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Professor Joerg Mattes

Chair - Paediatrics & Child Health

School of Medicine and Public Health (Immunology and Microbiology)

Career Summary

Biography

My research has focused on the pathogenesis of asthma, allergies and respiratory infections. The major sequence of recent projects undertaken in this area has involved epidemiological studies (e.g. birth cohort studies on the effect of asthma during pregnancy), clinical studies (e.g. improved diagnostic algorithm for peanut allergy employing exhaled nitric oxide), studies in mouse models of experimental asthma and rhinovirus infection (e.g. role of micro(mi)RNAs and TRAIL/MID1/PP2A). I have established the NSW Children and Infants lung function CEntre (NICE) in order to investigate the origins of asthma in early life on a physiological, cellular and molecular level. I have published in high impact journals [e.g. J Exp Med, Nat Med, JACI, PNAS] highlighting the significance of my scientific contributions to the field since 1998. The work has also received several prizes and awards at scientific meetings. I am regular reviewer of international medical journals and national and international grant funding bodies and editor of the Asthma & Allergic disorders section of BMC Pulmonary Medicine. I am convener of the Special Interest Group Asthma, Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand.

I am Head of Experimental and Translational Respiratory Medicine that employs a wide range of state-of-the-art experimental disease models (e.g. rhinovirus infection in mice, transgenic mouse models, eosinophilic oesophagitis & food allergy mouse models), molecular cutting-edge techniques (miRNA arraying, siRNA-mediated inhibition in vivo), ex vivo tissue culture systems (culturing of PBMCs, infection of airway epithelial cells), infant and pre-schooler lung function testing (e.g. the raised-volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique, multiple breath washout, forced oscillation technique, FeNO). We have successful national and international collaborations that are documented by publications in the highest-ranking medical science journals. 

I am a Paediatric Respiratory and Sleep Medicine physician (FRACP) and was clinically very active throughout my career. I was trained at the University Children's Hospital Freiburg, Germany from 1996 to 2005 including a Research Fellowship (German Research Council) at the John Curtin School of Medical Research, ANU, Canberra from 1999 to 2001. I have completed a M.D. degree in Cardiology (1999, University of Hamburg) and a Doctor habilitatus in Paediatrics (2005, University of Freiburg, premier Research higher Degree qualification for medical doctors in Germany). Based at the Newcastle Children's Hospital, I provide specialist services as a Consultant in Paediatric Respiratory and Sleep Medicine across the entire Northern NSW Child Health Network (Kaleidoscope). I am the clinical Director of the Paediatric lung function service and member of the Kaleidoscope Strategic Leadership Team.

In March 2011 I was appointed as the Chair and Discipline Lead of Paediatrics & Child Health at the University of Newcastle. I am the Course Coordinator for the Women, Children, and Adolescent Course (WACH) of Joint Medical Program, Year 4. I have recently authored the Neonatology and the Paediatrics Chapter (eBook) in Talley and O'Connor's Clinical Examination: A Systematic Guide to Physical Diagnosis, 7th Edition, a bestselling title for over 25 years among student clinicians.

I am a translational researcher with an internationally recognized expertise in both experimental and clinical Paediatric Respiratory Medicine as well as a scholarly teacher with the vision to promote self-improving health care to children and their families through excellence in research & education.

Research Expertise
Role of microRNA in antiviral responses, Role of microRNA in the pathogenesis of asthma, Role of TRAIL in allergic airways disease, Asthma in early life. 


Qualifications

  • Habilitation (European Equiv to Doctor of Sc), University of Freiburg - Germany
  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Hamburg - Germany

Keywords

  • Asthma and wheezing
  • Immunology
  • Infant lung function
  • Paediatrics
  • Respiratory Diseases
  • Rhinovirus
  • Virology

Languages

  • German (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
060499Genetics not elsewhere classified10
110399Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified25
110799Immunology not elsewhere classified65

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - Chair - Paediatrics & Child HealthUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
24/08/2006 - 21/01/2007Senior Research AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/12/2007 - 1/12/2011Health Professional Research Fellowship (Part-time)
NHMRC - Early Career Fellowships (Formerly Postdoctoral Training Fellowships)
University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (4 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Maltby S, Plank M, Ptaschinski C, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'Microrna function in mast cell biology: protocols to characterize and modulate microrna expression', , Humana Press Inc. 287-304 (2015)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that can modulate mRNA levels through RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-mediated degradation. Recognition of target mRNAs o... [more]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that can modulate mRNA levels through RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-mediated degradation. Recognition of target mRNAs occurs through imperfect base pairing between an miRNA and its target, meaning that each miRNA can target a number of different mRNAs to modulate gene expression. miRNAs have been proposed as novel therapeutic targets and many studies are aimed at characterizing miRNA expression patterns and functions within a range of cell types. To date, limited research has focused on the function of miRNAs specifi cally in mast cells; however, this is an emerging fi eld. In this chapter, we will briefl y overview miRNA synthesis and function and the current understanding of miRNAs in hematopoietic development and immune function, emphasizing studies related to mast cell biology. The chapter will conclude with fundamental techniques used in miRNA studies, including RNA isolation, real-time PCR and microarray approaches for quantifi cation of miRNA expression levels, and antagomir design to interfere with miRNA function.

DOI10.1007/978-1-4939-1568-2_18,
Co-authorsSteven Maltby, Paul Foster
2015Maltby S, Plank M, Ptaschinski C, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'Microrna function in mast cell biology: protocols to characterize and modulate microrna expression', , Humana Press Inc. 287-304 (2015)
DOI10.1007/978-1-4939-1568-2_18,
Co-authorsSteven Maltby, Paul Foster
2015Maltby S, Plank M, Ptaschinski C, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'MicroRNA function in mast cell biology: protocols to characterize and modulate microRNA expression.', 287-304 (2015)
DOI10.1007/978-1-4939-1568-2_18Author URL
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Steven Maltby
2013Lee JJ, Ptaschinski C, Plank M, Mattes J, Foster PS, Balla KM, et al., 'Emerging Concepts', Eosinophils in Health and Disease, Academic Press, London 607-641 (2013) [B1]
DOI10.1016/B978-0-12-394385-9.00016-X
Co-authorsPaul Foster
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (67 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Starkey MR, Nguyen DH, Essilfie AT, Kim RY, Hatchwell LM, Collison AM, et al., 'Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand translates neonatal respiratory infection into chronic lung disease.', Mucosal Immunol, 7 478-488 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1038/mi.2013.65Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Philip Hansbro, Malcolm Starkey, Jay Horvat
2014Mattes J, Murphy VE, Powell H, Gibson PG, 'Prenatal origins of bronchiolitis: Protective effect of optimised asthma management during pregnancy', Thorax, 69 383-384 (2014) [C1]

Objective Maternal asthma is the most common chronic disease complicating pregnancy and is a risk factor for bronchiolitis in infancy. Recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis are stro... [more]

Objective Maternal asthma is the most common chronic disease complicating pregnancy and is a risk factor for bronchiolitis in infancy. Recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis are strongly associated with the development of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a follow-up study of infants born to women with asthma who completed a double-blind randomised controlled trial during pregnancy. In this trial, pregnant women with asthma were assigned to treatment adjustment by an algorithm using clinical symptoms (clinical group) or the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO group) and we showed that the FeNO group had significantly lower asthma exacerbation rates in pregnancy. Results 146 infants attended the 12-month follow-up visit. Infants born to mothers from the FeNO group were significantly less likely to have recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis in the first year of life (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.62; p=0.016) as compared with the clinical group. Conclusions Optimised management of asthma during pregnancy may reduce recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis in infancy, which could potentially modulate the risk to develop or the severity of emerging childhood asthma.

