Profile Image

Dr Linda Campbell

Lecturer

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Campbell’s research focus is on familial interaction, neurodevelopmental disorders and psychopathology.

Dr Linda Campbell was awarded her PhD in 2006. Research conducted as part of this thesis has featured in several international peer-reviewed journal articles and many presentations at international conferences. The outcomes of her PhD research also formed the basis for a successful NHMRC Australian Training Fellowship and a Hunter Medical Research Institute Post-doctoral fellowship supported by Port Waratah Coal Services in 2006. Her post-doctoral research was on the behavioural phenotype of adolescents with the genetic neurodevelopmental disorder, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (also known as velo-cardio-facial syndrome). Dr Campbell has also project managed large competitively funded studies such as the NHMRC study 'Sensorimotor gating in Parkinsons Disease and Schizophrenia' and has worked as a local site coordinator on the national Australian study ‘Survey of High Impact Psychosis’.

Dr Campbell started teaching as a casual lecturer in the area of developmental psycholopathology and disabilities in the School of Psychology in 2008 during her post-doctoral fellowship. After finishing her post-doctoral fellowship in early 2011, Dr Campbell was successful in securing a position as an Associate Lecturer in the School of Psychology at the Ourimbah Campus. Currently, Dr Campbell is a Lecturer in the School of Psychology and primarily teaches in areas such as psychological disorders, developmental psychology, developmental disabilities and developmental psychopathology.

Dr Campbell is an active supervisor within the School of Psychology with Honours and Postgraduate Psychology students undertaking their research in fields related to her research and academic interests. The research undertaken by Dr Campbell and her lab is currently focused on familial functioning, including parental mental health (biological and foster carer parents, parents with mental illness and parents of children with disabilities) and the behavioural phenotype of children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorders. The research methods used within the lab includes both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Research Expertise
My research program focusses on the biopsychosocial influences on social functioning and mental health amongst children vulnerable for psychopathology. My primary focus is on children with genetic, neuropsychiatric, and neurodevelopmental conditions that affect learning and behaviour. The research that I am undertaking has important implications not only for families of children with disabilities but also for the development of appropriate remediation strategies and programs to promote positive psychological outcomes and quality of life for children affected by such disorders. My focus since commencing my PhD has been to delineate the behavioural phenotype of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. This work has included comprehensive evaluations of development, cognition and behaviour across childhood. Over the past few years, my research has methodically investigated social-cognitive abilities, the ability to understand social cues such as emotional faces using a variety of multi-disciplinary methodologies including eye-tracking to evaluate the extent and origin of problems in social-cognition amongst children with neurodevelopmental disorders, in particular 22q11.2 deletion syndrome but also in other disorders such as Williams syndrome and autism spectrum disorders, as measured by specialised experimental tasks of visual attention. More recently, my research has developed a strong developmental life-span focus, extending the research particularly towards younger children to understand the origin of impairments. In order to reach these goals, I have undertaken training in Clinical Psychology and I have also spent 6 months at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm to specifically train in undertaking early childhood research. I have acquired expertise in both the theoretical and practical undertakings of developmental information processing assessments of infants and young children. I have also a keen interest in parenting and in particular parental mental health amongst both biological and foster carers. The primary focus is on parents of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities but in my lab we also look at the experiences of parents with mental health issues including parents with psychosis and parents with post-natal depression.

Teaching Expertise
Dr Campbell has a Graduate Certificate in the Practice of Tertiary Teaching. She is an experienced lecturer in the School of Psychology and have been teaching in the School since 2008. She teaches primarily into courses with a focus on developmental processes but also more clinically relevant courses. Dr Campbell currently coordinate PSYC1200 Preprofessional Psychology I, Psyc1010 (semester 2) Introduction to Psychology and the psychology strand of the SOCA2505 Psychology and Sociology of Mental Health for Occupational Therapy. Dr Campbell also teaches into several courses including; PSYC1010 Introduction to Psychology, Psyc1200 Preprofessional 1, PSYC3400 Advanced Biological Psychology, PSYSC3700 Advanced Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology and PSYC4500 Advanced Topics in Personality,Social,Clinical & Health Psychology, Pysc3300 Advanced Cognitive Psychology and SOCA2505 Psychology and Sociology of Mental Health for Occupational Therapy. Dr Campbellhave supervised to completion 12 Honours (7 Hons I), 2 Professional Doctorates in Clinical and Health Psychology and 7 Master of Clinical Psychology students, and currently supervise/co-supervise 7 RHD, 2 Master of Clinical Psychology and 4 Honours students. 


