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Dr Julia Coffey

Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science (Sociology and Anthropology)

Julia Coffey is advancing our sociological understanding of body image and health

Body image is a persistent and intensifying concern for young people and new approaches are urgently needed to address this significant health and well-being issue. By listening to young people's ways of tackling problems, Dr Julia Coffey is advancing our sociological understanding of body image and health.

Dr Julia Coffey

Julia’s research highlights the importance of the body in young people’s lives. Young people’s body image is formed against the backdrop of increasingly intense social and cultural pressures regarding bodily appearance. Julia explains that sociological approaches are important in addressing the social dimensions of the issue, with key factors of consumer culture, development of new lifestyles, and an emphasis on crafting a fit, beautiful body as vital for understanding the heightened significance of the body in western societies such as Australia.

Julia, a member of the Newcastle Youth Studies Group, has contributed significantly to the sociology of youth and health by advancing our understanding of how young bodies are produced in relation to socio-cultural contexts. These issues are the focus of her recently published books, Body Work: Youth, Gender and Health in Routledge’s Youth and Young Adulthood Series, and Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, co-edited with University of Birmingham’s Shelley Budgeon and University of Melbourne’s Helen Cahill.

Her empirical studies engage cutting-edge concepts and perspectives on the body, gender and identity to understand the body as actively produced through affective relations, rather than a passive object upon which social and cultural meanings are inscribed.

Through her research she aims to uncover how young people negotiate their identities and the world to find ways of supporting their health and wellbeing.

"I believe that young people are experts in their own issues and wellbeing," Julia said.

"I am trying to change the perspective that people often have of young people. They have a lot of knowledge and expertise around how to address the problems they face, and this research can inform policy that will make a real difference to their health."

Julia has applied her expertise to issues relating to youth, the body and gender to inform understandings of steroid use, cosmetic surgery, exercise and diet, health, and appearance pressure for young women and men.

Her 2012 PhD at the University of Melbourne explored ‘body work’ practices in young people – how they change their appearance in ways ranging from diet and exercise to surgery and taking steroids in order to influence how they are perceived in the world. These themes are the focus of her book, Body Work: Youth, Gender and Health (Routledge, 2016).

“While their body work ranged from the mundane to the extreme, what was common in both genders was that young people felt these practices were important in order to maintain their identity – and that stopping them would entail a loss of self,” Julia explained.

"Body image is one of the top three concerns of young people in Australia, for both young women and men. But people negotiate body image at a range of different levels.

“By understanding how bodies are thought of and lived by young people, we can better understand the pressures that are leading to this increasing anxiety, in both genders, about the body."

Her post-doctoral work has involved a range of research projects related to the health and wellbeing of young people, including the Learning Partnerships Project, an education project using high school students to role play issues around help seeking to train student teachers and doctors. The project has been highly successful in promoting student wellbeing in Melbourne and it’s hoped it will be developed into a national resource.

In addition, Julia has worked on a UNESCO curriculum and training program that targets key populations vulnerable to HIV in South Asia and the Pacific by training young people to deliver information to their own groups.

In 2015, Julia was awarded the University of Newcastle Vice Chancellor’s Early Career Researcher of the Year, and Research Excellence and Innovation Awards. She was also awarded an International Visiting Fellowship to host Professor Jessica Ringrose, from University College London, UK.

This Fellowship is a significant collaboration with an internationally renowned researcher in gender and education including young people’s digital sexual cultures, which encompasses issues such as ‘sexting’ and cyberbullying. Ringrose is a member of the Institute of Education, London; the world’s leading centre for education and applied social sciences, which currently ranked number one for education worldwide. In collaboration with Helen Cahill and researchers from the Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Julia and Ringrose are working to refine new participatory arts­-based research methods for investigating young people’s perceptions of the influences on their gender identity, body image and body work practices.

“Poor body image is debilitating and can significantly impact on an individual’s capacity to participate fully in society,” Julia said.

“My research will be useful in producing strategies to promote the wellbeing and full engagement of Australian youth in society – in education as well as employment.”