DOI10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-203388
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2014Mattes J, Gibson PG, 'The early origins of copd in severe asthma: The one thing that leads to another or the two things that come together?', Thorax, 69 789-790 (2014)
DOI10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204815
Co-authorsPeter Gibson
2014Hatchwell L, Girkin J, Morten M, Collison A, Mattes J, Foster PS, et al., 'Salmeterol attenuates chemotactic responses in rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease¿by modulating protein phosphatase 2A', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, (2014) [C1]

Background: ß-Agonists are used for relief and control of asthma symptoms by reversing bronchoconstriction. They might also have anti-inflammatory properties, but the underpinnin... [more]

Background: ß-Agonists are used for relief and control of asthma symptoms by reversing bronchoconstriction. They might also have anti-inflammatory properties, but the underpinning mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, a direct interaction between formoterol and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been described in¿vitro. Objective: We sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which ß-agonists exert anti-inflammatory effects in allergen-driven and rhinovirus 1B-exacerbated allergic airways disease (AAD). Methods: Mice were sensitized and then challenged with house dust mite to induce AAD while receiving treatment with salmeterol, formoterol, or salbutamol. Mice were also infected with rhinovirus 1B to exacerbate lung inflammation and therapeutically administered salmeterol, dexamethasone, or the PP2A-activating drug (S)-2-amino-4-(4-[heptyloxy]phenyl)-2-methylbutan-1-ol (AAL[S]). Results: Systemic or intranasal administration of salmeterol protected against the development of allergen- and rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity and decreased eosinophil recruitment to the lungs as effectively as dexamethasone. Formoterol and salbutamol also showed anti-inflammatory properties. Salmeterol, but not dexamethasone, increased PP2A activity, which reduced CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and active nuclear factor ¿B subunits in the lungs. The anti-inflammatory effect of salmeterol was blocked by targeting the catalytic subunit of PP2A with small RNA interference. Conversely, increasing PP2A activity with AAL(S) abolished rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity, eosinophil influx, and CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression. Salmeterol also directly activated immunoprecipitated PP2A in¿vitro isolated from human airway epithelial cells. Conclusions: Salmeterol exerts anti-inflammatory effects by increasing PP2A activity in AAD and rhinovirus-induced lung inflammation, which might potentially account for some of its clinical benefits. © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

DOI10.1016/j.jaci.2013.11.014
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsNikki Verrills, Matt Dun, Paul Foster
2014Tay HL, Plank M, Collison A, Mattes J, Kumar RK, Foster PS, 'MicroRNA: Potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for allergic asthma?', Annals of Medicine, 46 633-639 (2014) [C1]

MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that bind to multiple target mRNAs to control gene expression post-transcriptionally by inhibiting translation. In mammalian cells, microRNAs p... [more]

MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that bind to multiple target mRNAs to control gene expression post-transcriptionally by inhibiting translation. In mammalian cells, microRNAs play important roles in a diverse array of cellular processes (e.g. cell proliferation and differentiation). However, alterations in their levels may compromise cellular function, predisposing to disease. In this review, we discuss microRNAs that have been linked with pathogenesis of asthma and propose functional roles in the regulation of disease. MicroRNAs have the potential to be biomarkers for asthma and provide the platform for the development of new classes of therapeutic compounds.

DOI10.3109/07853890.2014.958196
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2014Murphy VE, Mattes J, Powell H, Baines KJ, Gibson PG, 'Respiratory viral infections in pregnant women with asthma are associated with wheezing in the first 12 months of life', Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 25 151-158 (2014) [C1]

Background: There are few studies investigating the relationship between respiratory viral infection in pregnancy and asthma in the offspring, and none among mothers with asthma. ... [more]

Background: There are few studies investigating the relationship between respiratory viral infection in pregnancy and asthma in the offspring, and none among mothers with asthma. Infants of mothers with asthma are more likely to wheeze and have a higher risk of developing asthma than infants of non-asthmatic mothers. Methods: A prospective cohort study of viral infection in pregnancy was conducted between 2007 and 2009, and a subgroup of infants of mothers with asthma was followed up at 6 and 12 months of age. During common colds, nasal and throat swabs were collected from mothers and respiratory viruses detected by polymerase chain reaction. Respiratory health of infants was assessed by parent-completed questionnaire. Results: Twelve-month-old infants whose mothers had confirmed viral infections in pregnancy (n = 26) reported more frequent wheeze (40% had 4-12 wheeze attacks compared with 0%), sleep disturbed by wheeze (1 night per week or more in 60% vs. 11%), beta agonist treatment for wheeze (27% vs. 0%), prolonged colds (2 wk or longer 31% vs. 0%), more eczema (40% vs. 6.3%), and parent-perceived asthma (32% vs. 0%), compared with infants whose mothers had common colds without laboratory-confirmed viral infection (n = 16). Conclusions: This study demonstrates a relationship between maternal respiratory viral infection in pregnancy and wheezing illness in infants of mothers with asthma. Viral infections are the most common cause of asthma exacerbations in pregnancy, and infants of asthmatic mothers are at increased risk of asthma themselves. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI10.1111/pai.12156
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsKatherine Baines, Vanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2014Preece K, Bhatia R, Belcher J, Patchett K, McElduff P, Collison A, Mattes J, 'The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide improves prediction of clinical allergic reaction to peanut challenge in children', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 44 371-380 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1111/cea.12258Author URL
2014Pinnock R, Monagle P, Couper J, Wright I, Asher I, Jones P, et al., 'Dedicated paediatric teaching remains critical to the undergraduate medical curriculum', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 50 949-951 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.1111/jpc.12775Author URL
2014Wark PAB, Murphy V, Mattes J, 'The interaction between mother and fetus and the development of allergic asthma', Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 8 57-66 (2014) [C1]

The rising prevalence of asthma and atopic disease in industrialized countries in the last 50 years has raised important questions about how and why the disease develops in suscep... [more]

The rising prevalence of asthma and atopic disease in industrialized countries in the last 50 years has raised important questions about how and why the disease develops in susceptible populations. Most asthma begins in childhood in association with allergic sensitization and the development of a TH2 phenotype. It is recognized that asthma arises in the context of a complex interaction between genetic factors and the evolving immune system of the infant and the environment to which it is exposed, which now includes its in utero exposure. Early life exposures that lead to allergen sensitization and airway damage, especially in the form of viral respiratory tract infections, may lead to disease induction that commence the process that leads in some to asthma. Asthma models and early life observations suggest that repeated exposure to allergens and viral infection perpetuate a state of chronic airway inflammation leading to a maladaptive innate immune response that fails to resolve, characterized by chronic airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness. This article will concentrate on the development of asthma in the context of early life and maternal influences, including the effect of asthma on both the fetus and the mother. © 2014 Informa UK Ltd.

