Conjoint Associate Professor Stephen Oakley

Conjoint Associate Professor Stephen Oakley

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Oakley grew up in the Hunter Valley and Mid-North Coast of New South Wales matriculating from Kempsey High School in 1983. Following his graduation from UNSW medical school he completed basic physician training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, proceeded through Rheumatology advanced training (Prince of Wales & Prince Henry, Royal Newcastle and St George Hospitals) and was admitted to the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 1999. During this time he undertook studies toward his Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology (University of Newcastle) and went on to complete his doctoral thesis evaluating arthroscopic assessments of articular cartilage in an animal model of osteoarthritis (UNSW). 

In 2004 he took up the post of Consultant Rheumatologist at Guy’s & St Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust in London with an Honorary Senior Lectureship at Kings College London. He established an arthroscopic research unit performing targeted synovial biopsies an interventional MRI scanner and developed techniques to integrate arthroscopic, MRI and histologic assessments of knee articular structures. He also became involved in cardiovascular research evaluating the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. 

In 2008 he was offered a staff specialist position in the Department of Rheumatology at the John Hunter Hospital. He leapt at the opportunity to return to this strong clinical unit. He has developed a research program with the mission of more fully understanding and addressing the broader impacts of rheumatic disease with particular interests in cardiovascular disease, immune-modulatory therapies and cost-effectiveness of different models of care. He is an active member of the Australian Rheumatology Association and the John Hunter and Royal Newcastle Hospitals Combined Medical Staff Council.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Medicine), University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of New South Wales
  • Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Rheumatology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases) 50
110322 Rheumatology and Arthritis 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2009 -  Conjoint Associate Professor

Research and teaching in the field of Rheumatology. 

University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/09/2004 - 1/04/2008 Honorary Senior Lecturer Kings College, University of London, UK
United Kingdom

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
20/05/2004 -  American College of Rheumatology - International Member American College of Rheumatology
United States
1/01/1999 -  Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Royal Australasian College of Physicians
1/01/1999 -  Australian Rheumatology Association - Member Australian Rheumatology Association
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2008 -  Staff Specialist Rheumatologist Hunter New England Local Health District
Rheumatology Department, Division of Medicine
1/09/2004 - 1/04/2008 Consultant Rheumatologist Guy's & St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust
National Health Service, United Kingdom
Australia

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2002 ARA - Young Investigator of the Year
Australian Rheumatology Association
1998 Best Clinical Teacher in the Category of Registrar / Resident
St George Clinical School - UNSW

Scholarship

Year Award
2000 NSW Branches Scholarship
Arthritis Australia
1999 NSW Branches Scholarship
Arthritis Australia
1998 Frank Spurway Scholarship
Arthritis Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2004 Oakley SP, Arthroscopic assessment of articular cartilage in an animal model of osteoarthritis, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales (2004)
2009 MACEDO A, OAKLEY S, GULLICK N, KIRKHAM B, 'An Examination of Work Instability, Functional Impairment, and Disease Activity in Employed Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis', The Journal of Rheumatology, 36 225-230 (2009)
DOI 10.3899/jrheum.071001
2009 Wong M, Oakley SP, Young L, Jiang BY, Wierzbicki A, Panayi G, et al., 'Infliximab improves vascular stiffness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis', ANNALS OF THE RHEUMATIC DISEASES, 68 1277-1284 (2009)
DOI 10.1136/ard.2007.086157
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 48
2010 Holmes MV, Jiang B, McNeill K, Wong M, Oakley SP, Kirkham B, Chowienczyk PJ, 'Paradoxical association of C-Reactive protein with endothelial function in rheumatoid arthritis', PLoS ONE, 5 (2010)

Background: Within the general population, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether CRP is causally ... [more]

Background: Within the general population, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether CRP is causally implicated in atherogenesis or is the results of atherosclerosis is disputed. A role of CRP to protect endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) has been suggested. We examined the association of CRP with EDNO-dependent vasomotor function and subclinical measures of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis in patients with raised CRP resulting from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with RA (n = 59) and healthy control subjects (n = 123), underwent measures of high sensitivity CRP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD, dependent on EDNO), intima-media thickness (IMT, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis) and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, a measure of arteriosclerosis). IMT and PWV were elevated in patients with RA compared to controls but FMD was similar in the two groups. In patients with RA, IMT and PWV were not correlated with CRP but FMD was positively independently correlated with CRP (P<0.01). Conclusions/Significance: These findings argue against a causal role of CRP in atherogenesis and are consistent with a protective effect of CRP on EDNO bioavailability. © 2010 Holmes et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0010242
Citations Scopus - 10
2014 Oakley S, Esmaili N, Major G, Mathers D, Ratnarajah S, Van der Kallen J, et al., 'ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IS MOST STRONGLY INFLUENCED BY LIPID PROFILE AND DISEASE ACTIVITY IN ACPA-POSITIVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL (2014) [E3]
2014 Oakley S, Esmaili N, Major G, Mathers D, Ratnarajah S, van der Kallen J, et al., 'A Randomised Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effect of Humira upon Endothelial Function in ACPA Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis - an Interim Analysis', ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1

Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Holmes MV, Jiang B, McNeill K, Wong M, Oakley SP, Kirkham B, Chowienczyk PJ, 'Paradoxical association of C-Reactive protein with endothelial function in rheumatoid arthritis', PLoS ONE, 5 (2010)

