Mrs Joanna Latter

Project Officer

School of Medicine and Public Health (Public Health)

Career Summary

Biography

I have a B.Sc (Hons 1) and MPhil in Plant Science, where my studies focused on carotenoid content and regulation in wheat as a primary determinant of flour colour. After graduating with my MPhil, I moved to Newcastle in 2005 and since then have worked as a research assistant on a range of research projects with the University of Newcastle. I began working as a laboratory research assistant on projects using primary bronchial epithelial cell models of virus infection to determine mediators of viral respiratory tract infections. 

From there I went on to an NHMRC-funded project looking at susceptibility to Chlamydia trachomatis infection, where we sought to determine the effects of female sex hormones on the innate immune response to Chlamydia infection using primary endocervical cells. 

I was then employed as a research assistant working with the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit research team at the John Hunter Hospital, which mainly involved Laser Doppler and videomicroscopy studies for measurement of peripheral microvascular function in newborn infants as a cause of cardiovascular instability in pre-term newborns.

Since 2012 I have worked at the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics as a project officer. I work on the Hospital Outpatient Alcohol Project, which is a large randomised controlled trial for electronic screening and brief intervention for outpatients with unhealthy alcohol use. I also am involved in a pilot study of genetic feedback and telephone counselling on cancer susceptibility to reduce risky drinking in hospital outpatients. In my current role I also provide research support for Prof Kypros Kypri who leads an alcohol research group at the University of Newcastle which addresses a range of methodological, aetiological and intervention studies addressing the burden of injury and disease attributable to alcohol.


Qualifications

  • Master of Philosophy, Australian National University
  • Bachelor of Science (Biomedical), University of Technology Sydney
  • Bachelor of Science (Biomedical Sc)(Honours), University of Technology Sydney

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Research role

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2006 Cuttriss AJ, Mimica JL, Howitt CA, Pogson BJ, 'Carotenoids', The Structure and Function of Plastids, Kluwer Academic Pub, Netherlands 315-334 (2006)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4020-4061-0

Journal article (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Dyson RM, Palliser HK, Latter JL, Chwatko G, Glowacki R, Wright IMR, 'A Role for H2S in the microcirculation of newborns: The major metabolite of H2S (thiosulphate) is increased in preterm infants', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

Excessive vasodilatation during the perinatal period is associated with cardiorespiratory instability in preterm neonates. Little evidence of the mechanisms controlling microvascu... [more]

Excessive vasodilatation during the perinatal period is associated with cardiorespiratory instability in preterm neonates. Little evidence of the mechanisms controlling microvascular tone during circulatory transition exists. We hypothesised that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), an important regulator of microvascular reactivity and central cardiac function in adults and animal models, may contribute to the vasodilatation observed in preterm newborns. Term and preterm neonates (24-43 weeks gestational age) were studied. Peripheral microvascular blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler. Thiosulphate, a urinary metabolite of H2S, was determined by high performance liquid chromatography as a measure of 24 hr total body H2S turnover for the first 3 days of postnatal life. H2S turnover was greatest in very preterm infants and decreased with increasing gestational age (p = 0.0001). H2S turnover was stable across the first 72 hrs of life in older neonates. In very preterm neonates, H2S turnover increased significantly from day 1 to 3 (p = 0.0001); and males had higher H2S turnover than females (p = 0.04). A significant relationship between microvascular blood flow and H2S turnover was observed on day 2 of postnatal life (p = 0.0004). H2S may play a role in maintaining microvascular tone in the perinatal period. Neonates at the greatest risk of microvascular dysfunction characterised by inappropriate peripheral vasodilatation - very preterm male neonates - are also the neonates with highest levels of total body H2S turnover suggesting that overproduction of this gasotransmitter may contribute to microvascular dysfunction in preterms. Potentially, H2S is a target to selectively control microvascular tone in the circulation of newborns. © 2014 Dyson et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0105085
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Hannah Palliser, Ian Wright
2014 Dyson RM, Palliser HK, Lakkundi A, de Waal K, Latter JL, Clifton VL, Wright IM, 'Early microvascular changes in the preterm neonate: a comparative study of the human and guinea pig.', Physiol Rep, 2 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.14814/phy2.12145
Co-authors Vicki Clifton, Hannah Palliser, Ian Wright
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use a... [more]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Natalie Johnson, John Attia
2014 Wan C, Latter JL, Amirshahi A, Symonds I, Finnie J, Bowden N, et al., 'Progesterone Activates Multiple Innate Immune Pathways in Chlamydia trachomatis-Infected Endocervical Cells', American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 71 165-177 (2014) [C1]

