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Professor David Lubans

ARC Future Fellow

School of Education

Re-engaging teens in Physical Education

The University of Newcastle's (UON) Professor David Lubans is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow who is delivering a range of innovative school programs designed to upskill teachers in physical education and re-engage teens.
Professor David Lubans

 "Approximately a quarter to a third of young people in Australia report moderate to high level of psychological distress at some point in their adolescence. That's just the ones who get detected," said Lubans.

"There's no question that our society has changed and that young people are more engaged in screen-based recreation, they are doing less physical activity, and they are more likely to be overweight or obese – three times more likely than previous generations.

"If you put all those things together, it isn't surprising that the mental health of a large percentage of young people isn't optimal. Physical activity represents such a great opportunity; if provided in the right context, it can help reduce stress, provide an opportunity for social interaction and enhance self-concept."

Lubans' ARC Future Fellowship project will provide schools with teacher training and equipment that will impact on their ability and capacity to deliver programs that foster lifelong physical activity.

The first phase of his fellowship will involve an evaluation of the programs using a randomised controlled trial. Importantly, the second phase of the project will involve the dissemination of the programs throughout NSW secondary schools in collaboration with the Department of Education and Communities School Sport Unit.

"I would like to think we have a role to play in giving everyone a chance to feel good in the physical domain," said Lubans. "If adolescents only ever think of PE as competitive team sports and don't get an opportunity experience success – they make the decision that: 'I'm not a sporty kid, I can't do that,' and they drop out of activities all together.

…there would be kids and adults who are still scarred from the experience of being picked last for teams in their PE lessons.

"Giving teens the opportunity to succeed in the physical domain can impact on their physical self-concept, which can influence their overall wellbeing.

"Even those young people who are good at sports will benefit from developing competency in a range of lifelong physical activities, as these can be more easily carried into adulthood."

Non-traditional school activities will be provided by the program, including resistance training, yoga and Pilates.

However, the program doesn't just give teachers information about what to teach, it provides guidance on how to teach the programs.

"Unlike many subjects at school, effort and ability are on public display in PE. In a lot of poorly designed PE lessons, the focus is on competition and peer comparison.  Using poor teaching strategies thwarts needs satisfaction rather than making students feel good. An example would be having two captains picking their team mates – there would be kids and adults who are still scarred from the experience of being picked last for teams in their PE lessons," said Lubans.

"Our professional learning program will encourage teachers to be more autonomy supportive by applying teaching principles guided by self-determination theory. International and national research studies have shown that teachers can learn to become more autonomy supportive, which can lead to improved student outcomes and wellbeing."

While a major part of Lubans Future Fellowship is about disseminating programs to make a difference on a large scale, it's also about building evidence around physical activity and wellbeing.

"I would like to build more of an evidence base around the role of physical activity in promoting wellbeing. Focusing on the consequences of inactivity may not be the best way to go," said Lubans. "Maybe we are going to get more value and bigger impact when we stress the wellbeing implications of increased physical activity."

Lubans – a researcher in the Faculty of Education and Arts and the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PAN) at UON – is also focussed on building research capacity by working with PhD scholars and Early Career Researchers (ECR).

Three of his PhD students will graduate and take up positions with the Priority Research Centre in 2015: Jordan Smith, Kristen Cohen and Narelle Eather

"As part of its support for the Future Fellowship, the School of Education has funded an ECR to work with me and the School. So one of my PhD students, Jordan Smith – who is very talented – is going to be able to bring a lot of energy and new ideas to our research," said Lubans.

"All three have outstanding PhDs, and really high-quality publications that are internationally relevant. They are going to have a huge impact on physical education programs and their dissemination in Australian schools."

Reengaging teens in physical education

Re-engaging teens in Physical Education

David Lubans is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow who is delivering a range of innovative school programs designed to upskill teachers

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Career Summary

Biography

Associate Professor David Lubans is the theme leader for school-based research in the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition. His research is focused on understanding the determinants of physical activity and the development and evaluation of interventions in school and community settings. A/Prof Lubans is currently leading a number of research projects designed to evaluate the impact of physical activity interventions on behaviour, fitness, movement skills and social and emotional well-being in young people. He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and as a chief investigator he has secured over $2 million in competitive research funding. He is the Principal Investigator two Australian Research Council Discovery Projects focused on the promotion of physical activity and healthy eating among adolescents living in low-income communities. He is currently co-supervising 12 research higher degree students.

Research Expertise
Schools have been identified as key institutions for the promotion of physical activity and healthy lifestyles. In general, my research is focused on the promotion of physical activity and health among children and adolescents. A key area of interest is the impact of physical education, school sport and the school environment on health-related behaviours of students. Many of my current and proposed research projects aim to evaluate the impact of a diverse range of school and community based interventions designed to promote physical activity and prevent/treat childhood and adolescent obesity. Interventions are based on behavioural science theories and socio-ecological models to support behaviour change. My research also involves the evaluation of resistance training interventions designed to promote muscular fitness across a variety of settings in both clinical and non-clinical populations.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching expertise corresponds with my research interests. I currently teach a variety of team-based sports, exercise and fitness, and physical education teaching pedagogy.






Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Oxford - UK
  • Master of Educational Research Methodology, University of Oxford - UK

Keywords

  • Behaviour Change
  • Health and Fitness
  • Interventions
  • Motor Development and Skill Acquisition
  • Movement skills
  • Physical Activity
  • Physical Activity Measurement
  • Physical Activity Mediators
  • Physical Activity Promotion
  • Physical Education
  • Resistance Training

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 25
139999 Education not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2009 - 1/06/2011 Senior Lecturer

PRC in Physical Activity and Nutrition

University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2006 -  Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/12/2008 Lecturer

PRC in Physical Activity and Nutrition

University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/12/2000 Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/12/2000 Associate Lecturer in Health Studies University of Newcastle
School of Behavioural Health and Sciences
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/09/2000 University Internship Supervisor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2005 -  Strength and Conditioning Coach Newbury Rugby Football Club
Sporting Coaching
United Kingdom

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2002 - 1/12/2005 Physical Education Teacher / Strength and Conditioning Coach Oxfordshire County Council
St Edwards School, Oxford
United Kingdom
1/01/2000 - 1/12/2002 PDHPE Teacher NSW Department of Education and Training
Barker College, Sydney
1/01/1998 - 1/12/1999 PDHPE Teacher NSW Department of Education and Training
Newcastle High School

Invitations

External Examiner

Year Title / Rationale
2007 External Examiner
Organisation: Hong Kong Institute of Education Description: Dr Lubans was asked to review the development of the Associate Degree in Sports Coaching and Sports Management at the Hong Kong Institute of Education (2006) and is currently an external examiner to the program.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (146 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Harries SK, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of linear and undulating periodized resistance training programs on muscular strength.', J Strength Cond Res, 29 1113-1125 (2015)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000712
Co-authors Robin Callister
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Barnett LM, Lubans DR, 'Improvements in fundamental movement skill competency mediate the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children', Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 1908-1918 (2015)

Abstract: Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathwa... [more]

Abstract: Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have not been established. The aim of this study is to determine if changes in FMS competency mediated the effect of the Supporting Children¿s Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Eight primary schools (25 classes) and 460 children (aged 8.5¿±¿0.6, 54% girls) were randomised to the SCORES intervention or control group for the 12-month study. The outcomes were accelerometer-determined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness. The hypothesised mediators were actual FMS competency and perceived sport competence. Mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel linear analysis in MPlus. From the original sample, 138 (30.0%) and 370 (80.4%) children provided useable physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness data at post-test assessments. There were significant treatment effects for locomotor skills and overall FMSs. Changes in MVPA were associated with changes in object-control skills, overall FMSs and perceived competence. The overall FMSs had a significant mediating effect on MVPA (AB¿=¿2.09, CI¿=¿0.01¿4.55). Overall FMSs (AB¿=¿1.19, CI¿=¿0.002¿2.79) and locomotor skills (AB¿=¿0.74, CI¿=¿0.01¿1.69) had a significant mediating effect on cardiorespiratory fitness. The results of this study conclude that actual but not perceived movement skill competency mediated the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1017734
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2015 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Reliability and validity of a single-item physical activity measure for adolescents', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51 787-793 (2015)

Aims The aim of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of an adolescent single-item physical activity measure by comparing it with the exist... [more]

Aims The aim of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of an adolescent single-item physical activity measure by comparing it with the existing Oxford Physical Activity Questionnaire (OPAQ) and accelerometer output. Methods Participants were 123 adolescents (14.7 ± 0.5 years) from three secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia. To determine reliability, participants completed both questionnaires on two occasions separated by 2 weeks. To assess validity, participants wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers for a 7-day monitoring period and completed both physical activity questionnaires. Bivariate correlations between self-reported moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and accelerometer MVPA min/day were calculated. Results The single-item (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.83, P < 0.001) ) and the OPAQ (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.86, P < 0.001) were both found to have moderate-to-strong reliability. Correlations between self-reported and objectively measured MVPA were similar for the single-item measure (r = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.24-0.63, P < 0.001) and the OPAQ (r = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.30-0.65, P < 0.001). Conclusions These findings suggest the single-item measure can provide a reliable and valid assessment of youth physical activity.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.12836
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2015 Hills AP, Dengel DR, Lubans DR, 'Supporting Public Health Priorities: Recommendations for Physical Education and Physical Activity Promotion in Schools', PROGRESS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, 57 368-374 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.pcad.2014.09.010
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and skills intervention: SCORES cluster randomized controlled trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 765-774 (2015)

Purpose: Physical activity (PA) declines dramatically during adolescence, and activity levels are consistently lower among children living in low-income communities. Competency in... [more]

