Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health (Public Health)

Career Summary

Biography

In the early 1970s, I completed the first environmental psychology research masters at the University of Hawaii examining human-environment interaction in the context of Japanese perceptions and use of residential space. My doctoral fieldwork (community/clinical psychology) in Southeast Asia critically analysed the role of western-oriented psychiatric institutions in the context of non-western cultural values and healing practices and pioneered the concept of culture-accommodation of mental health care (Third World Challenge to Psychiatry (1984)). The theme of linking individual human action with broader social, cultural and political-economic contexts has dominated the inter-disciplinary and transdisciplinary research programs and publications I have developed over the past 21 years at the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics. With a 5-year NH&MRC program grant in the 1990s, I designed a community development strategy aimed at reducing the epidemic of heart disease in the Upper Hunter coalfields. This experience taught us that cross-disciplinary perspectives are required to gain a comprehensive understanding of health problems in a dynamic bio-social ecosystem. Working through the Coalfields material, Albrecht, Freeman and I constructed the first transdisciplinary analysis of heart disease, informed by complexity theory, which became a central case study in our pioneering 2001 research text, Health Social Science (Oxford Uni) and a companion volume, Applying Health Social Science (Zed Books). All of the 26 research theses that I have supervised over the past 18 years integrate inter-disciplinary design components linking human action with the dynamics of context. The ARC Discovery Grant (Open Cuts to Land and Culture, 2005-2007) has furthered my extensive collaboration with Connor and Albrecht in which my career-long experience in developing and empirically testing models of human action is being applied to explain Upper Hunter community members responses (perceptions, appraisal, social behaviour) to massive environmental transformation. Furthermore, I have taken substantial responsibility internationally for establishing the newly emerging perspective of transdisciplinary health social science. I authored the first two textbooks published in this field and have delivered a number of keynote lectures outlining the fields theoretical and methodological underpinnings, including: 2005 World Congress, International Forum for Social Sciences & Health, Istanbul, Turkey; 5th Asia Pacific Social Science & Medicine Conference, Kunming, China, 2002; INCLEN 18th Global Scientific Meeting, Sharm-El-Sheikh, Egypt, 2002; 4th Asia Pacific Social Science & Medicine Conference, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 1998; 3rd Asia Pacific Social Sciences & Medicine Conference, Perth, 1996; International Conference on Capacity Enhancement for the Social Sciences in Health, Ontario, Canada, 1995; INCLEN Twelfth Annual Scientific Meeting, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 1994; 2nd Asia Pacific Social Sciences & Medicine Conference, Manila, 1994; International Epidemiology Association Global Conference, Sydney, 1993. In order to develop research capacity in health social science, I have contributed to the following international organisations: " Founder & Coordinator, INCLEN (International Clinical Epidemiology Network) Social Science Committee " Member, INCLEN Pharmaco-Epidemiology Committee " Member, INCLEN Capacity Building Committee " Founder & Steering Committee Member, International Forum for Social Sciences in Health " Founder & Secretary, Asia Pacific Network of International Forum for Social Sciences in Health " Associate Editor, Kluwer Book Publishers Series, International and Cultural Psychology: Topics, Issues and Directions.

Research Expertise
The theme of linking individual human action with broader social, cultural and political-economic contexts has dominated the inter-disciplinary and transdisciplinary research programs and publications I have developed over the past 21 years at the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics. With a 5-year NH&MRC program grant in the 1990s, I designed a community development strategy aimed at reducing the epidemic of heart disease in the Upper Hunter coalfields. This experience taught us that cross-disciplinary perspectives are required to gain a comprehensive understanding of health problems in a dynamic bio-social ecosystem. Working through the Coalfields material, Albrecht, Freeman and I constructed the first transdisciplinary analysis of heart disease, informed by complexity theory, which became a central case study in our pioneering 2001 research text, Health Social Science (Oxford Uni) and a companion volume, Applying Health Social Science (Zed Books). All of the 26 research theses that I have supervised over the past 18 years integrate inter-disciplinary design components linking human action with the dynamics of context. The ARC Discovery Grant (Open Cuts to Land and Culture, 2005-2007) has furthered my extensive collaboration with Connor and Albrecht in which my career-long experience in developing and empirically testing models of human action is being applied to explain Upper Hunter community members responses (perceptions, appraisal, social behaviour) to massive environmental transformation.

Teaching Expertise
For over twenty years I taught postgraduate courses in health social science, health survey design, transdisciplinary approaches to public health research, and social program evaluation and planning. I have taken substantial responsibility internationally for establishing the newly emerging perspective of transdisciplinary health social science. I authored the first two textbooks published in this field and have delivered a number of keynote lectures outlining the fields theoretical and methodological underpinnings, including: 2005 World Congress, International Forum for Social Sciences & Health, Istanbul, Turkey; 5th Asia Pacific Social Science & Medicine Conference, Kunming, China, 2002; INCLEN 18th Global Scientific Meeting, Sharm-El-Sheikh, Egypt, 2002; 4th Asia Pacific Social Science & Medicine Conference, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 1998; 3rd Asia Pacific Social Sciences & Medicine Conference, Perth, 1996; International Conference on Capacity Enhancement for the Social Sciences in Health, Ontario, Canada, 1995; INCLEN Twelfth Annual Scientific Meeting, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 1994; 2nd Asia Pacific Social Sciences & Medicine Conference, Manila, 1994; International Epidemiology Association Global Conference, Sydney, 1993.

