Dr Serene Yoong

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

As a behavioural scientist and accredited practising dietitian with expertise in practice-based translational research, Dr Yoong has a vision to improve community health by implementing new research and best-practice guidelines into targeted settings.  Her research program focuses on developing and testing research translation strategies to support community and health service organisations in preventing obesity and other chronic disease risk factors. She is also interested in identifying ways of making research evidence more relevant to support community, policy and practice decisions.

Dr Yoong's research primarily involves undertaking randomised and other forms of controlled trials to identify effective interventions in community settings such as health care services, schools, childcare centres, and primary care. This research is informed by key service delivery evidence-practice gaps and the formation of active partnerships with relevant service providers, which aims to ensure that the proposed interventions, if shown to be effective, are relevant, feasible and capable of being implemented into routine practice.

In October 2014, Dr Yoong was awarded a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to undertake innovative web-based obesity prevention research in childcare services (commenced July 2015). This work has involved working with information technology partners to develop and integrate novel solutions into existing national information systems used by childcare centres to support staff to implement nutrition guidelines to improve children's diet.  Such technology based interventions represent a potentially scalable and cost-effective way of providing intervention support to all childcare centres nationally.

Dr Yoong's research has also examined improving the utility of research evidence and systematic reviews. She is a member of the international Cochrane-Global Burden of Disease collaboration that seeks to inform and prioritise the conduct of systematic reviews in addressing the primary causes of disease.

Dr Yoong has led a number of published bibliographic studies in international journals. In keeping with her interest in research translation and implementation of evidence-based solutions, she has published several articles highlighting the lack of reviews that focus on implementation research and examining the utility of meta-analyses in providing accurate estimates of intervention effectiveness when delivered as part of routine service delivery practice.

Despite being an early career researcher, Dr Yoong has been highy productive and influential, achieving both national and international recognition as a leading implementation scientist undertaking practice-based, translational research. In 2014, Dr Yoong was a visiting academic with the World Health Organisation (WHO), invited to develop an evidence-brief of the impact of tobacco use on post-surgical outcomes. She is currently undertaking a further commissioned literature review with WHO examining the use of e-cigarettes in youth and adolescents.   In July 2015, Dr Yoong was also selected to attend the US Training and Dissemination Research in Health training program, a prestigious training opportunity supported by the US National Institute of Health and the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • child health
  • childcare
  • children
  • chronic disease prevention
  • dissemination
  • implementation science
  • obesity
  • schools

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
111712 Health Promotion 30
111716 Preventive Medicine 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post-Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2014 - 30/05/2015 Evaluation Officer (acting Project Manager) Hunter New England Health
Population Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (54 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: a description of public health research output and citation.', Eur J Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Co-authors Amy Waller, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, John Wiggers, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong
2016 O'Brien KM, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol.', BMJ Open, 6 e010203 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010203
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: Study protocol Rehabilitation, physical therapy and occupational health', BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 17 (2016) [C3]

© 2016 Williams et al.Low back pain is a highly prevalent condition with a significant global burden. Management of lifestyle factors such as overweight and obesity may improve l... [more]

© 2016 Williams et al.Low back pain is a highly prevalent condition with a significant global burden. Management of lifestyle factors such as overweight and obesity may improve low back pain patient outcomes. Currently there are no randomised controlled trials that have been conducted to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle behavioural interventions in managing low back pain. The aim of this trial is to determine if a telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention is effective in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain, compared to usual care. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted with patients waiting for an outpatient consultation with an orthopaedic surgeon at a public tertiary referral hospital within New South Wales, Australia for chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive a lifestyle behavioural intervention (intervention group) or continue with usual care (control group). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a clinical consultation followed by a 6-month telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention (10 individually tailored sessions over a 6-month period) and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Participants will be followed for 26 weeks and asked to undertake three self-reported questionnaires at baseline (pre-randomisation), week 6 and 26 post randomisation to collect primary and secondary outcome data. The study requires a sample of 80 participants per group to detect a 1.5 point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks post randomisation. The primary outcome, pain intensity, will be measured using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. The study will provide robust evidence regarding the effectiveness of a lifestyle behavioural intervention in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain and inform management of these patients. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12615000478516, Registered 14/05/2015.

DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0922-1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams
2016 Karimkhani C, Trikha R, Aksut B, Jones T, Boyers LN, Schlichte M, et al., 'Identifying gaps for research prioritisation: Global burden of external causes of injury as reflected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.', Injury, 47 1151-1157 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2015.12.019
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wyse R, Yoong SL, Dodds P, Campbell L, Delaney T, Nathan N, et al., 'Online canteens: awareness, use, barriers to use, and the acceptability of potential online strategies to improve public health nutrition in primary schools.', Health Promot J Austr, (2016)
DOI 10.1071/HE15095
Co-authors Serene Yoong
2016 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Jones J, et al., 'Multistrategy childcare-based intervention to improve compliance with nutrition guidelines versus usual care in long day care services: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', BMJ Open, 6 e010786 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010786
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2016 Yoong SL, Dodds P, Hure A, Clinton-Mcharg T, Skelton E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Healthier options do not reduce total energy of parent intended fast food purchases for their young children: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 73 146-152 (2016)

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-repor... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat at fast food outlets for young children. Methods: Parents from an existing health survey cohort were approached to participate. They were eligible to participate if they resided in the Hunter region in NSW, could understand English and had a child aged between 3 and 12 years. Parents were randomised using a random number function embedded in the computer assisted telephone interview software, to receive one of two hypothetical fast food menus: one with healthier options and the other without healthier options (standard menu). After receiving these menus, participants completed a second telephone survey. Parents reported intended food purchases for their nominated child and intended number of visits to the fast food outlet with the hypothetical menu. Results: There was no significant difference in total energy of parent-reported intended purchases for their child, between the standard menu with (n = 101) and without (n = 113) healthier options (P = 0.60). There was also no difference in the frequency of intending to eat at the fast food restaurant between the two groups (P = 0.80). Conclusions: The provision of healthier options in itself may not reduce the total energy of intended purchases of parents for young children at fast food restaurants.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12204
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Alexis Hure, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Yoong SL, Chai LK, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions targeting sleep and their impact on child body mass index, diet, and physical activity.', Obesity (Silver Spring), 24 1140-1147 (2016)
DOI 10.1002/oby.21459
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams
2016 Yoong SL, Finch M, Nathan N, Wiggers J, Lecathelinais C, Jones J, et al., 'A longitudinal study assessing childcare services' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices.', J Paediatr Child Health, 52 765-770 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.13252
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wyse R, Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, 'Time to focus on implementation: the need to re-orient research on physical activity in childcare services.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 40 209-210 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12518
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Finch M, Jones J, Yoong S, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Effectiveness of centre-based childcare interventions in increasing child physical activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis for policymakers and practitioners.', Obes Rev, 17 412-428 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/obr.12392
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Jenna Hollis
2015 Pederson H, Okl T, Boyers LN, Karimkhani C, Rosenfeld RM, Nasser M, et al., 'Identifying otolaryngology systematic review research gaps: Comparing global burden of disease 2010 results with cochrane database of systematic review content', JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 141 67-72 (2015) [C1]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic re... [more]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.IMPORTANCE: Burden of disease should inform research prioritization. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systematic reviews and protocols published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) appropriately reflect disease burden for otolaryngologic conditions as measured by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 project. DESIGN: Two investigators independently assessed 10 otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR for systematic review and protocol representation from March to June 2014. The otolaryngologic diseases were matched to their respective GBD 2010 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) to assess their correlation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Relationship of CDSR representation (based on systematic reviews and protocols) with percentage of total 2010 DALYs, 2010 DALY rank, and DALY percentage change from 1990 to 2010 for 10 otolaryngologic conditions. RESULTS: All 10 otolaryngologic conditions were represented by at least 1 systematic review in CDSR. The number of reviews and protocols in CDSR was well matched with GBD 2010 disability metrics for only 1 disease, mouth cancer. Upper respiratory infections, otitis media, thyroid cancer, and cleft lip and cleft palate were overrepresented in CDSR, and esophageal cancer, "other hearing loss," nasopharynx cancer, larynx cancer, and "cancer of other part of pharynx and oropharynx" were underrepresented. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The representation of otolaryngologic conditions in CDSR correlates poorly with DALY metrics. The results of this study may guide future research prioritization and allocation of funds.

