New contributes to humanity

With a study of society and culture, you’ll learn about language, people, histories and culture - areas that are the key to world change. Without it, creating a humane, equitable and innovative society is virtually impossible.

Society and culture offers you a mix of subjects and specialities that you can tailor to your interests. Your studies will open your mind to new perspectives and teach you flexible skills attractive to employers. This means you'll graduate with adaptable skills that will pave the way to diverse career opportunities.

Why study society and culture at UON?

  • Follow your passions, with a diverse range of subjects, majors and minors to choose from.
  • One-of-a-kind programs will provide you with unique skills like Development Studies which is the only degree in Australia to include Economics and Aboriginal Studies as core courses; or our new work-ready Arts degree with a choice four streams and practical placement opportunities.
  • Build skills employers want like communication, teamwork, problem-solving and critical thinking. Our degrees make you ready for the real world and you can chase job opportunities both in Australia and around the world.
  • Mix humanities with the digital age with new approaches to learning like blended and online learning, digital streams and peer learning support circles.
  • Get hands on experience with placements, internships, industry collaborations and practical work experience.

Society and culture scholarships
Find out more about our scholarships for domestic and international students

$55,000 ? median salary Humanities, Culture and Social Sciences
158% ? increase in employer demand for critical thinking skills between 2012-2015

What you can study

We understand that sometimes you don't know exactly which degree you'd like to pursue, but you know which field excites you. Use these areas of interest to narrow down your study options based on your interests and career goals.

Anthropology is the study of humans and cultural differences, in both the past and present. To understand the full extent and complexities of cultures, anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences, the humanities and physical sciences. A central concern of anthropologists is the application of knowledge to the solution of human problems.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Access and Equity Advisor
  • Cultural Heritage Officer
  • Cultural Tourism Curator
  • Equity and Diversity Officer

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Sociology and Anthropology)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Sociology and Anthropology)
  3. Bachelor of Development Studies (major in Cultures and Citizenship)
  4. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Society and Culture, Geography, Aboriginal Studies and Studies of Religion)
  5. Bachelor of Social Science (major in Sociology and Anthropology)

Aboriginal studies explores Indigenous experiences and perspectives, with a focus on history, society, leadership, behaviours, beliefs and related issues. Specialists in this area can have a career in a wide range of government and non-government sectors, where specific skills in cross-cultural awareness is sought. Appreciation of Indigenous culture and issues is extremely valuable when working for land councils, medical services, legal services, cooperatives and housing companies.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Aboriginal Cultural Educational Officer
  • Community Development Worker
  • Multicultural Community Liaison
  • Native Title Consultant

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Global Indigenous Studies)
  3. Bachelor of Development Studies (major in Cultures and Citizenship)
  4. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Society and Culture, Geography, Aboriginal Studies and Studies of Religion)
  5. Bachelor of Social Science (major in Global Indigenous Studies)
  6. Bachelor of Education (Primary)

English professionals are experts in English literature in the context of individual authors, genres, historical periods and themes. They understand literary texts in the light of their cultural and historical contexts. They usually work in publishing and editing; education or in a library.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Critic
  • Editor
  • Editorial Assistant
  • Librarian

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Arts (major in English and Writing)
  2. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in English and Writing)
  3. Bachelor of Creative Industries (major in Writing and Publishing)
  4. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in English)
  5. Bachelor of Education (Primary)

History provides a window to the world, helping us understand and interpret the societies and cultures, the people and events of the past. Historians focus on anything from ancient societies like the Greeks and Romans; to the medieval period; right through to recent history with major world events such as the Vietnam War. Professionals in this area solely concentrate on history on its own or use the skills in other careers where it is relevant such as law, journalism, publishing, teaching and policy development.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Cultural Heritage Officer
  • Exhibitions Officer
  • Historian
  • Publications Officer

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Ancient History and Classical Languages)
  2. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in History)
  3. Bachelor of Arts (major in Ancient History and Classical Languages)
  4. Bachelor of Arts (major in History)
  5. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Ancient History)
  6. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Modern History)
  7. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Society and Culture, Ancient and Modern History and Studies of Religion)
  8. Bachelor of Social Science (major in History)

Human geography is the branch of social science that deals with the study of people and their communities, cultures, economies and interactions with the environment. A simple example of the focus on human geography is the study of the differences in how people are more culturally tied to the natural environment in rural areas compared to those in cities. Human geographers help resolve major urban and regional problems and ultimately have the ability to contribute to the creation of liveable communities, vibrant economies and sustainable places.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Demographer
  • Development Manager (International Aid)
  • Transport Geographer
  • Environmental Geographer

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Human Geography and the Environment)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Human Geography and the Environment)
  3. Bachelor of Development Studies (major in Cultures and Citizenship)
  4. Bachelor of Development Studies (major in Urban and Regional Development)
  5. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Geography)
  6. Bachelor of Science (major in Geography)
  7. Bachelor of Social Science (major in Human Geography and the Environment)

