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Associate Professor Jenny Schneider

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Pharmacy, University of Queensland

Keywords

  • hplc assay development
  • palliative care
  • pharmacokinetics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111599 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
110199 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified 20
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1993 - 30/07/2003 Specialist Pharmacist (Palliative Care) Calvary Mater Newcastle
Palliative Care
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PHAR4101 Cancer, Palliation and Critical Care
University of Newcastle
Course co-ordinator 1/01/2017 - 30/06/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Schneider J, Dickman A, The Syringe Driver: Continuous subcutaneous infusions in palliative car, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 496 (2011)
2011 Newby DA, Jin JS, Summons PF, Athauda RI, Park M, Schneider JJ, et al., Development of a computer-generated digital patient for teaching and assessment in pharmacy: Final Report, Australian Learning and Teaching Council, Surry Hills, 75 (2011) [A2]
Co-authors David Newby, Mira Park, Peter Summons, Rukshan Athauda
2011 Schneider J, Dickman A, The Syringe Driver: Continuous subcutaneous infusions in palliative car, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 496 (2011)
2005 Dickman A, Schneider JJ, Varga J, The syringe driver : continuous subcutaneous infusions in palliative care, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 327 (2005) [A3]
Show 1 more book

Journal article (56 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Daneshi N, Holliday E, Hancock S, Schneider JJ, Scott RJ, Attia J, Milward EA, 'Prevalence of clinically actionable genotypes and medication exposure of older adults in the community', PHARMACOGENOMICS & PERSONALIZED MEDICINE, 10 17-27 (2017)
DOI 10.2147/PGPM.S123719
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, Liz Milward
2016 Galettis P, Schneider J, Martin J, 'Care with overseas purchased drugs: devil is in the detail', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 46 1005-1006 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13184
Co-authors Peter Galettis, Jen Martin
2016 Schneider J, Galettis P, Williams M, Lucas C, Martin JH, 'Pill testing at music festivals: can we do more harm?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 46 1249-1251 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13250
Co-authors Peter Galettis, Jen Martin
2016 Thoopputra T, Pongmesa T, Newby DA, Schneider J, Li SC, 'Opportunistic Risk Screening for Type 2 Diabetes: Exploring of Application of Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in Community Pharmacy in Australia and Thailand', Value in Health Regional Issues, 9 1-7 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of providing diabetes risk assessment at community pharmac... [more]

© 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of providing diabetes risk assessment at community pharmacy level in Australia and Thailand from organizational aspects. Methods: The intervention study was conducted in eight community pharmacies in New South Wales, Australia, and six community pharmacies in Central Thailand. Diabetes risk assessment tools were applied to determine the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. An open-ended question was asked to solicit the willingness-to-pay value for the service. A semistructured interview was conducted with participating pharmacists to solicit the perceived facilitators and barriers in providing the service. Results: There were a total of 132 and 185 participants, with the ratio of participants in the three risk categories of low, intermediate, and high being 1:4:11 and 2:1:1.5 for Australia and Thailand, respectively. More Thai participants were willing to pay for the service (72.4% vs. 18.9%; P = 0.0001). Pharmacists from both countries agreed that providing risk assessment would increase health awareness and assist in dampening the burden of disease. A major barrier is time and staff shortage. Support from the government and collaboration among health care providers were major facilitators from Thai pharmacists' perspective, whereas remuneration was a major facilitator from Australian pharmacists' perspective. Conclusions: Pharmacists in both countries agreed that this intervention would contribute to produce positive health benefits. Differences in advantages and barriers as well as in the proportion of consumers willing to pay for the service demonstrated that it is essential for pharmacists (particularly in developing countries) to be aware of the pitfalls of copying practice initiatives in developed countries without any consideration of the local health care environment.