Background: Within the general population, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether CRP is causally ... [more]

Background: Within the general population, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether CRP is causally implicated in atherogenesis or is the results of atherosclerosis is disputed. A role of CRP to protect endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) has been suggested. We examined the association of CRP with EDNO-dependent vasomotor function and subclinical measures of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis in patients with raised CRP resulting from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with RA (n = 59) and healthy control subjects (n = 123), underwent measures of high sensitivity CRP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD, dependent on EDNO), intima-media thickness (IMT, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis) and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, a measure of arteriosclerosis). IMT and PWV were elevated in patients with RA compared to controls but FMD was similar in the two groups. In patients with RA, IMT and PWV were not correlated with CRP but FMD was positively independently correlated with CRP (P<0.01). Conclusions/Significance: These findings argue against a causal role of CRP in atherogenesis and are consistent with a protective effect of CRP on EDNO bioavailability. © 2010 Holmes et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0010242
Citations Scopus - 10
2009 MACEDO A, OAKLEY S, GULLICK N, KIRKHAM B, 'An Examination of Work Instability, Functional Impairment, and Disease Activity in Employed Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis', The Journal of Rheumatology, 36 225-230 (2009)
DOI 10.3899/jrheum.071001
2009 Hu C, Amati G, Gullick N, Oakley SP, Hurusiadis V, Schaeffter T, et al., 'A system for the registration of arthroscopic images to magnetic resonance images of the knee: for improved virtual knee arthroscopy', SPIE Proceedings, 7261 (2009)
DOI 10.1117/12.813775
2009 Wong M, Oakley SP, Young L, Jiang BY, Wierzbicki A, Panayi G, et al., 'Infliximab improves vascular stiffness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis', ANNALS OF THE RHEUMATIC DISEASES, 68 1277-1284 (2009)
DOI 10.1136/ard.2007.086157
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 48
2009 Macedo AM, Oakley SP, Panayi GS, Kirkham BW, 'Functional and work outcomes improve in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who receive targeted, comprehensive occupational therapy', Arthritis Care and Research, 61 1522-1530 (2009)

Objective. Work disability is a serious consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a 6-month, prospective randomized controlled trial comparing assessments of function... [more]

Objective. Work disability is a serious consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a 6-month, prospective randomized controlled trial comparing assessments of function, work, coping, and disease activity in employed patients with RA receiving occupational therapy intervention versus usual care. Methods. Employed patients with RA with increased perceived work disability risk were identified by the RA Work Instability Scale (WIS; score =10). Patients were stratified into medium- (score =10 and <17) and high-risk (=17) groups, then randomized into occupational therapy or usual care groups. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), a standardized patient self-report of function. Other outcomes included the disability index (DI) of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ); Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28); RA WIS; EuroQol Index; visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, work satisfaction, and work performance; and days missed/month. Independent sample t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used. Results. We recruited 32 employed patients with RA. At baseline the groups were well matched. At 6 months the improvement in the occupational therapy group was significantly greater than that in the usual care group for all functional outcomes (COPM performance P < 0.001, COPM satisfaction P < 0.001, HAQ DI P = 0.02) and most work outcomes (RA WIS [P = 0.04], VAS work satisfaction [P < 0.001], VAS work performance [P = 0.01]). Additionally, Arthritis Helplessness Index (P = 0.02), Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales II pain subscale (P = 0.03), VAS pain (P = 0.007), EuroQol Index (P = 0.02), EuroQol global (P = 0.02), and DAS28 (P = 0.03) scores significantly improved. Conclusion. Targeted, comprehensive occupational therapy intervention improves functional and work-related outcomes in employed RA patients at risk of work disability. © 2009, American College of Rheumatology.

DOI 10.1002/art.24563
Citations Scopus - 29
2008 Humby F, Gullick N, Kelly S, Pitzalis C, Oakley SP, 'A synovial pathergy reaction leading to a pseudo-septic arthritis and a diagnosis of Behcet's disease', RHEUMATOLOGY, 47 1255-1256 (2008)
DOI 10.1093/rheumatology/ken194
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2007 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Appleyard RC, Ghosh P, Kirkham BW, et al., 'Arthroscopic estimation of the extent of chondropathy', Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 15 506-515 (2007)

Introduction: Arthroscopy has been used to evaluate articular cartilage (AC) pathology in osteoarthritis (OA) for outcome measurement and validation of non-invasive imaging. Howev... [more]

Introduction: Arthroscopy has been used to evaluate articular cartilage (AC) pathology in osteoarthritis (OA) for outcome measurement and validation of non-invasive imaging. However, many fundamental aspects of arthroscopic assessment remain un-validated. Objectives: This study evaluated arthroscopic estimates of extent of chondropathy. Methods: Serial arthroscopic assessments were performed in a group of 15 sheep before and after bilateral stifle medial meniscectomy (MMx). Post-mortem assessments were performed in un-MMx sheep and 4 and 16 weeks post-MMx. Arthroscopic assessments of the extent of each grade of chondropathy were compared with a non-arthroscopic hybrid assessment that incorporated biomechanical, thickness and macroscopic assessments. Results: Arthroscopy evaluated only 36% of AC and missed significant pathological changes, softening and chondro-osteophyte, occurring in peripheral regions. The patterns of change in arthroscopic assessments were similar to those of the non-arthroscopic assessment but there was a very strong tendency to over-estimate the extent of softened AC after MMx. In spite of these limitations arthroscopic assessments were responsive to change. Estimates of the extent of normal and softened AC were most responsive to change over time followed by estimates of superficial and deep fibrillation. Arthroscopy was as an excellent discriminator between normal and OA. Assessments of chondro-osteophyte and exposed bone were not responsive to change. Conclusions: Arthroscopic estimates of extent of chondropathy are prone to substantial error. While experience and training may reduce these errors other approaches may more effectively improve performance. © 2006 Osteoarthritis Research Society International.

DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2006.10.013
Citations Scopus - 2
2005 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Appleyard RC, Ghosh P, Kirkham BW, et al., 'Arthroscopy - A potential "gold standard" for the diagnosis of the chondropathy of early osteoarthritis', Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 13 368-378 (2005)

Objectives: The aims of this study were to: 1. Evaluate the performance of arthroscopy for the diagnosis of chondropathy and to compare it to that of direct non-arthroscopic asses... [more]

Objectives: The aims of this study were to: 1. Evaluate the performance of arthroscopy for the diagnosis of chondropathy and to compare it to that of direct non-arthroscopic assessments; 2. Determine intra-observer reliability of arthroscopic assessments; 3. Evaluate the effects of the arthroscopic video quality and probing upon diagnostic performance. Design: The ovine medial meniscectomy (MMx) model of early osteoarthritis (OA) was used assuming that pre-MMx articular cartilage (AC) was "normal" and post-MMx AC "chondropathic". Video recordings of arthroscopic assessments of each stifle compartment were evaluated. Scores were given for the quality of the video and the amount of probing. The diagnostic performances of dynamic shear modulus (G), light microscopic assessment and superficial zone collagen birefringence assessments were evaluated and compared to that of arthroscopy. Intra-observer reliability of arthroscopic assessments was also evaluated. Results: Arthroscopic assessments had high sensitivity (91-100%), specificity (62-88%) and accuracy (75-93%) for the diagnosis of chondropathy 16 weeks after MMx. Arthroscopy compared favourably with the direct non-arthroscopic assessments in the lateral compartment and was found to have extremely high intra-observer reliability (kappa 0.78-1.00). The quality of arthroscopic video recordings and the amount of probing did not significantly influence accuracy or reliability. Conclusions: Arthroscopy performs as well as direct non-arthroscopic assessments of AC for diagnosis of early OA. These results suggest that arthroscopy can be used as a "gold standard" for the validation of non-invasive assessments like magnetic resonance imaging and that arthroscopic diagnosis can be based on small amounts of video footage without AC probing. © 2005 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2004.12.005
Citations Scopus - 25
2004 Oakley SP, Lassere MN, Portek I, Szomor Z, Ghosh P, Kirkham BW, et al., 'Biomechanical, histologic and macroscopic assessment of articular cartilage in a sheep model of osteoarthritis', Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 12 667-679 (2004)

Objectives. Our primary objective was to explore the full potential of the ovine medial meniscectomy (MMx) model of early osteoarthritis (OA) for studies to validate non-destructi... [more]

Objectives. Our primary objective was to explore the full potential of the ovine medial meniscectomy (MMx) model of early osteoarthritis (OA) for studies to validate non-destructive articular cartilage (AC) assessments and therapeutic interventions. Our secondary objective was to re-evaluate the relationships between the different types of AC assessment after MMx in sheep. Methods. Macroscopic assessments, dynamic shear modulus (G*), phase lag and AC thickness measurements were performed at a total of 5437 reference points on all six articular surfaces in four normal joints and 16 MMx ovine stifle (knee) joints. Comparisons with histologic assessments of gross structural damage, collagen organisation (birefringence) and proteoglycan content were possible at 702 of these points. Results. Histologic gross structural damage and proteoglycan loss were seen throughout the joint with greatest severity (fibrillation) in closest proximity to the MMx site. Increases in AC (30-50%) thickness, reductions in G* (30-40%) and collagen birefringence intensity (15-30%) occurred more evenly throughout the joint. Macroscopic softening was evident only when G* declined by 80%. G* correlated with AC thickness (¿=-0.47), collagen organisation (¿=0.44), gross structural damage (¿=-0.44) and proteoglycan content (¿=0.42). Multivariate analysis showed that collagen organisation contributed twice as much to dynamic shear modulus (t=6.66) as proteoglycan content (t=3.21). Collagen organisation (¿=0.11) and proteoglycan content (¿=0.09) correlated only weakly to phase lag. Conclusions. Macroscopic assessments were insensitive to AC softening suggesting that arthroscopic assessments of AC status might also perform poorly. Collagen integrity was more important for the maintenance of AC stiffness (G*) than proteoglycan content. The development of major AC softening and thickening throughout the joint following MMx suggested involvement of non-mechanical (e.g., protein and biochemical) chemical and cytokine mediated processes in addition to the disturbance in biomechanical loading. The ovine MMx model provides a setting in which the spectrum of AC changes associated with the initiation and progression of OA may be evaluated. © 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2004.05.006
Citations Scopus - 45
2004 Joshua FF, Oakley SP, Major GA, 'Impact of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors on anti-ulcer medication and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in patients with rheumatic disease', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 34 153-161 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1444-0903.2004.00515.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2004 Major GAC, Oakley SP, Joshua FF, 'Impact of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors on anti-ulcer medication and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in patients with rheumatic disease - Another viewpoint', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 34 650-650 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2004.00684.x
2003 Oakley SP, Lassere MN, 'A Critical Appraisal of Quantitative Arthroscopy as an Outcome Measure in Osteoarthritis of the Knee', Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, 33 83-105 (2003)