Purpose: Physical activity (PA) declines dramatically during adolescence, and activity levels are consistently lower among children living in low-income communities. Competency in a range of fundamental movement skills (FMS) may serve as a protective factor against the decline in PA typically observed during adolescence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 12-month multicomponent PA and FMS intervention on children attending primary schools in low-income communities. Methods: The Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise, and Skills intervention was evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial. The sample included 25 classes from eight primary schools located in low-income communities. Participants were 460 children (54.1% girls) age 8.5 T 0.6 yr. Primary outcomes were objectively measured PA (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers), FMS competency (Test of Gross Motor Development 2, six locomotor and six object control skills), and cardiorespiratory fitness (20-m multistage fitness test) assessed at baseline, midprogram (6-months), and at posttest (12 months). Linear mixed models, adjusted for sex, age, body mass index z-score, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and school class as a random factor, were used to assess the effect of the intervention. Results: At midprogram, there were no significant intervention effects for any of the outcomes. At posttest (study's primary time point), there were intervention effects for daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) (adjusted mean difference, 12.7 minIdj1 of MVPA; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.0-20.5), overall FMS competency (4.9 units; 95% CI, -0.04 to 9.8), and cardiorespiratory fitness (5.4 laps; 95% CI, 2.3-8.6). Conclusions: A school-based multicomponent PA and FMS intervention maintained daily MVPA, improved overall FMS competency, and increased cardiorespiratory fitness among children attending primary schools in low-income communities.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000452
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Barnett LM, Lubans DR, 'Improvements in fundamental movement skill competency mediate the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children', Journal of Sports Sciences, (2015)

Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have no... [more]

Numerous studies have identified a positive association between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competency and physical activity in children; however, the causal pathways have not been established. The aim of this study is to determine if changes in FMS competency mediated the effect of the Supporting Children¿s Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Eight primary schools (25 classes) and 460 children (aged 8.5¿±¿0.6, 54% girls) were randomised to the SCORES intervention or control group for the 12-month study. The outcomes were accelerometer-determined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness. The hypothesised mediators were actual FMS competency and perceived sport competence. Mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel linear analysis in MPlus. From the original sample, 138 (30.0%) and 370 (80.4%) children provided useable physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness data at post-test assessments. There were significant treatment effects for locomotor skills and overall FMSs. Changes in MVPA were associated with changes in object-control skills, overall FMSs and perceived competence. The overall FMSs had a significant mediating effect on MVPA (AB¿=¿2.09, CI¿=¿0.01¿4.55). Overall FMSs (AB¿=¿1.19, CI¿=¿0.002¿2.79) and locomotor skills (AB¿=¿0.74, CI¿=¿0.01¿1.69) had a significant mediating effect on cardiorespiratory fitness. The results of this study conclude that actual but not perceived movement skill competency mediated the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1017734
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 49 286-292 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Clare Collins, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015)

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to ident... [more]

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Clare Collins, Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015)

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to ident... [more]

Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Clare Collins
2015 Stacey FG, James EL, Chapman K, Courneya KS, Lubans DR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of social cognitive theory-based physical activity and/or nutrition behavior change interventions for cancer survivors', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 9 305-338 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11764-014-0413-z
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Erica James
2015 Barnett L, Reynolds J, Faigenbaum AD, Smith JJ, Harries S, Lubans DR, 'Rater agreement of a test battery designed to assess adolescents' resistance training skill competency', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 18 72-76 (2015)

Objectives: The study aim was to assess rater agreement of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training sk... [more]

Objectives: The study aim was to assess rater agreement of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training skill competency and includes six exercises. The RTSB can be used to assess performance and progress in adolescent resistance training programmes and to provide associated feedback to participants. Individual skill scores are based on the number of performance criteria successfully demonstrated and an overall resistance training skill quotient (RTSQ) is created by summing the six skill scores. Design/methods: The eight raters had varying experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training and completed a 2-3. h training session in how to assess resistance training performance using the RTSB. The raters then completed an assessment on six skills for 12 adolescents (mean age. =. 15.1 years, SD. =. 1.0, six male and six female) in a randomised order. Results: Agreement between seven of the eight raters was high (20 of the 21 pairwise correlations were greater than 0.7 and 13 of the 21 were greater than 0.8). Correlations between the eighth rater and each of the other seven raters were generally lower (0.45-0.78). Most variation in the assigned RTSB scores (67%) was between cases, a relatively small amount of the variation (10%) was between raters and the remainder (23%) was between periods within raters. The between-raters coefficient of variation was approximately 5%. Conclusions: The RTSB can be used reliably by those with experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training to assess the resistance skill of adolescents.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.11.012
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 40 150-158 (2015)

Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. ... [more]

Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Considering the growing popularity of screen-based recreation in adolescents, there is a need to identify effective strategies for reducing screen time among adolescents. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) study, an intervention designed to reduce recreational screen time among adolescents. Methods: The S4HM intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in eight secondary schools (. N=. 322 students) in New South Wales, Australia. The 6-month multi-component intervention will encourage adolescents to manage their recreational screen time using a range of evidence-based strategies. The intervention is grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and includes the following components: an interactive seminar for students, eHealth messaging, behavioral contract and parental newsletters. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6-months (i.e., immediate post-test). The primary outcome is recreational screen time measured by the Adolescent Sedentary Activity Questionnaire (ASAQ). Secondary outcomes include: self-reported psychological well-being, psychological distress, global physical self-concept, resilience, pathological video gaming and aggression, and objectively measured physical activity (accelerometry) and body mass index (BMI). Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: The S4HM study will involve the evaluation of an innovative, theory-driven, multi-component intervention that targets students and their parents and is designed to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. The intervention has been designed for scalability and dissemination across Australian secondary schools.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.12.001
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan, Geoff Skinner, Amanda Baker
2015 McCabe BE, Plotnikoff RC, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Lubans DR, 'Social Cognitive Mediators of Dietary Behavior Change in Adolescent Girls', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR, 39 51-61 (2015)
DOI 10.5993/AJHB.39.1.6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Reliability and validity of a single-item physical activity measure for adolescents.', J Paediatr Child Health, 51 787-793 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12836
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Miller A, Christensen EM, Eather N, Sproule J, Annis-Brown L, Lubans DR, 'The PLUNGE randomized controlled trial: evaluation of a games-based physical activity professional learning program in primary school physical education.', Prev Med, 74 1-8 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.02.002
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Narelle Eather
2015 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in adolescents: the CrossFit Teens¿ randomised controlled trial.', J Sports Sci, 1-15 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1045925
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2015 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Stodden DF, Lubans DR, 'Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial.', J Sports Sci, 1-8 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1069383
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2015 Hulteen RM, Lander NJ, Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Robertson SJ, Lubans DR, 'Validity and Reliability of Field-Based Measures for Assessing Movement Skill Competency in Lifelong Physical Activities: A Systematic Review.', Sports Med, (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-015-0357-0
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2015 Harries SK, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Comparison of resistance training progression models on maximal strength in sub-elite adolescent rugby union players.', J Sci Med Sport, (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.01.007
Co-authors Robin Callister
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Lubans DR, 'High-intensity interval training for improving health-related fitness in adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Br J Sports Med, (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094490
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2015 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Findings From the EASY Minds Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a Physical Activity Integration Program for Mathematics in Primary Schools.', J Phys Act Health, (2015)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2015-0046
Co-authors Kathryn Holmes, Philip Morgan, Nicholas Riley
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Paternal Lifestyle-Related Parenting Practices Mediate Changes in Children's Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors: Findings From the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Community Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Phys Act Health, (2014)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0367
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: the ATLAS RCT.', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Kerry Dally
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical Activity and Physical Self-Concept in Youth: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Sports Medicine, (2014) [C1]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been cond... [more]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been conducted. Objective The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the strength of associations between physical activity and physical self-concept (general and sub-domains) in children and adolescents. The secondary aim was to examine potential moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. Methods A systematic search of six electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, Web of Science and Scopus) with no date restrictions was conducted. Random effects meta-analyses with correction for measurement were employed. The associations between physical activity and general physical self-concept and sub-domains were explored. A risk of bias assessment was conducted by two reviewers. Results The search identified 64 studies to be included in the meta-analysis. Thirty-three studies addressed multiple outcomes of general physical self-concept: 28 studies examined general physical self-concept, 59 examined perceived competence, 25 examined perceived fitness, and 55 examined perceived appearance. Perceived competence was most strongly associated with physical activity (r = 0.30, 95 % CI 0.24-0.35, p < 0.001), followed by perceived fitness (r = 0.26, 95 % CI 0.20-0.32, p < 0.001), general physical self-concept (r = 0.25, 95 % CI 0.16-0.34, p < 0.001) and perceived physical appearance (r = 0.12, 95 % CI 0.08-0.16, p < 0.001). Sex was a significant moderator for general physical self-concept (p < 0.05), and age was a significant moderator for perceived appearance (p = 0.01) and perceived competence (p < 0.05). No significant moderators were found for perceived fitness. Conclusion Overall, a significant association has been consistently demonstrated between physical activity and physical self-concept and its various sub-domains in children and adolescents. Age and sex are key moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and physical self-concept in youth: systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports Med, 44 1589-1601 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and physical self-concept in youth: systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1589-1601 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014) [C1]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vita... [more]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Philip Morgan
2014 Plotnikoff R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Rhodes R, Costigan SA, 'The Intersect of Theory, Methods, and Translation in Guiding Interventions for the Promotion of Physical Activity: A Case Example of a Research Programme', AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGIST, 49 110-126 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ap.12037
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan, Philip Morgan
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Tracy Burrows, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2014 Owen KB, Smith J, Lubans DR, Ng JYY, Lonsdale C, 'Self-determined motivation and physical activity in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 67 270-279 (2014) [C1]

Objective: Self-determination theory is used as a framework for examining the relation between motivation and physical activity. The purpose of this review was to systematically r... [more]