DOI 10.1016/j.vhri.2015.03.022
Co-authors Shuchuen Li, David Newby
2016 Foo LK, Duffull SB, Calver L, Schneider J, Isbister GK, 'Population pharmacokinetics of intramuscular droperidol in acutely agitated patients', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 82 1550-1556 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The British Pharmacological SocietyBackground: Intramuscular droperidol is used increasingly for sedation of aggressive and violent patients. This study aimed to character... [more]

© 2016 The British Pharmacological SocietyBackground: Intramuscular droperidol is used increasingly for sedation of aggressive and violent patients. This study aimed to characterise the pharmacokinetics of intramuscular droperidol in these patients to determine how rapidly it is absorbed and the expected duration of measurable drug concentrations. Methods: We undertook a population pharmacokinetic analysis of a subgroup of patients from a clinical trial comparing droperidol and midazolam: 17 receiving 5¿mg and 24 receiving 10¿mg droperidol. Droperidol was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic modelling was performed under a nonlinear mixed effects modelling framework (NONMEM v7.2). The model was used to simulate concentration time profiles of three typical doses, 5¿mg, 10¿mg and 10¿mg¿+¿10¿mg repeated at 15¿min. Results: A two-compartment first-order input with first-order output model fitted the data best. The absorption rate constant was poorly characterised by the data and an estimate of the first order rate constant of absorption when fixed to 10¿h¿1 provided a stable model and lowest objective function. This represents extremely rapid absorption with a half-life of 5¿min. The final model had a clearance of 41.9¿l¿h¿1 and volume of distribution of the central compartment of, 73.6¿l. Median and interquartile range of initial (alpha) half-life was 0.32¿h (0.26¿0.37¿h) and second (beta) half-life was 3.0¿h (2.5¿3.6¿h). Simulations indicate that 10¿mg alone provides an 80% probability of being above the lower limit of quantification (5¿µg¿l¿1) for 7¿h, 2¿h longer than for 5¿mg. Giving two 10¿mg doses increased this duration to 10¿h. Conclusions: Intramuscular droperidol is rapidly absorbed with high therapeutic concentrations after 5 and 10¿mg doses, and supports clinical data in which droperidol sedates rapidly for up to 6¿h.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.13093
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister, Leonie Calver
2016 Schneider J, O'Hara K, Munro I, 'Using Continuing Professional Development with Portfolio in a Pharmaceutics Course', PHARMACY, 4 (2016)
DOI 10.3390/pharmacy4040036
2015 O'Hara K, Wright IMR, Schneider JJ, Jones AL, Martin JH, 'Pharmacokinetics in neonatal prescribing: Evidence base, paradigms and the future', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 80 1281-1288 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Paediatric patients, particularly preterm neonates, present many pharmacological challenges. Due to the difficulty in conducting clinic... [more]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Paediatric patients, particularly preterm neonates, present many pharmacological challenges. Due to the difficulty in conducting clinical trials in these populations dosing information is often extrapolated from adult populations. As the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs change throughout growth and development extrapolation presents risk of over or underestimating the doses required. Information about the development these processes, particularly drug metabolism pathways, is still limited with weight based dose adjustment presenting the best method of estimating pharmacokinetic changes due to growth and development. New innovations in pharmacokinetic research, such as population pharmacokinetic modelling, present unique opportunities to conduct clinical trials in these populations improving the safety and effectiveness of the drugs used. More research is required into this area to ensure the best outcomes for our most vulnerable patients.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.12741
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jen Martin, Ian Wright
2015 Hua S, Marks E, Schneider JJ, Keely S, 'Advances in oral nano-delivery systems for colon targeted drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease: selective targeting to diseased versus healthy tissue.', Nanomedicine, 11 1117-1132 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nano.2015.02.018
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Susan Hua, Simon Keely
2015 Chunyan L, Schneider J, Munro I, Li S, 'Introduction of flipped classroom model for learning in pharmacokinetics at the University of Newcastle, Australia', Chinese Journal of Medical Education, 35 312-315 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3760/cma.j.issn.1673-677X.2015.02.048
Co-authors Shuchuen Li
2014 Schneider J, Munro I, Krishnan S, 'Using audio-visual material to enhance laboratory practicals', Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology, 3 91-93 (2014) [C2]
DOI 10.14434/jotlt.v3n2.5068
2014 Schneider J, Munro I, Krishnan S, 'Flipping the Classroom for Pharmacokinetics', American Journal of Educational Research, 2 1225-1229 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.12691/education-2-12-15
2013 Iwaszkiewicz KS, Schneider JJ, Hua S, 'Targeting peripheral opioid receptors to promote analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions.', Front Pharmacol, 4 132 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fphar.2013.00132
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Susan Hua
2012 Thoopputra T, Newby DA, Schneider JJ, Li SC, 'Survey of diabetes risk assessment tools: Concepts, structure and performance', Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 28 485-498 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Shuchuen Li, David Newby
2011 Blank J, Schneider JJ, ''Use your words:' Reconsidering the language of conflict in the early years', Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 12 198-211 (2011)