DOI10.1586/17476348.2014.848795
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Wark
2014Mattes J, Gibson PG, 'The early origins of copd in severe asthma: The one thing that leads to another or the two things that come together?', Thorax, 69 789-790 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204815
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPeter Gibson
2014Hansbro PM, Starkey MR, Mattes J, Horvat JC, 'Pulmonary immunity during respiratory infections in early life and the development of severe asthma', Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 11 S297-S302 (2014) [C1]

Asthma affects 10% of the population in Westernized countries, being most common in children. It is a heterogeneous condition characterized by chronic allergic airway inflammation... [more]

Asthma affects 10% of the population in Westernized countries, being most common in children. It is a heterogeneous condition characterized by chronic allergic airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to normally innocuous antigens. Combination therapies with inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators effectively manage mild to moderate asthma, but there are no cures, and patients with severe asthma do not respond to these treatments. The inception of asthma is linked to respiratory viral (respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus) and bacterial (Chlamydia, Mycoplasma) infections. The examination of mouse models of early-life infections and allergic airway disease (AAD) provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of disease inception that may lead to the development of more effective therapeutics. For example, early-life, but not adult, Chlamydia respiratory infections in mice permanently modify immunity and lung physiology. This increases the severity of AAD by promoting IL-13 expression, mucus hypersecretion, and AHR. We have identified novel roles for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosisinducing ligand (TRAIL) and IL-13 in promoting infection-induced pathology in early life and subsequent chronic lung disease. Genetic deletion of TRAIL or IL-13 variously protected against neonatal infection-induced inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, altered lung structure, AHR, and impaired lung function. Therapeutic neutralization of these factors prevented infection-induced severe AAD. Other novel mechanisms and avenues for intervention are also being explored. Such studies indicate the immunological mechanisms that may underpin the association between early-life respiratory infections and the development of more severe asthma and may facilitate the development of tailored preventions and treatments.

DOI10.1513/AnnalsATS.201402-086AW
Co-authorsMalcolm Starkey, Philip Hansbro, Jay Horvat
2014Gunawardhana LP, Baines KJ, Mattes J, Murphy VE, Simpson JL, Gibson PG, 'Differential DNA methylation profiles of infants exposed to maternal asthma during pregnancy', Pediatric Pulmonology, 49 852-862 (2014) [C1]

Background Asthma is a complex disease that involves both genetic factors and environmental exposures. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, may be important... [more]

Background Asthma is a complex disease that involves both genetic factors and environmental exposures. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, may be important in asthma development. Fetal exposure to maternal asthma during critical periods of in utero development may lead to epigenetic alterations that predispose infants to a greater risk of developing asthma themselves. We investigated alterations in the DNA methylation profile of peripheral blood from infants exposed to maternal asthma during pregnancy. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 12-month-old infants born to women with (n = 25) and without (n = 15) doctor diagnosed asthma during pregnancy. Genomic DNA was extracted, bisulfite converted, and hybridized to Infinium Methylation 27 arrays (Illumina), containing over27,000 CpGs from 14,495 genes. CpG loci in only autosomal genes were classified as differentially methylated at the 99% level (P < 0.01, |DiffScore| > 22 and delta beta >0.06). Results There were 70 CpG loci, corresponding to 67 genes that were significantly differentially methylated. Twelve CpG loci (11 genes) showed greater than 10% comparative difference in DNA methylation, including hyper-methylated loci of FAM181A, MRI1, PIWIL1, CHFR, DEFA1, MRPL28, AURKA, and hypo-methylated loci of NALP1L5, MAP8KIP3, ACAT2, and PM20D1 in maternal asthma. Methylation of MAPK8IP3 was significantly negatively correlated with maternal blood eosinophils (r = -0.38; P = 0.022), maternal eNO (r = -0.44; P = 0.005), and maternal serum total IgE (r = -0.39, P = 0.015). Methylation of AURKA negatively correlated with maternal hemoglobin (r = -0.43; P = 0.008), infants height (r = -0.51; P < 0.001) and weight (r = -0.36; P = 0.021). Methylation of PM20D1 was lower in infants born to mothers with asthma on inhaled corticosteroid treatment. Methylation of PM20D1 was lower and MRI1 was higher in infants born to atopic mothers without asthma. Conclusions In an Australian study population, exposure to maternal asthma during pregnancy is associated with differential methylation profiles of infants' peripheral blood DNA, which may act as risk factors for future asthma development. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI10.1002/ppul.22930
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsPeter Gibson, Katherine Baines, Jodie Simpson, Vanessa Murphy
2014Collison A, Li J, Pereira De Siqueira A, Zhang J, Toop HD, Morris JC, et al., 'Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand regulates hallmark features of airways remodeling in allergic airways disease', American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, 51 86-93 (2014) [C1]

Allergic asthma is a complex disease characterized by acute inflammation of the airways that over time leads to the development of significant structural changes termed remodeling... [more]

Allergic asthma is a complex disease characterized by acute inflammation of the airways that over time leads to the development of significant structural changes termed remodeling. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has an important regulatory role in acute allergic airways inflammation through up-regulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Midline-1 (MID-1), which limits protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity and downstream dephosphorylation of proinflammatory signaling molecules. The relevance of TRAIL in the development of airways remodeling has yet to be determined. In this study, the lungs of wild-type (WT) BALB/c and Tnfsf10 knockout (TRAIL-/-) mice were chronically exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) for 12 weeks to induce hallmark features of chronic allergic airways disease, including airways hyperreactivity (AHR), subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet cell hyperplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy. TRAIL-/- mice were largely protected from the development of AHR and peribronchial eosinophilia and had reduced levels of mast cells in the airways. This correlated with lower levels of cytokines, including IL-4, -5, -10, and -13, and with lower levels of proinflammatory chemokines from cultured cells isolated from the draining lymph nodes. TRAIL-/- mice were also protected from the characteristic features of airways remodeling, including peribronchial fibrosis, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and mucus hypersecretion, which correlated with reduced TGF-ß1 levels in the lungs. MID-1 expression was reduced in TRAIL-/- mice and up-regulated in allergic WT mice. Raising PP2A activity using 2-amino-4-(4-heptyloyphenol)-2-methylbutan-1-ol in allergic WT mice reduced eosinophilia, TGF-ß1, and peribronchial fibrosis. This study shows that TRAIL promotes airways remodeling in an OVA-induced model of chronic allergic airways disease. Targeting TRAIL and its downstream proin flammatory signaling pathway involving PP2A may be of therapeutic bene fit in reducing the hallmark features of airways remodeling observed in chronic allergic airways inflammation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Thoracic Society.