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of London

Keywords

  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome
  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Biological Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Developmental Psychopathology
  • Developmental disorders
  • Genetic disorders
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Mental Health
  • Parenting and disabilities
  • Parenting and mental health
  • Williams syndrome

Languages

  • Swedish (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
110999Neurosciences not elsewhere classified10
170199Psychology not elsewhere classified80
170299Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
19/12/2010 - 20/12/2010Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
17/07/2008 - 17/12/2008Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/10/2009 - 1/02/2011Site coordinatorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/10/2007 - 1/12/2011Australian Part-time Research Fellowship
NHMRC - Early Career Fellowships (Formerly Postdoctoral Training Fellowships)
University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/02/2011Post-doctoral fellowshipUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/10/2006 - 1/02/2011Post-doctoral FellowshipUniversity of Newcastle
Hunter Medical Research Institute
Australia
1/07/2005 - 1/12/2006Research project managerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/12/2004 - 1/06/2005Research AssistantUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/09/2000 - 1/11/2004Research AssistantInstitute of Psychiatry, King's College London
Department of Psychological Medicine
United Kingdom

Membership

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2012 - Membership - Australian Psychology SocietyAustralian Psychology Society
Australia
1/01/2011 - Membership - Australian Health Practitioner Regulation AgencyAustralian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency
Australia
1/01/2007 - Membership - Velo-cardio-facial syndrome Education FoundationVelo-cardio-facial syndrome Education Foundation
Australia
1/01/1999 - Membership - British Psychological SocietyBritish Psychological Society
United Kingdom

Awards

Research Award

YearAward
2006An investigation of precursors of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome
Port Waratah Coal Services, HMRI
2006Functional brain imaging of prepulse inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)
National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia (NH&MRC)
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (32 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Goodwin J, Schoch K, Shashi V, Hooper SR, Morad O, Zalevsky M, et al., 'A tale worth telling: the impact of the diagnosis experience on disclosure of genetic disorders.', J Intellect Disabil Res, 59 474-486 (2015) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jir.12151Author URL
2015Lacey M, Paolini S, Hanlon M-C, Melville J, Galletly C, Campbell LE, 'Parents with serious mental illness: Differences in internalised and externalised mental illness stigma and gender stigma between mothers and fathers', Psychiatry Research, 225 723-733 (2015)

Research demonstrates that people living with serious mental illness (SMI) contend with widespread public stigma; however, little is known about the specific experiences of stigma... [more]

Research demonstrates that people living with serious mental illness (SMI) contend with widespread public stigma; however, little is known about the specific experiences of stigma that mothers, and in particular fathers, with SMI encounter as parents. This study aimed to explore and compare the experiences of stigma for mothers and fathers with SMI inferred not only by living with a mental illness but also potential compounding gender effects, and the associated impact of stigma on parenting. Telephone surveys were conducted with 93 participants with SMI who previously identified as parents in the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis. Results indicated that mothers were more likely than fathers to perceive and internalise stigma associated with their mental illness. Conversely, fathers were more inclined to perceive stigma relating to their gender and to hold stigmatising attitudes towards others. Mental illness and gender stigma predicted poorer self-reported parenting experiences for both mothers and fathers. These findings may assist in tailoring interventions for mothers and fathers with SMI.