Objective: Self-determination theory is used as a framework for examining the relation between motivation and physical activity. The purpose of this review was to systematically review studies that assessed the association between self-determined motivation and physical activity levels in children and adolescents. Method: We searched electronic databases in April 2013. Included studies assessed the relation between motivation (as outlined in self-determination theory) and physical activity in children and adolescents. Results: Forty-six studies ( n=15,984 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis indicated that overall levels of self-determined motivation had a weak to moderate, positive associations with physical activity ( ¿=.21 to .31). Autonomous forms of motivation (i.e., intrinsic motivation and identified regulation) had moderate, positive associations with physical activity ( ¿=.27 to .38), whereas controlled forms of motivation (i.e., introjection and external regulation) had weak, negative associations with physical activity ( ¿=.03 to 17). Amotivation had a weak, negative association with physical activity ( ¿=.11 to 21). Conclusions: Evidence provides some support for self-determination theory tenets. However, there was substantial heterogeneity in most associations and many studies had methodological shortcomings. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.033
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Lai SK, Costigan SA, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Stodden DF, Salmon J, Barnett LM, 'Do school-based interventions focusing on physical activity, fitness, or fundamental movement skill competency produce a sustained impact in these outcomes in children and adolescents? A systematic review of follow-up studies', Sports Medicine, 44 67-79 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and ad... [more]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and adolescents. Current reviews of interventions to improve these variables note few studies conduct follow-up assessments to assess behavior maintenance. Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether typically developing children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years) who have participated in school-based interventions have sustained outcomes in PA, fitness, and/or FMS. Methods: A systematic search of six electronic databases (CINAHL® Plus with Full Text, Ovid MEDLINE®, SPORTDiscus¿, Scopus, PsycINFO® and ERIC) was conducted from 1995 to 26 July 2012. Included studies were school-based studies (including randomized controlled trials, longitudinal cohort, quasi-experimental, and experimental) that had a positive effect at post intervention in at least one variable and had a follow-up PA, fitness, or FMS assessment at least 6 months after the post-intervention assessment. Risk of bias assessment was guided by the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses" statement. Results: The search identified 14 articles, and some studies addressed multiple outcomes: 13 articles assessed PA; three assessed fitness; and two assessed FMS. No study in this review met four key methodological criteria that have been shown to influence results, i.e., clarity on the randomization process, assessor blinding, analyzing participants in their original groups, and retaining sufficient participants through the entire study. Three-quarters (ten of 13) of the studies addressing PA, reported PA behavior change maintenance. The length of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 20 years, and the degree of PA difference reported was between 3 and 14 min per day. Only one of the three studies assessing fitness reported a sustained impact, whilst both studies that assessed FMS reported maintenance of effects. Conclusion: It is likely that PA is a sustainable outcome from interventions in children and adolescents, and there is reasonable evidence that interventions of longer than 1 year and interventions that utilize a theoretical model or framework are effective in producing this sustained impact. It would seem probable that FMS are a sustainable outcome in children and adolescents; however, this finding should be viewed with caution given the lack of studies and the risk of bias assessment. More research is needed to assess the sustainability of fitness interventions as this review only included a handful of studies that addressed fitness and only one of these studies found a sustained impact. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-013-0099-9
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: The ATLAS RCT', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kerry Dally, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Thorne HT, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Babic MJ, Lubans DR, 'Video game genre preference, physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities', Journal of Adolescence, 37 1345-1352 (2014) [C1]

The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adolescent boys and their participation in physical activity and recreation... [more]

The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adolescent boys and their participation in physical activity and recreational screen-time. Participants were 320 boys (mean age=12.7, ±0.5 years) from 14 secondary schools located in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Outcomes included height, weight, physical activity (accelerometers), total screen-time, and video game genre preference. Significant differences in both weekday and weekend screen-time were found between video game genre groups. In addition, significant differences in overall activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were found between genre groups on weekdays. Between-group differences in physical activity on weekends were not statistically significant. This cross-sectional study has demonstrated that video game genre preference is associated with physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities.

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.09.012
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2014 Lubans D, 'Obesity in men: are professional football clubs onside?', Lancet (London, England), 383 1190-1191 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/s0140-6736(13)62710-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Collins CE, Dewar DL, Schumacher TL, Finn T, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, '12 Month changes in dietary intake of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities following the NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial', APPETITE, 73 147-155 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2013.11.003
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children's adiposity, screen-time, diet and physical activity', Appetite, 79 149-157 (2014) [C1]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlat... [more]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlates of screen-time, diet and physical activity and (b) if there were differences in maternal and paternal physical activity- and dietary-related parenting practices. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 70 families with children (59% boys (41/70), mean age 8.4 (±2.4) years). Parenting practices were measured using the Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale. Children's outcomes included: 7-day pedometry (physical activity), screen-time, percent energy from core foods (Food frequency questionnaire) and BMI z-score. Multiple regression models were generated to examine the associations between maternal and paternal parenting practices and children's variables. In the regression analyses, fathers' BMI (p < .01) and mothers' control (p < .001) were significantly associated with child weight status. Fathers' reinforcement (p < .01) was significantly associated with child physical activity. For screen-time, mothers' monitoring (p < .001) and child characteristics [age (p = .01), sex (p = .01), BMI z-score (p = .03)] were significant predictors. Mothers' parenting practices [limit setting (p = .01), reinforcement (p = .02)] and child screen-time (p = .02) were significantly associated with intake of core foods. Despite some similarities within families, three out of five parenting constructs were significantly different between mothers and fathers. Mothers and fathers have different parental influences on their children's weight status and lifestyle behaviors and both should be included in lifestyle interventions targeting children. A focus on maternal parenting specifically relating to screen-time and diet, and father's physical activity parenting and weight status may support their children in developing more healthy behaviors. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Trost SG, Lubans DR, 'Adolescent pedometer protocols: examining reactivity, tampering and participants' perceptions', Journal of Sports Sciences, 32 183-190 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.815361
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Harries SK, Barnett LM, Faigenbaum AD, 'Development, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28 1373-1380 (2014) [C1]

The aim of this study was to describe the development and assess test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. T... [more]

The aim of this study was to describe the development and assess test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training skill competency and includes 6 exercises (i.e., body weight squat, push-up, lunge, suspended row, standing overhead press, and front support with chest touches). Scoring for each skill is based on the number of performance criteria successfully demonstrated. An overall resistance training skill quotient (RTSQ) is created by adding participants' scores for the 6 skills. Participants (44 boys and 19 girls, mean age = 14.5 ± 1.2 years) completed the RTSB on 2 occasions separated by 7 days. Participants also completed the following fitness tests, which were used to create a muscular fitness score (MFS): handgrip strength, timed push-up, and standing long jump tests. Intraclass correlation (ICC), paired samples t-tests, and typical error were used to assess test-retest reliability. To assess construct validity, gender and RTSQ were entered into a regression model predicting MFS. The rank order repeatability of the RTSQ was high (ICC = 0.88). The model explained 39% of the variance in MFS (p = 0.001) and RTSQ (r = 0.40, p = 0.001) was a significant predictor. This study has demonstrated the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the RTSB in a sample of adolescents. The RTSB can reliably rank participants in regards to their resistance training competency and has the necessary sensitivity to detect small changes in resistance training skill proficiency. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31829b5527
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting objective and self-report physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes', British Journal of Health Psychology, 19 329-346 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12085
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting objective and self-report physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes', British Journal of Health Psychology, 19 329-346 (2014) [C1]

Objective Theory-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) are more effective than atheoretical approaches; however, the comparative utility of theoretical models is r... [more]

Objective Theory-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) are more effective than atheoretical approaches; however, the comparative utility of theoretical models is rarely tested in longitudinal designs with multiple time points. Further, there is limited research that has simultaneously tested social-cognitive models with self-report and objective PA measures. The primary aim of this study was to test the predictive ability of three theoretical models (social cognitive theory, theory of planned behaviour, and protection motivation theory) in explaining PA behaviour. Methods Participants were adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 287, 53.8% males, mean age = 61.6 ± 11.8 years). Theoretical constructs across the three theories were tested to prospectively predict PA behaviour (objective and self-report) across three 6-month time intervals (baseline-6, 6-12, 12-18 months) using structural equation modelling. PA outcomes were steps/3 days (objective) and minutes of MET-weighted PA/week (self-report). Results The mean proportion of variance in PA explained by these models was 6.5% for objective PA and 8.8% for self-report PA. Direct pathways to PA outcomes were stronger for self-report compared with objective PA. Conclusions These theories explained a small proportion of the variance in longitudinal PA studies. Theory development to guide interventions for increasing and maintaining PA in adults with type 2 diabetes requires further research with objective measures. Theory integration across social-cognitive models and the inclusion of ecological levels are recommended to further explain PA behaviour change in this population. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Social-cognitive theories are able to explain partial variance for physical activity (PA) behaviour. What does this study add? The testing of three theories in a longitudinal design over 3, 6-month time intervals. The parallel use and comparison of both objective and self-report PA measures in testing these theories. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12085
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Okely AD, Batterham M, 'Exploring changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviors and hypothesized mediators in the NEAT girls group randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 39-46 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Batterham M, Lubans DR, 'Exploring changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviors and hypothesized mediators in the NEAT girls group randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 39-46 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of ... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior change. Design: Group randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Methods: The intervention, guided by Social Cognitive Theory, involved 357 adolescent girls (13.2. ±. 0.5 years) from 12 secondary schools (6 intervention schools, 6 control schools) in low-income communities in the Hunter and Central Coast regions of New South Wales, Australia.The intervention included enhanced school sport, lunchtime physical activity sessions, interactive seminars, student handbooks, nutrition workshops, pedometers, parent newsletters and text messages to encourage physical activity and healthy eating, and a decrease in sedentary behavior. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12-months and included: physical activity (accelerometers), sedentary behaviors (questionnaire and accelerometers), and social-cognitive mediators of physical activity (questionnaire). Results: There were significant between group differences in favor of the intervention group for self-reported recreational computer use (-26.0. min; 95% CI, -46.9 to -5.1), and sedentary activities summed (-56.4. min; 95% CI, -110.1 to -2.7), however objective sedentary behavior showed no differences. There were no group-by-time effects for any of the physical activity outcomes or hypothesized mediators. Conclusions: A school-based intervention tailored for adolescent girls from schools located in low-income communities significantly reduced time spent in sedentary activities. However, improvements in physical activity and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior were not observed. Future studies are encouraged to explore alternative mechanisms of behavior change derived from integrated and socio-ecological theories. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.003
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Barnett L, Reynolds J, Faigenbaum AD, Smith JJ, Harries S, Lubans DR, 'Rater agreement of a test battery designed to assess adolescents' resistance training skill competency', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