DOI 10.1001/jamaoto.2014.2700
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alix Hall
2015 Mackenzie LJ, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'A cross-sectional study of radiation oncology outpatients' concern about, preferences for, and perceived barriers to discussing anxiety and depression.', Psycho-oncology, 24 1392-1397 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3806
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong, Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey
2015 Finch M, Yoong SL, Thomson RJ, Seward K, Cooney M, Jones J, et al., 'A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of an implementation intervention to increase healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies, and practices in centre-based childcare services: Study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prev... [more]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.Background: Promotion of healthy eating and physical activity in early childhood is recommended as a global chronic disease prevention strategy. Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to provide children with opportunities to improve healthy eating and physical activity. Evidence to inform implementation of childcare obesity prevention guidelines into routine practice in childcare, however, is lacking. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an intervention, delivered to childcare staff, aiming to increasing service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods and analysis: A pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial will be undertaken with 165 childcare services in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia. Services will be randomised to receive either a 10-month evidence-based performance review intervention with other resources to support practice change, or to a waitlist control group. The primary trial outcome is the proportion of services implementing all of the following recommended healthy eating and physical activity promoting practices: written nutrition, physical activity and small screen recreation policies; providing information to families regarding healthy eating (including breastfeeding), physical activity and small screen time; providing twice weekly healthy eating learning experiences to children; providing water and only plain milk to children; providing fundamental movement skills activities for children every day; and limiting and using electronic screen time more for educational purposes and learning experiences. Effectiveness will be assessed using a telephone interview of practice implementation with childcare staff at baseline and 12 months following baseline. Ethics and dissemination: The study was approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000972628.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006706
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: A randomised trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]

© Wolfenden et al.Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the... [more]

© Wolfenden et al.Background: Amateur sporting clubs represent an attractive setting for health promotion. This study assesses the impact of a multi-component intervention on the availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar -sweetened drink products from community sporting club canteens. We also assessed the impact the intervention on sporting club revenue from the sale of food and beverages. Method: A repeat cross-sectional, parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken with amateur community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention was conducted over 2.5 winter sporting seasons and sought to improve the availability and promotion of fruit and vegetables and non sugar-sweetened drinks in sporting club canteens. Trial outcomes were assessed via telephone surveys of sporting club representatives and members. Results: Eighty five sporting clubs and 1143 club members participated in the study. Relative to the control group, at follow-up, clubs allocated to the intervention were significantly more likely to have fruit and vegetable products available at the club canteen (OR = 5.13; 95% CI 1.70-15.38), were more likely to promote fruit and vegetable selection using reduced pricing and meal deals (OR = 34.48; 95% CI 4.18-250.00) and members of intervention clubs were more likely to report purchase of fruit and vegetable (OR = 2.58 95% CI; 1.08-6.18) and non sugar -sweetened drink (OR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.09-2.25) products. There was no significant difference between groups in the annual club revenue from food and non-alcoholic beverage sales. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that the intervention can improve the nutrition environment of sporting clubs and the purchasing behaviour of members. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000224224.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0193-5
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need?', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2015)

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates ... [more]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates than the general population. As there are limited data specific to these groups regarding the success of nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation, this commentary will provide an overview of the relevant international literature supplemented with observational data relevant to the policy contexts in Australia and New Zealand.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12362
Co-authors John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong, Chris Paul
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-Mcharg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 788-791 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and D... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Nathan N, Weaver N, Wiggers J, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with early childhood education and care service implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australia: a cross-sectional study', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 5 327-334 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating a... [more]