Background and Objectives: To review the performance of arthroscopic assessment of articular cartilage damage in osteoarthritis. Methods: The literature was reviewed for publicati... [more]

Background and Objectives: To review the performance of arthroscopic assessment of articular cartilage damage in osteoarthritis. Methods: The literature was reviewed for publications containing data regarding validity and reliability of arthroscopic systems of cartilage evaluation in knee osteoarthritis. Results: Fifty-two distinct measurement systems were identified in 60 publications. There were 30 simple severity-scoring systems, 3 global visual analogue scale systems, and 19 composite systems. No systems consisted solely of measurements of lesion size or site, although 13 systems used either or both of these for the calculation of composite scores. Only 6 publications (10%) undertook any reliability evaluation and these generally used inappropriate methods of statistical analysis. Thirty-five publications (58%) evaluated validity. Construct validity was tested using several constructs (clinical in 2, magnetic resonance imaging in 10, radiographs in 10, or other arthroscopic assessments in 5 publications). Criterion validity was ascertained by using several methods including cartilage histology, histochemistry, or biomechanics in 10 publications. Responsiveness was determined in 1 publication. Discussion: Many publications evaluated composite systems but only a few evaluated fundamental aspects of arthroscopic measurement. Conceptually, composite scoring systems have the best validity; however, at present, there is only enough evidence to support the use of simple chondropathy severity scores and there are little data on the responsiveness of these methods. A proposed program for comprehensive evaluation and development of valid and responsive arthroscopic assessments of articular cartilage is outlined. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0049-0172(03)00082-9
Citations Scopus - 16
2003 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Turnbull A, Murrell GAC, Kirkham BW, Lassere MN, 'Accuracy and reliability of arthroscopic estimates of cartilage lesion size in a plastic knee simulation model', Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy and Related Surgery, 19 282-289 (2003)
DOI 10.1053/jars.2003.50039
Citations Scopus - 12
2002 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Turnbull A, Murrell GAC, Kirkham BW, Lassere MN, 'Poor accuracy and interobserver reliability of knee arthroscopy measurements are improved by the use of variable angle elongated probes', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 61 540-543 (2002)

Objectives: (a)To determine the accuracy and reliability of arthroscopic measurements of cartilage lesion diameter in an artificial right knee model; (b) to determine whether the ... [more]

Objectives: (a)To determine the accuracy and reliability of arthroscopic measurements of cartilage lesion diameter in an artificial right knee model; (b) to determine whether the use of a set of variable angle elongated probes improves performance; and (c) to identify other sources of variability. Methods: Ovoid "lesions" were drawn on the five cartilage surfaces of four plastic knees models. Two observers assessed these 20 lesions arthroscopically, measuring two diameters in orientations parallel and orthogonal to the probe. Observer 1 (orthopaedic surgeon) and observer 2 (arthroscopic rheumatologist) made two sets of measurements, firstly with the conventional probe and five months later with the variable angle elongated (VAE) probes. The knees were disarticulated to determine true lesion diameter. Results: Observer 1 had negligible bias and good accuracy regardless of orientation or probe type. Observer 2 demonstrated both bias and poor accuracy using the conventional probe. Both improved using VAE probes. Poor interobserver reliability with conventional probes also improved using VAE probes. Major sources of variability could be traced to the probe type, the characteristics of the operator, and the orientation of the lesion in relation to the probe; the lesion location itself did not cause variability. Conclusions: Variation in accuracy and poor interobserver reliability of measurements with conventional methods of cartilage lesion diameter measurement improved when specially designed measurement probes were used. Arthroscopic measurements performed as well as most clinical and radiographic measures. These findings have important implications for the use of arthroscopy as an outcome in multicentre trials where arthroscopists have different levels of experience.

