UON welcomes Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Education and Research

Monday, 22 August 2016


The University of Newcastle (UON) is delighted to announce Professor Steve Larkin, a member of Kungarakan and Yanyula Nations and one of Australia’s foremost Indigenous academic leaders, will join the University as the first Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Education and Research.

Professor Steve Larkin

In the new cross-institutional executive leadership role, Professor Larkin will take responsibility for embedding and championing Indigenous education and research throughout the University, and for overseeing the work of UON’s flagship Wollotuka Institute.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Caroline McMillen, said the appointment was an exciting step in ensuring Indigenous education and research continues to excel at UON.

“We have a proud legacy of over 30 years of commitment and engagement by the University and Wollotuka to equity and excellence. Under the outstanding leadership of Professor Larkin, this legacy will continue to go from strength to strength.

“UON is a proud supporter of Indigenous education and research, with the largest number of Indigenous students of any Australian university. The University also recently celebrated the remarkable success of Wollotuka’s accreditation by the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium - an Australian first,” she said.

Professor Larkin will join UON from Charles Darwin University (CDU), where he has led the Australian Centre for Indigenous Knowledges and Education and occupied the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Leadership since 2009.

“I am thrilled to be joining the leading university in Australian Indigenous higher education and look forward to the next stage of growth and progression.

“I am keen to continue strengthening the pipeline for Indigenous students to carry out their journey from high school to university, and look forward to further developing UON’s ties with the broader community as well as its international presence,” he said

Professor Larkin began his professional life as a social worker in Darwin. He was National Aboriginal Health Adviser at the Australian Medical Association, and later Chief Executive of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation. He has held senior leadership roles in the Australian Public Service and spent eight years at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), five of which were as Head of the Institute.