DOI10.1165/rcmb.2013-0490OC
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2013de Souza Alves CC, Collison A, Hatchwell L, Plank M, Morten M, Foster PS, et al., 'Inhibiting AKT phosphorylation employing non-cytotoxic anthraquinones ameliorates TH2 mediated allergic airways disease and rhinovirus exacerbation.', PLoS One, 8 e79565 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0079565Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2013Foster PS, Plank MW, Collison AM, Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Li J, et al., 'The emerging role of microRNAs in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in the lung', Immunological Reviews, 253 198-215 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 11
Co-authorsMing Yang, Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster
2013Barry J, Loh Z, Collison A, Mazzone S, Lalwani A, Zhang V, et al., 'Absence of Toll-IL-1 Receptor 8/Single Immunoglobulin IL-1 Receptor-Related Molecule Reduces House Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 49 481-490 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1165/rcmb.2012-0425OCAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2013Collison AM, Hatchwell LM, Verrills NM, Wark PA, Pereira De Siqueira AL, Tooze MK, et al., 'The E3 ubiquitin ligase midline 1 promotes allergen and rhinovirus-induced asthma by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A activity', Nature Medicine, 19 232-237 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 32Web of Science - 27
Co-authorsNikki Verrills, Paul Foster, Peter Wark
2013Collison A, Siegle JS, Hansbro NG, Kwok C-T, Herbert C, Mattes J, et al., 'Epigenetic changes associated with disease progression in a mouse model of childhood allergic asthma', DISEASE MODELS & MECHANISMS, 6 993-1000 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1242/dmm.011247Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Nicole Hansbro
2013Starkey MR, Essilfie A-T, Horvat JC, Kim RY, Nguyen DH, Beagley KW, et al., 'Constitutive production of IL-13 promotes early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection and allergic airway disease', Mucosal Immunology, 6 569-579 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsPhilip Hansbro, Malcolm Starkey, Jay Horvat, Paul Foster
2012Starkey MR, Kim RY, Beckett EL, Schilter HC, Shim D, Essilfie A-T, et al., 'Chlamydia muridarum lung infection in infants alters hematopoietic cells to promote allergic airway disease in mice', PLoS One, 7 e42588 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsJay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Malcolm Starkey
2011Collison AM, Herbert C, Siegle JS, Mattes J, Foster PS, Kumar RK, 'Altered expression of microRNA in the airway wall in chronic asthma: miR-126 as a potential therapeutic target', BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 11 29 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 34
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2011Collison AM, Mattes J, Plank MW, Foster PS, 'Inhibition of house dust mite-induced allergic airways disease by antagonism of microRNA-145 is comparable to glucocorticoid treatment', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 128 160-U251 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 70Web of Science - 58
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2011Weckmann M, Kopp MV, Heinzmann A, Mattes J, 'Haplotypes covering the TNFSF10 gene are associated with bronchial asthma', Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 22 25-30 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.01027.x
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009Tran HA, Song S, Crock PA, Mattes J, Howard K, 'The A, B, C, D of hypercalcaemia in Down syndrome', BMJ Case Reports, (2009) [C1]

Hypercalcaemia in infants with Down syndrome is an uncommon condition with only five previous case reports. The patients often present in the toddler years with the classical tria... [more]

Hypercalcaemia in infants with Down syndrome is an uncommon condition with only five previous case reports. The patients often present in the toddler years with the classical triad of Down syndrome, biochemical hypercalcaemia, and nephrocalcinosis. We present the sixth case and second male with this condition and further review the clinical details of this under-recognised condition and stratify the diagnostic criteria. The management mandates a reduction in calcium intake as a first step. The natural history of the various aspects of this condition is also considered.

DOI10.1136/bcr.06.2008.0232
2009Mattes J, Collison AM, Plank MW, Phipps S, Foster PS, 'Antagonism of microRNA-126 suppresses the effector function of T(H)2 cells and the development of allergic airways disease', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106 18704-18709 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1073/pnas.0905063106
CitationsScopus - 159Web of Science - 151
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Collison AM, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'Emerging role of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a key regulator of inflammatory responses', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 36 1049-1053 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1440-1681.2009.05258.x
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 27
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Foster PS, Mattes J, 'IL-21 comes of age', Immunology and Cell Biology, 87 359-360 (2009) [C2]
DOI10.1038/icb.2009.33
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Phipps S, Lam CE, Kaiko GE, Foo A, Collison AM, Mattes J, et al., 'Toll/IL-1 signaling is critical for house dust mite-specific Th1 and Th2 responses', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 179 883-893 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1164/rccm.200806-974oc
CitationsScopus - 91Web of Science - 92
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2008Mattes J, Collison AM, Foster PS, 'Emerging role of microRNAs in disease pathogenesis and strategies for therapeutic modulation', Current Opinion in Molecular Therapeutics, 10 150-157 (2008) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2008Yang M, Mattes J, 'Discovery, biology and therapeutic potential of RNA interference, microRNA and antagomirs', Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 117 94-104 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.08.004
CitationsScopus - 59Web of Science - 51
Co-authorsMing Yang
2007Mattes J, Yang M, Foster PS, 'Regulation of microRNA by antagomirs: a new class of pharmacological antagonists for the specific regulation of gene function?', American Journal of Respiratory and Cellular Molecular Biology, 36 8-12 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1165/rcmb.2006-0227TR
CitationsScopus - 43Web of Science - 38
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Ming Yang
2007Weckmann M, Collison A, Simpson JL, Kopp MV, Wark PA, Smyth MJ, et al., 'Critical link between TRAIL and CCL20 for the activation of T(H)2 cells and the expression of allergic airway disease', Nature Medicine, 13 1308-1315 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1038/nm1660
CitationsScopus - 61Web of Science - 59
Co-authorsPeter Wark, Paul Foster, Peter Gibson, Nicole Hansbro, Jodie Simpson
2007Huck B, Neumann-Haefelin D, Schmitt-Graeff A, Weckmann M, Mattes J, Ehl S, Falcone V, 'Human metapneumovirus induces more severe disease and stronger innate immune response in BALB/c mice as compared with respiratory syncytial virus', Respiratory Research, 8 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1465-9921-8-6
CitationsScopus - 17Web of Science - 19
2007Mattes J, Whitehead BF, Liehr T, Wilkinson I, Bear J, Fagan KA, et al., 'Paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 14 with mosaicism for a supernumerary marker chromosome 14', American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 143A 2165-2171 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1002/ajmg.a.31896
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2006Yang M, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'Employment of microRNA profiles and RNA interference and antagomirs for the characterization and treatment of respiratory disease', Drug Discovery Today: Therapeutic Strategies, 3 325-332 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ddstr.2006.10.001
CitationsScopus - 4
Co-authorsMing Yang, Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster
2005Prescott VE, Campbell PM, Moore A, Mattes J, Rothenberg ME, Foster PS, et al., 'Transgenic expression of bean alpha-amylase inhibitor in peas results in altered structure and immunogenicity', Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53 9023-9030 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jf050594v
CitationsScopus - 104Web of Science - 85
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2004Clark K, Simson L, Newcombe N, Koskinen AML, Mattes J, Lee NA, et al., 'Eosinophil degranulation in the allergic lung of mice primarily occurs in the airway lumen', Journal of Leukocyte Biology, 75 1001-1009 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1189/jlb.0803391
CitationsScopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2004Ihorst G, Frischer T, Horak F, Schumacher M, Kopp M, Forster J, et al., 'Long- and medium-term ozone effects on lung growth including a broad spectrum of exposure', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 23 292-299 (2004)
DOI10.1183/09031936.04.00021704Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 19
2004Storm Van's Gravesande K, Mattes J, Endlicher A, Alving K, Ihorst G, Kühr J, 'Effect of two doses of budesonide on exhaled nitric oxide and urinary EPX excretion in asthmatic children', Pneumologie, 58 483-488 (2004)