DOI 10.1136/ard.61.6.540
Citations Scopus - 19
1998 Oakley SP, Garsia RJ, Coates AS, 'Eosinophilic leukaemoid reaction and interleukin-5 in metastatic melanoma.', Medical Journal of Australia, 169 501 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 4
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (41 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Oakley S, Esmaili N, Major G, Mathers D, Ratnarajah S, Van der Kallen J, et al., 'ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IS MOST STRONGLY INFLUENCED BY LIPID PROFILE AND DISEASE ACTIVITY IN ACPA-POSITIVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL (2014) [E3]
2014 Oakley S, Esmaili N, Major G, Mathers D, Ratnarajah S, van der Kallen J, et al., 'A Randomised Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effect of Humira upon Endothelial Function in ACPA Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis - an Interim Analysis', ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2011 Gullick NJ, Oakley SP, Rees JD, Jones T, Mistlin A, Panayi GS, Kirkham BW, 'ACHIEVING REMISSION DURING GOAL DIRECTED THERAPY IMPROVES FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF RA IN ROUTINE PRACTICE', RHEUMATOLOGY (2011)
2011 Blackler L, Gullick NJ, Zain A, Oakley S, Rees J, Jones T, et al., 'NURSE-SPECIALIST-LED CLINICS SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE PATIENT CONCORDANCE WITH DMARD THERAPY IN RA: A CRITICAL STEP IN ACHIEVING REMISSION', RHEUMATOLOGY (2011)
2010 Gullick NJ, Oakley SP, Mistlin A, Rees JD, Jones T, Gibson T, et al., 'GOAL DIRECTED THERAPY (TREAT-TO-TARGET) FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN ROUTINE PRACTICE ACHIEVES INCREASED RATES OF REMISSION AND IMPROVED FUNCTION COMPARED TO USUAL CARE, WITH HIGHER USE OF COMBINATION THERAPY', Ann Rheum Dis 2010;69(Suppl3):215 (2010)
2008 Gullick NJ, Amati G, Penney G, Rhode K, Schaeffter T, Hill DL, et al., 'Localisation of Synovial Biopsy Using Infra-Red Tracking.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2008; 9 (Suppl) (2008)
2008 Amati G, Penney G, Gullick N, Rhode K, Hu C, Hill D, Oakley S, 'Infra-red tracking for high-precision localisation during arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the knee - The DIORAMA Project', International Journal of Computer Aided Radiology and Surgery (2008)
2008 Aslam L, Oakley S, d'Cruz D, Chowienczyk P, Kirkham BW, 'Direct Comparision Of Pre-Atherosclerotic Vascular Surrogate Measures In Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Rheumatology (Oxford) 2008; 47 (suppl. 2), ii91 (2008)
2007 Macedo A, akley SP, Kirkham BW, 'Patient Perceived Needs to Reduce Work Disability in Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2007;66(Suppl II):660 (2007)
2007 Agarwal S, Gullick N, Macedo A, Oakley SP, Kirkham BW, '10 Year Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2007; 56; 11 (Suppl.) Abstract 611 (2007)
2007 Tofts PS, Leung KK, McLeish K, Schaeffer T, Kirkham B, Oakley SP, Hill DL, 'Nonlinear Modelling of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Gd Imaging Data in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Extraction of Ktrans.' (2007)
2006 Oakley SP, Wong M, Chowienczyk P, Young L, KirkhaM BW, 'Severe Inflammation is Associated with Better Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2006; 65 (supply II): 314 (2006)
2006 Wong M, Oakley SP, Chowienzcyk P, Kirkham BW, 'Infliximab Improves Vascular Compliance in Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2006;65(suppl II):513 (2006)
2006 Macedo A, Oakley SP, 'HAQ Threshold for Determining Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient Perceived Risk of Work Disability.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2006; 54; 11 (suppl); 355 (2006)
2006 Oakley SP, Wong M, Chowienczyk P, Kirkham BW, 'Infliximab, CRP and Vascular Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2006; 54; 11 (suppl); 915 (2006)
2006 Wong M, Oakley SP, Chowienczyk P, Kirkham BW, 'Infliximab Improves Arterial Elasticity and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2006; 54; 11 (suppl); 942 (2006)
2006 Oakley SP, Wong M, Chowienczyk P, Young L, Kirkham BW, 'High Levels of C-Reactive Protein are Associated with Improved Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Internal Medicine Journal 2006; 36; (suppl. 2); A81. (2006)
2006 Humby F, Manzo A, Oakley S, Blades M, Portek I, Edmonds J, et al., 'A Novel Quantitative Aggregational Score for Rheumatoid Synovium Correlates with CRP.', Rheumatology 2006; 45 (suppl 1); i100. (2006)
2006 Macedo A, Oakley SP, Kirkham BW, 'Work Instability, Functional Impairment and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.', Rheumatology 2006; 45 (suppl 1); i123. (2006)
2005 Mathews JA, Oakley SP, Williams FMK, 'London¿s Longest Running Rheumatology Clinic?', Rheumatology 2005; 44 (suppl 1); i61 (2005)