Objectives: The study aim was to assess rater agreement of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training sk... [more]

Objectives: The study aim was to assess rater agreement of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training skill competency and includes six exercises. The RTSB can be used to assess performance and progress in adolescent resistance training programmes and to provide associated feedback to participants. Individual skill scores are based on the number of performance criteria successfully demonstrated and an overall resistance training skill quotient (RTSQ) is created by summing the six skill scores. Design/methods: The eight raters had varying experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training and completed a 2-3 h training session in how to assess resistance training performance using the RTSB. The raters then completed an assessment on six skills for 12 adolescents (mean age = 15.1 years, SD = 1.0, six male and six female) in a randomised order. Results: Agreement between seven of the eight raters was high (20 of the 21 pairwise correlations were greater than 0.7 and 13 of the 21 were greater than 0.8). Correlations between the eighth rater and each of the other seven raters were generally lower (0.45-0.78). Most variation in the assigned RTSB scores (67%) was between cases, a relatively small amount of the variation (10%) was between raters and the remainder (23%) was between periods within raters. The between-raters coefficient of variation was approximately 5%. Conclusions: The RTSB can be used reliably by those with experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training to assess the resistance skill of adolescents. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.11.012
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2014 Schumacher TL, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Watson J, Guest M, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight low consumption of core foods', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 127-134 (2014) [C1]

Aim: Overweight and obesity prevalence is high among adolescent girls of low socioeconomic position and this increases their risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders... [more]

Aim: Overweight and obesity prevalence is high among adolescent girls of low socioeconomic position and this increases their risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders in adulthood. The aim of this present study was to describe the dietary patterns of adolescent girls in terms of the relative contribution of core food groups to overall diet and by weight status category. Methods: Year 8 female students were recruited from schools in low-income communities. Weight status (i.e. underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese) was determined using age- and sex-adjusted body mass index (BMI; z score). Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Individual foods were collated into core food group or energy-dense, nutrient-poor categories in line with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and the percentage contribution to total energy intake calculated. Results: Participants (n = 332) were (mean ± SD) 13.7 ± 0.4 years old with BMI z score 0.63 ± 1.22. Few girls met AGHE core food group recommendations for daily serves; meat and substitutes 69.3%, vegetables 28.6%, fruit 23.8%, dairy 15.7% and breads/cereals 5.7%. Total percentage energy derived from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods was 46.6% (37.2-54.6%) (median (interquartile range)), with takeaways 9.8% (7.0-13.6%), confectionery 7.0% (4.1-10.9%) and packaged snacks 6.8% (4.0-10.7%), with no significant differences by weight status. Conclusions: Core food intakes are poor with excessive consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods in these adolescent girls. Nutrition education programs targeting this population are needed to address this imbalance. Strategies could include substitution of unhealthy snacks for core food items and greater inclusion of core foods within main meals. © 2013 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12084
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold CM, Courneya KS, 'Testing mediator variables in a physical activity intervention for women with type 2 diabetes', PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE, 15 1-8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Schranz N, Olds T, Cliff D, Davern M, Engelen L, Giles-Corti B, et al., 'Results From Australia¿s 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 S21-S25 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0164
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) group randomized controlled trial: An obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys from schools in low-income communities', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 37 106-119 (2014) [C3]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth w... [more]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth who are 'at risk' of obesity. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities. Methods/design: The ATLAS intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia (2012 to 2014). ATLAS is an 8-month multi-component, school-based program informed by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory. The intervention consists of teacher professional development, enhanced school-sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, lunch-time physical activity mentoring sessions, pedometers for self-monitoring, provision of equipment to schools, parental newsletters, and a smartphone application and website. Assessments were conducted at baseline and will be completed again at 9- and 18-months from baseline. Primary outcomes are body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes include BMI z-scores, body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis), physical activity (accelerometers), muscular fitness (grip strength and push-ups), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, resistance training skill competency, daytime sleepiness, subjective well-being, physical self-perception, pathological video gaming, and aggression. Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: ATLAS is an innovative school-based intervention designed to improve the health behaviors and related outcomes of adolescent males in low-income communities. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.008
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Geoff Skinner, Kerry Dally, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Miller A, Scott JJ, Thompson D, Tudor-Locke C, 'Using Pedometers for Measuring and Increasing Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents: The Next Step', American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, (2014)
DOI 10.1177/1559827614537774
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Andrew Miller
2014 Stacey FG, James EL, Chapman K, Courneya KS, Lubans DR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of social cognitive theory-based physical activity and/or nutrition behavior change interventions for cancer survivors', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 9 305-338 (2014)

Purpose: Little is known about how to improve and create sustainable lifestyle behaviors of cancer survivors. Interventions based on social cognitive theory (SCT) have shown promi... [more]

Purpose: Little is known about how to improve and create sustainable lifestyle behaviors of cancer survivors. Interventions based on social cognitive theory (SCT) have shown promise. This review examined the effect of SCT-based physical activity and nutrition interventions that target cancer survivors and identified factors associated with their efficacy. Methods: A systematic search of seven databases identified randomized controlled trials that (i) targeted adult cancer survivors (any point from diagnosis); (ii) reported a primary outcome of physical activity, diet, or weight management; and (iii) included an SCT-based intervention targeting physical activity or diet. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted. Theoretical constructs and intervention characteristics were examined to identify factors associated with intervention efficacy. Results: Eighteen studies (reported in 33 publications) met review inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis (n = 12) revealed a significant intervention effect for physical activity (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.33; P < 0.01). Most studies (six out of eight) that targeted dietary change reported significant improvements in at least one aspect of diet quality. No SCT constructs were associated with intervention effects. There were no consistent trends relating to intervention delivery method or whether the intervention targeted single or multiple behaviors. Conclusions: SCT-based interventions demonstrate promise in improving physical activity and diet behavior in cancer survivors, using a range of intervention delivery modes. Further work is required to understand how and why these interventions offer promise for improving behavior. Implications for Cancer Survivors: SCT-based interventions targeting diet or physical activity are safe and result in meaningful changes to diet and physical activity behavior that can result in health improvements.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-014-0413-z
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'Physical education in secondary schools located in low-income communities: Physical activity levels, lesson context and teacher interaction', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower than re... [more]

Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower than recommended. Little is known about the PA levels of students from disadvantaged schools within PE. This study aimed to describe: (i) the PA levels of students from disadvantaged secondary schools during PE lessons, (ii) the lesson context and teacher interactions occurring during PE, and (iii) the associations between teacher, school or PE lesson characteristics with student physical activity levels in PE.: Design: Cross-sectional study of 100 Grade 7 PE lessons across 10 secondary schools.: Methods: System for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) was used to assess student PA, lesson context, and teacher interaction. Teacher and school characteristics were collected via survey. Mean proportion of lesson time was used to describe PA, lesson context and teacher interaction. Associations between each outcome variable and each characteristic were examined using 2-sample t-tests, ANOVAs and linear regression.: Results: Thirty-nine percent of PE lesson was spent in MVPA, and less than 10% spent in VA. Lessons in schools in urban areas included significantly more MVPA than rural areas (P = 0.04). Male teachers and more experienced teachers conducted lessons with significantly more VA than female and less experienced teachers (P = 0.04 and 0.02). MVPA was also higher in lessons conducted by more experienced teachers.: Conclusion: PA during PE lessons within disadvantaged secondary schools is below international recommendations. Male teachers, more experienced teachers and schools in urban regions teach more active lessons.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.12.003
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
2014 Riley N, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Young M, 'Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of the 'Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young (EASY) Minds' programme, a school-based intervention for integrating physical acti... [more]

Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of the 'Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young (EASY) Minds' programme, a school-based intervention for integrating physical activity (PA) into mathematics lessons. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Methods: Two classes from a single school (n = 54) were randomised to receive either the 6-week EASY Minds intervention (n = 27) or follow their usual school programme (n = 27). The intervention involved the embedding of PA across the pre-existing mathematics programme for 3. ×. 60. min sessions per week. Changes in PA were measured using accelerometers and 'on task' behaviour was measured using momentary time sampling observation. Results: Using intention-to-treat analysis, significant intervention effects were found for MVPA (9.7%, 95%CI = 7.6, 11.8, p =. 0.001) and sedentary time (-22.4%, CI = -24.9, -12.2, p =. 0.001) for the intervention group during Mathematics lessons (9.30am-10.30am). Significant intervention effects were also shown for MVPA 8.7% (95% CI = 5.8, 11.6, p =. 0.001 and sedentary time -18.6% (95% CI = -24.9, -12.2, p =. 0.001) across the whole school day. Furthermore, children displayed significantly greater 'on-task' behaviour across the intervention period with a 19.9% (95%CI = 2.4, 37.4, p =. 0.03) mean difference between groups. Conclusions: The EASY Minds programme demonstrated that integrating movement across the primary mathematics syllabus is feasible and efficacious in enhancing school based-PA and improving on-task behaviour in mathematics lessons.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.09.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Myles Young, Nicholas Riley, Philip Morgan
2014 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics.', BMC Public Health, 14 816 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-816
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kathryn Holmes, Philip Morgan, Nicholas Riley
2014 Ha AS, Ng JYY, Lonsdale C, Lubans DR, 'A school-based rope skipping intervention for adolescents in Hong Kong: Protocol of a matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-535
2014 Plotnikoff RC, Gebel K, Lubans DR, 'Self-efficacy, physical activity, and sedentary behavior in adolescent girls: Testing mediating effects of the perceived school and home environment', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 1579-1586 (2014) [C1]

Background: According to social-cognitive theory (SCT), self-efficacy affects health behavior both directly and indirectly by influencing how individuals perceive their environmen... [more]

