Dr Megan Rollo

Research Academic

School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
The development and validation of new methods for the assessment of dietary intake, in particular smartphone photographic records, and the design and evaluation of innovative uses of interactive technologies to enhance dietetic practice, support individuals make and sustain healthy behaviours in management of chronic diseases such as obesity.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Applied Science, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nut & Diet) Hons, Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • dietary intake methods
  • dietetics
  • dietietics
  • eHealth
  • mHealth
  • nutrition
  • nutrition assessment
  • telehealth

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Guest M, Collins CE, 'Fruit and vegetable intake assessed by food frequency questionnaire and plasma carotenoids: a validation study in adults.', Nutrients, 7 3240-3251 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/nu7053240
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity... [more]

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Self-Monitoring of Dietary Intake by Young Women: Online Food Records Completed on Computer or Smartphone Are as Accurate as Paper-Based Food Records but More Acceptable', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115 87-94 (2015)

Adherence and accuracy of self-monitoring of dietary intake influences success in weight management interventions. Information technologies such as computers and smartphones have ... [more]

Adherence and accuracy of self-monitoring of dietary intake influences success in weight management interventions. Information technologies such as computers and smartphones have the potential to improve adherence and accuracy by reducing the burden associated with monitoring dietary intake using traditional paper-based food records. We evaluated the acceptability and accuracy of three different 7-day food record methods (online accessed via computer, online accessed via smartphone, and paper-based). Young women (N=18; aged 23.4±2.9 years; body mass index 24.0±2.2) completed the three 7-day food records in random order with 7-day washout periods between each method. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was derived from resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity level (PAL) derived from accelerometers (TEE=REE×PAL). Accuracy of the three methods wasassessed by calculating absolute (energy intake [EI]-TEE) and percentage difference (EI/TEE×100) between self-reported EI and TEE. Acceptability was assessed via questionnaire. Mean±standard deviation TEE was 2,185±302 kcal/day and EI was 1,729±249 kcal/day, 1,675±287kcal/day, and 1,682±352 kcal/day for computer, smartphone, and paper records, respectively. There were no significant differences between absolute and percentage differences between EI and TEE for the three methods: computer, -510±389 kcal/day (78%); smartphone, -456±372 kcal/day (80%); and paper, -503±513 kcal/day (79%). Half of participants (n=9) preferred computer recording, 44.4% preferred smartphone, and 5.6% preferred paper-based records. Most participants (89%) least preferred the paper-based record. Because online food records completed on either computer or smartphone were as accurate as paper-based records but more acceptable to young women, they should be considered when self-monitoring of intake is recommended to young women.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2014.07.036
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, et al., 'The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: the Australian Recommended Food Score.', Nutrients, 7 785-798 (2015)
DOI 10.3390/nu7020785
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, (2015)

Summary: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight an... [more]

Summary: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity... [more]

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2015 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell AW, 'Evaluation of a mobile phone image-based dietary assessment method in adults with type 2 diabetes', Nutrients, 7 4897-4910 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu7064897
2015 Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, Krukowski RA, Harvey JR, Hoggle LB, Collins CE, 'Video Consultations and Virtual Nutrition Care for Weight Management', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2015.03.016
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015)

Background: There is a lack of understanding of young men's perspectives in obesity-related research. This study aims to: (1) identify young men's perceived motivators and barrier... [more]

Background: There is a lack of understanding of young men's perspectives in obesity-related research. This study aims to: (1) identify young men's perceived motivators and barriers in adopting healthy eating and physical activity behaviours, and (2) explore any differences in responses by weight status categories. Methods: Ten focus groups (32-63 minutes; 3-9 participants per group) were conducted with 61 young men (BMI: 25.3±5.1kg/m2, aged: 18-25 years) from the Hunter region, New South Wales, Australia. There were 35 (57.4%) healthy weight men and 26 (42.6%) overweight/ obese men. Three groups were with healthy weight participants, three with overweight/obese participants and four with mixed-BMI participants. Sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data analysis was conducted by an independent researcher using NVIVO10. Results: Motivators for healthy eating grouped into four themes: physical health (e.g. to live longer), sport or performance (e.g. to support their sporting goals), physical appearance (e.g. sexual attractiveness) and social influences (e.g. societal expectations to eat healthy), while key motivators for physical activity were: physical appearance (e.g. sexual attractiveness), social inclusion (e.g. making friends), physical and mental health (e.g. relieve stress) and improvements for sport or performance (e.g. improve fitness). Themes for key barriers to eating healthy were: intrinsic (e.g. perceived effort to adopt healthy eating), logistic (e.g. cost), and social factors (e.g. peer influence), while busy lifestyles (e.g. lack of time), logistic (e.g. cost), cognitive-emotional (e.g. feelings of inferiority) and social factors (e.g. family upbringing) were key barriers for physical activity. Responses varied little by BMI status. Conclusion: This research emphasises the importance of consulting young men when developing healthy lifestyle programs that aim to promote healthy eating and physical activity in young men. Future research is needed to identify the most effective ways to address their motivators and barriers in intervention research.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, (2015)