2003 Oakley SP, Shnier R, Portek I, Szomor Z, Kirkham B, Lassere MN, 'MRI Assessents of Articular Cartilage (AC) Damage are More Responsive than Measurement of AC Volume.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2003 : 48 : 9 :S-246 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Appleyard R, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Internal Medicine Journal 2003 : 30 : 11 (suppl.) A-81', Internal Medicine Journal 2003 : 30 : 11 (suppl.) A-81 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, 'Arthroscopic Diagnosis Of Very Early Osteoarthritis.', Internal Medicine Journal 2003 : 30 : 11 (suppl.) A-81 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Szomor Z, Portek I, Appleyard R, Kirkham B, Murrell G, Lassere M, 'Responsiveness Of Arthroscopic Assessments Of Articular Cartilage Damage.', Internal Medicine Journal 2003: 33 : 11 (Suppl.) A-87 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Szomor Z, Portek I, Appleyard R, Kirkham B, Murrell G, Lassere M, 'Arthroscopic Estimates Articular Cartilage Structural Damage In OA.', Internal Medicine Journal 2003: 33 : 11 (Suppl.):A-88 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Appleyard R, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, 'Macroscopic and Biomechanical Assessment of Severity of Chondropathy in a Sheep Model of Osteoarthritis.', Internal Medicine Journal 2003: 33 : 3 (Suppl.) A-12 (2003)
2003 Oakley SP, Appleyard R, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Changes in Cartilage Biomechanics Occur Early and Throughout the Stifle Joint of Sheep After Medial Meniscectomy.', Internal Medicine Journal 2003: 33: 3 (Suppl.) A-12 (2003)
2002 Oakley SP, Appleyard R, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Cartilage Thickening Occurs Throughout The Ovine Stifle (Knee) Joint After Medial Meniscectomy.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2002 46, 9 (Suppl.) : Abstract 1325 (2002)
2002 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Turnbull A, Murrell G, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Poor Accuracy and Inter-Observer Reliability of Knee Arthroscopy Measurements Are Greatly Improved By the Use Of Specially Designed Measurement Probes.', Internal Medicine Journal 2002: 32 1/2 (Suppl.) :A-12. (2002)
2002 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Shnier R, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Reliability Of Manual Estimates Of Cross-Sectional Area (CSA) Of Cartilage In The Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scan Of Sheep Stifle (Knee) With Early Osteoarthritis (OA).', Internal Medicine Journal 2002: 32 1/2 (Suppl.) :A -11 (2002)
2002 Oakley SP, Ghosh P, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirkham B, Lassere M, 'Evaluation of Reliability of a New Histological Method of Assessment of Osteoarthritic Cartilage.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 2002 : 10 (Suppl. A):S23. (2002)
2002 Oakley SP, 'The Relationship Between Stiffness (Shear Modulus), Thickness and Histologic Grading Of Cartilage Using Different Scoring Methods.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 2002: 10 (Suppl A):S23-PS11. (2002)
2002 Oakley SP, 'Cellular and Matrix Changes Exist Throughout the Stifle Joint After Medial Meniscectomy - Evaluation of Responsiveness of a New Histological Method of Assessment.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 2002: 10 (Suppl. A):S22-PS09 (2002)
2000 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Lassere M, 'Reliability of chondroscopic estimates of cartilage lesion size in a sheep model of early osteoarthritis (OA) and the effect of severity of chondropathy upon reliability.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2000 : 43: 9 (Suppl.) : S-222 (2000)
2000 Bird P, Oakley S, Shnier R, Szomor Z, Edmonds J, Kirkham B, 'Prospective Evaluation of MRI and Physical Examination Findings in Patients With Greater Trochanteric Bursitis.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 2000: 43: 9 (Suppl.) : S-209. (2000)
2000 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Turnbull A, Bird P, Youssef P, Lassere M, 'Accuracy And Reliability Of Chondroscopic Measurements By Untrained Observers In A Knee Joint Simulation Model.', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Medicine 2000: 30: 4 :p 540. (2000)
2000 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, Edmonds J, 'Chondroscopic Assessment Of Cartilage Changes In The Ovine (Sheep) Meniscectomy (OM) Model Of Osteoarthritis.', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Medicine 2000: 30: 4 :p 541. (2000)
2000 Oakley SP, Portek I, Szomor Z, 'Quantitative Assessment Of Ovine Stifle Osteoarthritis Using Chondroscopy.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 2000 : 8 :S-82. (2000)
2000 Oakley SP, Appleyard R, Szomor Z, Portek I, Kirklham B, Lassere M, 'Cartilage Thickening Occurs Throughout The Ovine Stifle (Knee) Joint After Medial Meniscectomy.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 2002 : 10 (Suppl. A):S22-PS 08. (2000)
1999 Oakley SP, Bid P, Kirkham B, 'Gluteus medius tears presenting as the clinical syndrome of Trochanteric Bursitis.', Arthritis & Rheumatism 1999 42 : 9 (Suppl.):S-340. (1999)
1999 Oakley SP, Portek I, Shnier R, Szomor Z, Edmonds J, Kirkham B, 'Feasibility Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Chondroscopy And Chondral Biopsy In A Sheep Model Of Early Osteoarthritis.', Osteoarthritis & Cartilage 1999 : 7 (Suppl.) :S-27. (1999)
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Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2004 Oakley SP, Arthroscopic assessment of articular cartilage in an animal model of osteoarthritis, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales (2004)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $2,078,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $381,000