Administrative Expertise
I served as a senior member of the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle taking on such roles as: Head of Discipline; Deputy Director of the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics; Chair, Postgraduate Education Program; Member of School of Medicine & Public Health Executive; Member, Faculty of Health Board. In order to develop research capacity in health social science, I have contributed to the following international organisations: " Founder & Coordinator, INCLEN (International Clinical Epidemiology Network) Social Science Committee " Member, INCLEN Pharmaco-Epidemiology Committee " Member, INCLEN Capacity Building Committee " Founder & Steering Committee Member, International Forum for Social Sciences in Health " Founder & Secretary, Asia Pacific Network of International Forum for Social Sciences in Health " Associate Editor, Kluwer Book Publishers Series, International and Cultural Psychology: Topics, Issues and Directions



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Hawaii - USA
  • Master of Arts, University of Hawaii - USA
  • Bachelor of Arts, United States International University

Keywords

  • environmental distress
  • environmental psychology
  • health psychology
  • health social science
  • program evaluation
  • survey design methods

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 55
160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified 30
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 15

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/1987 - 1/07/2005 Associate Professor University of South Australia
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Higginbotham HN, Albrecht G, Connor L, Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia, 380 (2001) [A3]
2001 Higginbotham HN, Briceno-Leon R, Johnson N, Applying Health Social Science, Zed Books, New York USA, 285 (2001) [A3]

Chapter (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2002 Tanaka-Matsumi J, Higginbotham HN, Chang R, 'Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches to Counseling Across Cultures: A Functional Analytic Approach for Clinical Applications', Counseling Across Cultures, Sage Publications, Inc., United States 337-354 (2002) [B2]
2001 Connor L, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Albrecht G, 'Pharmaceuticals in Transdisciplinary perspective', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 115-150 (2001) [B2]
2001 Albrecht G, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, 'The Hierarchy of Health Influences', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 17-46 (2001) [B2]
2001 Albrecht G, Higginbotham HN, 'Complexity and Human health: Across the Health Hierarchy', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 47-69 (2001) [B2]
2001 Higginbotham HN, Albrecht G, Freeman SR, 'Heart Disease in Transdisciplinary Perspective', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 93-114 (2001) [B2]
2001 Albrecht G, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, 'Transdisciplinary thinking in Health Social Science Research: Definition, Rationale, and Procedures', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 70-89 (2001) [B2]
2001 Albrecht G, Higginbotham HN, 'Situating Health and Illness', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 3-16 (2001) [B2]
2001 Higginbotham HN, D'Este CA, Saul A, Connor L, 'Strengthening Cross-sectional Studies through Cognitive and Qualitative Methods', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford Unifversity Press, South Melbourne, Australia 266-303 (2001) [B2]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Ann Taylor
2001 Connor L, Treloar C, Higginbotham HN, 'How to perform transdisciplinary research: qualitative study designs and methods', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria 227-265 (2001) [B2]
2001 Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, Heller R, 'How to perform transdisciplinary research: Epidemiological study designs', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria 206-226 (2001) [B2]
Co-authors Julie Byles
2001 Higginbotham HN, Willms D, Sewankambo N, 'Transdisciplinary Research in the Community', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria 175-199 (2001) [B2]
2001 Treloar C, Higginbotham HN, 'The Problems and Potential of Transdisciplinary Teams', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria 151-174 (2001) [B2]
2001 Porteous J, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Connor L, 'Qualitative Case-control and Case-study Designs', Health Social Science:" A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria 304-339 (2001) [B2]
2001 Higginbotham HN, Albrecht G, Connor L, 'Conclusion: The Future and Health Social Science', Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Australia 340-343 (2001) [B2]
2001 Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Heading G, Saul A, 'Cultural constructions of Risk: Heart Disease in the New South Wales Coalfields, Australia', Applying Health Social Science: Best Practice in the Developing World, Zed Books, London and New York 38-65 (2001) [B1]
Co-authors Ann Taylor
2001 Higginbotham HN, Briceno-Leon R, Johnson N, 'Health Social Science: Transdisciplinary Partnerships for Improving Human Health', Applying Health Social Science: Best Practice in the Developing World, Zed Books Limited, London and New York 3-14 (2001) [B2]
2001 Johnson N, Higginbotham HN, Briceno-Leon R, 'Best Practice and Future Innovations in applying Social Science to Advancing the Health of Populations', Applying Health Social Science: Best Practice in the Developing World, Zed Books Limited, London and New York 249-276 (2001) [B1]
Show 14 more chapters