Problem: Susceptibility to Chlamydia trachomatis infection is increased by oral contraceptives and modulated by sex hormones. We therefore sought to determine the effects of femal... [more]

Problem: Susceptibility to Chlamydia trachomatis infection is increased by oral contraceptives and modulated by sex hormones. We therefore sought to determine the effects of female sex hormones on the innate immune response to C. trachomatis infection. Method of study: ECC-1 endometrial cells, pre-treated with oestradiol or progesterone, were infected with C. trachomatis and the host transcriptome analysed by Illumina Sentrix HumanRef-8 microarray. Primary endocervical epithelial cells, prepared at either the proliferative or secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, were infected with C. trachomatis and cytokine gene expression determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results: Chlamydia trachomatis yield from progesterone-primed ECC-1 cells was significantly reduced compared with oestradiol-treated cells. Genes upregulated in progesterone-treated and Chlamydia-infected cells only included multiple CC and CXC chemokines, IL-17C, IL-29, IL-32, TNF-a, DEFB4B, LCN2, S100A7-9, ITGAM, NOD2, JAK1, IL-6ST, type I and II interferon receptors, numerous interferon-stimulated genes and STAT6. CXCL10, CXCL11, CX3CL1 and IL-17C, which were also upregulated in infected secretory-stage primary cells, and there was a trend towards higher levels of immune mediators in infected secretory-phase compared with proliferative-phase cells. Conclusion: Progesterone treatment primes multiple innate immune pathways in hormone-responsive epithelial cells that could potentially increase resistance to chlamydial infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/aji.12168
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nikola Bowden, Rodney Scott, Ian Symonds
2011 Amirshahi A, Wan C, Beagley K, Latter JL, Symonds IM, Timms P, 'Modulation of the Chlamydia trachomatis In vitro transcriptome response by the sex hormones estradiol and progesterone', BMC Microbiology, 11 150 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ian Symonds
2009 Howitt CA, Cavanagh CR, Bowerman AF, Cazzonelli C, Rampling L, Mimica JL, Pogson BJ, 'Alternative splicing, activation of cryptic exons and amino acid substitutions in carotenoid biosynthetic genes are associated with lutein accumulation in wheat endosperm', Functional & Integrative Genomics, 9 363-376 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10142-009-0121-3
2007 Wark PA, Bucchieri F, Johnston SL, Gibson PG, Hamilton L, Mimica J, et al., 'IFN-gamma-induced protein 10 is a novel biomarker of rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 120 586-593 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2007.04.046
Citations Scopus - 82Web of Science - 78
Co-authors Peter Wark, Peter Gibson, John Attia
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Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Johnson N, Latter J, Kypri K, 'PREVALENCE OF UNHEALTHY ALCOHOL USE AMONG HOSPITAL OUTPATIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Natalie Johnson
2012 Wright IM, Latter JL, Buchan J, 'Videomicroscopy of neonatal microvasculature: Relationship to laser doppler flowmetry', Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Fetal and Neonatal Physiological Society, Zeist, The Netherlands (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Wright
2012 Dyson RM, Palliser HK, Latter JL, Chwatko G, Glowacki R, Wright IM, 'Hydrogen sulphide in the neonatal transitional circulation', Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Fetal and Neonatal Physiological Society, Zeist, The Netherlands (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Wright, Hannah Palliser
2012 Wright IM, Latter JL, Wright A, Finnegan T, Clifton VL, 'Maternal peripheral constriction in preeclampsia is not reflected in the central microvasculature', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Vicki Clifton, Ian Wright
2012 Wright IM, Latter JL, Wright A, Finnegan T, Clifton VL, 'Functional capillary density in babies born to mothers with preeclampsia', 16th Annual Congress of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Wright, Vicki Clifton
2011 Wright IM, Dyson RM, Latter JL, Clifton VL, 'Microvascular blood flow changes from 6 to 24 h in the preterm infant', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Hobart, Tasmania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Wright, Vicki Clifton
2010 Wright IM, Latter JL, Finnegan T, Clifton VL, 'Placental vascular mediators in preeclampsia', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health: Abstracts of the 14th Annual Congress of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand 2010, Wellington, NZ (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Wright, Vicki Clifton
Show 4 more conferences
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Mrs Joanna Latter

Position

Project Officer
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email joanna.latter@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0379
Fax (02) 4042 0044

Office

Room W4-013
Building HMRI
Location Level 4 West

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