Funding bodyCoalfields
Project Team
SchemeMater grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNo
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Local
Category2OPL
UONY

20053 grants / $27,500

2004 Hydration and Nutrition at the end stage of life (Victorian Registration Board). $20,000. Awarded jointly with Denise Brookes (Unit Manager Palliative Care Unit Monash Medical Centre).$20,000

Funding body: Nurses Board of Victoria

Funding bodyNurses Board of Victoria
Project Team
SchemeProgram Grant (Shared)
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2006
GNo
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

2005 Nurses' and Doctors' perceptions and attitudes of patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life in a palliative care setting. The University of Newcastle.$5,000

Funding body: NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY

Funding bodyNEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY
Project Team
SchemeUnknown
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2006
GNo
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Nurses' and doctors' perceptions and attitudes of patient nutrition and hydration at the end of life in a palliative care setting$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185670
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015An Exploratory Study of the Adolescent with Cancer Living with Hope and Loss: Do You Feel the Way I Do?
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014What is the Survivors' Experience of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation?
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013The Influence of Healthcare Pathways upon the Outcomes and Experiences of People with TIA or Minor Stroke: A Mulitmethod Approach
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2010The Experience of Undergraduate Nursing Students with End of Life Care Simulation
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2007The Factors Influencing, & the Nature of Their Impact, on the Child & Family Health Nurse's Ability to Work in Partnership with Parents
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Like a Breath of Fresh Air: Yoga and Tai Chi for Frail Older People in Residential Care: A Mixed Methods Study
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2009Attitudes of Health Care Staff Towards Older Persons in Acute Care
General Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Pamela Van Der Riet

Position

Associate Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Emailpamela.vanderriet@newcastle.edu.au
Phone16261
Mobile0457845166
Fax16301

Office

RoomRW1-24
BuildingRichardson Wing
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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