Journal article (63 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Higginbotham N, Connor LH, Baker F, 'Subregional differences in Australian climate risk perceptions: coastal versus agricultural areas of the Hunter Valley, NSW', REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE, 14 699-712 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s10113-013-0529-0
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Connor LH, Higginbotham N, '¿Natural cycles¿ in lay understandings of climate change', Global Environmental Change, 23 1852-1861 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.07.002
Citations Scopus - 9
2013 Bailey K, Higginbotham N, 'How and Why People Change: Foundations of Psychological Therapy', JOURNAL OF PACIFIC RIM PSYCHOLOGY, 7 73-74 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1017/prp.2013.7
2010 Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Connor L, Albrecht G, 'Environmental injustice and air pollution in coal affected communities, Hunter Valley, Australia', Health and Place, 16 259-266 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.10.007
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 31
2009 Connor L, Freeman SR, Higginbotham HN, 'Not just a coalmine: Shifting grounds of community opposition to coal mining in Southeastern Australia', Ethnos, 74 490-513 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00141840903202132
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
2008 Lane P, Stain HJ, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, Higginbotham HN, 'Creating a database to facilitate multilevel analyses of mental health determinants and outcomes in rural and remote areas', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 207-212 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00977.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Helen Stain, Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly
2008 Connor LH, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Albrecht GA, 'Watercourses and discourses: Coalmining in the Upper Hunter Valley, New South Wales', Oceania, 78 76-90 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
2008 Sartore GM, Kelly B, Stain H, Albrecht G, Higginbotham N, 'Control, uncertainty, and expectations for the future: a qualitative study of the impact of drought on a rural Australian community.', Rural and remote health, 8 950-. (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Helen Stain, Brian Kelly
2008 Stain HJ, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, Higginbotham HN, Beard JR, Hourihan F, 'Social networks and mental health among a farming population', Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 43 843-849 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00127-008-0374-5
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Helen Stain
2007 Albrecht GA, Sartore G-M, Connor LH, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Kelly BJ, et al., 'Solastalgia: The distress caused by environmental change', Australasian Psychiatry, 15 S95-S98 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10398560701701288
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Helen Stain
2007 James CL, Mackenzie LA, Higginbotham HN, 'Health professionals' attitudes and practices in relation to functional capacity evaluations', Work, 29 81-87 (2007) [C1]
Co-authors Carole James
2006 Higginbotham HN, Connor LH, Albrecht GA, Freeman SR, Agho K, 'Validation of an Environmental Distress Scale', EcoHealth, 3 245-254 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10393-006-0069-x
Citations Scopus - 55
2005 Higginbotham HN, 'Social marketing principles and practice (book review)', Drug and Alcohol Review, 24 201-202 (2005) [C3]
2004 Byles JE, Tavener MA, O'Connell RL, Nair BR, Higginbotham HN, Jackson CL, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of health assessments for older Australian veterans and war widows', Medical Journal of Australia, 181 186-190 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2004 Howteerakul N, Higginbotham HN, Dibley MJ, 'Antimicrobial use in children under five years with diarrhoea in a central region province, Thailand', Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 35 181-187 (2004) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 11
2004 Harris G, Connor LH, Bisits AM, Higginbotham HN, ''Seeing the baby': Pleasures and dilemmas of ultrasound technologies for primiparous Australian women', Medical Anthropology Quarterly: international journal for the cultural and social analysis of health, 18 23-47 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1525/maq.2004.18.1.23
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
2004 Osmotherly PG, Higginbotham HN, 'Assessing patient intention to perform a home based exercise program for back and shoulder pain', Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 20 57-71 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09593980490425111
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2004 Connor LH, Albrecht GA, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Smith WT, 'Environmental change and Human health in Upper Hunter communities of New South Wales, Australia', EcoHealth, 1 SU47-SU58 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10393-004-0053-2
Co-authors Wayne Smith
2004 Albrecht GA, Higginbotham HN, Cashman P, Flint K, 'Evolution of transdisciplinarity and ecosystem health at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia', EcoHealth, 1 S23-S29 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10393-004-0109-3
2003 Winzenberg T, Higginbotham HN, 'Factors affecting the intention of providers to deliver more effective continuing medical education to general practitioners: a pilot study', BMC Medical Education, 3 1-12 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-3-11
2003 Winzenberg T, Higginbotham N, 'Factors affecting the intention of providers to deliver more effective continuing medical education to general practitioners: A pilot study', BMC Medical Education, 3 1-6 (2003)

Background: Despite the importance of continuing medical education (CME) for GPs, there has been little research into how providers decide what types of CME to deliver to GPs. Thi... [more]

Background: Despite the importance of continuing medical education (CME) for GPs, there has been little research into how providers decide what types of CME to deliver to GPs. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the intention of providers to provide more effective types of CME; and to design a survey instrument which can be used to test the applicability of Triandis' model of social behaviour to the provision of CME to general practitioners. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 11 Australian providers of CME for interviews and a random sample of 25 providers for the pilot test. Open-ended interviews structured on Triandis' theory were performed with key informants who provide CME to GPs. These were used to develop a pilot survey instrument to measure the factors affecting intention, resulting in a revised instrument for use in further research. Results: There was a broad range of factors affecting providers' intention to deliver more effective forms of CME identified, and these were classifiable in a manner which was consistent with Triandis' model. Key factors affecting providers' intention were the attitude toward CME within organisations and the time and extra work involved. Conclusions: We identified a range of potential factors influencing the intention of providers to provide more effective forms of CME, in all categories of Triandis model. Those interested in increasing the choice of more effective CME activities available to GPs may need to broaden the methods used in working with providers to influence them to use more effective CME techniques. The interview material and questionnaire analysis of the pilot survey support the use of Triandis model. Further research is needed to validate Triandis'model for the intention to deliver more effective forms of CME. Such research will inform future strategies aimed at increasing the amount and choice of effective CME activities available for GPs.

DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-3-1
Citations Scopus - 1
2003 Winzenberg T, Higginbotham N, 'Factors affecting the intention of providers to deliver more effective continuing medical education to general practitioners: a pilot study', BMC medical education, 3 11 (2003)

RESULTS: There was a broad range of factors affecting providers' intention to deliver more effective forms of CME identified, and these were classifiable in a manner which was con... [more]

RESULTS: There was a broad range of factors affecting providers' intention to deliver more effective forms of CME identified, and these were classifiable in a manner which was consistent with Triandis' model. Key factors affecting providers' intention were the attitude toward CME within organisations and the time and extra work involved. CONCLUSIONS: We identified a range of potential factors influencing the intention of providers to provide more effective forms of CME, in all categories of Triandis model. Those interested in increasing the choice of more effective CME activities available to GPs may need to broaden the methods used in working with providers to influence them to use more effective CME techniques. The interview material and questionnaire analysis of the pilot survey support the use of Triandis model. Further research is needed to validate Triandis'model for the intention to deliver more effective forms of CME. Such research will inform future strategies aimed at increasing the amount and choice of effective CME activities available for GPs. BACKGROUND: Despite the importance of continuing medical education (CME) for GPs, there has been little research into how providers decide what types of CME to deliver to GPs. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the intention of providers to provide more effective types of CME; and to design a survey instrument which can be used to test the applicability of Triandis' model of social behaviour to the provision of CME to general practitioners. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 11 Australian providers of CME for interviews and a random sample of 25 providers for the pilot test. Open-ended interviews structured on Triandis' theory were performed with key informants who provide CME to GPs. These were used to develop a pilot survey instrument to measure the factors affecting intention, resulting in a revised instrument for use in further research.

Citations Scopus - 1
2003 Howteerakul N, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, Dibley MJ, 'ORS is never enough: physician rationales for altering standard threatment guidelines when managing childhood diarrhoea in Thailand', Social Science & Medicine, 1031-1044 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00478-1
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
2002 Plotnikoff R, Higginbotham HN, 'Protection Motivation Theory and exercise behaviour change for the prevention of coronary heart disease in a high-risk, Australian representative community sample of adults', Psychology, Health & Medicine, 7(1) 87-98 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 42
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2002 McClean W, Higginbotham HN, 'Prevalence of pain among nursing home residents in rural New South Wales', Medical Journal of Australia, 177 17-20 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 51
2002 Fletcher R, Higginbotham HN, Dobson A, 'Men's Perceived Health Needs', Journal of Health Psychology: an interdisciplinary, international journal, 7(3) 233-241 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2002 Mackenzie L, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'Professional Perceptions About Home Safety: Cross-National Validation of the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool (HOME FAST)', Journal of Allied Health, 31(1) 22-28 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Julie Byles
2002 Mackenzie L, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'Reliability of the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool (HOME FAST) for identifying older people at increased risk of falls', Disability and Rehabilitation, 24(5) 266-274 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Julie Byles
2002 Byles JE, Tavener MA, Fitzgerald PE, Nair BR, Higginbotham HN, Jackson C, et al., 'A checklist for comprehensive health assessment for the over 70's', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 21 14-20 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2002 Mackenzie L, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'A Prospective Community-Based Study of Falls Among Older People in Australia: Frequency, Circumstances, and Consequences', OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 22(4) 143-152 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Julie Byles
2001 Serquina-Ramiro L, Kasniyah N, Inthusoma T, Higginbotham HN, Streiner D, Nichter M, Freeman SR, 'Measles Immunization Acceptance in Southeast Asia: Past patterns and future challenges', Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 32 791-804 (2001) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3
2001 Fletcher R, Higginbotham HN, 'Men's perceived health needs', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 12 327-329 (2001) [C1]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2000 Treloar CJ, Champness S, Simpson P, Higginbotham HN, 'Critical Appraisal Checklist for Qualitative Research Studies', Indian Journal of Pediatrics, 67 347-351 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
2000 Mukti A, Treloar CJ, Suprawimbarti, Asdie A, D'Este CA, Higginbotham HN, Heller RF, 'A Universal Precautions Education Intervention for Health Workers in Sradjito and PKU Hospital Indonesia', Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 31 1-7 (2000) [C1]
Co-authors Catherine Deste
2000 Saradamma R, Higginbotham HN, Nichter M, 'Social factors influencing the acquisition of antibiotics without prescription in Kerala State, south India', Social Science & Medicine, 50 891-903 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 61
2000 Mackenzie LA, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'Designing the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool (HOME FAST): Selecting the items', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63 (6) 260-269 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36
Co-authors Julie Byles
2000 Mackenzie LA, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'Designing a home safety screening instrument, stage one: Item generation', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63 260-269 (2000) [C1]
Co-authors Julie Byles
2000 Mackenzie LA, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, 'A comparison of self-report and prospective recording using a calendar, to measure falls, trips, accidents and injuries experienced by older people in the community', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 19 No.4 6-7 (2000) [C2]
Co-authors Julie Byles
2000 Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, Goodger BG, Tavener MA, Conrad A, Schofield P, Anthony DM, 'Development of a depression scale for veterans and war widows', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 7 256-270 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Peter Schofield, Julie Byles, Agatha Conrad
2000 Mukti AG, Treloar C, Suprawimbarti, Asdie AH, D'Este K, Higginbotham N, Heller R, 'A universal precautions education intervention for health workers in Sardjito and PKU Hospital Indonesia', Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 31 405-411 (2000)