DOI10.1016/j.psychres.2014.09.010
Co-authorsStefania Paolini, Mary-Claire Hanlon
2015Goodwin J, Schoch K, Shashi V, Hooper SR, Morad O, Zalevsky M, et al., 'A tale worth telling: The impact of the diagnosis experience on disclosure of genetic disorders', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 59 474-486 (2015)

Background: Research suggests children with genetic disorders exhibit greater coping skills when they are aware of their condition and its heritability. While the experiences pare... [more]

Background: Research suggests children with genetic disorders exhibit greater coping skills when they are aware of their condition and its heritability. While the experiences parents have at diagnosis may influence their decision to disclose the diagnosis to their children, there is little research into this communication. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between the diagnosis experience and the disclosure experience for parents of children with developmental disorders of a known genetic aetiology: parents of children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) were compared with a group of parents with children affected with other genetic diagnoses, with a similar age of diagnosis (e.g. fragile X syndrome) and a group where diagnosis generally occurs early (i.e. Down syndrome). Method: The sample comprised 559 parents and caregivers of children with genetic developmental disorders, and an online survey was utilised. Items from the questionnaire were combined to create variables for diagnosis experience, parental disclosure experience, child's disclosure experience, and parental coping and self-efficacy. Results: Across all groups parents reported that the diagnosis experience was negative and often accompanied by a lack of support and appropriate information. Sixty-eight per cent of those in the 22q11DS and 58.3% in the Similar Conditions groups had disclosed the diagnosis to their child, whereas only 32.7% of the Down syndrome group had. Eighty-six per cent of the Down syndrome group felt they had sufficient information to talk to their child compared with 44.1% of the Similar Conditions group and 32.6% of the 22q11DS group. Parents reported disclosing the diagnosis to their child because they did not want to create secrets; and that they considered the child's age when disclosing. In the 22q11DS and Similar Conditions groups, a poor diagnosis experience was significantly associated with negative parental disclosure experiences. In the Similar Conditions group, a poor diagnosis experience was also significantly associated with a more negative child disclosure experience. Conclusions: As expected this study highlights how difficult most parents find the diagnosis experience. Importantly, the data indicate that the personal experiences the parents have can have a long-term impact on how well they cope with telling their child about the diagnosis. It is important for clinicians to consider the long-term ramifications of the diagnosis experience and give the parents opportunities; through, for instance, psychoeducation to prepare for telling their child about the diagnosis. Further research is warranted to explore what type of information would be useful for parents to receive.

DOI10.1111/jir.12151
2015Goodwin J, Schoch K, Shashi V, Hooper SR, Morad O, Zalevsky M, et al., 'A tale worth telling: the impact of the diagnosis experience on disclosure of genetic disorders', JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, 59 474-486 (2015) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jir.12151Author URL
2015Azuma R, Deeley Q, Campbell LE, Daly EM, Giampietro V, Brammer MJ, et al., 'An fMRI study of facial emotion processing in children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome', JOURNAL OF NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 7 (2015)
DOI10.1186/1866-1955-7-1Author URL
2015Vorstman JAS, Breetvelt EJ, Duijff SN, Eliez S, Schneider M, Jalbrzikowski M, et al., 'Cognitive decline preceding the onset of psychosis in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome', JAMA Psychiatry, 72 377-385 (2015)

Importance: Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have an elevated (25%) risk of developing schizophrenia. Recent reports have suggested that a subgroup of children wi... [more]