Julia Coffey is advancing our sociological understanding of body image and health

Julia Coffey is advancing our sociological understanding of body image and health.

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Career Summary

Biography

Julia Coffey is a lecturer in sociology in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Newcastle, Australia. She is currently co-convenor of the TASA Sociology of Youth thematic group. Her research is in the field of health sociology, with a focus on youth, the body, and gender. Julia has also worked on areas related to health and youth in education and development. Julia has published on young people’s body work practices and identity, health and the body, and pedagogy. She is especially interested in the ways body work practices are shaped by health and gender ideals and theories of the body.

Julia is currently working on a project titled: ‘Youth, transitions and bodies’, which aims to advance sociological understandings of body image and health in young people’s transitions from education to employment in rural and urban contexts.

Recent research projects have investigated: Youth health issues, such as ‘Learning Partnerships’ which explored young people’s willingness to seek help for sexual health, mental health and substance issues; and ‘NewGen Asia’ which targets a leadership and advocacy course to young people from key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure in Asia.

Research Expertise
Main areas of research expertise involve sociology, health and the body. I have worked on a range of research projects including youth mental health and wellbeing, body image and identity, health inequalities, and health pedagogy in education. My PhD in Sociology was completed and awarded in 2012. I completed my doctoral study under Professor Johanna Wyn at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne. My thesis title was: ‘Exploring Body Work Practices: Bodies, Affect and Becoming’, and used qualitative interviewing methods. Health was a major emphasis in the interpretation of data and the research findings, as discourses of health were central to young women’s and men’s body work practices, and how they understood the benefits and risks. Key research projects: ‘Learning Partnerships’ (2012-2013), Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne Funded by the CASS Foundation, researching the impact of the ‘Learning Partnerships’ curriculum which involves collaborations between school students and tertiary students of Medicine and Education, and investigating the impact of the program on adolescent help- seeking through collecting interview and survey data. Chief investigator: Helen Cahill ‘NewGen Asia’ (2012-2013), Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne In collaboration with UNESCO, UNICEF and YouthLEAD, researching the impact of the ‘NewGen Asia’, a leadership course designed specifically to equip young people from key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure in Asia with knowledge and skills in communication, advocacy and leadership.The course employs conceptually driven, participatory pedagogical approaches to youth health initiatives. This is very applied, high impact work which contributes directly to policy. Chief investigator: Helen Cahill ‘Drug Education in Victorian Schools’ (2009-2013) Australian Research Council Linkage Grant with partner organisations Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, the University of Melbourne, Oxford Brookes University (UK) and the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. Chief investigator: Helen Cahill (University of Melbourne), Richard Midford (Charles Darwin University) Role: Research officer, 2012-2013.

Teaching Expertise
Between 2009 – 2013 I taught in four Sociology courses in the School of Social and Political Science, two Masters of Education courses in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, and one Breadth course (all at the University of Melbourne). o Sociology of Youth (2012, 2013) o Leading Educational Ideas (2013, 2014); o Reading Educational Research (2013); o Ethics, Gender and the Family (2013, 2014); o Social Science Research Methods (2010); o Sociology of the Body (2009) I have delivered guest lectures on health and body image, identity, gender and sexuality, in sociology, education and health courses.

Administrative Expertise
I am co-convener and communications officer for The Australian Sociological Association’s Youth Thematic Group (2013-2015), alongside Dr David Farrugia and Dr Paula Geldens. This role fosters networks and communications that operate at a school, faculty, university and national level in the field of Sociology.