Background: According to social-cognitive theory (SCT), self-efficacy affects health behavior both directly and indirectly by influencing how individuals perceive their environment. This study examines whether perceptions of home and school environment mediate the association between self-efficacy and physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior in adolescent girls. Methods: Baseline data from the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT) was used for this study. Grade 8 female students (n = 357) were recruited from 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in the Hunter Region, New South Wales, Australia. PA was assessed using accelerometers, and sedentary behavior by self-report and accelerometers. Self-reported measures were used for perceived home and school environment and self-efficacy. Multilevel regression models were calculated to determine if the perceived environment mediated the relationship between self-efficacy with both PA and sedentary behavior. Results: The perceptions of the school and home environment did not mediate the relationship between PA self-efficacy and PA behavior or sedentary behavior. Conclusion: The mediated models were not supported for PA or sedentary behavior. However, other results of this paper may be helpful for future theory development and practice. More research is needed to understand behaviors in unique populations such as this.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2012-0414
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Skinner G, Morgan PJ, 'Development and implementation of a smartphone application to promote physical activity and reduce screen-time in adolescent boys.', Front Public Health, 2 42 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00042
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Geoff Skinner
2014 Stacey FG, James EL, Chapman K, Courneya KS, Lubans DR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of social cognitive theory-based physical activity and/or nutrition behavior change interventions for cancer survivors', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11764-014-0413-z
Co-authors Erica James
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' lifestyle programme on the activity- and diet-related parenting practices of fathers and mothers', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e149-e155 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijpo.248
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: A cross-sectional study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014) [C1]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known... [more]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children's fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities.Methods: Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5 ± 0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children's fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X + accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA.Results: After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P = 0.002, r = 0.15) and after-school (P = 0.014, r = 0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P < 0.001, r = 0.20), lunchtime (P = 0.03, r = 0.10), recess (P = 0.006, r = 0.11) and after-school (P = 0.022, r = 0.13) MVPA.Conclusions: Object-control skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children's MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children's MVPA throughout the day.Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12611001080910. © 2014 Cohen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-49
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni ND, Lubans DR, 'Community-based physical activity interventions for treatment of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analysis.', Frontiers in Endocrinology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fendo.2013.00003
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2013 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Smith J, Dally K, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of the Motivation to Limit Screen-time Questionnaire (MLSQ) for adolescents.', Prev Med, 57 561-566 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.07.023
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Kerry Dally, Philip Morgan
2013 Farmanbar R, Niknami S, Lubans DR, Hidarnia A, 'Predicting exercise behaviour in Iranian college students: Utility of an integrated model of health behaviour based on the transtheoretical model and self-determination theory', HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, 72 56-69 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0017896911430549
2013 Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Scott HA, Cohen KE, Lubans DR, 'Fundamental movement skill interventions in youth: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Pediatrics, 132 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2013-1167
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans DR, Mundey C, Lubans NJ, Lonsdale C, 'Testing physical activity mediators in an intervention for sedentary older adults', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT PSYCHOLOGY, 44 252-262 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.7352/IJSP2013.44.252
2013 Lonsdale C, Rosenkranz RR, Peralta LR, Bennie A, Fahey P, Lubans DR, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions designed to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in school physical education lessons', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 56 152-161 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.12.004
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni N, Lubans DR, 'Social cognitive theories used to explain physical activity behavior in adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 56 245-253 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.013
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Lonsdale C, Rosenkranz RR, Sanders T, Peralta LR, Bennie A, Jackson B, et al., 'A cluster randomized controlled trial of strategies to increase adolescents' physical activity and motivation in physical education: Results of the Motivating Active Learning in Physical Education (MALP) trial', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 57 696-702 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.09.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving the fitness and physical activity levels of primary school children: Results of the Fit-4-Fun group randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 56 12-19 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity in primary school children. Methods: Four Hunter primary schools were recruited in April, 2011 and randomized by school into treatment or control conditions. Participants included 213 children (mean age=10.72years±0.6; 52.2% female) with the treatment group (n=118) completing the 8-week Fit-4-Fun Program. Participants were assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up, with a 91% retention rate. Cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) (20m shuttle run) was the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes included body composition (BMI, BMIZ), muscular fitness (7-stage sit-up test, push-up test, basketball throw test, Standing Jump), flexibility (sit and reach) and physical activity (7days pedometry). Results: After 6-months, significant treatment effects were found for CRF (adjusted mean difference, 1.14 levels, p<0.001), body composition (BMI mean, -0.96kg/m2, p<0.001 and BMI z-score mean -0.47 z-scores, p<0.001), flexibility (sit and reach mean, 1.52cm, p=0.0013), muscular fitness (sit-ups) (mean 0.62 stages, p=0.003) and physical activity (mean, 3253 steps/day, p<0.001). There were no group by time effects for the other muscular fitness measures. Conclusions: A primary school-based intervention focusing on fitness education significantly improved health-related fitness and physical activity levels in children. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.10.019
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather
2013 Dewar DL, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, Lubans DR, 'Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls From Low-Income Communities', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT, 84 483-491 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02701367.2013.842454
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'The nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls study: A cluster randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45 313-317 (2013) [C1]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the ... [more]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the 24-month impact of a school-based obesity prevention program among adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Design The study was a school-based group RCT, the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) intervention. Setting/participants The study involved 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 357 adolescent girls (aged 13.2±0.5 years). Intervention The 12-month multicomponent intervention was guided by social cognitive theory and involved strategies to promote physical activity, reduce sedentary behaviors, and improve dietary outcomes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was BMI, and secondary outcomes were BMI z-score; percentage body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis); physical activity (accelerometers); dietary intake; and recreational screen-time (self-report). Data were collected in 2010-2012 and analyzed in 2012. Results After 24 months, there were no intervention effects on BMI (adjusted mean difference -0.33, 95% CI= -0.97, 0.28, p=0.353) and BMI z-score (-0.12, 95% CI= -0.27, 0.04, p=0.178). However, there was a group-by-time interaction for percentage body fat (-1.96%, 95% CI= -3.02, -0.89, p=0.006). Intervention effects for physical activity, screen time, and dietary intake were not significant. Conclusions The NEAT Girls intervention did not result in effects on the primary outcome. Further study of youth who are "at risk" of obesity should focus on strategies to improve retention and adherence in prevention programs. Trial registration This study is registered at Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials ACTRN1261000033004. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.04.014
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2013 Barnett LM, Hardy LL, Lubans DR, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Hills AP, Morgan PJ, 'Australian children lack the basic movement skills to be active and healthy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 82-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE12920
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans DR, Jones R, Okely AD, Salmon J, Baur LA, 'Review of Australian childhood obesity research funding 2010-2013', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 155-155 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1071/HE13017
2013 Costigan SA, Barnett L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'The Health Indicators Associated With Screen-Based Sedentary Behavior Among Adolescent Girls: A Systematic Review', JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH, 52 382-392 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.07.018
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2013 Lubans DR, Mundey CM, Lubans NJ, Lonsdale CC, 'Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial: Elastic-Resistance-Training and Lifestyle-Activity Intervention for Sedentary Older Adults', JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 21 20-32 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, McCargar L, 'A Test of the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Physical Activity in an Overweight/Obese Population Sample of Adolescents From Alberta, Canada', HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR, 40 415-425 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198112455642
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2013 Hardy LL, Hills AP, Timperio A, Cliff D, Lubans D, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A hitchhiker's guide to assessing sedentary behaviour among young people: Deciding what method to use', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16 28-35 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To provide a user's guide for selecting an appropriate method to assess sedentary behaviours among children and adolescents. Design: While recommendations regarding spe... [more]

Objective: To provide a user's guide for selecting an appropriate method to assess sedentary behaviours among children and adolescents. Design: While recommendations regarding specific instruments are not provided, the guide offers information about key attributes and considerations for objective (accelerometry; inclinometers; direct observation; screen monitoring devices) and subjective (self-report; parent report; and time use diaries/logs) approaches to assess sedentary behaviour Attributes of instruments and other factors to be considered in the selection of assessment instruments include: population (age); sample size; respondent burden; method/delivery mode; assessment time frame; physical activity information required (data output); data management; measurement error; cost (instrument and administration) and other limitations. Methods: Expert consensus among members of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network's (ACAORN) Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Special Interest Group. Results: We developed decision flow charts to assist researchers and practitioners select an appropriate method of assessing sedentary behaviour, identified attributes of each method and described five real-life scenarios to illustrate considerations associated with the selection of each method of measurement. Conclusions: It is important that researchers, practitioners and policy makers understand the strengths and limitations of different methods of assessing sedentary behaviour among youth, and are guided on selection of the most appropriate instrument/s to suit their needs. © 2012 .

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.05.010
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2013 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: study protocol for the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-57
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Social support from teachers mediates physical activity behavior change in children participating in the Fit-4-Fun intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-68
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather
2013 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent physical activity', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10 544-555 (2013) [C1]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adol... [more]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adolescents. Methods: An instrument was developed based on constructs from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and included the following scales: self-efficacy, situation (perceived physical environment), social support, behavioral strategies, and outcome expectations and expectancies. The questionnaire was administered in a sample of 171 adolescents (age = 13.6 ± 1.2 years, females = 61%). Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to examine model-fit for each scale using multiple indices, including chi-square index, comparative-fit index (CFI), goodness-of-fit index (GFI), and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Reliability properties were also examined (ICC and Cronbach's alpha). Results: Each scale represented a statistically sound measure: fit indices indicated each model to be an adequate-to-exact fit to the data; internal consistency was acceptable to good (a = 0.63-0.79); rank order repeatability was strong (ICC = 0.82-0.91). Conclusions: Results support the validity and reliability of social cognitive scales relating to physical activity among adolescents. As such, the developed scales have utility for the identification of potential social cognitive correlates of youth physical activity, mediators of physical activity behavior changes and the testing of theoretical models based on Social Cognitive Theory. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc..

Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the Fit4Fun intervention for improving physical fitness in a sample of primary school children: a pilot study', PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT PEDAGOGY, 18 389-411 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408989.2012.690375
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan
2013 Nihill GFJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'Associations between sedentary behavior and self-esteem in adolescent girls from schools in low-income communities', Mental Health and Physical Activity, 6 30-35 (2013) [C1]

Background: Excessive time spent in sedentary behavior is associated with a range of physiological, psychosocial and behavioral health concerns in youth. Objective: The primary ai... [more]

Background: Excessive time spent in sedentary behavior is associated with a range of physiological, psychosocial and behavioral health concerns in youth. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between sedentary behavior and self-esteem among adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Methods: Participants were 357 girls [mean age (standard deviation) = 13.2 (0.5) years] from 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Height, weight, body fat (bio-electrical impedance analysis) and physical activity (accelerometers), self-esteem were assessed. Results: Significant inverse associations were found between self-esteem and time spent watching DVDs and using the computer for non-school purposes, but no relationship was found between TV viewing and self-esteem. The relationship between sedentary time (%) from accelerometers and self-esteem was not significant. Conclusions: Sedentary behavior is a pervasive public health concern and time spent in specific screen-based recreation was associated with self-esteem in adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Our findings are indicative of the complex nature of these relationships and reveal a need for further longitudinal and intervention-based research in the field. Copyright © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2012.02.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, (2013) [C1]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vita... [more]

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Philip Morgan
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, Collins CE, 'Explaining dietary intake in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. A test of Social Cognitive Theory', Appetite, 58 517-524 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Lubans DR, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Cotton W, Puglisi L, Miller J, 'Description and evaluation of a social cognitive model of physical activity behaviour tailored for adolescent girls', Health Education Research, 27 115-128 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2012 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Bray JF, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 55 408-411 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: One-year outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls (NEAT Girls) cluster randomized controlled trial', Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 166 821-827 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2012 Jaenke RL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Warren JM, 'The impact of a school garden and cooking program on boys' and girls' fruit and vegetable preferences, taste rating, and intake', Health Education & Behavior, 39 131-141 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Potential moderators and mediators of intervention effects in an obesity prevention program for adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 519-525 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.03.011
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 Harries SK, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Resistance training to improve power and sports performance in adolescent athletes: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 532-540 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Robin Callister
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Trinh L, Craig CL, 'A 15-year longitudinal test of the theory of planned behaviour to predict physical activity in a randomized national sample of Canadian adults', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 13 521-527 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Weaver KE, Callister R, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities', BMC Public Health, 12 1-11 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 Rosenkranz RR, Lubans DR, Peralta LR, Bennie A, Sanders T, Lonsdale C, 'A cluster-randomized controlled trial of strategies to increase adolescents' physical activity and motivation during physical education lessons: The Motivating Active Learning in Physical Education (MALP) Trial', BMC Public Health, 12 834 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans NJ, 'Review: A systematic review of the impact of physical activity programmes on social and emotional well-being in at-risk youth', Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 17 2-13 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Jung M, Eves N, Sigal R, 'Testing mediator variables in a resistance training intervention for obese adults with type 2 diabetes', Psychology and Health, 27 1388-1404 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent dietary behaviours', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Mediators of weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot study for overweight fathers', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 45 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Taymoori P, Berry TR, Lubans DR, 'Tracking of physical activity during middle school transition in Iranian adolescents', Health Education Journal, 71 631-641 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Morgan PJ, Saunders KL, Lubans DR, 'Improving physical self-perception in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools: Psychological outcomes from the Physical Activity Leaders randomized controlled trial', Pediatric Obesity, 7 e27-e32 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2012 Kelty TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Efficacy and feasibility of the 'Girls' Recreational Activity Support Program Using Information Technology': A pilot randomised controlled trial', Advances in Physical Education, 2 10-16 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Tracey Kelty
2011 James EL, Stacey FG, Chapman K, Lubans DR, Asprey G, Sundquist K, et al., 'Exercise and nutrition routine improving cancer health (ENRICH): The protocol for a randomized efficacy trial of a nutrition and physical activity program for adult cancer survivors and carers', BMC Public Health, 11 236 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-236
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Erica James
2011 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial study protocol', BMC Public Health, 11 902 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-902
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Narelle Eather
2011 Okely AD, Cotton WG, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Puglisi L, Miller J, et al., 'A school-based intervention to promote physical activity among adolescent girls: Rationale, design, and baseline data from the Girls in Sport group randomised controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 11 658 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller
2011 Lubans DR, Boreham CA, Kelly P, Foster CE, 'The relationship between active travel to school and health-related fitness in children and adolescents: A systematic review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 8 5 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 48
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, McCormack AC, 'Adolescents and school sport: The relationship between beliefs, social support and physical self-perception', Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 16 237-250 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408989.2010.532784
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2011 Jones RA, Sinn N, Campbell KJ, Hesketh K, Denney-Wilson E, Morgan PJ, et al., 'The importance of long-term follow-up in child and adolescent obesity prevention interventions', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 6 178-181 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/17477166.2011.575155
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2011 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough-and-tumble play: Implications for early childhood services', Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36 131-138 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan
2011 Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Engaging men in weight loss: Experiences of men who participated in the male only SHED-IT pilot study', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 5 e239-e248 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2011.03.002
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, '12-month outcomes and process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT: An internet-based weight loss program targeting men', Obesity, 19 142-151 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2010.119
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2011 Farmanbar R, Niknami S, Hidarnia A, Lubans DR, 'Psychometric Properties of the Iranian Version of the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 (BREQ-2).', Health promotion perspectives, 1 95-104 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.5681/hpp.2011.010
2011 Hall LE, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Children's intake of fruit and selected energy-dense nutrient-poor foods is associated with fathers' intake', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 111 1039-1044 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jada.2011.04.008
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Aguiar EJ, Callister R, 'Randomized controlled trial of the Physical Activity Leaders (PALs) program for adolescent boys from disadvantaged secondary schools', Preventive Medicine, 52 239-246 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.009
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2011 Barnett LM, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Ball K, Lubans DR, 'A reverse pathway? Actual and perceived skill proficiency and physical activity', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43 898-904 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e3181fdfadd
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, Riley N, Smith CJ, 'Test-retest reliability of a battery of field-based health-related fitness measures for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 685-693 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2010.551215
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff, Nicholas Riley
2011 Smith CJ, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'A systematic review of strength and conditioning programmes designed to improve fitness characteristics in golfers', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 933-943 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2011.571273
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Robin Callister
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', International Journal of Obesity, 35 436-447 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence JC, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada', Journal of Adolescent Health, 49 547-549 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.03.006
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan
2011 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Men participating in a weight-loss intervention are able to implement key dietary messages, but not those relating to vegetables or alcohol: the Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology (SHED-IT) study', Public Health Nutrition, 14 168-175 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980010001916
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2011 Lubans DR, Cliff DP, 'Muscular fitness, body composition and physical self-perception in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 14 216-221 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2010.10.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2011 Lubans DR, Hesketh K, Cliff DP, Barnett LM, Salmon J, Dollman J, et al., 'A systematic review of the validity and reliability of sedentary behaviour measures used with children and adolescents', Obesity Reviews, 12 781-799 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2010 Lubans DR, Sheaman C, Callister R, 'Exercise adherence and intervention effects of two school-based resistance training programs for adolescents', Preventive Medicine, 50 56-62 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.12.003
Co-authors Robin Callister
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Cliff DP, Barnett LM, Okely AD, 'Fundamental movement skills in children and adolescents: Review of associated health benefits', Sports Medicine, 40 1019-1035 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2165/11536850-000000000-00000
Citations Scopus - 130Web of Science - 123
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Exploring the mechanisms of physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Program X intervention for adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 47 83-91 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.12.015
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Taymoori P, Lubans DR, Berry TR, 'Evaluation of the health promotion model to predict physical activity in Iranian adolescent boys', Health Education & Behavior, 37 84-96 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198109356407
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2010 Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Quick GIE, Collins CE, 'The impact of nutrition education with and without a school garden on knowledge, vegetable intake and preferences and quality of school life among primary-school students', Public Health Nutrition, 13 1931-1940 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980010000959
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2010 Lubans DR, Aguiar EJ, Callister R, 'The effects of free weights and elastic tubing resistance training on physical self-perception in adolescents', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 11 497-504 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2010.06.009
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Robin Callister
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, et al., 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', BMC Public Health, 10 652 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'Exploring the mechanisms of weight loss in the SHED-IT intervention for overweight men: A mediation analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 Article 76 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-76
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'The SHED-IT Randomized Controlled Trial: Evaluation of an Internet-based weight-loss program for men', Obesity, 17 2025-2032 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2009.85
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 61
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Tudor-Locke C, 'A systematic review of studies using pedometers to promote physical activity among youth', Preventive Medicine, 48 307-315 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.02.014
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Boreham CA, Callister R, 'The relationship between heart rate intensity and pedometer step counts in adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 27 591-597 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640410802676687
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effects of integrating pedometers, parental materials, and e-mail support within an extracurricular school sport intervention', Journal of Adolescent Health, 44 176-183 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.06.020
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Social, psychological and behavioural correlates of pedometer step counts in a sample of Australian adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 141-147 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2007.06.010
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Sylva K, 'Mediators of change following a senior school physical activity intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 134-140 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2007.08.013
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2009 Farmanbar R, Niknami S, Heydarnia A, Hajizadeh E, Lubans DR, 'Predicting exercise behavior among Iranian college students using the Transtheoretical Model and structural equation modeling', European Journal of Scientific Research, 31 355-365 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
2008 Taymoori P, Lubans DR, 'Mediators of behavior change in two tailored physical activity interventions for adolescent girls', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 9 605-619 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.psychsport.2007.09.001
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
2008 Taymoori P, Niknami S, Berry T, Lubans DR, Ghofranipour F, Kazemnejad A, 'A school-based randomized controlled trial to improve physical activity among Iranian high school girls', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-5-18
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of an extra-curricular school sport programme on determinants of objectively measured physical activity among adolescents', Health Education Journal, 67 305-320 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0017896908097072
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2008 Lubans DR, Foster C, Biddle SJH, 'A review of mediators of behavior in interventions to promote physical activity among children and adolescents', Preventive Medicine, 47 463-470 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.07.011
Citations Scopus - 117Web of Science - 102
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Evaluation of an extra-curricular school sport programme promoting lifestyle and lifetime activity for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 26 519-529 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640410701624549
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2008 Lubans DR, Sylva K, Osborn Z, 'Convergent validity and test-retest reliability of the Oxford Physical Activity Questionnaire for secondary school students', Behaviour Change, 25 23-34 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1375/bech.25.1.23
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'The relationship between pedometer step counts and estimated VO2 max as determined by a submaximal fitness test in adolescents', Pediatric Exercise Science, 20 273-284 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2007 Lubans DR, Sylva K, Morgan PJ, 'Factors associated with physical activity in a sample of British secondary school students', Australian Journal of Educational & Developmental Psychology, 7 22-30 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'The 'Learning to Enjoy Activity with Friends' Programme', Education & Health, 25 10-14 (2007) [C2]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2006 Lubans DR, Syjva K, 'Controlled evaluation of a physical activity intervention for senior school students: Effects of the lifetime activity program', Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 28 252-268 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 15
Show 143 more journal articles