© 2015, Society of Behavioral Medicine.Many early childhood education and care (ECEC) services fail to implement recommended policies and practices supportive of healthy eating and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether certain theoretically-based factors are associated with implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in a sample of ECEC services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Service Managers of ECEC services. The survey assessed the operational characteristics, policy, and practice implementation, and 13 factors were suggested by Damschroder¿s Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to impede or promote implementation. Logistic regression analyses found a significant association between implementation factor score and full implementation (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.18¿1.61; p = <0.01), indicating that for every one point increase in implementation score, ECEC services were 38¿% more likely to be fully implementing the policies and practices. The findings highlight the opportunities for improving implementation of obesity prevention interventions in this setting by developing interventions that address such factors.

DOI 10.1007/s13142-015-0319-y
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Natasha Weaver
2015 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, 'Local implementation of obesity policy', The Lancet, 386 1039 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00141-5
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Waller A, Carey M, Mazza D, Yoong S, Grady A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 65 e312-e318 (2015) [C1]

©British Journal of General Practice.Background: GPs are often a patient's first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact... [more]

©British Journal of General Practice.Background: GPs are often a patient's first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact on the quality of care delivered. Patients are well placed to make judgements about aspects of care that need to be improved. Aim: To determine whether general practice patients perceive that the care they receive is 'patient-centred' across eight domains of care, and to determine the association between sociodemographic, GP and practice characteristics, detection of preventive health risks, and receipt of patient-centred care. Design and setting: Cross-sectional survey of patients attending Australian general practice clinics. Method: Patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room to rate the care received from their GP across eight domains of patient-centred care. Patients also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and self-reported health risk factors. GPs completed a checklist for each patient asking about the presence of health risk factors. Results: In total1486 patients and 51 GPs participated. Overall, 83% of patients perceived that the care they received was patient-centred across all eight domains. Patients most frequently perceived the 'access to health care when needed' domain as requiring improvement (8.3%). Not having private health insurance and attending a practice located in a disadvantaged area were significantly associated with perceived need for improvements in care (P<0.05). Conclusion: Patients in general practice report that accessibility is an aspect of care that could be improved. Further investigation of how indicators of lower socioeconomic status interact with the provision of patient-centred care and health outcomes is required.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X684841
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 30 262-271 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment: A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 49 215-222 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportuni... [more]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Carey M, Turon H, Goergen S, Sanson-Fisher R, Yoong SL, Jones K, 'Patients¿ experiences of the management of lower back pain in general practice: use of diagnostic imaging, medication and provision of self-management advice', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 21 342-346 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY14057
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2015 Wolfenden L, Kingsland M, Rowland BC, Dodds P, Gillham K, Yoong SL, et al., 'Improving availability, promotion and purchase of fruit and vegetable and non sugar-sweetened drink products at community sporting clubs: a randomised trial.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 12 35 (2015)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2015 Carey M, Yoong SL, Grady A, Bryant J, Jayakody A, Sanson-Fisher R, Inder KJ, 'Unassisted detection of depression by GPs: Who is most likely to be misclassified?', Family Practice, 32 282-287 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is importan... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.Background. Meta-analyses indicate 50% of cases of depression are not detected by GPs. It is important to examine patient and GP characteristics associated with misclassification so that systems can be improved to increase accurate detection and optimal management for groups at risk of depression. Objective. To examine patient and GP characteristics associated with GP misclassification of depression for patients classified by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as depressed. Methods. A cross-sectional study within general practices in two states of Australia. GPs completed a one-page paper and pencil survey indicating whether they thought each patient was clinically depressed. Patients completed a computer tablet survey while waiting for their appointment to provide demographic information and indicate depression status. Chi-square analyses were used to determine whether patient and GP characteristics were associated with a false-negative and false-positive result. The probability of misclassification was modelled using Generalized Estimating Equations to account for clustering of patients. Results. Fifty GPs from 12 practices participated. GPs completed surveys for 1880 patients. Younger patients aged 25-44, and those with a health care card were less likely to have a false-negative assessment. Patients with 0-3 GP visits in the past 12 months, and those with private health insurance were less likely to have a false-positive assessment. GPs who worked five sessions or fewer per week were more likely to make false-positive assessments.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu087