Proficiency in other languages enriches personal growth and gives you a deeper appreciation of cultural differences. Those who know a second language are attractive for a range of jobs, especially those involving travel; overseas postings and teaching; along with opportunities in sectors that have foreign-language clients, markets and stakeholders. Language specialists can focus on one or several modern languages; sign language; or classical languages like Ancient Greek or Latin.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Translator
  • Tour Guide
  • Overseas English Teacher
  • Immigration Officer

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Arts (major in Ancient History and Classical Languages)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (minor in Chinese)
  3. Bachelor of Arts (major in French Studies)
  4. Bachelor of Arts (major in German)
  5. Bachelor of Arts (major in Japanese Studies)
  6. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Chinese)
  7. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in French)
  8. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in German)
  9. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Japanese)
  10. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (minor in Teaching English as a second language)
  11. Diploma in Languages (either by itself or alongside another degree)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language. It looks at language as a human communication system, focusing on the structure, acquisition and uses of language, and the variety of world languages. Linguists analyse the role of language in society and communication between people and cultures. Many linguists team this scientific knowledge of language and communication with a second language other than English.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Cryptographer
  • Linguistic Analyst
  • Foreign Affairs and Trade Officer
  • Academic

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Arts (major in Linguistics)
  2. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Linguistics)
  3. Bachelor of Social Science (major in Linguistics)

Media studies professionals look at the role of media in society. They analyse the way we consume and use popular media forms such as music, film and television; as well as new media like social media and the internet. Media studies experts consider the institutions and practices that shape these cultural forms and have a deep understanding of topics like audiences and consumption; gender and sexuality; digital labour; and representation and spectatorship.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Archivist
  • Media Analyst
  • Media Research Analyst
  • Blogger

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Arts (major in Film, Media and Cultural Studies)
  2. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Film, Media and Cultural Studies)
  3. Bachelor of Communication (major in Media Studies)
  4. Bachelor of Creative Industries (major in Communication and Media)

Music professionals write, arrange, orchestrate, conduct and perform musical compositions. Not only do they have strong technical know-how they can fuse entrepreneurial and creative applications of music technologies. This area is broad and varied and you can specialise in things like performance (instrumental or voice), composition, creative production, song writing or teaching.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Conductor
  • Critic
  • Music Producer
  • Vocal Coach

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Creative Industries (major in Music)
  2. Bachelor of Music

Philosophers explore life’s big questions and encourage critical and systematic inquiry into fundamental questions of right and wrong; truth and falsehood; the meaning of life; and the nature of reality, knowledge and society. Philosophy specialists know the importance of the structure of an argument and how to push further and ask deeper questions. Philosophers usually work in research and education but can also find roles in public service administration, community welfare and political advisory work.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Researcher
  • Technical Writer
  • Ethicist
  • Political Scientist

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Philosophy and Religion)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Philosophy and Religion)

Sociologists study human society and social relationships, particularly in areas concerning ethnicity and gender, employment and leisure, recreation and tourism, population health, lifestyle and well-being. They use quantitative and qualitative methods to research social data and often work in government departments. These specialists design and implement surveys, conduct interviews, analyse data, compile and evaluate information, and present the results in a report format.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Social Researcher
  • Policy Analyst
  • Advisory Officers
  • Market Research Officer

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Sociology and Anthropology)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Sociology and Anthropology)
  3. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Society and Culture, Geography, Aboriginal Studies, and Studies of Religion)
  4. Bachelor of Social Science (major in Sociology and Anthropology)

Religion specialists cover the history, literature, beliefs and practices of religion. They focus on all main religions from antiquity to the present day. Careers in this area are mainly limited to religious institutions but coupled with another related specialisation, religion specialists can move into a range of other industries including government, law and politics.

CAREER EXAMPLES

  • Church Administrator
  • Religious Education Coordinator
  • Pastoral Care Worker
  • Community Development Worker

STUDY OPTIONS

  1. Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice (major in Philosophy and Religion)
  2. Bachelor of Arts (major in Philosophy and Religion)
  3. Bachelor of Education (Secondary) (major in Society and Culture, Ancient and Modern History, and Studies of Religion)

Postgraduate degrees

Postgraduate degrees are a higher level of study that clarify and redefine your new. In most cases, but not all, you would usually complete a postgraduate qualification after your undergraduate degree.

Find a Postgraduate degree

PhD and Research Masters

Higher degrees in research are centred on defining your new through research and discovery. Research PhDs or Masters can only be completed after the Honours component of your undergraduate degree.

Find a PhD or Research Masters degree

World top 100 ? for sociology
90% Satisfied ? with teaching quality
World top 200 ? English language and literature
World top 150 ? for geography and psychology

Experience

Uni life after a gap-year

Madeleine shares her uni experience after taking a gap year and then choosing to major in Linguistics with minors in Aboriginal Studies and Psychology.

Discover the Newcastle Conservatorium of Music

The Newcastle Conservatorium of Music celebrates over 30 years of music.

What's it like to study a Bachelor of Development Studies?

Lisa talks about her experience studying a Bachelor of Development Studies at the University of Newcastle.