This article explores the nature of classroom conflict as language practice. The authors describe the enactment of conflict events in one kindergarten classroom and analyze the ev... [more]

This article explores the nature of classroom conflict as language practice. The authors describe the enactment of conflict events in one kindergarten classroom and analyze the events in order to identify the language practices teachers use, considering teachers' desires for language use in relation to conflict and exploring the nature of the interplay between what is said to be desired and the implicit messages of the lived experience of conflict. The authors describe the nature of conflict events as apology ritual and suggest that this practice is reflective of a way of framing conflict as destructive, illustrating the way in which the notion of 'using words' situates the language of conflict as a conflict resolution convention. They argue that there are complex and contradictory underlying assumptions at play in conflict events and position them within larger school discipline and developmentally appropriate practice discourses. Finally, they close the article with a consideration of alternative perspectives on classroom conflict events.

DOI 10.2304/ciec.2011.12.3.198
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Huffstetter M, King JR, Onwuegbuzie AJ, Schneider JJ, Powell-Smith KA, 'Effects of a computer-based early reading program on the early reading and oral language skills of at-risk preschool children', Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 15 279-298 (2010)

This study examined the effects of a computer-based early reading program (Headsprout Early Reading) on the oral language and early reading skills of at-risk preschool children. I... [more]

This study examined the effects of a computer-based early reading program (Headsprout Early Reading) on the oral language and early reading skills of at-risk preschool children. In a pretest-posttest control group design, 62 children were randomly assigned to receive supplemental instruction with Headsprout Early Reading (experimental group) or Millie's Math House (control group) for 30 min each school day for 8 weeks. Children using Headsprout Early Reading made greater gains in early reading skills as measured by the Test of Early Reading Ability (TERA-3), F(1, 59)=39.35, p<0.01, and in oral language skills as measured by the Test of Language Development-Primary(TOLD-P:3), F(1, 59)=37.03, p<0.01. Effect sizes were large for the gains in both measures (TERA-3, ¿2=0.24; TOLD-P:3, ¿2=0.17). Teachers' responses to an open-ended interview indicated that the program was perceived as a desirable instructional aid. Educational considerations for preventing future reading difficulties and issues about implementation integrity are discussed. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10824669.2010.532415
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Bobrovskaya L, Damanhuri HA, Ong LK, Schneider JJ, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Goodchild AK, 'Signal transduction pathways and tyrosine hydroxylase regulation in the adrenal medulla following glucoprivation: An in vivo analysis', Neurochemistry International, 57 162-167 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2010.05.009
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley, Phil Dickson
2010 Isbister GK, O'Leary MA, Hagan J, Nichols KL, Jacoby T, Davern K, et al., 'Cross-neutralisation of Australian brown snake, taipan and death adder venoms by monovalent antibodies', Vaccine, 28 798-802 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2009.10.055
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2010 Franco JL, Posser T, Gordon SL, Bobrovskaya L, Schneider JJ, Farina M, et al., 'Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase increases the resistance of human neuroblastoma cells to oxidative insults', Toxicological Sciences, 113 150-157 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/toxsci/kfp245
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Phil Dickson
2008 Isbister GK, O'Leary M, Miller MK, Brown SGA, Ramasamy S, James R, Schneider JJ, 'A comparison of serum antivenom concentrations after intravenous and intramuscular administration of redback (widow) spider antivenom', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 65 139-143 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2007.03004.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2008 Winter KL, Isbister GK, Schneider JJ, Konstantakopoulos N, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC, 'An examination of the cardiovascular effects of an 'Irukandji' jellyfish, Alatina nr mordens', Toxicology Letters, 179 118-123 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.toxlet.2008.04.011
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2007 Isbister G, O'Leary M, Schneider JJ, Brown S, Currie B, 'Efficacy of antivenom against the procoagulant effect of Australian brown snake (Pseudonaja sp.) venom: In vivo and in vitro studies', Toxicon, 49 57-67 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.09.007
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2007 O'Leary MA, Schneider JJ, Krishnan BP, Lavis C, McKendry A, Ong LK, Isbister GK, 'Cross-neutralisation of Australian brown and tiger snake venoms with commercial antivenoms: Cross-reactivity or antivenom mixtures?', Toxicon, 50 206-213 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.toxicon.2007.03.014
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Geoffrey Isbister
2006 O'Leary MA, Isbister GK, Schneider JJ, Brown SGA, Currie BJ, 'Enzyme immunoassays in brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.) envenoming: Detecting venom, antivenom and venom-antivenom complexes', Toxicon, 48 4-11 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.04.001
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2006 Schneider JJ, Good PD, Ravenscroft P, 'Effect of tubing on loss of clonazepam administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 31 563-567 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2005.09.008
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 2
2005 Eckburg PB, Schneider JJ, Renault CA, 'Avian influenza in humans: A practical review for clinicians', Infections in Medicine, 22 535-542 (2005)