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'Is identification of smoking, risky alcohol consumption and overweight and obesity by General Practitioners improving? A comparison over time.', Family practice, 32 664-671 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices:a cross-sectional study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating ... [more]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. Objective: This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods: A computer-Assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-Assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Results: Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (P<.001, OR 28,95% CI 8.0-95.2). Features reported by service managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to support staff with menu planning (117/129, 90.7%), links to relevant resources (212/212, 100%), updated information on guidelines (208/212, 98.1%), and feedback regarding childcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Conclusions: Childcare service managers reported high intention to use a Web-based program and identified several useful features to support staff to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Further descriptive and intervention research examining the development and use of such a program to support childcare centers with the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is warranted.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2014 Paul C, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Russell G, Makeham M, 'Under the radar: A cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting', BMC Family Practice, 15 (2014) [C1]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concer... [more]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Method. GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. Results: GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs' detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Conclusions: GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is 'at-risk', computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care. © 2014 Paul et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-15-74
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Yoong SLI, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C1]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously valid... [more]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously validated measures exist to measure healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in this setting, and no such measures exist that are specific to the childcare setting in Australia. Methods. This was a cross sectional study, comparing two measures (pen and paper survey and observation) of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services. Research assistants attended consenting childcare services (n = 42) across the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia and observed practices for one day. Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders of the service also completed a pen and paper survey during the day of observation. Kappa statistics and proportion agreement were calculated for a total of 43 items relating to healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Results: Agreement ranged from 38%-100%. Fifty one percent of items showed agreement of greater than or equal to 80%. Items assessing the frequency with which staff joined in active play with children reported the lowest percent agreement, while items assessing availability of beverages such as juice, milk and cordial, as well as the provision of foods such as popcorn, pretzels and sweet biscuits, reported the highest percent agreement. Kappa scores ranged from -0.06 (poor agreement) to 1 (perfect agreement). Of the 43 items assessed, 27 were found to have moderate or greater agreement. Conclusions: The study found that Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders were able to accurately report on a number of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Items assessing healthy eating practices tended to have higher kappa scores than those assessing physical activity related policies or practices. The tool represents a useful instrument for public health researchers and policy makers working in this setting. © 2014Dodds et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: Findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014.Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2014.Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. Methods: A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. Results: The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Conclusions: Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. So what?: Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, 'A cross-sectional study examining Australian general practitioners' identification of overweight and obese patients', Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29 328-334 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such a... [more]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such advice. One reason may be that physicians do not identify their overweight and obese patients. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the extent that Australian general practitioners (GP) recognise overweight or obesity in their patients, and to explore patient and GP characteristics associated with non-detection of overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consenting adult patients (n = 1,111) reported weight, height, demographics and health conditions using a touchscreen computer. GPs (n = 51) completed hard-copy questionnaires indicating whether their patients were overweight or obese. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GP detection, using patient self-reported weight and height as the criterion measure for overweight and obesity. For a subsample of patients (n = 107), we did a sensitivity analysis with patient-measured weight and height. We conducted an adjusted, multivariable logistic regression to explore characteristics associated with non-detection, using random effects to adjust for correlation within GPs. RESULTS: Sensitivity for GP assessment was 63 % [95 % CI 57-69 %], specificity 89 % [95 % CI 85-92 %], PPV 87 % [95 % CI 83-90 %] and NPV 69 % [95 % CI 65-72 %]. Sensitivity increased by 3 % and specificity was unchanged in the sensitivity analysis. Men (OR: 1.7 [95 % CI 1.1-2.7]), patients without high blood pressure (OR: 1.8 [95 % CI 1.2-2.8]) and without type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.4 [95 % CI 1.2-8.0]) had higher odds of non-detection. Individuals with obesity (OR: 0.1 [95 % CI 0.07-0.2]) or diploma-level education (OR: 0.3 [95%CI 0.1-0.6]) had lower odds of not being identified. No GP characteristics were associated with non-detection of overweight or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: GPs missed identifying a substantial proportion of overweight and obese patients. Strategies to support GPs in identifying their overweight or obese patients need to be implemented. © 2013 Society of General Internal Medicine.