The use of objective outcome measures that assess airway inflammation in pediatric asthma can provide a good evaluation of asthma severity and treatment response. In this double-b... [more]

The use of objective outcome measures that assess airway inflammation in pediatric asthma can provide a good evaluation of asthma severity and treatment response. In this double-blind and randomized study the effects of 200 µg of budesonide and 800 µg of budesonide on markers of inflammation (exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), eosinophil protein X (EPX) excretion in urine) and on lung function (FEV 1) were prospectively investigated in 24 ICS-naive children with mild persistent to moderate persistent asthma over a period of eight weeks. After eight weeks of treatment 200 µg and 800 µg of budesonide led to a significant decrease (p < 0.025) in eNO [median (90% interval): 200 µg: -17.2 ppb (-54.6 to 0.9); 800 µg: -13.2 ppb (-44.6 to -1.7)]. A significant change in urinary EPX excretion was only observed in the high dose group [200 µg: -10.3 µg/mmol creatinine (-116.2 to 50.5), p = 0.9; 800 µg: -49.2 µg/mmol creatinine (-231.0 to 48.7), p = 0.02]. However, a significant difference between the change from baseline after 8 weeks of either group was found neither for eNO (p = 0.66) nor for EPX excretion (p = 0.04). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that 800 µg budesonide per day did not show any advantage in reduction of airway inflammation, measured by eNO and urinary EPX excretion, in children with mild persistent to moderate persistent asthma.

DOI10.1055/s-2004-818466
CitationsScopus - 3
2004Ngoumou G, Schaefer DO, Mattes J, Kopp MV, 'Interleukin-18 enhances the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by allergen-specific and unspecific stimulated cord blood mononuclear cells', CYTOKINE, 25 172-178 (2004)
DOI10.1016/j.cyto.2003.11.013Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 3
2003Mattes J, Foster P, 'Regulation of eosinophil migration and Th2 cell function by IL-5 and eotaxin', Current Drug Targets, 2 169-174 (2003) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 37
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2003Mattes J, Hulett M, Xie W, Hogan S, Rothenburg ME, Foster P, Parish C, 'Immunotherapy of cytotoxic T cell resistant tumors by T helper 2 cells: an eotaxin and STAT6 dependent process', Journal of Experimental Medicine, 197 387-393 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1084/jem.20021683
CitationsScopus - 109Web of Science - 105
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2003Kruse S, Kuehr J, Moseler M, Kropp MV, Kurz T, Deichmann KA, et al., 'Polymorphisms in the IL18 gene are associated with specific sensitization to common allergens and allergic rhinitis', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 111 117-122 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1067/mai.2003.43
CitationsScopus - 92Web of Science - 79
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2003Lange J, Ngoumou G, Berkenheide S, Moseler M, Mattes J, Kuehr J, Kopp MV, 'High interleukin-13 production by phytohaemagglutinin- and Der p 1-stimulated cord blood mononuclear cells is associated with the subsequent development of atopic dermatitis at the age of 3 years', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 33 1537-1543 (2003)
DOI10.1046/j.1365-2222.2003.01789.xAuthor URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 23
2002Mattes J, Yang M, Mahalinggam S, Kuehr J, Webb DC, Simson L, et al., 'Intrinsic defect in T cell production of interleukin (IL)-13 in the absence of both IL-5 and cotaxin precludes the development of eosinophilia and airways hyperreactivity in experimental asthma.', J Exp Med. 195:1433-44, 1433-1444 (2002) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 181Web of Science - 171
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2002Mattes J, Gravesande KSV, Moeller C, Moseler M, Brandis M, Kuehr J, 'Circadian variation of exhaled nitric oxide and urinary eosinophil protein X in asthmatic and healthy children', PEDIATRIC RESEARCH, 51 190-194 (2002)
DOI10.1203/00006450-200202000-00011Author URL
CitationsScopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2002Foster PS, Hogan S, Yang M, Mattes J, Young I, Matthaei K, et al., 'Interleukin-5 and eosinophils as therapeutic targets for asthma', Trends in Molecular Medicine, 8 162-167 (2002) [C2]
CitationsScopus - 55Web of Science - 51
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2002Karmaus W, Arshad H, Mattes J, 'Re: "Does the sibling effect have its origin in utero? Investigating birth order, cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, and allergic sensitization at age 4 years" - Reply', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 156 883-884 (2002)
DOI10.1093/aje/kwf123Author URL
2001Karmaus W, Arshad H, Mattes J, 'Does the sibling effect have its origin in utero? Investigating birth order, cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, and allergic sensitization at age 4 years', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 154 909-915 (2001)
DOI10.1093/aje/154.10.909Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 90
2001Hertz M, Mahalingam S, Dalum I, Klysner S, Mattes J, Neisig A, et al., 'Active vaccination against IL-5 bypasses immunological tolerance and ameliorates experimental asthma', Journal of Immunology, 167 3792-3799 (2001) [C1]
CitationsWeb of Science - 66
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2001Mackenzie J, Mattes J, Dent L, Foster PS, 'Eosinophils promote allergic disease of the lung by regulating CD4+ Th2 lymphocyte function', Journal of Immunology, 167 3146-3155 (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 127Web of Science - 118
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2001Mattes J, Yang M, Siqueira A, Clark K, Mackenzie J, McKenzie A, et al., 'IL-13 induces airways hyperreactivity independently of the IL-4R{alpha} chain in the allergic lung', Journal of Immunology, 167 1683-1692 (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 109Web of Science - 100
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2001Foster PS, Mould A, Yang M, Mackenzie J, Mattes J, Hogan S, et al., 'Elemental signals regulating eosinophil accumulation in the lung', Immunological Reviews, 179 173-181 (2001) [C2]
CitationsScopus - 159Web of Science - 145
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2000Webb D, McKenzie A, Koskinen A, Yang M, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'Integrated signals between IL-13, IL-4, and IL-5 regulate airways hyperreactivity', Journal of Immunology, 165 108-113 (2000) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 213Web of Science - 194
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2000Mattes J, van's Gravesande KS, Moeller C, Kuehr J, 'Circadian variation of urinary EPX in asthmatic and healthy children', JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, 105 S193-S193 (2000)
DOI10.1016/S0091-6749(00)91008-XAuthor URL
2000van Gravesande KS, Mattes J, Grossklauss E, Zurmuhl A, Moseler M, Kuhr J, 'Preventive effect of 2 and 10 mg of sodium cromoglycate on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 159 759-763 (2000)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 1
2000Reining U, Mattes J, Storm van's Gravesande K, Ihorst G, Kühr J, '[Reproducibility in induced sputum in children with asthma]', Pneumologie (Stuttgart, Germany), 54 185-190 (2000)
DOI10.1055/s-2000-3828
1999Mattes J, Gravesande KS, Reining U, Alving K, Ihorst G, Henschen M, Kuehr J, 'NO in exhaled air is correlated with markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation in corticosteroid-dependent childhood asthma', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 13 1391-1395 (1999)
DOI10.1183/09031936.99.13613969Author URL
CitationsScopus - 117Web of Science - 96
1999Mattes J, Karmaus W, 'The use of antibiotics in the first year of life and development of asthma: which comes first?', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 29 729-732 (1999)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 19
1999van's Gravesande KS, Mattes J, Gruntjens T, Kopp M, Seydewitz HH, Moseler M, Kuehr J, 'Circadian variation of urinary eosinophil protein X in asthmatic and healthy children', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 29 1497-1501 (1999)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 17Web of Science - 11
1999Bohnet W, Bar G, Strauch E, Ihorst G, Mattes J, Schneider C, et al., 'Short-term effect of particular matter (PM10) on pulmonary function in schoolchildren over two years', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 159 A772-A772 (1999)
Author URL
1999Mattes J, Baer G, Schneider C, Bohnet W, Ihorst G, Strauch E, et al., 'Association between respiratory symptoms and ambient ozone levels over two summers in 765 schoolchildren', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 159 A772-A772 (1999)
Author URL
1999Mattes J, Baer G, Schneider C, Bohnet W, Ihorst G, Strauch E, et al., 'Correlation between personal and fixed-site ozone measurements in schoolchildren', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 159 A772-A772 (1999)
Author URL
1999Mattes J, van Gravesande KS, Reining U, Alving K, Ihorst G, Heuschen M, Kuehr J, 'Nitric oxide in exhaled air is correlated with eosinophilic airway inflammation in children with chronic asthma', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 159 A862-A862 (1999)
Author URL
1999Gravesande KSV, Langenbacher E, Mattes J, Zurmuehl A, Beck W, Moseler M, Knehr J, 'Sodium cromoglycate (SCG) reduces the excretion of eosinophil protein X (EPX) in children with exercise induced asthma', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 159 A911-A911 (1999)
Author URL
1999Mattes J, Karmaus W, Gravesande KSV, Moseler M, Forster J, Kuehr J, 'Pulmonary function in children of school age is related to the number of siblings in their family', PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY, 28 414-417 (1999)
DOI10.1002/(SICI)1099-0496(199912)28:6<414::AID-PPUL5>3.0.CO;2-KAuthor URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 7
1998Mattes J, Karmaus W, Moseler M, Frischer T, Kuehr J, 'Accumulation of atopic disorders within families: a sibling effect only in the offspring of atopic fathers', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, 28 1480-1486 (1998)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 21
Show 64 more journal articles