Importance: Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have an elevated (25%) risk of developing schizophrenia. Recent reports have suggested that a subgroup of children with 22q11DS display a substantial decline in cognitive abilities starting at a young age.Objective: To determine whether early cognitive decline is associated with risk of psychotic disorder in 22q11DS.Design, Setting, And Participants: Prospective longitudinal cohort study. As part of an international research consortium initiative, we used the largest data set of intelligence (IQ) measurements in patients with 22q11DS reported to date to investigate longitudinal IQ trajectories and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness. A total of 829 patients with a confirmed hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion, recruited through 12 international clinical research sites, were included. Both psychiatric assessments and longitudinal IQ measurements were available for a subset of 411 patients (388 with=1 assessment at age 8-24 years).Main Outcomes And Measures: Diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, initial IQ, longitudinal IQ trajectory, and timing of the last psychiatric assessment with respect to the last IQ test.Results: Among 411 patients with 22q11DS, 55 (13.4%) were diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder. The mean (SD) age at the most recent psychiatric assessment was 16.1 (6.2) years. The mean (SD) full-scale IQ at first cognitive assessment was lower in patients who developed a psychotic disorder (65.5 [12.0]) compared with those without a psychotic disorder (74.0 [14.0]). On average, children with 22q11DS showed a mild decline in IQ (full-scale IQ, 7.04 points) with increasing age, particularly in the domain of verbal IQ (9.02 points). In those who developed psychotic illness, this decline was significantly steeper (P < .001). Those with a negative deviation from the average cognitive trajectory observed in 22q11DS were at significantly increased risk for the development of a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 2.49; 95%CI, 1.24-5.00; P = .01). The divergence of verbal IQ trajectories between those who subsequently developed a psychotic disorder and those who did not was distinguishable from age 11 years onward.Conclusions And Relevance: In 22q11DS, early cognitive decline is a robust indicator of the risk of developing a psychotic illness. These findings mirror those observed in idiopathic schizophrenia. The results provide further support for investigations of 22q11DS as a genetic model for elucidating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the development of psychosis.

DOI10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2671
2015Campbell LE, McCabe KL, Melville JL, Strutt PA, Schall U, 'Social cognition dysfunction in adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velo-cardio-facial syndrome): relationship with executive functioning and social competence/functioning.', J Intellect Disabil Res, (2015)
DOI10.1111/jir.12183Author URL
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2014Strutt PA, Campbell LE, Burke D, Elmer S, 'High anxiety levels are associated with divergent empathising and systemising tendencies', Cogent Psychology, 1 1-10 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1080/23311908.2014.981973
Co-authorsDarren Burke
2014Schneider M, Debbane M, Bassett AS, Chow EWC, Fung WLA, van den Bree MBM, et al., 'Psychiatric Disorders From Childhood to Adulthood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Results From the International Consortium on Brain and Behavior in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 171 627-639 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.13070864Author URL
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 16
2014Elliot R-L, Campbell L, Hunter M, Cooper G, Melville J, McCabe K, et al., 'WHEN I LOOK INTO MY BABY'S EYES... INFANT EMOTION RECOGNITION BY MOTHERS WITH BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER', INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, 35 21-32 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1002/imhj.21426Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsMick Hunter, Carmel Loughland
2014Lacey M, Paolini S, Hanlon M-C, Melville J, Galletly C, Campbell LE, 'Parents with serious mental illness: Differences in internalised and externalised mental illness stigma and gender stigma between mothers and fathers', Psychiatry Research, (2014)

Research demonstrates that people living with serious mental illness (SMI) contend with widespread public stigma; however, little is known about the specific experiences of stigma... [more]

Research demonstrates that people living with serious mental illness (SMI) contend with widespread public stigma; however, little is known about the specific experiences of stigma that mothers, and in particular fathers, with SMI encounter as parents. This study aimed to explore and compare the experiences of stigma for mothers and fathers with SMI inferred not only by living with a mental illness but also potential compounding gender effects, and the associated impact of stigma on parenting. Telephone surveys were conducted with 93 participants with SMI who previously identified as parents in the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis. Results indicated that mothers were more likely than fathers to perceive and internalise stigma associated with their mental illness. Conversely, fathers were more inclined to perceive stigma relating to their gender and to hold stigmatising attitudes towards others. Mental illness and gender stigma predicted poorer self-reported parenting experiences for both mothers and fathers. These findings may assist in tailoring interventions for mothers and fathers with SMI.