Collaborations
Julia is a member of the Newcastle Youth Studies Group.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Monash University

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Health
  • Identity
  • Methodology
  • Sociology
  • The body
  • Youth

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified 50
160806 Social Theory 25
169901 Gender Specific Studies 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2011 - 1/06/2014 Research fellow The University of Melbourne
Youth Research Centre, Melbourne Graduate School of Education
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2014 Dr Julia Coffey
University of Melbourne
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Coffey J, Budgeon S, Cahill H, Learning Bodies The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, Springer, 267 (2016)
2016 Coffey J, Body Work Youth, Gender and Health, Routledge, New York, 192 (2016) [A1]

Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Coffey JE, ''She was becoming too healthy and it was just becoming dangerous': Body work and assemblages of health', Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, Springer, Singapore 191-203 (2016) [B1]
2016 Coffey JE, Landstedt E, 'The social context of youth mental health', Routledge Handbook of Youth and Young Adulthood, Routledge, London and New York (2016)
2016 Coffey JE, Ringrose J, 'Boobs and Barbie: Feministposthuman perspectives on gender, bodies and practice', Practice Theory and Education: Diffractive readings in professional practice, Routledge, London and New York 175-192 (2016) [B1]
2016 Coffey JE, Budgeon S, Cahill H, 'Introduction: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies', Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, Springer, Singapore 1-22 (2016) [B1]
2016 Budgeon S, Cahill H, Coffey JE, 'Conclusion: Towards Embodied Theories, Methodologies and Pedagogies', Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, Springer, Singapore 259-267 (2016) [B1]
2016 Coffey J, 'Youth, health and morality: Body work and health assemblages', Neoliberalism, Austerity, and the Moral Economies of Young People's Health and Well-being 69-86 (2016)

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017.In the current neo-Liberal context, individuals are both required and expected to be responsible for managing the health an... [more]

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017.In the current neo-Liberal context, individuals are both required and expected to be responsible for managing the health and wellbeing of their bodies (Moore 2010). A range of sociological work has argued the current emphasis on individual responsibility for managing health and the body is indicative of the ways in which neo-Liberal rationality permeates contemporary social life (Rose 1996; Lupton 1999). This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study to explore the ways in which moral imperatives of health and wellbeing shape young people¿s negotiations of health and body work practices. Body work practices, which include diet, exercise and all practices aimed at modifying the body¿s form or appearance, are a central way in which young people are encouraged to be increasingly responsible for their own health and wellbeing. The moral and individualistic dimensions of ¿health¿ were apparent in many instances in interviews with young people. Many spoke of how they felt ¿lazy¿ or ¿slack¿ if they had not been exercising regardless of the broader contexts of their lives such as long working hours in casualised industries. Where ¿fit, healthy¿ bodies were broadly described as ¿deserving of respect¿, people with ¿overweight¿ were described as moral failures, lacking in self-esteem and self-restraint. The chapter combines a Deleuzo-Guattarian theorisation of health as an assemblage to analyse the ways in which moral imperatives function through discourses and affects associated with neo-Liberal conditions. From this perspective, health as an assemblage is comprised (among numerous other things) by discourses, such as those which emphasise individualised self-responsibility and bodily perfection in Western, neo-Liberal contexts, as well as through affects which mediate a body¿s capacities (what a body can do) (Coffey 2014). The examples and analysis aim to show the ways in which moral imperatives of health function through discourses of neo-Liberal self-responsibility, and through affect and embodied sensations, such as in the importance of ¿looking healthy¿ and ¿feeling healthy¿ and ¿worry¿ associated with becoming overweight.