Review (2 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Plank M, Maltby S, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'Targeting translational control as a novel way to treat inflammatory disease: The emerging role of MicroRNAs', Clinical and Experimental Allergy (2013) [C1]

Chronic inflammatory diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are leading causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide and effective treatments are limited... [more]

Chronic inflammatory diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are leading causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide and effective treatments are limited. These disorders can often be attributed to abnormal immune responses to environmental stimuli and infections. Mechanisms leading to inflammation are complex, resulting from interactions of structural cells and activation of both the adaptive and innate arms of the immune system. The activation of structural and immune cells involves both temporary and permanent changes in gene expression in these cells, which underpin chronic inflammation and tissue dysfunction. miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs increasingly being recognized to play important roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells by regulating translation. Individual miRNAs can exert their effects by directly inhibiting the translation or stability of multiple mRNAs simultaneously. Thus, the expression or blockade of function of a single miRNA (miR) can result in pronounced alterations in protein expression within a given cell. Dysregulation of miRNA expression may subsequently alter cellular function, and in certain situations predispose to disease. Our current understanding of the role of miRNA in the regulation of inflammatory disease (e.g. allergic diseases) remains limited. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of miRNA biogenesis and function, the roles miRNA play in the regulation of immune cell function and their potential contribution to inflammatory diseases. We also highlight strategies to alter miRNA function for experimental or therapeutic gain, and discuss the potential utility and limitations of targeting these molecules as anti-inflammatory strategies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI10.1111/cea.12135
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsSteven Maltby, Paul Foster
2013Plank M, Maltby S, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'Targeting translational control as a novel way to treat inflammatory disease: the emerging role of microRNAs.', Clinical and Experimental Allergy (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/cea.12170Author URL
Co-authorsSteven Maltby, Paul Foster