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis - 2 (HEART-RA-2)$229,000

Interim analysis in Hunter HEART-RA-1 confirmed that endothelial function correlates inversely with inflammatory burden in patients with anti-CCP positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it appears that other disease-specific but non-inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to cardiovascular disease in RA. This might include genetic factors, abnormalities of lipid transport and newly described immune mechanisms such as NETosis. HEART-RA-1 also only evaluated patients with anti-CCP positive RA. 

HEART-RA-2 will consist of 2 parts:

Part 1, a randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effect of Humira upon endothelial function in anti-CCP antibody positive and anti-CCP antibody negative patients with RA. 

Part 2 will evaluate non-inflammatory mechanisms of cardiovascular disease by taking inflammation out of the equation. This will be done by studying people with Pre-RA i.e. who have evidence of RA on blood test of on ultrasound but no clinical evidence of RA.

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Project Team

Stephen Oakley

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

CHESS - Curing Hepatitis C: Effect on the Endothelium and cardiovaScular riSk$152,000

Hepatitis C is a serious viral form of hepatitis that causes cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure and liver cancer. Effective treatment now exists for the treatment of Hepatitis. Decisions to treat are based upon a range of prognostic factors related to hepatic outcomes. 

Hepatitis C is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms of CV disease in hepatitis C are not understood but it is possible that it is directly related to the presence of the virus and liver inflammation. In this regard there may be similarities with rheumatoid arthritis. 

This collaborative study draws upon the expertise and research interests of Dr Joshua Davis (Lead investigator, Infectious Disease Physician) and Dr Stephen Oakley (Clinical Rheumatologist)  to evaluate the effect of Hepatitis C anti-viral therapy upon endothelial function. 

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Project Team

Joshua Davis

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $161,000

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis (HEART - RA)$161,000

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a severe immune-mediated destructive inflammatory arthritis that affects the peripheral joints and affects 1% of the population. It is also associated with double the risk of cardiovascular disease and reduces life expectancy by 10-15 years. This effect is particularly pronounced in the anti-CCP antibody (ACPA) positive sub-group. Recent advances in the therapeutics of RA have greatly improved the treatment of arthritis. However, the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in RA are not fully understood and it is not known if these new treatments also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Hunter HEART-RA is a single-site randomised controlled trial of 60 patients with ACPA-positive RA being conducted through the Department of Rheumatology, John Hunter Hospital. The study will determine whether the drug adalimumab influences cardiovascular risk in patients with RA using a platform of cardiovascular biomarkers including endothelial function, central arterial pressure indices and aortic stiffness. The study will also explore a range of potential mechanisms of cardiovascular disease including genetic risk, lipid profiling and novel neutrophil-mediated mechanisms of immunity.  

Recruitment for the study commenced in 2013. The final participant was recruited mid 2015. The study will conclude with final analysis in 2016.

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Project Team

Stephen Oakley

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20062 grants / $1,536,000

DIORAMA: 3-Dimensional Integration of images using Optical Remote-sensing technology to evaluate Arthroscopic and MRI Assessments$816,000

Dr Oakley was Chief Investigator on this study until his departure from the United Kingdom April 2008. He oversaw the development and implementation of remote sensing technology that facilitated targeted arthroscopic synovial biopsies in a procedural MRI scanner. Subsequent to his departure the technology was adapted and used for ultrasound assisted synovial biopsy for Dr Nicola Gullick's doctoral thesis and for cardiac imaging studies. 

Funding body: Guy's & St Thomas's Charity

Funding body Guy's & St Thomas's Charity
Project Team

Stephen Oakley 1/1/2006 - 31/04/2008

Scheme Guy's & St Thomas's Charity
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Knee Osteoarthritis in Twins$720,000

This study is was conducted through the Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit under the Lead of Prof Tim Spector. This cross-sectional study evaluated differences in phenotype and gene expression in twins discordant for knee osteoarthritis. Twenty pairs of twins discordant for knee osteoarthritis underwent a range of assessments including knee MRI, arthroscopic assessment and synovial biopsy. Dr Oakley's role was to develop the protocol, obtain ethical approval and to perform knee arthroscopic assessments and obtain synovial biopsies. This study was completed without significant findings and no publications were produced. 

Funding body: Merck Sharpe and Dohme - Investigator-Initiated Grant

Funding body Merck Sharpe and Dohme - Investigator-Initiated Grant
Project Team

Tim Spector

Scheme Merck Sharpe and Dohme - Investigator-Initiated Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Projects

CHESS - Curing Hepatitis C: Effect on the Endothelium and cardiovaScular riSk. 2015 - 2016

This longitudinal observational study evaluates whether anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C improves endothelial function. Dr Oakley (rheumatology) and Dr Davis (infectious diseases) are collaborating due to the likely shared pathogenic mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis and in hepatitis C and to share resources. 

Grants

CHESS - Curing Hepatitis C: Effect on the Endothelium and cardiovaScular riSk

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Description

Hepatitis C is a serious viral form of hepatitis that causes cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure and liver cancer. Effective treatment now exists for the treatment of Hepatitis. Decisions to treat are based upon a range of prognostic factors related to hepatic outcomes. 

Hepatitis C is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms of CV disease in hepatitis C are not understood but it is possible that it is directly related to the presence of the virus and liver inflammation. In this regard there may be similarities with rheumatoid arthritis. 

This collaborative study draws upon the expertise and research interests of Dr Joshua Davis (Lead investigator, Infectious Disease Physician) and Dr Stephen Oakley (Clinical Rheumatologist)  to evaluate the effect of Hepatitis C anti-viral therapy upon endothelial function. 

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant

NETA - Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Autoimmunity 2015 -

Neutrophil Extracellular Traps are a recently described mechanism of innate immunity. The Trauma group led by Prof Zsolt Balogh at HNE Health have recently demonstrated that a different type of NETosis involving mitochondrial DNA rather than cellular nuclear DNA occurs in the sterile inflammation occurring in the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome. It seems plausible that the same process may occur in other forms of sterile inflammation such as the autoimmune diseases encountered in clinical Rheumatology. NETA is a preliminary observational study to determine whether NETosis is occurring in a range of inflammatory diseases and the type of NETosis that is occurring. The range of conditions includes rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, gout, bacterial sepsis. The collaborators include A/Prof Stephen Oakley, Prof Zsolt Balogh, Prof Phil Hansbro and Dr Joshua Davis.