DOI10.1016/j.psychres.2014.09.010
Co-authorsStefania Paolini
2014McCabe KL, Atkinson RJ, Cooper G, Melville JL, Harris J, Schall U, et al., 'Pre-pulse inhibition and antisaccade performance indicate impaired attention modulation of cognitive inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS)', Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 6 (2014) [C1]

Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with a number of physical anomalies and neuropsychological deficits including impairments in executive and sensorimot... [more]

Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with a number of physical anomalies and neuropsychological deficits including impairments in executive and sensorimotor function. It is estimated that 25% of children with 22q11DS will develop schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders later in life. Evidence of genetic transmission of information processing deficits in schizophrenia suggests performance in 22q11DS individuals will enhance understanding of the neurobiological and genetic substrates associated with information processing. In this report, we examine information processing in 22q11DS using measures of startle eyeblink modification and antisaccade inhibition to explore similarities with schizophrenia and associations with neurocognitive performance. Methods: Startle modification (passive and active tasks; 120- and 480-ms pre-pulse intervals) and antisaccade inhibition were measured in 25 individuals with genetically confirmed 22q11DS and 30 healthy control subjects. Results: Individuals with 22q1 1DS exhibited increased antisaccade error as well as some evidence (trend-level effect) of impaired sensorimotor gating during the active condition, suggesting a dysfunction in controlled attentional processing, rather than a pre-attentive dysfunction using this paradigm. Conclusions: The findings from the present study show similarities with previous studies in clinical populations associated with 22q11DS such as schizophrenia that may indicate shared dysfunction of inhibition pathways in these groups.

DOI10.1186/1866-1955-6-38
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsUlrich Schall, Carmel Loughland, Renate Thienel
2013McCabe KL, Melville JL, Rich D, Strutt PA, Cooper G, Loughland CM, et al., 'Divergent Patterns of Social Cognition Performance in Autism and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 43 1926-1934 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s10803-012-1742-2Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsCarmel Loughland, Ulrich Schall
2013Sinderberry B, Brown SD, Hammond P, Stevens AF, Schall UA, Murphy DGM, et al., 'Subtypes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome associated with behaviour and neurofacial morphology', Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34 116-125 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ridd.2012.07.025
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsScott Brown, Ulrich Schall
2012Campbell LE, Hanlon M-C, Poon AWC, Paolini S, Stone MJ, Galletly C, et al., 'The experiences of Australian parents with psychosis: The second Australian national survey of psychosis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 46 890-900 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1177/0004867412455108
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsMary-Claire Hanlon, Helen Stain, Stefania Paolini
2012Stain HJ, Galletly CA, Clark SC, Wilson JM, Killen EA, Anthes LJ, et al., 'Understanding the social costs of psychosis: The experience of adults affected by psychosis identified within the second Australian national survey of psychosis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 46 879-889 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1177/0004867412449060
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsHelen Stain, Mary-Claire Hanlon
2011Campbell LE, Stevens AF, McCabe KL, Cruickshank L, Morris RG, Murphy DGM, Murphy KC, 'Is theory of mind related to social dysfunction and emotional problems in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velo-cardio-facial syndrome)?', Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 3 152-161 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s11689-011-9082-7
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2011Bassett AS, McDonald-McGinn DM, Devriendt K, Digilio MC, Goldenberg P, Habel A, et al., 'Practical Guidelines for Managing Patients with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome', JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 159 332-U213 (2011) [C3]
DOI10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.02.039Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 60