DOI 10.1057/978-1-137-58266-9_4
2016 Coffey JE, Budgeon S, Cahill H, 'Introduction: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies', Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies, Springer, Singapore 1-22 (2016) [B1]
2015 Coffey JE, Watson J, 'Bodies: Corporeality and Embodiment in Childhood and Youth Studies', Handbook of Children and Youth Studies, Springer, New York 185-200 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-981-4451-15-4_1
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Stokes H, Aaltonen S, Coffey JE, 'Young People, Identity, Class, and the Family', Handbook of Children and Youth Studies, Springer, New York 259-278 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-981-4451-15-4_59
2015 Cahill H, Coffey JE, Beadle S, 'Performative Pedagogy: Poststructural Theory as a Tool to Engage in Identity Work Within a Youth-Led HIV Prevention Program', Handbook of Children and Youth Studies, Springer, New York 301-314 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-981-4451-15-4_68
Citations Scopus - 1
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Landstedt E, Coffey J, Wyn J, Cuervo H, Woodman D, 'The Complex Relationship between Mental Health and Social Conditions in the Lives of Young Australians Mixing Work and Study', Young, 110330881664948-110330881664948 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1103308816649486
2016 Coffey J, '¿What can I do next?¿: Cosmetic Surgery, Femininities and Affect', Women: A Cultural Review, 27 79-95 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09574042.2015.1122481
2016 Ravn S, Coffey J, '¿Steroids, it¿s so much an identity thing!¿ perceptions of steroid use, risk and masculine body image', Journal of Youth Studies, 19 87-102 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.This paper explores how taste and distaste, body image and masculinity play into young people¿s perceptions of risk related to steroid use. Data are draw... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.This paper explores how taste and distaste, body image and masculinity play into young people¿s perceptions of risk related to steroid use. Data are drawn from a qualitative study on risk-taking among 52 Danish youths enrolled in high school or vocational training. A number of ¿risky¿ practices such as drug use, fights, speeding, etc. were discussed. In contrast to these practices, which were primarily described in relation to ¿physical risks¿, steroid use was understood as part of an ¿identity¿ or ¿lifestyle¿ in a way these other risks were not. Few interviewees had used steroids, and the large majority distanced themselves from the practice. Reasons for not wanting to use steroids were related to (1) perceiving the drug to be part of a broader lifestyle and identity that they are not interested in committing to or embodying and (2) finding the body image, physicality and associations with steroid use ¿fake¿, ¿gross¿ and distasteful. We draw on recent developments in feminist sociological theory related to the gendered body as both a performance and process to understand steroid use as a practice through which the body and self is produced. More than a one-dimensional ¿risky¿ practice, we argue that gendered and embodied identities are crucial to understanding the dynamics of steroid use.

DOI 10.1080/13676261.2015.1052051
2016 Crofts J, Coffey J, 'Young women¿s negotiations of gender, the body and the labour market in a post-feminist context', Journal of Gender Studies, 1-15 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor & FrancisThis article explores the ways the body and femininity is understood and negotiated in relation to employment. This article draws on interview data from an... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & FrancisThis article explores the ways the body and femininity is understood and negotiated in relation to employment. This article draws on interview data from an Australian study which aimed to explore what it meant to be a ¿young woman¿ in neoliberal late modernity, and in relation to the paradoxes of post-feminism. Though there has been an unprecedented rise in youth post-secondary school participation in Australia and elsewhere, girls¿ and young women¿s increased investment and participation in education has not provided the same gains as for their male counterparts. All interview participants described being aware of gender inequalities and gender discrimination in the workplace, including the glass ceiling, the gender pay gap, and demands and pressures on women to balance career and motherhood, however many did not associate these issues with ¿feminism¿. We explore the dynamics of notions of equality, difference and the body in participants¿ discussions of work and their anticipation of motherhood and the logics by which gender inequalities are sustained.

DOI 10.1080/09589236.2015.1130610
2016 Cahill H, Coffey J, McLean Davies L, Kriewaldt J, Freeman E, Acquaro D, et al., 'Learning with and from: positioning school students as advisors in pre-service teacher education', Teacher Development, 20 295-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Teacher Development.This article reports on an innovative pedagogical approach within the Learning Partnerships program in which school students help to ¿teach the teache... [more]

© 2016 Teacher Development.This article reports on an innovative pedagogical approach within the Learning Partnerships program in which school students help to ¿teach the teachers¿ within pre-service teacher education. Classes of school students join with classes of pre-service teachers to provide input on how teachers can enhance school students¿ engagement and wellbeing. The article draws on data collected from 125 students (aged 13¿16) and 120 pre-service teachers in these workshops. Findings generated from a mixed methods study combining pre-workshop focus groups (n¿=¿Students: 38, Teachers: 33) and post-workshop focus groups (n¿=¿Students: 69, Teachers: 15) and post-workshop surveys (n¿=¿Students: 96; Teachers: 101) demonstrated that the workshops were mutually beneficial for both students and pre-service teachers. Participants found that workshopping together enhanced their belief in the possibility of positive student¿teacher relationships. The pre-service teachers reported greater confidence in communicating with young people about the issues that affect student engagement and wellbeing. The school students reported that they were more willing to use teachers as a source of help. Implications include the need for increased attention to a ¿third space¿ for learning in teacher development which provides opportunity for learning with and from young people about how to foster their engagement and wellbeing.