DOI 10.1007/s11606-013-2637-4
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Serene Yoong
2014 Carey M, Small H, Yoong SL, Boyes A, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence of comorbid depression and obesity in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014) [C1]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciproca... [more]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciprocal relationship between obesity and depression, there are limited data about the rates of depression among general practice patients who are underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese. Aim: To explore the prevalence of depression among underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese general practice patients. Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 Australian general practices. Method: Patients aged =18 years and older who were presenting for general practice care were eligible to participate. Consenting patients completed a touchscreen computer survey assessing self-reported weight and height. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with a score of =10 used to indicate possible depression. Results: Data were obtained from 3361 participants. The prevalence of depression was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.86 to 39.28) among underweight participants, 11% (95% CI = 8.5 to 14.0) among normal weight participants, 12% (95% CI = 0.9 to 15.2) among overweight participants, and 23% (95% CI = 17.8 to 29.0) among obese participants. The prevalence of depression was higher for women than for men across all weight categories except underweight. Conclusion: Weight and depression demonstrated a U-shaped relationship, with higher prevalence of depression observed among underweight and obese general practice patients. These conditions may act as red flags for opportunistic screening of depression in the general practice setting. ©British Journal of General Practice.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X677482
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2014 Yoong SL, Skelton E, Jones J, Wolfenden L, 'Do childcare services provide foods in line with the 2013 Australian Dietary guidelines? A cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 595-596 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12312
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2014 Carey M, Jones KA, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Boyes AW, Paul C, et al., 'Comparison of a single self-assessment item with the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in general practice', Family Practice, 31 (2014) [C1]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and f... [more]