A non-randomized control trial was conducted to develop and evaluate a culturally appropriate academic detailing intervention on the universal precautions knowledge, attitude and ... [more]

A non-randomized control trial was conducted to develop and evaluate a culturally appropriate academic detailing intervention on the universal precautions knowledge, attitude and behavior of health care workers in hospitals. Fivety-five health care workers (44 nurses and 11 doctors) participated in the study. They were visited individually to discuss principles of universal precautions as well as the effect of automatic pilot on their work practices. Self-reported measures of knowledge and attitudes were collected from each participant before and after the intervention. A nurse observer collected measures of participants' compliance with the universal precautions guidelines according to a pre-determined protocol before and after the intervention. There was a significantly different level of knowledge, attitudes and compliance on universal precautions between the control and intervention hospital with p=0.0007, p=0.038 and p=0.03 respectively following the intervention. It is concluded that an academic detailing approach of education used in this study has significantly improved knowledge, attitudes and compliance scores.

Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Catherine Deste
1999 Higginbotham HN, Heading G, McElduff P, Dobson A, Heller RF, 'Reducing Coronary Heart Disease in the Australian Coalfields: Evaluation of a Ten-Year Community Intervention', Social Science and Medicine, 48 683-692 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
1999 Goodger BG, Byles JE, Higginbotham HN, Mishra G, 'Assessment of a Brief Scale to Measure Social Support Among Older People', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 23 260-265 (1999) [C1]
Co-authors Julie Byles
1998 Albrecht GA, Freeman S, Higginbotham N, 'Complexity and human health: the case for a transdisciplinary paradigm', Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 22 55-92 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 69
1998 Raymond D, Henry R, Higginbotham HN, Coory M, 'Predicting readmission to hospital with asthma', Journal of Paediatric Child Health, 34 534-538 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
1998 Plotnikoff R, Higginbotham HN, 'Protection motivation theory and the prediction of exercise and low-fat diet behaviours among Australian cardiac patients', Psychology and Health, 13 411-429 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1998 Sarwano S, Broto P, Soemitro D, Higginbotham HN, 'A social psychological study of diarrhoeal disease in Jakarta, Indonesia: A test of cognitive dissonance theory', South Pacific Journal of Psychology, 10(2) 68-70 (1998) [C1]
1996 Dupen F, Higginbotham N, Francis L, Cruickshank D, Gibson P, 'Validation of a new multidimensional health locus of control scale (form C) in asthma research', PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH, 11 493-504 (1996)
DOI 10.1080/08870449608401985
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
1995 PLOTNIKOFF RC, HIGGINBOTHAM N, 'Predicting low-fat diet intentions and behaviors for the prevention of coronary heart disease: An application of protection motivation theory among an Australian population.', PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH, 10 397-408 (1995)
DOI 10.1080/08870449508401959
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1995 Treloar CJ, Higginbotham N, Malcolm JA, Sutherland DC, Berenger S, 'The personal experience of Australian health-care workers accidentally exposed to risk of HIV infection [7]', AIDS, 9 1385-1386 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 8
1994 Higginbotham N, 'Capacity building for health social science: The International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) social science program and the International Forum for Social Science in Health (IFSSH)', Acta Tropica, 57 123-137 (1994)

This paper describes the unfolding of two complementary efforts to build global capacity in health social science. The INCLEN model aims to infuse a genuine transdisciplinary pers... [more]

This paper describes the unfolding of two complementary efforts to build global capacity in health social science. The INCLEN model aims to infuse a genuine transdisciplinary perspective into international health through equipping social scientists to speak a common language with clinical epidemiologists and sensitising clinicians to the ways social sciences contribute to research and policy. Issues are raised pertinent to the model's viability, including recruitment of scholars for fellowships, curriculum substance, and mechanisms for integrating social science fellows when they return home. The future success of the INCLEN program, and comparable donor initiatives, depends upon a wider infrastructure of career supports played out at the international level in which donor and operating agencies nourish the emergence of an expanded body of health social scientists. The International Forum for Social Sciences in Health (IFSSH) has been formed to help build this infrastructure and provide impetus for a viable scientific community of health social scientists. The IFSSH 'global agenda' is portrayed and an illustration is given of how this agenda is being implemented in the Asia and Pacific region. © 1994.