DOI 10.1080/13664530.2016.1155478
2016 Cahill H, Coffey JE, Wyn J, Beadlie S, 'The challenge of addressing continuity in gendered patterns in Asia and the Pacific', Journal of Applied Youth Studies, 1 42-57 (2016)
2016 Cahill H, Coffey J, Smith K, 'Exploring embodied methodologies for transformative practice in early childhood and youth', Journal of Pedagogy, 7 79-92 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/jped-2016-0005
2016 Landstedt E, Coffey J, Nygren M, 'Mental health in young Australians: a longitudinal study', Journal of Youth Studies, 19 74-86 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2015.1048205
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Coffey J, ''I put pressure on myself to keep that body': 'Health'-related body work, masculinities and embodied identity', Social Theory and Health, 14 169-188 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.This article draws on qualitative interview data exploring men's understandings of their bodies and practices of body work in Australia in the con... [more]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.This article draws on qualitative interview data exploring men's understandings of their bodies and practices of body work in Australia in the context of increasing 'visibility' of men's bodies and increasing attention to young men's body image. For the men discussed in this article, body work practices of eating and exercise in particular relate to their embodiments of masculinity and to their broader understandings of their bodies and 'selves'. While appearance and 'beauty' are typically constructed as feminine concerns and important to women's constructions of identity, these examples show that a concern for the body's appearance is also an important component of current embodiments of masculinity. This article provides an outline of a Deleuze-Guattarian approach to theorising the body through the concepts of affect and assemblage and suggests how this approach can assist in empirical analysis of the complex, contingent and contradictory relationship between the idealisation of health as an 'image' and 'ideal' gendered appearances in young men's gendered and 'health'-related body work practices. This has academic and practical implications for understanding contemporary gender arrangements related to the social and cultural circumstances in which the body is becoming ever more central.

DOI 10.1057/sth.2015.27
2016 Cahill H, Coffey J, 'Positioning, participation, and possibility: using post-structural concepts for social change in Asia-Pacific youth HIV prevention', Journal of Youth Studies, 19 533-551 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.This article addresses one of the areas of global concern for Southern youth: HIV rates amongst young people from key communities. In the Asia-Pacific reg... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.This article addresses one of the areas of global concern for Southern youth: HIV rates amongst young people from key communities. In the Asia-Pacific region 95% of all new infections occur amongst those under 25. Furthermore, in this region the nature of the epidemic is concentrated, chiefly affecting people from certain sub-groups such as those who inject drugs, sell sex, participate in male-to-male sex and people who are transgender. In this article we discuss an innovative peer-led leadership and advocacy program for youth which uses post-structural theoretical frames and concepts in an effort to steer against the dominant medicalised and individualising storylines which tend to inform approaches to HIV prevention. We draw on examples and data collected from the NewGen Asia Leadership training program to illustrate the ways post-structural concepts can be used to inform program design as well as analysis and critique of the impact of change efforts. Rather than the traditional focus on transmission of knowledge, skills, and attitudes in prevention efforts, we aim to show how the concepts of positioning, platform, and possibility may be mobilised in strategies used to address the challenge of HIV prevention amongst key youth populations.

DOI 10.1080/13676261.2015.1083960
2015 Cahill H, Coffey J, Sanci L, ''I wouldn't get that feedback from anywhere else': Learning partnerships and the use of high school students as simulated patients to enhance medical students' communication skills Curriculum development', BMC Medical Education, 15 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0315-4
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Coffey J, '¿As long as I¿m fit and a healthy weight, I don¿t feel bad¿: Exploring body work and health through the concept of ¿affect¿', Journal of Sociology, 51 613-627 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1440783313518249
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Cahill H, Coffey J, Lester L, Midford R, Ramsden R, Venning L, 'Influences on teachers' use of participatory learning strategies in health education classes', Health Education Journal, 73 702-713 (2014)

