News and Publications

A pharmacological framework for integrating treating the host, drug repurposing and the damage response framework in COVID‐19

A pharmacological framework for integrating treating the host, drug repurposing and the damage response framework in COVID‐19

With any new disease a framework for the development of preventative or treatment therapeutics is key; the absence of such in COVID‐19 has enabled ineffective and potentially unsafe treatments to be taken up by governments and clinicians desperate to have options for patients. As we still have few therapies and nil vaccines yet available, the void of a clear framework for research and practice is increasingly clear. We describe a framework that has been used to prioritise therapeutic research in previous pandemics which could be used to progress clinical pharmacology and therapeutics research in COVID‐19.

Induction into Australian Academcy of Health & Medical Sciences

Induction into Australian Academcy of Health & Medical Sciences

Professor Jennifer Martin (FRACP, PhD) is being inducted into the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences as a Fellow this week in recognition of her contribution made to health and medical research in Australia, in the area of clinical pharmacology research and education and clinical medicine.

COVID-19: the rise and fall of hydroxychloroquine

COVID-19: the rise and fall of hydroxychloroquine

THE United States Strategic National Stockpile is laden with 63 million doses of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) that have no clinical use in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This has occurred as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has revoked the emergency use authorisation for the use of HCQ in patients with COVID-19 admitted to hospital for whom a clinical trial is unavailable or not feasible. It is worth reflecting how things ever got to this situation.

Publication - Buying time: Drug repurposing to treat the host in COVID-19H

Publication - Buying time: Drug repurposing to treat the host in COVID-19H

A “treating the host” approach has the potential to enable
infected people to survive an acute pulmonary/vascular inflammatory
dysregulation with a decreased call on high end health resource.
This approach is increasingly recognized as being important
to patient care.

Repurposing drugs for ovarian cancer

Repurposing drugs for ovarian cancer

On World Ovarian Cancer Day, the Australian Government announced a $16.2 million investment in eight research projects to help beat Ovarian Cancer. 
Associate Professor Nikola Bowden, Professor Jennifer Martin, Dr Michelle Wong-Brown and Dr Penny Reeves from the University of Newcastle and the Hunter Medical Research Institute have successfully been awarded $2.69 million for their Australian Program for Drug-repurposing for Treatment-resistant Ovarian Cancer.

Hands holding medicine in dish

Featured story • 13 Mar 2020

Drug Repurposing: overcoming the translational hurdles to clinical use

Drug repurposing is a methodology for identifying new uses for approved or investigational drugs outside the scope of the original medical indication. In the field of cancer drug development repurposing is of interest because despite the genomic revolution, therapeutic advances have been slow.

New life for tried-and-true cancer drugs

New life for tried-and-true cancer drugs

Awarding-winning molecular biologist Associate Professor Nikola Bowden is giving existing cancer drugs new life by combining them in unconventional ways with exciting results.