Conference (76 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Webster CA, Schaefer J, Morgan P, Lubans D, Penney D, Okely A, Parrish A-M, 'Defining Quality Physical Education: An Analysis of International Documents', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2013 Lloyd A, Lubans D, Plotnikoff R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'A comparison of maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children¿s physical activity, screen-time, diet and adiposity', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2013 Lubans DR, Dewar D, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Two Year Outcomes and Moderators of Intervention Effects from the NEAT Girls Obesity Prevention Group Randomised Controlled Trial.', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Lubans D, Dewar D, Plotnikoff R, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, Morgan PJ, 'Two year outcomes and moderators of intervention effects from the NEAT Girls obesity prevention group randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2013 Morgan PJ, Smith J, Plotnikoff R, Dally K, Finn T, Okley A, et al., 'Group randomised controlled trial of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-Time (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Lubans D, Lonsdale C, Morgan PJ, Smith J, Dally K, Plotnikoff R, 'Instrument development and initial validity for a scale to measure adolescents¿ motivation to limit their screen time', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference, Newcastle, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2012 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, 'Explaining physical activity behaviour in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: A test of social cognitive theory', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Harries SK, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Resistance training to improve power and sports performance in adolescent athletes: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2012 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'The impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community RCT on fathers' physical activity-related parenting practices and children's physical activity', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Weaver K, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Dewar DL, Finn TL, et al., 'Rationale and intervention description of the Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills physical activity intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2012 Stacey FG, James EL, Lubans DR, Chapman K, Boyes AW, Courneya K, et al., 'Acceptability of home-based resistance training for cancer survivors', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Ron Plotnikoff, Erica James, Philip Morgan
2012 Hardy LL, Hills A, Timperio A, Cliff D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A hitchhiker's guide to assessing sedentary behavior among young people: Deciding what method to use', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2012 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Philip Morgan
2012 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary findings of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) Minds feasibility study: A curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, Philip Morgan
2012 Scott J, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Trost S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Pedometer protocols for measuring physical activity: An examination of reactivity, tampering and perceptions among adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold C, Courneya K, 'Testing mediator variables in a physical activity intervention for women with Type 2 Diabetes', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: Outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012 James EL, Boyes AW, Courbeya K, Lubans DR, Stacey FG, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A home-based resistance training program for survivors of prostate cancer: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Erica James, Allison Boyes, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Smith J, Morgan PJ, Saunders KL, Lubans DR, 'Improving physical self-perception in adolescent boys from disadvantaged communities: Psychological outcomes from the PALs intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2012 Collins CE, Schumacher R, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Finn TL, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight inadequate consumption of core food groups', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Finn TL, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls in low-income secondary schools: One year outcomes of the NEAT girls randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Penfold C, Courneya K, 'Testing the utility of three social-cognitive models for predicting physical activity in overweight adults with Type 2 diabetes', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'Investigating the measurement and operationalisation of obesity-related parenting variables of overweight fathers in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Andersen LB, Lubans DR, 'Active travel and biological health outcomes in young people', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
2011 Farmanbar R, Niknami S, Hidarnia A, Lubans DR, 'The effect intervention based on transtheoretical model and self-determination theory to promote and maintenance physical activity in college students', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'A description of the operationalisation and measurement of key parenting variables in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program for overweight fathers and their children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Lubans DR, Okely A, Morgan PJ, Cotton W, Puglisi L, Miller J, 'Description and evaluation of a social cognitive model of physical activity behavior tailored for adolescent girls', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyr039
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2011 Lubans DR, Rosenkranz R, Bennie A, Lonsdale C, 'A systematic review of interventions designed to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during physical education lessons', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
2011 Lubans DR, 'The Relationship between Active Travel to School and Health-Related Fitness in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-8-5
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence J, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of Canadian adolescents', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Methodology of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) minds study: evaluation of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Nicholas Riley
2011 Stacey FG, Lubans DR, James EL, Chapman K, Asprey G, 'Exploring potential mediators of physical activity behaviour change in the ENRICH lifestyle intervention for cancer survivors and carers', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James
2011 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Okely T, 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2011 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Jung M, Eves N, Sigal R, 'Mediators of change in a resistance training intervention for adults with Type 2 Diabetes', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'The Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2010 Stacey FG, James EL, Chapman K, Lubans DR, Asprey G, Sundquist K, et al., 'ENRICH (Exercise and Nutrition Routine Improving Cancer Health): Efficiacy and feasibility of an exercise and nutrition program for cancer survivors and carers', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Washington, DC (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Erica James
2010 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the healthy dads healthy kids randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2010 Kelty TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'The Girls Recreational Activity Support Program using Internet Technology (GRASP-IT) feasibility and preliminary efficacy', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Tracey Kelty, Philip Morgan
2010 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Quick GIE, Collins CE, 'Impact of a school garden-enhanced nutrition education on primary students vegetable intake and preferences, knowledge, and quality of school life', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Exploring the effects of the physical activity leaders (PALs) intervention for low-active adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools: A mediation analysis', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Rationale and intervention description of a primary school-based program to integrate physical activity across the curriculum and engage children in movement-based learning', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, Philip Morgan
2010 James EL, Chapman K, Stacey FG, Asprey G, Lubans DR, Sundquist K, et al., 'Description and preliminary evaluation of the ENRICH (Exercise and Nutrition Routine Improving Cancer Health) program', 10th Behavioural Research in Cancer Control Conference, Perth, WA (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James, Allison Boyes
2010 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough and tumble play', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference Proceedings, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher
2010 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, 'Strategies For Successful Weight Loss In Men: Lessons From The SHED-IT Randomised Controlled Trial', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, Baltimore, MD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2010 Barnett L, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Ball K, Lubans DR, 'Evidence for a reciprocal dynamic relationship between fundamental motor skill proficiency, perceived sports competence, and physical activity', Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, Tuscan, Arizona (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2010 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The development of scales for assessing social cognitive constructs relating to physical activity participation in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts, Port Douglas, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Aguiar EJ, Callister R, 'Randomised controlled trial of the Physical Activity Leaders (PALs) program for low-active adolescent boys from disadvantaged secondary schools', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts, Port Douglas, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren J, Callister R, '12-month outcomes and process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT: An Internet-based weight loss program targeting men', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2010.119
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'Strategies for successful weight loss in men: Lessons from the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, '12-month outcomes of an Internet-based weight loss program for men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Rationale and intervention description of a school-based obesity prevention program for economically disadvantaged adolescent boys', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, McCormack AC, 'Exploring adolescents' perceptions of school sport: A survey of secondary school students from the Hunter Region and Central Coast', 26th ACHPER International Conference: Creating Active Futures: Program & Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2009 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Strategies used to lose weight in the SHED-IT weight loss study for men', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray JF, Fletcher R, et al., 'Using mediation analysis to explain weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Bray JF, Okely T, et al., 'Engaging overweight men to improve their health: Lessons learnt from the 'SHED-IT' and 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trials', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren JM, Callister R, 'Dietary intake changes in men participating in the SHED-IT weight loss intervention', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2009 Jaenke R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Quick GIE, Warren JM, 'Does a school garden program have a differential impact on vegetable intakes in boys versus girls attending primary school?', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Quick GIE, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Warren JM, 'Process evaluation of a primary school garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Fernance D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'The development of scales for assessing social cognitive constructs relating to physical activity participation in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2009 Lubans DR, Sheaman C, Callister R, 'Exercise adherence and intervention effects of two school-based resistance training programs in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.12.003
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Robin Callister
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Bray JF, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'Intervention description and preliminary findings of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009 Smith C, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'A review of strength and conditioning programs designed to improve fitness in golfers', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2009 Callister R, Simpson N, Dyson RM, Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, 'Reliability of the ImpSFB7 bio-impedance analyser for body composition analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Evaluation of the impact of an internet-based weight loss program for men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2008 Lubans DR, Foster C, Biddle S, 'A review of mediators of behaviour in interventions to promote physical activity among children and adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, QLD (2008) [E3]
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effects of a school-based intervention incorporating pedometers and email support to promote physical activity and health eating in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2008 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial: Evaluation of an Internet-based weight loss program for men', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Tudor-Locke C, 'A review of studies using pedometers to promote physical activity among youth', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Hypothesized mediators of weight change in an Internet-based weight loss intervention for overweight men: The self-help exercise & diet using information technology (SHED-IT) RCT', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Boreham C, Callister R, 'The relationship between heart rate intensity and pedometer step counts in adolescents', Proceedings of the 3rd Australian Association for Exercise and Sports Science Conference and the 5th Sports Dietitians Australia Update: From Research to Practice, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Callister R, 'The relationship between pedometer step counts and cardiorespiratory fitness as determined by a submaximal fitness test in adolescents', Proceedings of the 3rd Australian Association for Exercise and Sports Science Conference and the 5th Sports Dietitians Australia Update: From Research to Practice, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Effects of an extra-curricular school sport program on lifestyle physical activity and sedentary behaviour', International Conference on Physical Activity & Obesity in Children. Science, Policy, Practice. Presentation and Poster Abstracts, Toronto, Ontario (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of an extra-curricular school sport programme on potential determinants of physical activity', Pace Yourself 2007: The 25th National/International ACHPER Biennial Conference. Book of Abstracts, Fremantle, WA (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan
Show 73 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Lubans DR, 'Physical Education Trends in Australia and Europe', ( pp.149): American Heart Association (2013) [O1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 40
Total funding $4,254,010