© 2014 The Author(s).Objective: Participatory learning strategies are integral to the effectiveness of school-based health education programmes; however, use of such methods is n... [more]

© 2014 The Author(s).Objective: Participatory learning strategies are integral to the effectiveness of school-based health education programmes; however, use of such methods is not the norm in teaching. The omission of participatory learning strategies is a common form of programme breakdown leading to erosion of positive learning and behavioural outcomes. Based on a survey of 75 Australian high school health education teachers, the studys objective is to examine teachers perspectives on the factors that influence their use of participatory learning strategies.Results: Whilst it is often presumed that training is the most significant factor, this study found that teachers identify understanding the educational rationale for the approach, student engagement, confidence in class control, and having positive relationships with the students, along with practicalities such as having time to adequately prepare a class, as the most significant influences on their pedagogical choices.Conclusion: The study concludes that a better understanding of the reasons why teachers make particular choices in their delivery of programmes gives valuable insight into what teachers need in order to support uptake or maintenance of such approaches. This understanding may in turn contribute to health education programmes being delivered with a higher fidelity and better outcomes for students.

DOI 10.1177/0017896913513892
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Coffey J, Farrugia D, 'Unpacking the black box: the problem of agency in the sociology of youth', JOURNAL OF YOUTH STUDIES, 17 461-474 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13676261.2013.830707
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors David M Farrugia
2013 Coffey J, 'Bodies, body work and gender: Exploring a Deleuzian approach', Journal of Gender Studies, 22 3-16 (2013)

This article is concerned with the relationships between the body, gender, and society. Body work, which involves a range of practices to maintain or modify the body's appearance,... [more]

This article is concerned with the relationships between the body, gender, and society. Body work, which involves a range of practices to maintain or modify the body's appearance, is central to the way the body is experienced in a Western, industrialized, and consumerist society such as Australia. Through body work practices, gender is continually reasserted and reconstructed. Examining body work is a way of exploring the ways that gender is embodied and lived. Body work must be understood as embodied processes which move beyond binarized analyses of the body in society. In this regard, embodiment and Deleuzian frameworks which focus on 'becomings' provide important analytic insights. Drawing on 22 qualitative in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted in 2010 with men and women aged 18-35 in Melbourne, Australia, this article explores the ways that body work and gender can be understood as relations through which bodies 'become'. There were contrasts and similarities between the male and female participants' experiences of feeling pressure to change their bodies. Most women recognized the social pressure guiding expectations of their bodies, and although many felt that this was inappropriate, this did not lessen the pressure they experienced to 'work on' their bodies. A number of men too described feeling pressure to attain, or maintain, the ideal body but were less critical of this pressure. Body work must be understood as embodied processes which move beyond binarized analyses of the body. In this regard Deleuzian frameworks that focus on 'becomings' provide important conceptual developments. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/09589236.2012.714076
Citations Scopus - 20
2013 Coffey J, ''Body pressure': Negotiating gender through body work practices', Youth Studies Australia, 32 39-48 (2013)

Body image concerns have been highlighted as a key issue for young Australians. Drawing on qualitative research, this paper contextualises the current sociological interest in the... [more]

Body image concerns have been highlighted as a key issue for young Australians. Drawing on qualitative research, this paper contextualises the current sociological interest in the body, and explores the ways that the body is understood as linking with numerous social forces, particularly gender. While many women in the study discussed feeling under pressure to live up to standards of feminine beauty, a number of men also spoke about experiencing pressure or anxiety related to how their body looks. It is crucial to study the ways both young women and young men experience their bodies in the context of gender and body work, to enable a consideration of the ways masculinities and femininities are co-constructed and negotiated.