Human outbreaks of avian influenza in Southeast Asia in recent years have raised concerns about the potential for a pandemic. The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (subtyp... [more]

Human outbreaks of avian influenza in Southeast Asia in recent years have raised concerns about the potential for a pandemic. The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (subtype H5N1) has caused high mortality in previously healthy children and young adults and has demonstrated characteristics that suggest a potential for pandemic spread. It is important that front-line physicians be able to recognize cases of avian influenza, to be aware of atypical symptoms, to institute proper isolation precautions, and to start appropriate therapy. Current influenza vaccines provide no protection against avian influenza, but vaccination of at-risk persons may help decrease the likelihood of genetic recombination that could lead to efficiently transmitted strains. Amantadine and rimantadine are considered ineffective for treatment of infection with the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, but oseltamivir may play an important role in prevention and control of avian influenza outbreaks among humans.

2004 Good PD, Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft P, 'The Compatibility and Stability of Midazolam and Dexamethasone in Infusion Solutions', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 27 471-475 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2004.02.002
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2004 O'Leary MA, Schneider JJ, Isbister GK, 'Use of high performance liquid chromatography to measure tetrodotoxin in serum and urine of poisoned patients', Toxicon, 44 549-553 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.toxicon.2004.07.008
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister
2003 Rohr Y, Schneider JJ, Good P, Sattler L, 'Availability of analgesia for breakthrough pain for palliative care residents in hostels', Geriaction, 21 11-16 (2003) [C3]
2002 Schneider JJ, 'Stability and compatibility of drug combinations in syringe drivers: Is it really crystal clear?', JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE CARE, 18 227-227 (2002)
2002 Brindley R, Schneider JJ, 'Writing instruction or destruction: Lessons to be learned from fourth-grade teachers' perspectives on teaching writing', Journal of Teacher Education, 53 328-341 (2002)

The purpose of this study was to examine fourth-grade teachers' self-assessments of their perceptions about writing development and writing instruction. The authors surveyed fourt... [more]

The purpose of this study was to examine fourth-grade teachers' self-assessments of their perceptions about writing development and writing instruction. The authors surveyed fourth-grade teachers within one large school district in the Southeastern United States. Utilizing quantitative and qualitative methodologies, they analyzed the teachers' self-assessments of their instructional practices with regard to writing. They found that the teachers revealed a wide range of statements about writing instruction with fluctuating perspectives about how writing develops. In addition, there was evidence that the state curriculum and the writing test dictated the teachers' instructional practice. As a result, many teachers revealed discrepancies between their perspectives about writing development and their instructional practices. The authors suggest there are lessons to be learned for all teacher educators from this scenario.