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $8,950

2015 International Visitor from University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada$8,950

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Dr Mark Beauchamp
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401298
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

201410 grants / $2,050,528

Investigating the effects and maximising the benefits of increased physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviour on wellbeing in youth$800,282

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Future Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301163
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving teaching quality through peer observation and feedback: an investigation of the impact of Quality Teaching Rounds $730,433

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Communities

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Communities
Project Team Professor Jennifer Gore, Ms Julie Bowe, Professor Max Smith, Doctor Nicole Mockler, Professor David Lubans
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400499
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Engaging dads and daughters to increase physical activity and social and emotional well-being in pre-adolescent girls: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) program$327,813

Funding body: Port Waratah Coal Services Limited

Funding body Port Waratah Coal Services Limited
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Myles Young
Scheme Community Investment and Partnership Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401411
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

DVC(R) Research Support for Future Fellow (FT14)$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400945
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

the Effectiveness of Feasible Physical Activity Population-based Approaches for Inactive Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study Assessing Tailored and Preference Modes of Delivery$40,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor David Lubans, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Professor Ronald Sigal, Professor Kerry Coumeya
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400674
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Engaging fathers to improve physical activity levels and social-emotional well-being in their daughters: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Enjoying Exercise) study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes
Scheme Youth Research Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301335
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a multi-component intervention to reduce screen-time in adolescents: The ‘Stand Up for Healthy Minds’ study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301432
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Efficacy of a Home-based Resistance Training Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Dennis Taaffe, Miss Fiona Stacey
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301395
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The impact of high intensity interval training on physical and psycho-social outcomes in low-active adolescents: A randomised controlled trial$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1500311
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural, Nutrition and Physical Activity, San Diego USA, 21-24 May 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400592
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20133 grants / $107,901

Translation of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids program in local communities: Transitioning for sustainability$73,436

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301006
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of a School-based Physical Activity Intervention in At-risk Communities$32,965

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Dr Chris Lonsdale, Professor David Lubans, Dr Gregory Kolt, Dr Lousia Peralta, Professor Anthony Maeder, Professor Jennifer Gore, Professor Ester Cerin, Professor Nikos Ntoumanis
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201273
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, USA 16-20 Nov 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300768
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20125 grants / $408,835

Increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour to improve health and wellbeing in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools$261,837

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Kerry Dally, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100085
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Investigating the effects and maximising the benefits of increased physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviour on health and well-being in youth.$88,150

Funding body: The Wests Group Australia

Funding body The Wests Group Australia
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Postgraduate Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200998
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Thinking while moving: Development of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school$54,568

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Communities

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Communities
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Mr Nick Riley, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201201
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Promoting physical activity and reducing screen-time in adolescents: Research Advisory Group funding$2,930

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201075
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

22nd Annual Scientific meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society, 18-20 Oct 2012$1,350

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200717
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20116 grants / $742,336

Physical Activity and Nutrition: The University of Newcastle's Approach Toward Better Population Health and Education$321,711

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Benjamin Ewald, Professor Manohar Garg, Associate Professor Erica James, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100058
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) study$220,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100880
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Physical Activity 4 Every 1$110,000

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Promotion Demonstration Research Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100605
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

HNEPH Health Promotion Demonstration Grant- PA4E1$87,875

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Promotion Demonstration Research Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100762
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The Fit-4-Fun Program: promoting fitness and health in primary school children$2,000

Funding body: Sports Medicine Australia

Funding body Sports Medicine Australia
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100582
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Melbourne, 15 - 18 June 2011$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100389
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20104 grants / $780,303

The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships$524,453

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Victoria Clay, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Richard Fletcher, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Anthony Okely
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000001
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Engaging economically disadvantaged adolescent girls in physical activity and healthy eating to improve health and prevent obesity$155,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Anthony Okely, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190012
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Physical Activity and Population Health Education$100,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting, Sydney, 21 - 23 October 2010$850

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000773
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20092 grants / $17,232

Promotion of physical activity and healthy eating among low-SES adolescent boys$9,905

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Youth Research Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189812
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Girls in sport intervention and research project 2008-2011$7,327

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Training

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Training
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190216
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20085 grants / $102,989

Healthy dads, healthy kids project: feasibility and benefits of a father-focused child obesity prevention intervention$50,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Richard Fletcher, Dr Janet Warren, Professor Anthony Okely
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189179
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Evaluation of the benefit of a school garden$41,284

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Clare Collins
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188614
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The effects of resistance training on physiological and psychological health in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial$5,192

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189042
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The effects of resistance training on physiological and psychological health in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Pilot Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189383
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, 16/10/2008 - 18/10/2008$1,513

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189219
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20073 grants / $26,659

Evaluation of an Internet-based Weight Loss Program for Men$14,796

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187848
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Evaluation of an enhanced school sport program for adolescents promoting healthy eating and physical activity$10,163

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187834
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Conference on Physical Activity & Obesity in Children, Toronto, Canada 24/6/2007 - 27/6/2007$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187741
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $8,277

Promoting participation in lifetime physical activities among adolescents: The LEAF (Learning to Enjoy Activity with Friends) program$8,277

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor David Lubans
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186766
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed7
Current13

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD3.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Creating and Implementing a Physical Activity Intervention Created by Teenage Girls for Teenage Girls - Listening for and Reliably Delivering that Which Makes a Difference in Causing Adolescent Girls to Engage in Physical Activity
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Evaluation of a Multi-Component Screen-Time Reduction Intervention in Adolescents: The 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' Study
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Lifelong Physical Activities: Conceptual Definition, Participation Rates and Importance of Movement Skill Competency
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Impact of High Intensity Interval Training on Physical and Psycho-Social Outcomes in Low-Active Adolescents
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Integrating Smartphone Technology and the Physical Environment to Promote Physical Activity in an "At Risk" Population. Randomised Controlled Trial of the Park Fit Intervention
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD A Multi-Component Intervention in Disadvantaged Secondary Schools to Reduce the Decline in Adolescent Physical Activity
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) Group Randomised Controlled Trial: A Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skills Intervention for Primary Schools in Low-Income Communities
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Measurement of Physical Activity: An Examination of the Adolescent Population
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Resistance Training in Adolescent Rugby Union Players
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD A Longitudinal Examination of Elements Associated with Educational Outcomes: Testing an Integrated Whole-Child Whole-School Model of Learning in Disadvantaged High School Communities
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Development and Evaluation of a Primary School-Based Program to Integrate Physical Activity Across the Curriculum: the E.A.S.Y Minds Program
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD A Randomised Trial of a Healthy Lifestyle Program for Cancer Survivors and their Partners/Caregivers
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2007 Masters Contribution of fictional literature to health understanding and attitudes in early childhood
Education Studies, University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention Designed to Improve Health-Related Fitness in Adolescent Boys from Schools in Low-Income Communities: The 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD The Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' Program for Overweight Fathers and Their Children on Lifestyle-related Parenting
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters The Effects of Improving Fitness Characteristics on Overall Performance in Junior Golfers
Human Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD The Fit-4-Fun Study: Promoting Physical Activity and Physical Fitness in Primary School-Aged Children
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) Group Randomised Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a School-based Obesity Prevention Program for Adolescent Girls from Low-income Communities
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 Masters Feasibility of the 'Girls Recreational Activity Support Program using Information Technology' (GRASP-IT) Pilot Study: A Randomised Controlled Trial to Increase Physical Activity Among Older Adolescent Girls using a Social Networking Website
Curriculum & Education Studies, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD An Examination of the New South Wales Electronic Gaming Machine Industry 1995 to 2005 and its Historical, Regulatory, Political and Economic Contexts
Political Science, Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 133
Canada 17
United Kingdom 17
United States 12
Iran, Islamic Republic of 7
More...
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News

Teen boys swap screens for fitness

February 17, 2015

A school-based physical activity study called ATLAS (Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time) has achieved the double 'whammy' – a marked improvement in fitness among adolescent boys and a reduction in television and video game usage.

2014 Scopus Researchers

Scopus Young Researchers

September 22, 2014

UON academics have featured prominently in the 2014 Scopus Young Researcher of the Year Awards, receiving honours in three of five categories.

David Lubans

SCORES a winner for children’s fitness

August 5, 2014

More than 200 young school children have gained profound fitness benefits from a year-long physical activity and movement skills intervention run by University of Newcastle researchers.

ARC Future Fellows

July 23, 2014

Six mid-career researchers at the University of Newcastle (UON) have received funding under the Australian Research Council's (ARC) Future Fellowships scheme, just announced.

Teachers and Teaching Research Program

Teachers and teaching

May 15, 2014

University of Newcastle research program, Teachers and Teaching, proves collaboration is the key to success in teaching and research.

David Lubans

School-based solution helps inactive teens

March 5, 2014

School-based intervention programs may offer hope for inactive teenage girls, a University of Newcastle study has found.

childhoodobesity

The relationship between technology use and childhood obesity

June 19, 2013

The University of Newcastle is leading a research project into the link between adolescent boys, the amount of time that they spend in front of a computer or TV screen and their level of physical fitness.

Professor David Lubans

Position

ARC Future Fellow
Physical Education
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email david.lubans@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 2049
Fax (02) 4921 7407

Office

Room ATC Rm301C
Building Health and Physical Education Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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