Citations Scopus - 7
2013 Cahill H, Coffey J, 'Young people and the learning partnerships program: Shifting negative attitudes to help-seeking', Youth Studies Australia, 32 (2013)

This article discusses research that explored the impact of the Learning Partnerships program on young people's attitudes to help-seeking. The Learning Partnerships program brings... [more]

This article discusses research that explored the impact of the Learning Partnerships program on young people's attitudes to help-seeking. The Learning Partnerships program brings classes of high school students into universities to teach pre-service teachers and doctors how to communicate effectively with adolescents about sensitive issues such as bullying, sex, drugs and mental health. In the program, school students are positioned as contributors working with adults on issues of shared concern. The research aimed to contribute to growing knowledge about the barriers that discourage young people from seeking help from teachers and doctors, and whether these barriers may be shifted or addressed through the pedagogical approach used in Learning Partnerships. Focus groups and surveys with young people found Learning Partnerships workshops had a significant positive impact on the way in which high school students appraised the possibility that teachers and doctors could be useful sources of help. Students said workshops gave them a greater understanding and trust of both doctors and teachers, and as a result were more likely to seek help for problems affecting their own or their friend's mental, sexual or physical health. These findings have implications for the methodologies that may be useful in further addressing the barriers to help-seeking.

Citations Scopus - 3
Show 14 more journal articles

Conference (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Farrugia D, Threadgold SR, Coffey J, 'Affective Labour: Towards a New Research Agenda for Youth Studies.' (2016)
Co-authors David M Farrugia, Steven Threadgold
2015 Coffey J, 'Youth, risk and the body: body work, health and affect' (2015)
2014 Coffey JE, '¿She was becoming too healthy and it was just becoming dangerous¿: Health affects, youth and embodiment', Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities. Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014. (2014) [E1]
2014 Coffey JE, 'Images and the virtual: Bodies, embodiment and youth', Interactive Futures: Young People¿s Mediated Lives in the Asia Pacific and Beyond. Conference Program Booklet (2014) [E3]
2013 Coffey JE, '¿What can I do next?¿ Cosmetic surgery, femininities and affect¿', Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2013)
2013 Coffey JE, 'Towards an embodied sociology of youth: Ontological tensions and methodological developments', TASA Youth Symposium (2013)
2013 Coffey JE, '¿I¿ll have everything done¿ vs. ¿I¿m me forever now¿: exploring cosmetic surgery, identity and ¿affect¿', Talking bodies (2013)
2013 Coffey JE, Farrugia D, '¿The Problem of Agency in the Sociology of Youth: Conceptual Problems and Normative Commitments¿', The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2013)
2013 Coffey JE, Cahill H, ''Learning Partnerships¿: Re-figuring the possibility of communication between young people and their doctors and teachers¿', The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2013)
2012 Coffey JE, '¿Exploring body work practices: bodies, affect and becoming¿', The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2012)
2011 Coffey JE, 'Negotiating ¿healthy¿ bodies: body work and the body as an ¿event'', British Sociological Association Annual Conference (2011)
2011 Coffey JE, 'Gender, body work and the body as an ¿event¿', The Athens Institute of Education and Research (2011)
2011 Coffey JE, '¿Gender, body work and the body as an ¿event¿ of becoming¿', The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2011)
2010 Coffey JE, 'Exploring Body Work: Embodiment and Experiences of Gender', Australian Women¿s and Gender Studies Association (2010)
2010 Coffey JE, '¿Inhabiting my flesh¿: Exploring body work and gender through frameworks of embodiment and ¿becoming', The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Annual Conference (2010)
Show 12 more conferences

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Askland HH, Askew M, Hanley J, Sherval M, Farrugia D, Threadgold S, Coffey J, 'Local Attitudes to Changing Land Use - Narrabri Shire', NSW Departmment of Primary Industries, 113 (2016)
Co-authors Hedda Askland, Steven Threadgold, Meg Sherval, Joanne Hanley
2013 Cahill H, Coffey JE, 'Learning Partnerships', Youth Research Centre, 45 (2013)
2013 Cahill H, Beadle S, Coffey JE, 'NewGen Asia: Building capacity in emerging young leaders in the HIV response', Youth Research Centre, 53 (2013)
2012 Coffey JE, 'Bodies, health and gender: exploring body work practices with Deleuze', Youth Research Centre, 21 (2012)
2011 Cahill H, Beadle S, Mitch J, Coffey JE, Crofts J, 'Adolescents in Emergencies', Youth Research Centre, 38 (2011)
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Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Coffey JE, Exploring Body Work Practices: Bodies, Affect and Becoming, University of Melbourne (2012)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $219,566