DOI 10.1177/0022487102053004005
Citations Scopus - 8
2002 Schneider J, Duffy K, Page C, Atkinson P, Sketchley P, 'The sounds of music: A community collaboration project in palliative care', JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE CARE, 18 241-241 (2002)
2002 Burns J, Schneider J, O'Brien L, 'The application of handheld computers to palliative care', JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE CARE, 18 234-234 (2002)
2000 Ravenscroft PJ, Schneider JJ, 'Bedside perspectives on the use of opioids: Transferring results of clinical research into practice', Clin. Exp. Pharm. Ther, 27 529-532 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2000 Cadd AL, Keatinge DR, Henssen M, O'Brien L, Parker D, Rohr Y, et al., 'Assessment and documentation of bowel care management in palliative care: incorporating patient preferences into the care regimen', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 9, No 2 228-235 (2000) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 8
2000 Schneider JJ, Jackson SAW, 'Process drama: A special space and place for writing', Reading Teacher, 54 38-51 (2000)

Drama is a tool for instruction and learning that supports literacy development while also fostering children's inclination to imagine.... [more]

Drama is a tool for instruction and learning that supports literacy development while also fostering children's inclination to imagine.

Citations Scopus - 7
1999 Parker D, Rohr Y, Schneider J, Thompson J, Keatinge DR, Cadd AL, et al., 'Nurses' use of patient notes to chart bowel care management for the palliative care patient', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 16 36-41 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
1998 Wilson KM, Schneider J, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Improved solid phase extraction technique for plasma flecainide analysis by high performance liquid chromatography', Ther. Drug Monit, 20(4) 435-438 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
1998 Wilson KM, Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Stability of midazolam and fentanyl in infusion solutions', J. Pain Sympt Management, 16:(1) 52-58 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
1997 Schneider JJ, Wilson KM, Ravenscroft PJ, 'A study of the osmolality and pH of subcutaneous infusion solutions', Aust. J. Hosp. Pharm, 27(1) 29-31 (1997) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
1995 Schneider JJ, Hart J, Newton S, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Use of morphine in palliative care patients', Australian Pharmacist, 0.589583333333333 536-538 (1995) [C1]
1992 Wilkinson TJ, Robinson BA, Begg EJ, Duffull SB, Ravenscroft PJ, Schnieder JJ, 'Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of rectal versus oral sustained-release morphine in cancer patients', Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, 31 251-254 (1992)

Sustained-release morphine (MST) given by the rectal route was compared with oral MST in an open randomised cross-over trial in ten patients with cancer who received stable doses ... [more]

Sustained-release morphine (MST) given by the rectal route was compared with oral MST in an open randomised cross-over trial in ten patients with cancer who received stable doses of MST. No significant difference was found in the areas under the curve of the concentration-time profiles (AUC) following oral or rectal administration for parent morphine. The AUCs determine for morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) after oral administration were approximately twice those obtained following rectal administration. The maximal concentration achieved was lower and the time to maximal concentration was longer following rectal administration for morphine, M6G and M3G. The relative mean arrival times following rectal administration were significantly longer for morphine and M3G but not for M6G. These findings suggest slower absorption but less first-pass metabolism of MST after rectal administration. No significant difference was noted between the oral and the rectal route in measurements on visual-analogue scales for pain or side effects. We recommend the rectal route as being suitable for MST administration when the oral route is no longer available. In changing from oral to rectal administration, the same dose and dose interval may be used, but dose adjustment may be needed. © 1992 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/BF00685556
Citations Scopus - 25
1992 Wilkinson TJ, Robinson BA, Begg EJ, Duffull SB, Ravenscroft PJ, Schneider JJ, 'Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of rectal versus oral sustained-release morphine in cancer patients', Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 34 431-433 (1992) [C1]
1992 Chen Y, Norris RL, Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, 'The influence of vancomycin concentration and pH of plasma on vancomycin protein binding', J. Pharm. Toxicol. Method, 28(1) 57-60 (1992) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
1992 Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, Cavenagh JD, Brown AN, Bradley J, 'Plasma morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide and morphine concentrations in patients receiving long-term epidural morphine', 1365-2125, 34 431-433 (1992) [C1]
1990 Huni K, Schneider J, Zanetti G, Rihs T, 'Survey of aflatoxin content in Swiss concentrate feeds for dairy cattle', Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology, 10 160-161 (1990)

Within the context of restrictive Federal measures, the Swiss concentrate feeds for dairy cattle have been periodically surveyed and analyzed for aflatoxin content. In these comme... [more]