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Conjoint Professor Josh S Davis
Professor Zsolt Janos Balogh University of Newcastle

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis 2 (HEART RA - 2) 2015 -

Hunter HEART-RA will answer many questions regarding cardiovascular disease in ACPA-positive RA. However, it will not evaluate ACPA-negative RA patient group and cannot answer the question of when, at which stage in the development of RA, cardiovascular risk becomes elevated and which inflammatory and non-inflammatory processes may be responsible. Hunter HEAT-RA-2 has been designed to investigate these questions in greater detail. 

Hunter HEART-RA-2 is an extension of Hunter HEART-RA consisting of 2 parts.

Part 1: Randomised Controlled Trial evaluating the Effect of the TNF-Inhibitor drug Humira (adalimumab) upon cardiovascular risk as measured by a platform of cardiovascular assessments. This second study will include ACPA-negative RA patients and more comprehensive assessments of cardiovascular function and inflammatory burden.

Part 2: Cross-Sectional Study evaluating cardiovascular risk in First Degree Relatives of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Unrelated Controls and people with immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis without clinical disease.  

In both parts of this study there will be a platform of assessments of articular inflammation, cardiovascular function and laboratory assessments. In addition to the routine assessments of inflammatory burden (clinical joint counts, ESR and CRP) musculoskeletal ultrasound will be used to detect subclinical joint inflammation.  The platform of cardiovascular assessments include endothelial function (EndoPAT), central arterial pressure indices, aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity) and carotid ultrasound (carotid intimal medial thickness and carotid plaque measurement). Participants will have a range of genetic and immunological tests and a sub-group will participate in studies of NETosis. 

Grants

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis - 2 (HEART-RA-2)

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Description

Interim analysis in Hunter HEART-RA-1 confirmed that endothelial function correlates inversely with inflammatory burden in patients with anti-CCP positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it appears that other disease-specific but non-inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to cardiovascular disease in RA. This might include genetic factors, abnormalities of lipid transport and newly described immune mechanisms such as NETosis. HEART-RA-1 also only evaluated patients with anti-CCP positive RA. 

HEART-RA-2 will consist of 2 parts:

Part 1, a randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effect of Humira upon endothelial function in anti-CCP antibody positive and anti-CCP antibody negative patients with RA. 

Part 2 will evaluate non-inflammatory mechanisms of cardiovascular disease by taking inflammation out of the equation. This will be done by studying people with Pre-RA i.e. who have evidence of RA on blood test of on ultrasound but no clinical evidence of RA.

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Professor John Richard Attia University of Newcastle
Professor Phil Michael Hansbro University of Newcastle

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis (HEART-RA) 2013 -

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a severe immune-mediated destructive inflammatory arthritis that affects the peripheral joints and affects 1% of the population. It is also associated with double the risk of cardiovascular disease and reduces life expectancy by 10-15 years. This effect is particularly pronounced in the anti-CCP antibody (ACPA) positive sub-group. Recent advances in the therapeutics of RA have greatly improved the treatment of arthritis. However, the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in RA are not fully understood and it is not known if these new treatments also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Hunter HEART-RA is a single-site randomised controlled trial of 60 patients with ACPA-positive RA being conducted through the Department of Rheumatology, John Hunter Hospital. The study will determine whether the drug adalimumab influences cardiovascular risk in patients with RA using a platform of cardiovascular biomarkers including endothelial function, central arterial pressure indices and aortic stiffness. The study will also explore a range of potential mechanisms of cardiovascular disease including genetic risk, lipid profiling and novel neutrophil-mediated mechanisms of immunity.  

Recruitment for the study commenced in 2013. The final participant was recruited mid 2015. The study will conclude with final analysis in 2016.

Grants

Humira and Endothelial Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis (HEART - RA)

Funding body: Abbvie Pharmaceuticals

Funding body Abbvie Pharmaceuticals
Description

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a severe immune-mediated destructive inflammatory arthritis that affects the peripheral joints and affects 1% of the population. It is also associated with double the risk of cardiovascular disease and reduces life expectancy by 10-15 years. This effect is particularly pronounced in the anti-CCP antibody (ACPA) positive sub-group. Recent advances in the therapeutics of RA have greatly improved the treatment of arthritis. However, the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in RA are not fully understood and it is not known if these new treatments also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Hunter HEART-RA is a single-site randomised controlled trial of 60 patients with ACPA-positive RA being conducted through the Department of Rheumatology, John Hunter Hospital. The study will determine whether the drug adalimumab influences cardiovascular risk in patients with RA using a platform of cardiovascular biomarkers including endothelial function, central arterial pressure indices and aortic stiffness. The study will also explore a range of potential mechanisms of cardiovascular disease including genetic risk, lipid profiling and novel neutrophil-mediated mechanisms of immunity.  

Recruitment for the study commenced in 2013. The final participant was recruited mid 2015. The study will conclude with final analysis in 2016.

Scheme Abbvie Investigator-Initiated Grant

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 18
United Kingdom 12
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Conjoint Associate Professor Stephen Oakley

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email stephen.oakley@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0249 223 500
Fax 0249 223 214

Office

Room Rheumatology Department
Building John Hunter Hospital
Location New Lambton

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