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20163 grants / $25,500

Young People, Insecurity and Affective Labour: a Study of 'Front of House' Service Labour$13,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Steven Threadgold; Prof Lisa Adkins; Dr Julia Coffey; Dr David Farrugia

Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Early Career Researcher of the Year$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Julia Coffey
Scheme VC's Award for Research and Innovation Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501460
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Research and Innovation Excellence Award$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Julia Coffey
Scheme VC's Award for Research and Innovation Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501441
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20153 grants / $66,923

Attitudes to Changing Land Use - the Narrabri Shire$49,923

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Meg Sherval, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Doctor Michael Askew
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401491
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Newcastle Youth Studies Group - Theoretical Innovations and Challenges in Youth Sociology: One day symposium$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold, Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500904
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Journal of Youth Studies Conference, Copenhagen Denmark, 30 March to 1 April 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Julia Coffey
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500188
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20143 grants / $67,343

Violence Prevention and Respectful Relationships Education in Early Childhood$31,893

The prevention of violence against women and respectful relationships education is an important focus of the Victorian Government’s 10-year State Plan to Prevent Violence against Women and the Federal Government’s National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. While there is growing momentum for this work through programs in schools, workplaces, sporting clubs, local government and the media, there has been a lack of prevention work in an early childhood context. This project aims to contribute to an interdisciplinary discourse concerning ways of operationalising violence prevention approaches within social policy across the life course, starting in early childhood.

Funding body: University of Melbourne

Funding body University of Melbourne
Project Team

Dr Kylie Smith

Scheme Melbourne Social Equity Institute Interdisciplinary Seed Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Youth, transitions and bodies$20,450

This project aims to advance sociological understandings of body image and health in young people’s transitions from education to employment in rural and urban contexts.

Funding body: University of Melbourne

Funding body University of Melbourne
Project Team

Julia Coffey

Scheme Early Career Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Network for Youth Research Outside the Northern Metropole$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Conjoint Professor Andy Furlong, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor Lena Rodriguez
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400957
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $59,800

The Learning Partnerships Program$59,800

This research will support the next phase of the Learning Partnerships Program, which aims to: o enhance the capacity of teachers and doctors to communicate effectively with young people about the social and emotional issues which impact on learning and wellbeing; and o enhance secondary school students’ sense of purpose, social efficacy, and help-seeking skills.

Funding body: The Cass Foundation

Funding body The Cass Foundation
Project Team

Associate Professor Helen Cahill

Scheme Pilot funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Becoming and Being a Father During Adolescence in Lombok PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Commercialisation, Digital Media and Edgework in Backcountry Touring PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Women Fighters and Ultimate Fighting PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Queer Women on Social Media: Creating New Narratives to Resist Hegemonic Expectations of Feminine Beauty PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Research Directions 2016

July 7, 2016

Read the latest research highlights from the Faculty.

Youth health and self image study

New study on young people's health and self-image

October 30, 2014

Youth sociology researcher at the University of Newcastle (UON), Dr Julia Coffey, is currently recruiting young people aged 18 to 30 to examine health and self image in relation to study and employment.

Dr Julia Coffey interview on NBN

Body image an increasing concern for young men

July 24, 2014

A study by University of Newcastle youth sociology researcher Dr Julia Coffey has shown that body image is an increasing concern for young men, but many consider it something they have to face alone.

The Conversation

Muscle mania: young men aren’t alone with body image concerns

July 11, 2014

By Julia Coffey, University of Newcastle

Youth can be a difficult phase of life, as young people attempt to forge new identities, while facing challenges at school and in their social life. Many also experience pressure and stress related to their bodies.

Dr Julia Coffey

Position

Lecturer
Newcastle Youth Studies Group
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Sociology and Anthropology

Contact Details

Email julia.coffey@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4348 4081
Fax 02 4384 4075

Office

Room HO1.12
Building Humanities Building
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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