Within the context of restrictive Federal measures, the Swiss concentrate feeds for dairy cattle have been periodically surveyed and analyzed for aflatoxin content. In these commercial feeds, the average aflatoxin B 1 content decreased sharply from 47 µg/kg in the winter of 1976-1977 (period prior to restrictive measures) to 24 µg/kg in the winter of 1977-1978 and to 3 µg/kg in the winter of 1978-1979. Work made public by the Federal Office of Public Health, reveals a corresponding downward trend for aflatoxin M 1 concentration levels in milk from 109 ng/kg in the winter of 1976-1977 to 44 ng/kg in the winter of 1977-1978 and to 10 ng/kg in the winter of 1978-1979. This record indicates that the feed control measures taken were effective in reducing milk contamination by aflatoxins.

Citations Scopus - 2
1989 Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Determination of morphine in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection', J. Chromatogr., 497 326-329 (1989) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
1989 Norris RL, Taylor PJ, Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, Charles BG, 'Sensitive measurement of oxazepam in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography', J. Drug Dev., 2(2) 109-113 (1989) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
1987 Charles BG, Schneider JJ, Norris RL, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Temalastine does not affect theophylline pharmacokinetics in normal subjects', 1365-2125, 24 673-675 (1987) [C1]
1986 Geurrini VH, English PB, Schneider JJ, Bourne DW, 'Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a slow release cefotaxime suspension in the dog and in sheep', Am. J. Vet res, 119 81-823 (1986) [C1]
1985 Geurrini VH, English PB, Schneider JJ, Bourne DW, 'Pharmacokinetics of probenecid in sheep', J. Vet Pharmacol. Ther., 8(2) 128-135 (1985) [C1]
1984 Schneider JJ, Triggs EJ, Bourne DWA, Stephens ID, Haviland AM, 'Determination of oxycodone in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection', Journal of Chromatography B: Biomedical Sciences and Applications, 308 359-362 (1984)
DOI 10.1016/0378-4347(84)80231-5
Citations Scopus - 13
1984 Schneider JJ, Triggs EJ, Bourne DW, Stephens ID, Havilano AA, 'Determination of oxycodone in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection', J. Chromatogr., 308 359-362 (1984) [C1]
1983 Tovey C, Bourne DW, Schneider JJ, Stephens ID, 'Determination of alcuronium chloride in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography', J. Chromatogr., (1983) [C1]
1983 Tovey C, Bourne DWA, Schneider J, Stephens ID, Triggs EJ, 'Determination of alcuronium dichloride in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography without solvent extraction', Journal of Chromatography B: Biomedical Sciences and Applications, 278 216-219 (1983)
DOI 10.1016/S0378-4347(00)84778-7
Citations Scopus - 2
1981 Charles BG, Schneider JJ, Ravenscroft PJ, 'Effect of metoclopramide on the bioavailability of long-acting propranolol', 1365-2125, 517-518 (1981) [C1]
1976 Alsen C, Köpcke C, Ohnesorge FK, Schneider J, 'Effects of cadmium on carbonic anhydrase activity and hemoglobin content of rat testes', Archives of Toxicology, 37 39-46 (1976)

The cadmium-induced (Cd) damage of mammalian testes is thought to be correlated with an inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CAH) by Cd. Since Cd causes dose-dependent changes in blo... [more]

