Available in 2022
Course code

OCCT4163

Units

10 units

Level

4000 level

Course handbook

Description

Occupations, i.e., the meaningful things people do, are innately human and a determinant of health. In this course, students deeply explore the concepts and research associated with occupation, occupational science, occupational justice and occupational injustice as they relate to occupational therapy practice. Students critically analyse the structural and contextual influences on occupation, for populations of people in our "local" communities.

This course emphasizes population-based practice, advocacy as intervention, persuasive communication, innovation and leadership as essential to service delivery for today's occupational therapists.

Students engage in analytical, practical and reflective learning, to promote occupational justice in practice and our community.


Availability

Callaghan

  • Semester 1 - 2022

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

1. Appreciate the complex nature of occupation;

2. Differentiate between occupation, occupational science, occupational therapy, occupational justice and occupational injustice;

3. Envision making our community more occupationally just

4. Analyse how societal, structural and contextual factors and stakeholders influence occupation, identity, health and participation for our clients, i.e., populations or individuals.

5. Apply occupational justice, population-based practice, advocacy as intervention, persuasive communication, innovation and leadership to occupational therapy practice.

6. Communicate and collaborate effectively, in both oral and written form, independently and within pairs, using the appropriate conventions of the discipline.


Content

Topics include:

  1. Occupational science
  2. Occupational Justice & Injustice
  3. Client as Individual, Organisation, Population
  4. WFOT Position Statement on Human Rights
  5. Participation in occupation
  6. Evidence-based practice
  7. Advocacy as intervention
  8. Communication & Diffusion of Innovation
  9. Leadership & Social Entrepreneurship
  10. Examples from Contemporary and/or local occupational therapy practice

Requisite

This course is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours) program.

Pre-requisite - successful completion of OCCT3161, OCCT3262, OCCT3264 and HLSC4120.


Assessment items

Written Assignment: Analysis: Written Advocacy AiMMe Framework

Presentation: Application Presentation: Call to Action

In Term Test: In Class Test


Contact hours

Callaghan

Lecture

Face to Face On Campus 2 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks starting in week 1

Please note: Lecture for 2 Hours per week. Weeks 1-10 and Week 12. .

Online Activity

Face to Face On Campus 1 hour(s) per Week for Full Term

1 hour per week for weeks 1 - 10, and week 12.

Self-Directed Learning

Self-Directed 2 hour(s) per Week for 12 Weeks

Seminar

Face to Face On Campus 3.5 hour(s) per Term Full Term starting in week 11

3.5 hours in Week 11 only for Assessment

Tutorial

Face to Face On Campus 1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks starting in week 1

1 hour per week for weeks 1 - 10 and week 12.

The University of Newcastle acknowledges the traditional custodians of the lands within our footprint areas: Awabakal, Darkinjung, Biripai, Worimi, Wonnarua, and Eora Nations. We also pay respect to the wisdom of our Elders past and present.