DOI 10.1016/0001-706X(94)90003-5
Citations Scopus - 3
1994 Treloar CJ, Malcolm JA, Sutherland DC, Berenger S, Higginbotham N, 'Hospital administrators' tolerance of staff needlestick injuries', Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 15 307-310 (1994)

OBJECTIVE: Develop national estimates of compliance with infection control guidelines by workers in healthcare facilities to prevent occupational transmission of hepatitis B virus... [more]

OBJECTIVE: Develop national estimates of compliance with infection control guidelines by workers in healthcare facilities to prevent occupational transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus. DESIGN: A national survey of 3,094 workers in hospitals. SETTINGS: United States ambulatory care hospitals with emergency rooms. RESULTS: While the sampled hospitals had policies that incorporated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) infection control guidelines, only 55% of patient care staff, 56% of physicians, and 30% of housekeeping staffreported receiving at least one of the shots recommended in the HBV vaccination series. About one half of patient care staff reported that they recapped used needles at least sometimes after giving injections and after drawing blood. Only 43% of patient care staff ¿always¿ wore gloves to draw blood. While most patient care staff ¿always¿ changed gloves between patients, only 61% reported that they ¿always¿ washed their hands after taking off their gloves. One half of patient care staff reported a percutaneous exposure to a patient's blood, and one quarter reported a percutaneous exposure in the past year The most common cause of these exposures was recapping used needles. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to reduce exposures to bloodborne pathogens will involve compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration bloodborne pathogens standard and the CDC's infection control guidelines, continued education and training, and emphasis on engineering controls where applicable (Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1994;15:243-252). © 1994, The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1086/646917
Citations Scopus - 8
1993 Dobson AJ, Blijlevens R, Alexander HM, Croce N, Heller RF, Higginbotham N, et al., 'Correction: Short fat questionnaire: A self-administered measure of fat-intake behaviour (Australian Journal of Public Health (1993) 17 (144-149))', Australian Journal of Public Health, 17 387 (1993)
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1993 LIM LLY, VALENTI LA, KNAPP JC, DOBSON AJ, PLOTNIKOFF R, HIGGINBOTHAM N, HELLER RF, 'A self-administered quality-of-life questionnaire after acute myocardial infarction', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, 46 1249-1256 (1993)
DOI 10.1016/0895-4356(93)90089-J
Citations Scopus - 100Web of Science - 75
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1993 GIBSON P, HENRY D, FRANCIS L, CRUICKSHANK D, DUPEN F, HIGGINBOTHAM N, et al., 'ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AVAILABILITY OF NONPRESCRIPTION BETA(2) AGONIST INHALERS AND UNDERTREATMENT OF ASTHMA', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 306 1514-1518 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1993 DOBSON AJ, BLIJLEVENS R, ALEXANDER HM, CROCE N, HELLER RF, HIGGINBOTHAM N, et al., 'SHORT FAT QUESTIONNAIRE - A SELF-ADMINISTERED MEASURE OF FAT-INTAKE BEHAVIOR', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 144-149 (1993) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 54
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1993 HIGGINBOTHAM N, HEADING G, PONT J, PLOTNIKOFF R, DOBSON AJ, SMITH E, et al., 'COMMUNITY WORRY ABOUT HEART-DISEASE - A NEEDS SURVEY IN THE COALFIELDS AND NEWCASTLE AREAS OF THE HUNTER REGION', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 314-321 (1993) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
1992 Higginbotham N, 'Developing partnerships for health and social science research: The International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) social science component', Social Science and Medicine, 35 1325-1327 (1992)

A decade after its inception, the International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) adopted a social science component. Health social science concepts were added to a physician... [more]

A decade after its inception, the International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) adopted a social science component. Health social science concepts were added to a physician training curriculum encompassing epidemiology, biostatistics and clinical economics, and a position was created for qualified social scientists at 26 clinical epidemiology units in developing country medical schools. This paper describes the INCLEN model for strengthening partnerships among clinical epidemiologists and social scientists. The rationale for interdisciplinary training is presented along with the difficulties inherent in attracting social scientists to a new career path. These include problems of recruitment, training curricula, re-entry, and career sustainability. The need is identified for collaborative international efforts to promote an infrastructure for professional growth and sustainable careers in health social science. © 1992.

DOI 10.1016/0277-9536(92)90036-P
Citations Scopus - 12
1992 HENRY DA, GIBSON P, CRUICKSHANK D, FRANCIS L, DUPEN F, HIGGINBOTHAM N, HENRY RL, 'NONPRESCRIPTION USE OF BRONCHODILATOR AEROSOLS', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 156 68-68 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1991 Higginbotham N, Tanaka-Matsumi J, 'Cross-cultural Application of Behaviour Therapy', Behaviour Change, 8 35-42 (1991)

The potential application of behaviour therapy to cross-cultural situations is explored as societies move to recognise their bicultural or multicultural composition. First reviewe... [more]

The potential application of behaviour therapy to cross-cultural situations is explored as societies move to recognise their bicultural or multicultural composition. First reviewed are the moral and epistemological underpinnings of behaviour therapy and questions involving the universality of behaviour principles and technologies. Expected competencies of cross-cultural therapists are next raised. The basic message, told through examples from Australia, North American, and elsewhere, is that cultural norms and values penetrate every facet of client¿therapist interaction and clinical decision-making. Competently performed functional analyses can produce culturally accommodating interventions that respond to culture-specific definitions of deviancy, accepted norms of role behaviour, expectations of change techniques, and approved behaviour change practitioners. © 1991, The Author(s). All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1017/S0813483900006896
Citations Scopus - 6
1991 Higginbotham N, Streiner DL, 'The social science contribution to pharmacoepidemiology', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 45 73-82 (1991)