2011McCabe KL, Rich D, Loughland CM, Schall UA, Campbell LE, 'Visual scanpath abnormalities in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Is this a face specific deficit?', Psychiatry Research, 189 292-298 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsCarmel Loughland, Ulrich Schall
2010Sundram F, Campbell LE, Azuma R, Daly E, Bloemen O, Barker G, et al., 'White matter microstructure in 22q11 deletion syndrome: A pilot diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry study of children and adolescents', Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 2 77-92 (2010) [C2]
CitationsScopus - 18Web of Science - 18
2010Campbell LE, Azuma R, Ambery F, Stevens A, Smith A, Morris RG, et al., 'Executive functions and memory abilities in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44 364-371 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.3109/00048670903489882
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2010Campbell LE, McCabe KL, Leadbeater KE, Schall UA, Loughland CM, Rich D, 'Visual scanning of faces in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Attention to the mouth or the eyes?', Psychiatry Research, 177 211-215 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.psychres.2009.06.007
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authorsCarmel Loughland, Ulrich Schall
2009Azuma R, Daly EM, Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Deeley Q, Giampietro V, et al., 'Visuospatial working memory in children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: An fMRI study', Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 1 46-60 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s11689-009-9008-9
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2009Campbell LE, Daly E, Toal F, Stevens A, Azuma R, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'Brain structural differences associated with the behavioural phenotype in children with Williams syndrome', Brain Research, 1258 96-107 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.brainres.2008.11.101
CitationsScopus - 37Web of Science - 32
2009Campbell LE, Stevens A, Daly E, Toal F, Azuma R, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'A comparative study of cognition and brain anatomy between two neurodevelopmental disorders: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Williams syndrome', Neuropsychologia, 47 1034-1044 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2008.10.029
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2007Campbell LE, Hughes ME, Budd TW, Cooper GJ, Fulham WR, Karayanidis F, et al., 'Primary and secondary neural networks of auditory prepulse inhibition: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of sensorimotor gating of the human acoustic startle response', European Journal of Neuroscience, 26 2327-2333 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05858.x
CitationsScopus - 41Web of Science - 39
Co-authorsBill Budd, Mary-Claire Hanlon, Ulrich Schall, Frini Karayanidis
2006Campbell LE, Stevens A, Daly E, Toal F, Azuma R, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'A cross-syndrome comparison of structural brain and cognitive profiles: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Williams syndrome', JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, 50 784-784 (2006)
Author URL
2006Campbell LE, Daly E, Toal F, Stevens A, Azuma R, Catani M, et al., 'Brain and behaviour in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a volumetric and voxel-based morphometry MRI study', BRAIN, 129 1218-1228 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1093/brain/awl066Author URL
CitationsScopus - 104Web of Science - 100
2005Hammond P, Hutton TJ, Allanson JE, Buxton B, Campbell LE, Smith JC, et al., 'Discriminating power of localized three-dimensional facial morphology', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS, 77 999-1010 (2005)
DOI10.1086/498396Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 73
2004Hammond P, Hutton TJ, Allanson JE, Campbell LE, Hennekam RCM, Holden S, et al., '3D analysis of facial morphology', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART A, 126A 339-348 (2004)
DOI10.1002/ajmg.a.20665Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 99
2002Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'An investigation of early precursors of psychosis; A neuropsychological profile of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 53 82-82 (2002)
Author URL
2001Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Owen MJ, Murphy DGM, Murphy KC, 'Neuropsychological profile of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS, 105 601-601 (2001)
Author URL
Show 29 more journal articles