Conference (35 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Mandaliya PH, Bhatia R, Belcher J, McElduff P, Collison A, Mattes J, 'Is fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) able to predict severity of allergic reaction at an open cooked egg challenge?', ALLERGY, Copenhagen, DENMARK (2014) [E3]
Author URL
2014Collison A, Hatchwell L, Girkin J, Li J, Parsons K, Bartlett N, et al., 'REDUCED TLR7 EXPRESSION MAY UNDERPIN IMPAIRED RESPONSE TO VIRAL INFECTION IN ASTHMA', RESPIROLOGY (2014) [E3]
DOI10.1111/resp.12263_5Author URL
Co-authorsPeter Wark, Paul Foster
2014Li J, Collison A, De Siqueira PA, Zhang J, Mattes J, 'TUMOUR NECROSIS FACTOR RELATED APOPTOSIS INDUCING LIGAND (TRAIL) REGULATION OF PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (PP)2A IS CRUCIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF BLEOMYCIN INDUCED PULMONARY FIBROSIS IN MICE', RESPIROLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
2014Preece K, Bhatia R, Belcher J, Patchett K, Mcelduff P, Collison A, Mattes J, 'FRACTION OF EXHALED NITRIC OXIDE IS A NOVEL NON-INVASIVE PREDICTOR OF PEANUT ALLERGY', RESPIROLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
2014Rhys-Jones B, Bhatia R, Hilton J, Kumar R, Mattes J, 'RECURRENT, THERAPY-RESISTANT ALVEOLAR INFILTRATES IN A YOUNG CHILD: APPROACHES TO DIAGNOSIS AND CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT', RESPIROLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
2014Girkin J, Sokulsky L, Hatchwell L, Starkey M, Collison A, Hansbro P, Mattes J, 'IDENTIFICATION OF A NOVEL INTERLEUKIN-13 SIGNALLING PATHWAY', RESPIROLOGY (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsMalcolm Starkey, Philip Hansbro
2013Preece KD, Bhatia R, Belcher J, Patchett K, McElduff P, Mattes J, 'Prospective validation and accuracy of Ara h2 in the diagnosis of childhood peanut allergy', ALLERGY, Milan, ITALY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
2013Girkin J, Hatchwell L, Foster PS, Johnston SL, Collison A, Mattes J, 'SALMETEROL ATTENUATES CHEMOTAXIS IN RHINOVIRUS-INDUCED EXACERBATION OF ASTHMA VIA MODULATION OF PP2A', RESPIROLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2013Mattes J, Murphy V, Powell H, Gibson P, 'THE EFFECT OF BETTER ASTHMA CONTROL IN PREGNANCY ON WHEEZY ILLNESSES IN INFANCY', RESPIROLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2013Gunawardhana LP, Baines KJ, Mattes J, Murphy VE, Simpson JL, Gibson PG, 'EPIGENETIC ALTERATIONS IN INFANTS ASSOCIATED WITH MATERNAL ASTHMA DURING PREGNANCY', RESPIROLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Jodie Simpson, Katherine Baines, Peter Gibson
2013Hatchwell L, Collison A, Phipps S, Foster PS, Johnston SL, Mattes J, 'CCL7 (MCP-3) MEDIATES RHINOVIRUS-INDUCED LUNG INFLAMMATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY DISEASE', RESPIROLOGY (2013) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2012Starkey M, Kim R, Horvat J, Essilfie A-T, Beagley K, Mattes J, et al., 'Constitutive IL-13 promotes respiratory chlamydial infection and infection-induced chronic airway hyper-responsiveness', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, Boston, MA (2012) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Philip Hansbro
2012Collison AM, Hatchwell LM, Siqueira AP, Bartlett NW, Johnston SL, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'Antagonism of microRNA-122 is comparible to azithromycin treatment in a mouse model of rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2012Hatchwell LM, Collison AM, Siqueira AP, Bartlett NW, Johnston SL, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'Toll-like receptor 7 mediates anti-viral responses to rhinovirus while suppressing exacerbation of asthma', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2012Hatchwell LM, Collison AM, Siqueira AP, Bartlett NW, Johnston SL, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'TRAIL regulates inflammatory responses to rhinovirus and rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of asthma', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2012Plank MW, Kaiko GE, Luck H, Li J, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'The role of micrornas in CD4 T cell function', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster, Philip Hansbro
2012Starkey MR, Kim RY, Horvat JC, Essilfie A-T, Beagley KW, Mattes J, et al., 'Constitutive IL-13 promotes respiratory chlamydial infection-induced chronic airway hyperresponsiveness', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMalcolm Starkey, Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster, Jay Horvat
2012Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank MW, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'MiRNAs regulate bacterial infection in lungs', Respirology, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Hansbro, Paul Foster
2011Foster PS, Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank MW, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, 'MiRNA and its roles in regulating bacterial infection in lungs', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Denver, CO (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Hansbro, Paul Foster
2011McLaughlin KM, Mattes J, Murphy VE, Steel KR, Powell H, Gibson PG, 'The Growing Into Asthma (GIA) Study: Need for improved management of respiratory illnesses in early life', PSANZ 2011 15th Annual Congress: Poster Abstracts, Hobart, TAS (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2011Gunawardhana LP, Baines KJ, Simpson JL, Mattes J, Murphy VE, Gibson PG, 'Maternal asthma is associated with alterations in DNA methylation profile of peripheral blood of infants', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson, Katherine Baines, Jodie Simpson
2011Mattes J, Murphy VE, McLaughlin KM, Steel KR, Powell H, Gibson PG, 'Are maternal asthma exacerbations during pregnancy related to impaired infant growth in the first six months of life?', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsVanessa Murphy, Peter Gibson
2011Collison AM, Hatchwell LM, Pereira De Siqueira AL, Don A, Verrills NM, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'The development of house dust mite-induced allergic airways disease is regulated by a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase-dependent deactivation of a protein phosphatase', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsNikki Verrills, Paul Foster
2011Hatchwell LM, Collison AM, Pereira De Siqueira AL, Foster PS, Verrills NM, Don A, et al., 'A novel E3 ubiquitin ligase links rhinovirus infection to exacerbation of asthma', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsNikki Verrills, Paul Foster, Peter Wark
2011Mattes J, Hankin RG, Hilton JM, Collison AM, Pereira De Siqueira AL, Gulliver T, et al., 'Frequent persistent wheeze in infancy may be associated with impaired FEV0.5 and FVC values', Respirology, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2010Ptaschinski CM, Phipps S, Hansbro NG, Rosenberg HF, Mattes J, Foster PS, 'MicroRNAs are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses characteristic of severe respiratory virus infection', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, New Orleans (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsNicole Hansbro, Paul Foster
2010Mattes J, Collison AM, Plank MW, Phipps S, Foster PS, 'The role of microRNA as new anti-inflammatory targets', APCAACI 2010: The 8th Asia Pacific Congress on Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology Programme & Abstracts Handbook, Singapore (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2010Foster PS, Mattes J, Collison AM, Plank MW, Phipps S, 'MicoRNAs bridge innate and adative immunity: induction of TH2 mediated allergic airways disease', OzBio 2010: The Molecules of Life - from Discovery to Biotechnology. Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Collison AM, Mattes J, Phipps S, Plank MW, Foster PS, 'MicroRNAs are crucial in the development of airways hyperreactivity', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Mattes J, Collison AM, Plank MW, Phipps S, Foster PS, 'MicroRNAs regulate allergic airway inflammation', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2009Collison AM, De Siqueira A, Plank MW, Foster PS, Mattes J, 'The identification of TRAIL as a mediator of airways remodelling in a chronic model of murine allergic airways disease', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPaul Foster
2007Talbot PI, Wright IM, Hilton JM, Mattes J, Clifton VL, 'Effect of maternal asthma during pregnancy on childhood growth and development of atopic disease', Respirology (TSANZ Abstracts-Posters), Auckland (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsVicki Clifton, Ian Wright
2006Mattes J, Simpson JL, Foster PS, Gibson PG, 'Trail is upregulated in the airways of asthmatics', Respirology, Canberra (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsPeter Gibson, Paul Foster, Jodie Simpson
2002Klysner S, Mahalingam S, Neisig A, Hertz M, Dalum I, Mattes J, et al., 'Induction of a protective immune response in a murine model of asthma by DNA vaccination with modified IL-5', ALLERGY, NAPLES, ITALY (2002)
Author URL
2002Lange J, Schaefer D, Engels E, Mattes J, Kuehr J, Kopp M, 'Interferon-gamma and IL-13 production in response to PHA and IL-18 by human cord blood mononuclear cells', ALLERGY, NAPLES, ITALY (2002)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Show 32 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants39
Total funding$9,800,279

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20153 grants / $1,119,402

The effect of asthma control during pregnancy on markers of airways inflammation and lung function in the offspring$1,083,354

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Vanessa Murphy, Professor Peter Sly, Doctor Adam Collison, Professor Paul Robinson
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1400050
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Viral infections in the BLT cohort in the first year of life$19,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund

Funding bodyJohn Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Vanessa Murphy, Doctor Adam Collison
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500671
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Lung function in early life for children with high asthma risk$17,048

Funding body: Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd

Funding bodyRebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation Ltd
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Vanessa Murphy, Doctor Adam Collison
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500704
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20145 grants / $2,358,616

The Breathing for Life Trial $1,647,904

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Vanessa Murphy, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Professor Joerg Mattes, Professor Warwick Giles, Professor Michael Peek, Associate Professor Andrew Bisits, Associate Professor Leonie Callaway, Dr Kirsten McCaffery, Dr Helen Barrett
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300106
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Toll-like receptor 7 and asthma $673,712

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Conjoint Professor Peter Wark
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300093
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

High-flow Nasal-prong Warm Humidified Oxygen Pilot Randomised Control Trial for infants aged = 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamMrs Elizabeth Kepreotes, Professor Joerg Mattes
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301430
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

A descriptive observational study of infants aged < 24 months with severe bronchiolitis requiring critical care$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamMrs Elizabeth Kepreotes, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Peter Harrigan, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce Whitehead, Professor John Attia, Doctor Mark Lee
SchemeCritical Care and HMRI BRICs Nursing Research and Innovation Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401451
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

European Respiratory Congress (ERS) 2014, ICM - International Congress Centre, Munich Germany, 6 - 10 September 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1401074
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20135 grants / $153,959