An understanding of the inappropriate use of pharmaceuticals (the prescribing of unnecessary or ineffective medications, and non-compliance by consumers) can be furthered by consi... [more]

An understanding of the inappropriate use of pharmaceuticals (the prescribing of unnecessary or ineffective medications, and non-compliance by consumers) can be furthered by considering the psychological, social and cultural contexts in which medicines are used. The consumers are influenced by their beliefs about benefits, safety and cost; opinions of their social group; and emotions associated with taking the medication itself. Similar considerations apply to the prescribers or dispensers of the drugs, who are also influenced by the marketing and regulatory practices of their countries. A model of drug use which takes these factors into account can suggest various strategies to increase optimal pharmaceutical utilization. To date, these efforts have focused almost exclusively on the prescriber or manufacturer, and have had limited success. However, other, more effective techniques exist, which can modify the behavior of both of these groups, and of the consumers. A strategy of research in this area is outlined. © 1991.

DOI 10.1016/0895-4356(91)90116-Q
Citations Scopus - 6
1989 Higginbottom N, Connor L, 'Professional ideology and the construction of Western psychiatry in Southeast Asia', International Journal of Health Services, 19 63-79 (1989) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
1988 Higginbotham N, Marsella AJ, 'International consultation and the homogenization of psychiatry in Southeast Asia', Social Science and Medicine, 27 553-561 (1988)

The nature of psychiatric care varies little among the capital cities of Southeast Asia. Differences that may exist are of degrees along a common dimension. Colonial forces from t... [more]

The nature of psychiatric care varies little among the capital cities of Southeast Asia. Differences that may exist are of degrees along a common dimension. Colonial forces from the past and contemporary diffusion of modern psyciatry have produced this remarkably uniform pattern of thought and treatment across divergent national and cultural boundaries. Our paper analyzes the homogenization of psychiatry in Southeast Asia in three ways. First, we examine international mental health education, consultation and collaboration as interlocking mechanisms for the transfer of psychiatric technology. Second, the indirect and undesirable consequences of the diffusion of psychiatric knowledge and practice are analyzed. Third, we pose recommendations for countering these unanticipated consequences through evaluation research, ethical guidelines, and educational and intervention practices that strengthen indigenous healing resources. © 1988.

DOI 10.1016/0277-9536(88)90379-6
Citations Scopus - 29
1986 Connor LH, Higginbotham N, 'An integrated sociocultural curriculum for community medicine in Bali, Indonesia', Social Science and Medicine, 23 673-682 (1986)

Since 1983, social scientists have collaborated with teaching staff at the Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Bali, Indonesia, to develop an integrated sociocultural curricu... [more]

Since 1983, social scientists have collaborated with teaching staff at the Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Bali, Indonesia, to develop an integrated sociocultural curriculum for undergraduate students in community health. The Udayana curriculum is discussed in the context of an international commitment over the last two decades to appropriate education for primary health care and community health in developing countries. The authors describe their work as consultants with Udayana staff. Participants formulated a five-stage project of curriculum development and community health research that could be continued as part of an ongoing community medicine teaching program. Recommendations for integrating social science perspectives within medical domains are outlined, based on the project experience. The paper also discusses the undertaking as a 'development project' suggesting that many of the issues and problems that arose are common to bureaucratic institutions in Third World countries when development projects are initiated. © 1986.

DOI 10.1016/0277-9536(86)90114-0
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 60 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2008 Albrecht GA, Higginbotham HN, Connor LH, Freeman SR, 'Social and cultural perspectives on eco-health', International Encyclopedia of Public Health (2008) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 6

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2007 Albrecht G, Sartore G-M, Connor L, Higginbotham N, Freeman S, Kelly B, et al., 'Solastalgia: the distress caused by environmental change', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY (2007) [E2]
DOI 10.1080/10398560701701288
Citations Scopus - 144Web of Science - 116
Co-authors Helen Stain, Brian Kelly
2007 Connor LH, Higginbotham HN, Albrecht GA, Freeman SR, 'Water, coal mines and human health in the Upper Hunter Valley', 2nd Biennial Conference, Environmental Health in Hunter New England. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Connor LH, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, 'Mining community at Anvil Hill: State, civil society and global governance', AAS Conference 2007: Transforming Economies, Changing States. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Higginbotham HN, Connor LH, Freeman SR, Albrecht GA, 'Clearing the air: Health studies and the environment in coal communities in the Hunter', Asia Pacific Eco Health Conference 2007 Ecology and Health: People and Places in a Changing World. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Connor LH, Higginbotham HN, Freeman SR, 'Hunter Valley localities, environmentalism, and the Asia-Pacific coal economy', Asia Pacific Sociological Association: Asia Pacific Region: Societies in Transformation. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Stain HJ, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, Higginbotham HN, 'Community connectedness and mental health in a farming population', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Helen Stain, Terry Lewin
2006 Stain HJ, Higginbotham HN, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, Lane P, 'Multilevel modeling of rural mental health', Acta Neuropsychiatria (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Helen Stain
2006 James CL, Mackenzie LA, Capra MF, 'Health professionals attitudes and practices in relation to functional capacity evaluations', WFOT 2006: 14th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Congress Program Handbook (2006) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Carole James
2005 Sartore G-M, Stain HJ, Kelly BJ, Higginbotham HN, Albrecht GA, Tonna AM, 'Drought, the environment and mental health in a rural NSW Community', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Stain, Brian Kelly
2004 Tavener MA, Higginbotham N, D'Este C, Byles JE, 'Veteran satisfaction with a preventive care home health assessment.' (2004)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Deste, Meredith Tavener
Show 7 more conferences

