Language in Society

Description

Human society as it is today would not be possible without language. Institutions, relationships, and human achievements all rely on the trait that is unique to humans - language. This course provides an introduction to the study of human language, known as linguistics.

Most of us are not aware of the enormous number of language choices we make every day and this course will give students insight into some of these choices. It investigates how the language we use changes according to the physical and social setting in which we find ourselves, who we communicate with, which mode of communication we use, and how historical events have influenced language over time.

Although the main language of study is English, examples from other languages are given, with the intention of providing an understanding of the features that all languages share.

The course aims to engage students in a learning experience of language through various approaches catering for different learning styles. Students are encouraged to engage in objective analysis of various aspects of language, and they will be given the opportunity to develop skills necessary for undergraduate study through the embedded explicit teaching of academic literacies.

Availability

On-Line from Callaghan

  • Semester 1 - 2017

Ourimbah

  • Semester 1 - 2017

Callaghan

  • Semester 1 - 2017

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

1. Explain how language varies across text types, geographical regions, social strata, and cultures

2. Explain difference between standard and non-standard varieties of English and the social meanings these varieties create

3. Discuss the historical development of Australian English and how it is manifested today

4. Accurately utilise and demonstrate an understanding of linguistic terminology and concepts

5. Apply skills in relevant technology

6. Demonstrate an appropriate level of academic literacies for tertiary study

Content

  1. How language varies across text types, geographical regions, social strata, and cultures
  2. The history of English, with a focus on Australian English
  3. Varieties of Australian English
  4. Australian Aboriginal languages
  5. Language differences between genders
  6. The consequences of linguistic and social groups in contact situations

Requisite

This course is only available to students who are active in the Open Foundation Program or the Yapug Program.

Assessment Items

Quiz: Online Quizzes

Tutorial / Laboratory Exercises: Paragraph

Essay: Essay Plan

Essay: Essay

Formal Examination: Examination

Contact Hours

Callaghan

Lecture

Face to Face On Campus 2 hour(s) per Week for 12 Weeks

Tutorial

Face to Face On Campus 1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks

Ourimbah

Lecture

Face to Face On Campus 2 hour(s) per Week for 12 Weeks

Tutorial

Face to Face On Campus 1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks

On-Line from Callaghan

Tutorial

Online 1 hour(s) per Week for 12 Weeks

Workshop

Face to Face On Campus 5 hour(s) per Term

Face2Face Day x 2