Asthma Australia Scholarship$73,959

Funding body: Asthma Australia

Funding bodyAsthma Australia
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeNational Research Program (PhD Scholarship)
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300552
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Molecular and cellular characterisation of TLR7 signalling in rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbation$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300469
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Molecular and cellular characterisation of TLR7 signalling in rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbation$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster
SchemeNear Miss
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300692
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

DP73 Digital colour and monochrome camera + cellSens software + Xcite120 fluorescence lamp illuminator$20,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Doctor Alan Hsu, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Katie Baines, Associate Professor Jodie Simpson, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Steven Maltby, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Gerard Kaiko, Doctor Jay Horvat, Doctor Simon Keely, Doctor Andrew Jarnicki, Doctor Michael Fricker
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201186
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Effect of better asthma management in pregnancy on antiviral responses, atopy and airways inflammation in early childhood$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Doctor Vanessa Murphy
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300476
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20125 grants / $135,000

SpectraMax M5e Multi-Mode Microplate Reader$50,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Jay Horvat, Doctor Simon Keely, Doctor Andrew Jarnicki, Doctor Linda Howland, Doctor Kelly Asquith
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100975
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

The Growing into Asthma Study: Wheezing prevalence and markers of airways inflammation in preschoolers born to mothers in asthma exacerbations in pregnancy$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce Whitehead, Doctor Vanessa Murphy
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200662
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Novel molecular markers in children with eosinophilic oesophagitis – association with symptoms, oesophageal function and treatment response and role in disease pathogenesis$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Scott Nightingale, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Adam Collison, Laureate Professor Nick Talley
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200661
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Coordinated targeting of immune pathways to suppress infection-associated inflammatory diseases.$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200671
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Molecular and cellular characterisation of TLR7 signalling for the expression of rhinovirus induced asthma exacerbation$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200680
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20114 grants / $1,313,780

Targeting microRNA (miRNA) as a unified therapeutic approach to the treatment of asthma and allergic inflammation$651,732

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Joerg Mattes, Professor Rakesh Kumar
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000262
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Molecular characterisation of TRAIL-regulated signal transduction pathways and their role in the development, persistence, and exacerbation of allergic airways disease$615,048

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Nikki Verrills
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000314
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

SCIREQ FlexiVentFX system + FlexiVentFX extension$45,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Simon Keely, Doctor Jay Horvat, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Catherine Ptaschinski, Doctor Kelly Asquith, Doctor Gough Au, Conjoint Professor Peter Wark, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Roger Smith, Professor Judith Black, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Professor Paul Hertzog
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100037
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

7th IES Syumposium, 21 - 25 June 2011, Quebec City$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100834
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20103 grants / $642,342

The role of microRNAs in the regulation of antiviral and inflammatory responses during experimental rhinovirus infection$583,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0190183
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Buxco FinePointe software and FinePointe RC system for mice $39,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Simon Phipps, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Kelly Asquith, Doctor Catherine Ptaschinski, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Professor Judith Black
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000053
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Molecular markers of reversible airway obstruction in early life and correlation with clinical wheezing patterns$19,842

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding bodyHunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Conjoint Associate Professor Bruce Whitehead, Doctor Ana Pereira De Siqueira
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900119
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20098 grants / $733,575

Mechanisms and treatment of early life chlamydial infection and associated asthma$592,125

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Phil Hansbro, Professor Kenneth Beagley, Professor Joerg Mattes
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0188845
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Coulter counter$41,150

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Simon Phipps, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Kelly Asquith
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189851
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Jaeger MasterScreen Baby Bodybox for infant lung function measurement$30,000

Funding body: Ramaciotti Foundations

Funding bodyRamaciotti Foundations
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeMajor Equipment Award
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189323
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Growing into asthma: A birth cohort study to investigate the prenatal and development origins of asthma$24,800

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Vanessa Murphy, Professor Joerg Mattes, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189802
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Development of novel therapeutic approaches for rhinovirus - induced asthma exacerbation$24,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Conjoint Professor Peter Wark
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189800
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Growing into asthma: a birth cohort study to investigate the prenatal and development origins of asthma$13,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Vanessa Murphy, Professor Joerg Mattes, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190487
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Small RNA molecules and Rhinovirus$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190605
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

American Thoracic Society Annual meeting, San Diego USA, 15 - 20 May 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190138
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20082 grants / $635,375

The role of microRNAs as new anti-inflammatory targets for the treatment of asthma$600,375

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Assoc. Prof Klaus Matthaei, Professor Joerg Mattes
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0187584
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Individually ventilated cages (IVC) and associated ventilator, holding boxes and water bottles$35,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Simon Phipps, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Kelly Asquith
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188541
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20071 grants / $137,000

Molecular mechanisms of persistent allergic responses$137,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes
SchemeTraining (Postdoctoral) Fellowships - Health Professional Research Fellowship (Part-time)
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0186769
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20062 grants / $540,282

PRC Priority Research Centre for Asthma & Respiratory Diseases$524,282

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Professor Alistair Sim, Conjoint Professor Peter Wark
SchemePriority Research Centre
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0186914
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Role of TRAIL on development of atopic dermatitis and T helper type 2 immunity$16,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Joerg Mattes, Laureate Professor Paul Foster
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0186098
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20051 grants / $2,030,948

Drug targets from new animal models$2,030,948

Funding body: CRC for Asthma

Funding bodyCRC for Asthma
Project TeamLaureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Ming Yang, Dr Simon Phipps
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185860
Type Of FundingCRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category4CRC
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Novel Signalling Pathways in Food Allergy and Eosinophilic Oesophagitis
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2015Post-Transitional Cardiac Physiology in Very Preterm Neonates
Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2015PEAnut Anaphylaxis Predictors (PEAAP study)
General Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014To Determine the Effect of Reduced Asthma Exacerbations During Pregnancy on Markers of Airways Inflammation, Lung Function, and Antiviral Responses in the Offspring at Six Years of Age
General Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013The Impact of Better Asthma Management during Pregnancy on the Lung Function of the Child
Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012The Role of Rhinovirus, TRAIL, IL-13 and PP2A in Allergic Airways Disease
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012The Role of TRAIL in the Induction and Perpetuation of Eosinophilic Oesophagitis
Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012Understanding the mechanisms of airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of asthma
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2010Role of TRAIL and TLRT in Response to Rhinovirus Infection in Allergic Airways Disease
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014The Role of microRNAs in Allergic Airways Disease and T Cell Biology
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014The Role of MicroRNA in Regulating Anti-Bacterial Responses in Innate Immune Cells
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012Novel Therapeutic Approaches for the Treatment of Allergic Airways Disease
Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
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News

HMRI logo

Asthma researchers' virus and allergy breakthrough

January 21, 2013

Paediatric and respiratory researchers from the University of Newcastle, along with national and international collaborators, are a step closer to identifying the source of serious virus-and allergen-induced asthma attacks after detecting important molecular signals generated very early in the disease process.

Professor Joerg Mattes

Position

Chair - Paediatrics & Child Health
Experimental&Translational Respiratory Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Immunology and Microbiology

Contact Details

Emailjoerg.mattes@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 40420209 (02) 49213656
Fax(02) 49855277 (02) 40420023

Office

Room2411
BuildingHMRI
LocationLevel 2 East, HMRI, Lot 1 Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia

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