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2000 Byles JE, Heller R, Higginbotham N, Nair, Jackson C, Butler J, et al., 'Preventive Care Trial. Final Interim Report.', Department of Veterans' Affairs, 32 (2000)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
1999 Byles J, Heller R, Higginbotham N, Nair K, Jackson C, Butler J, et al., 'Preventive Care Trial. Second Interim Report.', Department of Veterans' Affairs, 47 (1999)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
1998 byles, Heller R, Higginbotham N, Nair K, Jackson C, Butler J, et al., 'Preventive Care Trial. First Interim Report.', Department of Veterans' Affairs, 19 (1998)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
1997 byles, Heller R, Higginbotham N, Nair K, Jackson C, Butler J, et al., 'Preventive Care Trial. Extra-contractural project report.', Department of Veterans' Affairs, 25 (1997)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
1997 Byles J, Heller R, Higginbotham N, Nair K, Jackson C, Butler J, et al., 'Preventive Care Trial. Establishment Report.', Department of Veterans' Affairs, 29 (1997)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
Show 2 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $1,992,241

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20082 grants / $218,000

Climate change, place and community: An ethnographic study of the Hunter Valley, New South Wales$135,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Linda Connor, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0187498
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Climate change, place and community: An ethnographic study of the Hunter Valley, New South Wales$83,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Linda Connor, Professor Glen Albrecht, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000060
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20052 grants / $131,421

Open Cuts to Land and Culture: Rural Community Engagement with Large-Scale Industrial Development.$122,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Linda Connor, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0184379
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effect of drought on rural and remote Australian communities$9,421

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Brian Kelly, Associate Professor Helen Stain, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184757
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $288,806

Changing diets, levels of activity and environments and their relationship to the emergence of adolescent overweight and obesity in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam$273,806

Funding body: Nestle Foundation

Funding body Nestle Foundation
Project Team Dr Hong Tang, Doctor Michael Dibley, Mr Kim Nguyen, Conjoint Professor David Sibbritt, Dr Thanh Phan Nguyen, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0184894
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Psychological and social monitoring of Hunter environmental change.$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Professor Linda Connor, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht, Conjoint Professor Wayne Smith, Doctor Craig Dalton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183538
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20031 grants / $14,000

Relating Ecological and Human Distress Syndromes: a Pilot Investigation in Upper Hunter Communities Exposed to Large Scale Industrial and Mining Activity$14,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Professor Linda Connor, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht, Conjoint Professor Wayne Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182454
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20012 grants / $19,000

School-Based Education Program to Prevent the Uptake of Smoking by Male Junior High School Students in Yogyakarta, Indonesia$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0179983
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Impact of electronic information on patient health seeking behaviour, decision-making & wellbeing.$9,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Dr Anni Dugdale, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180029
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20002 grants / $101,840

Anthropometric status of adult men and women in Vietnam and the relationship between levels of body mass indicator and risk of morbitity in adults(Scholarship)$89,840

Funding body: Wellcome Trust

Funding body Wellcome Trust
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Doctor Michael Dibley
Scheme Senior Research Fellowship in Medical Science
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0179014
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Conceptions of Nourishment During Pregnancy Among Primiparous Australian Women of English-Speaking Backgrounds: Influence of Social Class and Sources of Health$12,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Professor Linda Connor, Doctor Michael Dibley, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bisits
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178954
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

19952 grants / $168,173

International Forum for Social Sciences in Health$94,500

Funding body: Ford Foundation

Funding body Ford Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175412
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Social Science Twinning Project$73,673

Funding body: International Clinical Epidemiology Network

Funding body International Clinical Epidemiology Network
Project Team Emeritus Professor Richard Heller, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0176109
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

19941 grants / $51,000

Planning proposal to set an initial agenda for Asia and the Pacific Regions of the International Forum for Social Sciences in Health.$51,000

Funding body: Ford Foundation

Funding body Ford Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0173361
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

19901 grants / $1,000,001

Implementation and Evaluation of Various Strategies to prevent Heart Disease$1,000,001

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor Richard Heller, Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham, Emeritus Professor Annette Dobson
Scheme PHRDC Project Grant (Defunct)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1990
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175454
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2006 PhD Smoking Inoculation Program to Prevent the Uptake of Smoking Among Junior High School Students in Yogyakarta Municipality, Indonesia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2003 Masters Veteran satisfaction with a home based preventive care intervention Public Health Not Elswr Classi, The University of Notre Dame Australia Principal Supervisor
2002 PhD Home hazards and falls prevention in home-based health assessments for older people in the community Public Health Not Elswr Classi, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Nick Higginbotham

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
Public Health/CCEB
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email nick.higginbotham@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room HMRI Building W-4 John Hunter Hospital
Building HMRI Building
Location John Hunter Hospital Campus

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