The University of Newcastle, Australia
Youth sociology book cover

News • 6 Jul 2020

New book Youth Sociology helps understand youth pressures of today

Youth is a key period of transition with many challenges and issues for young people to contend with. A new book co-authored by University of Newcastle youth sociologist Dr Julia Coffey titled Youth Sociology helps break down and understand the pressures on youth today.

Routledge handbook

News • 2 Jul 2020

Dr. S A Hamed Hosseini publishes The Routledge Handbook of Transformative Global Studies

S A Hamed Hosseini, an expert in global studies from the School of Humanities and Social Science and the founder of Alternative Futures Research Network has led an international team of editors and authors to publish a novel handbook in the twin fields of globalisation and development studies: The Routledge Handbook of Transformative Global Studies.

Returned soldiers with masks on 1919.

News • 29 Jun 2020

Historians reveal little known histories of the Spanish Flu

Two Centre for 21st Century Humanities historians have delved into different aspects of the Spanish Flu pandemic, revealing little known histories which have become even more pertinent during the COVID-19 crisis.

Design Nuts

News • 16 Jun 2020

Edtech founder shares her story of empowering teachers and students

Kylie Burrett shares her startup journey as co-founder of edtech company Design Nuts at I2N's Startup Stories

Reasonable Doubt book cover

News • 10 Jun 2020

Book 'Reasonable Doubt' exposes Australia's worst wrongful convictions

Forensic anthropologist and criminologist with the University of Newcastle, Dr Xanthé Mallett, has published a book which exposes Australia’s worst wrongful convictions.

Karen Thrift Prize for Poetry and Lyrics

News • 4 Jun 2020

Call for Entries: 2020 Karen Thrift Prize for Poetry and Lyrics

The University of Newcastle's School of Humanities and Social Science is thrilled to announce the launch of the 2020 Karen Thrift Prize for Poetry and Lyrics.

News • 4 Jun 2020

Criminology expert in police accountability comments on George Floyd case

The tragic death of George Floyd on 25 May has once again emphasised the significance of bystander video distributed through social media as a police accountability mechanism, says University of Newcastle Criminologist, Dr Justin Ellis.

Screenshot of Twitter online conference

News • 14 May 2020

Cancelled digital humanities conference goes online to great success

When COVID-19 restrictions meant the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) conference in April was cancelled, members of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria, Canada, created a virtual conference instead so that papers could still be presented and discussed.

News • 13 May 2020

Modern teaching techniques shaping students’ learning experience

As an inaugural recipient of a DVC(A) Merit List Award for Teaching and Learning Excellence, Lecturer in the School of Education, Dr Emma Shaw, shares how she uses modern teaching techniques to shape her students’ learning experience.

Penny Jane Burke

News • 12 May 2020

Collaboration with the University of Bath through Global Chair role

The award of the 2020-2021 Global Chair role to Professor Penny Jane Burke will support ongoing research collaboration with the University of Bath. Professor Burke will provide mentorship to colleagues in the UK and co-develop research projects and online courses.

Neighbours around table

News • 11 May 2020

Research highlights importance of collective efficacy in mitigating community fears

Criminologist from the University of Newcastle, Dr Justin Ellis has recently published a co-authored journal article into the level of fear of crime in inner city Sydney, with Professor Murray Lee at the Sydney Law School and Professor Jonathan Jackson at the London School of Economics.

David Farrugia

News • 7 May 2020

New podcast episode highlights young hospitality workers career crises

With COVID-19 restrictions forcing many in the hospitality industry out of work, Dr David Farrugia warns that now could be a time of crisis for young people whose identities are closely entangled with their work.

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