Conference (28 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2011Parsons E, Campbell LE, 'How coping skills affect symptoms of anxiety and depression in young adults with Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
2010Campbell LE, 'A study of the behavioural phenotype in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: An Australian cohort', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
2010Campbell LE, Fulham WR, Hughes M, Provost AL, Hanlon M-C, Karayanidis F, et al., 'Functional magnetic resonance brain imaging study on sensorimotoe gating in schizophrenia and parkinson's disease', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsBill Budd, Ulrich Schall, Frini Karayanidis, Mary-Claire Hanlon
2008Campbell LE, Fulham WR, Hughes ME, Provost AL, Budd TW, Johnston PJ, et al., 'Multimodel assessment of auditory prepulse inhibition in Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Mary-Claire Hanlon, Bill Budd, Ulrich Schall
2008Campbell LE, McCabe KL, Leadbeater KE, Rich D, Schall UA, Loughland CM, 'Visual scan paths in young adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall, Carmel Loughland
2008Cruickshank L, Leadbeater KE, Azuma R, Stevens A, Karmiloff-Smith A, Morris R, et al., 'Social cognitive skills in children and young adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall, Frini Karayanidis
2008Leadbeater KE, Schall UA, Campbell LE, 'Psychiatric characteristics and schizotypal personality traits in young adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2008Reeves L, Azuma R, Stevens A, Karmiloff-Smith A, Morris R, Murphy KC, et al., 'Basic numerical capacities in Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Ulrich Schall
2008Campbell LE, McCabe KL, Cruickshank L, Leadbeater KE, Schall UA, Karayanidis F, Loughland CM, 'Social cognitive skills and visual scan paths in children and young adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrom (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Lorne, VIC (2008) [E3]
DOI10.1080/00048670802441844
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Carmel Loughland, Ulrich Schall
2006Campbell LE, Budd TW, Karayanidis F, Hanlon M-C, Stojanov WM, Johnston PJ, Schall UA, 'Functional brain imaging of auditory prepulse inhibition', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research V50 Suppl 1: Proceedings of the Society for the Study of Behavioural Phenotypes11th Annual Scientific Meeting, Dublin, Ireland (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsMary-Claire Hanlon, Frini Karayanidis, Ulrich Schall, Bill Budd
2006Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Azuma R, Morris R, Murphy DGM, Murphy KC, 'Cognition and brain in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Cagliari, ITALY (2006)
Author URL
2006Azuma R, Campbell LE, Daly EM, Stevens AF, Giampietro V, Brammer MJ, et al., 'FMRI study of visuospatial working memory in children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, Davos, SWITZERLAND (2006)
Author URL
2006Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Azuma R, Morris RG, Murphy DGM, Murphy KC, 'Cognition and brain in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2006)
Author URL
2006Campbell LE, Daly EM, Toal F, Stevens AF, Azuma R, Catani M, et al., 'Brain and behaviour in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A volumetric and voxel-based morphometry MRI study', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2006)
Author URL
2006Campbell LE, Budd TW, Karayanidis F, Hanlon M-C, Stojanov WM, Johnston PJ, Schall UA, 'Functional brain imaging of auditory prepulse inhibition', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (Vol 40, noS2), Fremantle, Western Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Ulrich Schall, Mary-Claire Hanlon, Bill Budd
2005Budd TW, Campbell LE, Johnston PJ, Hanlon M-C, Karayanidis F, Schall UA, 'Functional Brain Imaging of Auditory Prepulse Inhibition', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, V39, Suppl: Proceedings of the Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientifice Meeting, Brisbane, Australia (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Bill Budd, Ulrich Schall, Mary-Claire Hanlon
2005Stevens AF, Campbell LE, Morris R, Simonoff E, Murphy DG, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'Psychiatric profile of children with Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Savannah, GA (2005)
Author URL
2005Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Daly EM, Chitnis X, Catani M, Azuma R, et al., 'The effect of deletion 22Q11 on brain anatomy and behaviour: A structural imaging study of children with velocardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Savannah, GA (2005)
Author URL
2005Azuma R, Campbell LE, Daly E, Stevens AF, Deeley Q, Giampietro V, et al., 'Visuospatial working memory in children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome; An fMRI study', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Boston, MA (2005)
Author URL
2005Stevens AF, Campbell LE, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'Psychiatric profile of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Boston, MA (2005)
Author URL
2005Campbell LE, Stevens A, Daly E, Chitnis X, Catani M, Azuma R, et al., 'The effect of deletion 22q11 on brain anatomy and behaviour: A structural imaging study of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Boston, MA (2005)
Author URL
2004Stevens AF, Campbell LE, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'Psychiatric profile of children with Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Dublin, IRELAND (2004)
Author URL
2004Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Daly EM, Azuma R, Morris RG, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'The effect of deletion 22q11 on brain anatomy: A structural imaging study of children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS, Dublin, IRELAND (2004)
Author URL
2003Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Azuma R, Morris RG, Karmiloff-Smith A, Owen MJ, et al., 'A cognitive investigation of children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2003)
Author URL
2003Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Daly EM, Azuma R, Morris RG, Karmiloff-Smith A, et al., 'The effect of deletion 22q11.2 on brain anatomy: A structural imaging study of children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, SAN FRANCISCO, CA (2003)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2002Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'Cognitive profile of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS, BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (2002)
Author URL
2002Stevens AF, Campbell LE, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'Psychiatric profile of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome-preliminary findings', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS, BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (2002)
Author URL
2001Campbell LE, Stevens AF, Morris R, Karmiloff-Smith A, Simonoff E, Owen MJ, et al., 'Neuropsychological profile of children with Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS)', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS (2001)
Author URL
Show 25 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants15
Total funding$1,004,849