The cadmium-induced (Cd) damage of mammalian testes is thought to be correlated with an inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CAH) by Cd. Since Cd causes dose-dependent changes in blood flow of the testes, an inhibition of CAH in the testes could be simulated by a decrease of CAH-rich erythrocytes. Therefore, CAH activities and hemoglobin (Hb) content were determined in blood and testes of untreated and Cd-treated Sprague-Dawley rats as well as in testes perfused via the testicular artery. Cd was intraperitoneally applied as CdCl2 in single doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg Cd2+/kg b.w., respectively. 1. The experiments on perfused testes clearly demonstrated that the CAH activities originate from erythrocytes rather than from a tissue located enzyme. 2. The alterations in blood circulation occurring shortly (0.25-1.0 h) after the Cd administration were characterized by a dose-dependent, transient decrease (1.5 mg Cd2+/kg) as well as an increase (3.0 and 5.0 mg Cd2+, respectively) of the Hb content in the testes. 3. Independent of these minor alterations in a later state (14-24 h after 1.5 mg Cd2+/kg, 7-14 h after 3.0 mg Cd2+/kg, and 1-3 after 5.0 mg Cd2+/kg), Cd induced the well known hemorrhagic alterations of the testes with a high increase of Hb content and CAH activity. 4. By means of the correlations between CAH activities and Hb content in blood and testes an inhibition of the CAH by Cd as the primary cause for the tissue damage of the testes could largely be excluded. © 1976 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/BF00353353
Citations Scopus - 8
Show 53 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Daneshi N, Graham M, Holliday E, Schneider J, Kerr KP, Rasiah R, et al., 'Clinically actionable pharmacogenomic variants in community-dwelling older Australians.', ASMR XXIII NSW Scientific Meeting: Programme and Abstracts (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, John Attia, Liz Milward, Rohan Rasiah, Liz Holliday, Karen Kerr
2015 Schneider J, Munro I, 'Portfolio Development in a Simulated Village Pharamcy Experience', Hawaii International Conference on Education 2015 (2015) [E3]
2014 Krishnan S, Schneider J, Munro I, 'What did we Flip? Exploring technology for students to develop real world perspectives in the classroom', Research and Development in Higher Education. Higher Education in a Globalized World (2014) [E1]
2013 Schneider JJ, Krishnan S, Munro I, Birchnell A, 'The Village Pharm:Flipping the classroom to enhance the learning of pharmaceutics and associated professional skills', Electric Dreams: Proceedings ascilite 2013 (2013) [E1]
2012 Thoopputra T, Li SC, Newby DA, Schneider JJ, 'Pharmaceutical care intervention for disease management in community pharmacies in Australia', Value in Health: ISPOR 15th Annual European Congress and ISPOR 5th Asia-Pacific Conference (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Newby, Shuchuen Li
2012 Thoopputra T, Newby DA, Schneider JJ, Li SC, 'Awareness and perception of diabetes risk assessment in community pharmacy in Australia', Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy: Workshop and Presentation Abstracts from the 17th International Social Pharmacy Workshop (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Newby, Shuchuen Li
2011 Thoopputra T, Li SC, Newby DA, Schneider JJ, 'A literature review of diabetes risk assessment tools', Value in Health (2011) [E3]
Co-authors David Newby, Shuchuen Li
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $391,792

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $200,000

Feasibility of minimally invasive, reliable and reproducible blood sampling techniques for chemotherapy dose optimisation in breast cancer$200,000

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team Professor Jennifer Martin, Associate Professor Jenny Schneider, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland
Scheme Pilot Study Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600810
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20071 grants / $149,292

Development of a computer-generated digital patient for teaching and assessment in pharmacy$149,292

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Associate Professor David Newby, Professor Jesse Jin, Doctor Peter Summons, Doctor Rukshan Athauda, Associate Professor Jenny Schneider
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188332
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20051 grants / $27,500

2005 RIBG allocation$27,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Jenny Schneider
Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185787
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20041 grants / $15,000

Establishing a Pharmacolkinetics-Pharmacodynamic analysis and research team: Stage 1: Developing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic resources$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Jenny Schneider
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184645
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.75

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Developmental and Environmental Determinants on Neonatal Pharmacology PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Identifying the Impact Factors Affecting Pharmacist Performance to Develop a Best-Practice Model for Pharmaceutical Care Delivery PhD (Pharmacy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Improving Post-marketing Monitoring of Risk and Benefits of Drugs for Chronic Diseases in China PhD (Pharmacy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Implementation of an Appropriate Screening Tool for Depression in Adults with Chronic Illness by Australian Community Pharmacists PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Feasibility and Value of Holistic Systems-Based Approaches to Personalised, Patient-Centred Healthcare in Modern Pharmacy PhD (Medical Genetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Evidence and Value Based Healthcare Decision Making for Chronic Disease in China PhD (Pharmacy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD How to Implement Quality Use of Medicines in Developing Countries - An Example from China PhD (Pharmacy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Risk Management for Type 2 Diabetes in Community Pharmacy Practice PhD (Pharmacy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Jenny Schneider

Position

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology

Contact Details

Email jennifer.schneider@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5060
Fax (02) 4921 7903

Office

Room MS116
Building Medical Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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