Background: Several factors need to be considered when selecting a screening tool for depression including accuracy, level of burden for patients and for staff to administer and follow-up. Objective: This study aimed to explore the utility of a single self-assessment item in identifying possible cases of depression in primary care by examining sensitivity and specificity with the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) at different thresholds. Design: Cross-sectional survey presented on a touchscreen computer. Participants. Adult patients attending 12 urban general practices in Australia completed a health status questionnaire (n = 1004). Main measures. Depression was assessed by the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for the single item using a PHQ-9 score of 10 or more as the criterion value. Key results. A total of 1004 participants (61% female, 48% aged 55 years or older) completed both the PHQ-9 and a single self-assessment item. When using a threshold of mild depression or greater, the single item had adequate specificity (76%, 95% CI: 71-80%), with 76 out of every 100 people defined as non-depressed by the PHQ-9 also identified as not depressed by the single item. Sensitivity was high (91%, 95% CI: 84-95%), with the single item identifying 91 out of every 100 true cases (as defined by the PHQ-9). Conclusions: The single self-assessment item has high sensitivity and moderate specificity to identify possible cases of depression when used at a threshold of mild depression or greater. © The Author 2014.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu018
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Kerry Inder, Allison Boyes
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Yoong SL, 'Agreement between HADS classifications and single-item screening questions for anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional survey of cancer patients.', Ann Oncol, 25 889-895 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu023
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul
2014 Carey M, Jones K, Meadows G, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Inder K, et al., 'Accuracy of general practitioner unassisted detection of depression.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 48 571-578 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413520047
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Serene Yoong, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Grady A, 'A systematic review of behavioural weight-loss interventions involving primary-care physicians in overweight and obese primary-care patients (1999-2011).', Public Health Nutrition, 16 2083-2099 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004375
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Recruitment in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 42 9 (2013) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Catherine Deste
2013 Paul CL, Carey M, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Makeham M, Henskens F, 'Access to chronic disease care in general practice: The acceptability of implementing systematic waiting-room screening using computer-based patient-reported risk status', British Journal of General Practice, 63 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3399/bjgp13X671605
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Williams A, Dodds P, Gillham K, Wyse R, 'A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 224-226 (2013) [C1]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a ke... [more]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods: Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, ¿2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions: An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13055
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity in adult Australian general practice patients', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 586-586 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12117
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Agreement between self-reported and measured weight and height collected in general practice patients: a prospective study', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-38
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing Australian general practice patients' intention, reasons and preferences for assistance with losing weight', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-187
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Macrae FA, Yoong SL, 'Community approaches to increasing colorectal screening uptake: A review of the methodological quality and strength of current evidence', Cancer Forum, 36 27-35 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients', BMC Family Practice, 13 48 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Russell G, Mazza D, Makeham M, et al., 'Touch screen computer health assessment in Australian general practice patients: A cross-sectional study protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-7 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kerry Inder
2011 Carey ML, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, Inder KJ, Makeham M, 'Efforts to close the evidence-practice gap in the management of cardiovascular risk factors in general practice: Strategic or haphazard?', International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, 1 660-667 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 51 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2015 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong S, Dodds P, et al., 'Improving implementation of evidence-based obesity prevention policies and practices in childcare services: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan NR, Yoong S, Rose B, Aikman V, Williams C, et al., 'Improving implementation of NSW healthy canteen policy: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'RADIATION ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS' CONCERN ABOUT, PREFERENCES FOR, AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO DISCUSSING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2014 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'IS IDENTIFICATION OF SMOKING, RISKY ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IMPROVING? A COMPARISON OF DETECTION RATES IN AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 1982 AND 2011', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Inder KJ, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight or obese general practice patients', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kerry Inder
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $2,101,625

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20164 grants / $1,288,847

A randomised controlled trial of a web-based, organisational systems change intervention to increase childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines$1,044,145

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Dr Vicki Flood, Professor Chris Rissel, Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500172
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of strategies to scale the implementation of community chronic disease prevention interventions$118,004

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Christopher Williams, Ms Melanie Kingsland, Professor John Wiggers, Mr Andrew Milat, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Professor Adrian Bauman
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600445
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Research to gather baseline data regarding operations and provision of healthy food and drinks of licensed school canteens$99,425

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Ms Tessa Delaney, Doctor Serene Yoong, Ms Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600903
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play - a simple approach to increasing physical activity in childcare$27,273

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong, Ms Lubna Abdul Razak
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600481
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20151 grants / $150,000

A randomised controlled trial of a childcare-based web intervention to improve children's fruit and vegetable consumption in care.$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Doctor Serene Yoong
Scheme Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400586
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20121 grants / $662,778

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team

Luke Wolfenden

Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.54

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play - a simple approach to increasing physical activity in childcare
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The efficacy of an online public health nutrition intervention on improving healthy food purchases from primary school canteens
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Improving Population Wide Implementation of Healthy Food Policy in Primary Schools
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD An Intervention to Improve Implementation of Nutrition Guidelines in Childcare Services
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention: The Effectiveness of an Intensive Population Based Dissemination Intervention
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Increasing the Implementation of Vegetable and Fruit Breaks in Australian Primary Schools
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

Obesity

Weighty Problem

November 1, 2013

In a region where 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, a new study conducted by University of Newcastle and HMRI researchers has found that doctors are falling short in detecting weight conditions, which may lead to inadequate assistance with managing weight.

Dr Serene Yoong

Position

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email sze.yoong@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4924 6122
Link Twitter

Office

Room Booth Building Wallsend
Building Booth Building, Hunter New England Population Health, Wallsend
Location Wallsend

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