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $44,436

Childhood Trauma and Growth: Efficacy of trauma interventions for promoting growth in adults exposed to childhood trauma$44,436

Funding body: Heal for Life Foundation

Funding bodyHeal for Life Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Lynne McCormack, Doctor Linda Campbell, Doctor Sean Halpin
SchemePostgraduate Scholarship
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400837
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20131 grants / $23,872

International Consortium on Brain and Behavior in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome$23,872

Funding body: NIH National Institutes of Health

Funding bodyNIH National Institutes of Health
Project TeamDr Anne Bassett, Doctor Linda Campbell, Dr Eva Chow, Dr Gabriela Repetto, Dr Steve Scherer
SchemeCollaborative NIH Research Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201094
Type Of FundingInternational - Competitive
Category3IFA
UONY

20122 grants / $17,000

Exploring the neurobiological basis of visual processing deficits in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11DS) - a genetically defined risk population for schizophrenia$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell, Doctor Renate Thienel, Doctor Kathryn McCabe
SchemeStrategic Small Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1401096
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Establish an eye-tracking laboratory in the School of Psychology at the Ourimbah Campus$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200987
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20112 grants / $56,930

Here's looking at you, kid: Face processing, emotional availability and reflective functioning in mothers with postnatal depression$51,930

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Carmel Loughland, Doctor Linda Campbell
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1001024
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

A pilot-study of the microstructural integrity of the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways and the association with PRODH and COMT genotype in schizophrenia and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.$5,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding bodySchizophrenia Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel, Doctor Natalie Beveridge, Doctor Linda Campbell, Doctor Kathryn McCabe
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1101139
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20102 grants / $5,500

PULSE - Education Prize$4,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemePULSE Education Prize
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000561
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

VCFS Education Foundation Meeting, Salt Lake City, 14 - 18 July 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000555
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20092 grants / $411,416

Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP)$409,716

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding bodyDepartment of Health
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell, Professor Assen Jablensky, Professor Robert Bush, Professor Vaughan Carr, Professor David Castle, Professor Cherie Galletly, Professor Carol Harvey, Professor Pat McGorry, Professor John McGrath, Ms Vera Morgan, Conjoint Associate Professor Martin Cohen, Associate Professor Helen Stain
SchemeResearch Project Support
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190653
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

VCFS Educational Foundation Conference, Rome, Italy, 3-5 July 2009$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190332
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20082 grants / $2,945

Travel and Conference Grant$1,700

Funding body: Ian Potter Foundation

Funding bodyIan Potter Foundation
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188911
Type Of FundingDonation - Aust Non Government
Category3AFD
UONY

The 6th International 22q11.2 deletion Conference, Utrecht, Netherlands, 18/6/2008 - 20/6/2008$1,245

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188977
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20073 grants / $442,750

An investigation of precursors of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome$300,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemePostdoctoral Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187296
Type Of FundingDonation - Aust Non Government
Category3AFD
UONY

Functional brain imaging of prepulse inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)$137,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeTraining (Postdoctoral) Fellowships - Australian Part-time Research Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0186736
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Functional brain imaging of prepulse inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)$5,750

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0188270
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Understanding Negative Thought Experiences in Healthy Fathers
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013The Impact of Anxiety on Social Abilities
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2013Resilience In Children With Chronic Illness
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2013A Longitudinal Study of Physical Health in Individuals With Severe Mental Health Problems
General Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012Here's Looking at You, Kid: Face Processing, Emotional Availability and Reflective Functioning in Mothers with Postnatal Depression
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2012Cognitive, Emotional and Behavioural Consequences of Child Maltreatment in Saudi Arabia
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2010Maximising Child Outcomes by Optimising Care for Children with Genetic Disorders: A Study of Healthcare, Education and Support Service Needs
Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
Edit

Dr Linda Campbell

Position

Lecturer
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Emaillinda.e.campbell@newcastle.edu.au
Phone43494490
Fax43494404

Office

RoomE1.19
BuildingScience Offices
LocationOurimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
Edit