Background: There is a lack of understanding of young men's perspectives in obesity-related research. This study aims to: (1) identify young men's perceived motivators and barrier... [more]

Background: There is a lack of understanding of young men's perspectives in obesity-related research. This study aims to: (1) identify young men's perceived motivators and barriers in adopting healthy eating and physical activity behaviours, and (2) explore any differences in responses by weight status categories. Methods: Ten focus groups (32-63 minutes; 3-9 participants per group) were conducted with 61 young men (BMI: 25.3 ± 5.1 kg/m2, aged: 18-25 years) from the Hunter region, New South Wales, Australia. There were 35 (57.4 %) healthy weight men and 26 (42.6 %) overweight/ obese men. Three groups were with healthy weight participants, three with overweight/obese participants and four with mixed-BMI participants. Sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data analysis was conducted by an independent researcher using NVIVO10. Results: Motivators for healthy eating grouped into four themes: physical health (e.g. to live longer), sport or performance (e.g. to support their sporting goals), physical appearance (e.g. sexual attractiveness) and social influences (e.g. societal expectations to eat healthy), while key motivators for physical activity were: physical appearance (e.g. sexual attractiveness), social inclusion (e.g. making friends), physical and mental health (e.g. relieve stress) and improvements for sport or performance (e.g. improve fitness). Themes for key barriers to eating healthy were: intrinsic (e.g. perceived effort to adopt healthy eating), logistic (e.g. cost), and social factors (e.g. peer influence), while busy lifestyles (e.g. lack of time), logistic (e.g. cost), cognitive-emotional (e.g. feelings of inferiority) and social factors (e.g. family upbringing) were key barriers for physical activity. Responses varied little by BMI status. Conclusion: This research emphasises the importance of consulting young men when developing healthy lifestyle programs that aim to promote healthy eating and physical activity in young men. Future research is needed to identify the most effective ways to address their motivators and barriers in intervention research.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2015 Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell AW, 'Evaluation of a mobile phone image-based dietary assessment method in adults with type 2 diabetes', Nutrients, 7 4897-4910 (2015)

Image-based dietary records have limited evidence evaluating their performance and use among adults with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the performance of a 3-day mobile ... [more]

Image-based dietary records have limited evidence evaluating their performance and use among adults with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the performance of a 3-day mobile phone image-based dietary record, the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM), in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Criterion validity was determined by comparing energy intake (EI) with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by the doubly-labelled water technique. Relative validity was established by comparison to a weighed food record (WFR). Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing estimates of intake from three dietitians. Ten adults (6 males, age: 61.2 ± 6.9 years old, BMI: 31.0 ± 4.5 kg/m2) participated. Compared to TEE, mean EI (MJ/day) was significantly under-reported using both methods, with a mean ratio of EI:TEE 0.76 ± 0.20 for the NuDAM and 0.76 ± 0.17 for the WFR. Correlations between the NuDAM and WFR were mostly moderate for energy (r = 0.57), carbohydrate (g/day) (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), protein (g/day) (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) and alcohol (g/day) (rs = 0.85, p < 0.01), with a weaker relationship for fat (g/day) (r = 0.24). Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77¿0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82¿0.99). These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample. Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required.

DOI 10.3390/nu7064897
2015 Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, Krukowski RA, Harvey JR, Hoggle LB, Collins CE, 'Video Consultations and Virtual Nutrition Care for Weight Management', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115 1213-1220 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2015.03.016
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2015 Blumfield ML, Schreurs M, Rollo ME, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Kokavec A, Collins CE, 'The association between portion size, nutrient intake and gestational weight gain: a secondary analysis in the WATCH study 2006/7.', J Hum Nutr Diet, (2015)
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12330
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2014 Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson J, Guest M, Boggess MM, Neve M, et al., 'Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Pre-schoolers', Nutrition Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]

Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation ... [more]

Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation of a pediatric diet quality index, the Australian Recommended Food Scores for Pre-schoolers (ARFS-P), for use with children aged two to five years. Methods. The ARFS-P was derived from a 120-item food frequency questionnaire, with eight sub-scales, and was scored from zero to 73. Linear regressions were used to estimate the relationship between diet quality score and nutrient intakes, in 142 children (mean age 4 years) in rural localities in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Total ARFS-P and component scores were highly related to dietary intake of the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients including protein, ß-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin A. Total ARFS-P was also positively related to total consumption of nutrient dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and negatively related to total consumption of discretionary choices, such as sugar sweetened drinks and packaged snacks. Conclusion: ARFS-P is a valid measure that can be used to characterise nutrient intakes for children aged two to five years. Further research could assess the utility of the ARFS-P for monitoring of usual dietary intake over time or as part of clinical management.

DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-13-87
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows
2014 Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014) [C1]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and relia... [more]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. Aims: To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Methods: Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m2, females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m2. Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Results: Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Conclusions: Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Robinson LN, Rollo ME, Watson J, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Relationships between dietary intakes of children and their parents: A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of families participating in the Family Diet Quality Study', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, (2014)

Being overweight and obese in Australian children is common. Current evidence related to parental influence on child dietary intake is conflicting, and is particularly limited in ... [more]

Being overweight and obese in Australian children is common. Current evidence related to parental influence on child dietary intake is conflicting, and is particularly limited in terms of which parent exerts the stronger relationship. The present study aimed to assess mother-father and parent-child dietary relationships and to identify which parent-child relationship is stronger. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed of dietary intake data from 66 families with one parent and one child aged 8-12 years who were participating in the Family Diet Quality Study, in the Hunter and Forster regions of New South Wales, Australia. Dietary intakes were assessed using adult and child specific, validated semi-quantitative 120-item food frequency questionnaires. Diet quality and variety subscores were assessed using the Australian Recommended Food Scores for adults and children/adolescents. Pearson's correlations were used to assess dietary relationships between mother-father, father-child and mother-child dyads. Results: Weak-to-moderate correlations were found between mother-child dyads for components of dietary intake (r = 0.27-0.47). Similarly, for father-child dyads, predominantly weak-to-moderate correlations were found (r = 0.01-0.52). Variety of fruit intake was the most strongly correlated in both parent-child dyads, with the weakest relationships found for fibre (g 1000 kJ-1) in father-child and percentage energy from total fats for mother-child dyads. Mother-father dyads demonstrated mostly moderate-to-strong correlations (r = 0.13-0.73), with scores for condiments showing the weakest relationship and vegetables the strongest. For all dyads, strong correlations were observed for overall diet quality (r = 0.50-0.59). Conclusions: Parent-child dietary intake is significantly related but differs for mother versus fathers. Further research is required to examine whether differing dietary components should be targeted for mothers versus fathers in interventions aiming to improve family dietary patterns. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12261
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-957
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
Show 15 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ashman A, Collins C, Brown LJ, Rollo M, Rae K, 'Investigating dietary intakes of Indigenous Australian women and their infants in the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', A Healthy Start for the Human Race... 2015 DOHaD Conference., Melbourne (2015)
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Leanne Brown
2014 Ashman A, Weatherall L, Brown LJ, Collins C, Naden M, Rae K, et al., 'Infant feeding practices in an Aboriginal cohort of pregnancy and infancy - the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', Aboriginal Health Conference 2014, Perth (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Clare Collins, Roger Smith, Kym Rae
2013 Burrows T, Collins CE, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Guest M, Boggess M, 'Validation of fruit and vegetable intakes assessed by food frequency questionnaire using plasma carotenoids in adults', Australasian Medical Journal, Brisbane, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Tracy Burrows
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan
2012 Rollo ME, Te Kloot A, Ash S, 'Digital dietetics: Practices and attitudes relating to technology use among Australian dietitians', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2012 Rollo ME, Te Kloot A, Ash S, 'Is there a place for pixels in our practice? Dietitians' attitudes towards the use of photographic dietary records within the nutrition care process', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $62,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20153 grants / $35,000

Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Miss Lisa Spencer
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500649
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Providing one-on-one virtual exercise care via video consultations: a feasibility study in pregnancy.$10,000

Funding body: Exercise and Sports Science Australia

Funding body Exercise and Sports Science Australia
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo, Miss Lisa Spencer, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
Scheme Tom Penrose Research and Community Service Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401192
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a community-focused healthy lifestyle challenge$5,000

Funding body: Newcastle Herald

Funding body Newcastle Herald
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500177
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20142 grants / $20,000

Using focus groups to understand young adult males motivators and barriers to participating in a Healthy Lifestyle Program$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301360
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Helping pregnant women achieve a healthy lifestyle and good outcomes for themselves and their baby in terms of health and well-being$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Megan Rollo, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Miss Lisa Spencer
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401512
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20132 grants / $7,000

Nutrition and Dietetics$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301074
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

mHealth Summit 2013, Washington DC USA, 6-11 December 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Megan Rollo
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301059
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.12

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Nutrition's Role in the Management of Chronic Pain
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Weight Management During Pregnancy and Following Childbirth
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Optimising Dietary Intake and Nutrition-Related Health Outcomes in Aboriginal Women and their Children
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health.
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

smartphone food

Smart snapshot of pregnancy diets

July 28, 2014

With little being known about the diets of expectant Indigenous mums, University of Newcastle nutrition researchers are using smartphone technology to gather first-hand insights and provide personalised feedback.

Young men exercising

Healthy lifestyle study targets young men

March 19, 2014

Young men are the target of a new University of Newcastle study aiming to tailor a healthy lifestyle program that meets their specific needs.

Diet Bytes

Diet Bytes and Baby Bumps

October 18, 2013

A University of Newcastle study will assess the use of smartphones as a new method for pregnant women to record their nutritional intake.

Dr Megan Rollo

Positions

Research Academic
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Associate
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Email megan.rollo@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5649

Office

Room HC54
Building Hunter Building
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