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Dr Rebecca Wyse

Research Assistant

School of Medicine and Public Health

Technological travails and smaller scales

Mixing digitalism with family food dynamism, Dr Rebecca Wyse's behavioural science research is helping to reverse increasing population rates of childhood obesity.

Dr Rebecca Wyse 

Recognising the futility of blaming children and parents for being overweight in a contemporary environment where healthy choices are often hard to make, Dr Rebecca Wyse is seeking to remedy some of these situational inadequacies in her research. Also looking to cross-pollinate ideas and collaborate with those in the emerging technology field, Wyse is a firm believer in the practical promise of digital tools - if not for the immediate challenge presented by childhood obesity and associated chronic disease burdens, then for their not-so-distant future.

'Put simply, healthy decisions should be easy decisions,' she asserts.

'I think we can remove a lot of the hard stuff by increasing our use of technology.'

While championing both healthy eating and regular physical activity in the pursuit of a balanced lifestyle, Wyse's research to date has focused mainly on the former.

'Maybe that's because I love food,' she laughs.

'Everyone obviously needs to eat regardless but not everyone is going to exercise regardless, so we've already got our foot in the door in that respect.'

'People are eating, we just need to make them more nutrition-conscious.'

The behavioural scientist – and self-confessed epicurean – began to satisfy this curiousity about problem dieting behaviours during her PhD candidateship, which saw her modify home food settings in an effort to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Focusing on the way we eat just as much as what we eat, Wyse also sought to make fresh produce more appealing to young families.

'It's often very difficult to compete with the convenience of pre-packaged snacks,' she concedes.

'But if fruit and vegetables are stored in a form that's washed and chopped, it does make it easier for children to access them.'

'My research was all about raising awareness of these little strategies.'

Wyse used the humble telephone to distribute this content, initially making contact with parents of 3-5 year olds and then monitoring their progression over two years. Families were also educated to modify mealtime routines throughout the study, with eating together and eating at a table both closely linked to increased fruit and vegetable consumption.

'Though not particularly cutting-edge, the telephone allowed us to reach much larger numbers than face-to-face involvement or one-on-one counselling would have,' she says.

'We were able to support over 200 people through the intervention, and much more efficiently than if we'd opted to use those more traditional means.'

With a distinct focus on family food habits, Wyse was successful in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption for up to 12 months in children and up to 18 months in parents.

'Ready to go' in the real world

After presenting thesis findings to the NSW Office of Preventative Health in 2012, these interventions were subsequently incorporated into the Draft Obesity Prevention Strategy. Scalable, fundable, and ultimately able to influence health outcomes at a population level, Wyse's PhD research has also been presented internationally at conferences in Turkey, Hungary and New Zealand.

'I was thrilled that a study I could initiate and be a part of was picked up to inform policy and practice,' she says.

'It was really exciting!'

Wyse continued promoting healthy eating post-PhD, bringing together a variety of agencies, community organisations, and industry specialists to continue the work started as part of the Good for Kids, Good for Life Obesity prevention program. Relaying a number of settings-based intervention strategies to schools and childcare services across the Hunter, New England, and Mid North Coast regions, it was Australia's largest obesity prevention program at the time it received its funding in 2005.

In her role as Evaluation Manager, Wyse was responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating interventions across 300 schools and 400 childcare centres.

'It was a big undertaking,' she confirms.

'But it was great to see so many different streams of influence come together for a common cause.'

Digital delivery

Wyse's impending research will also have a technological focus. Building on established stoplight colour coding in primary school canteens, it will use online ordering systems to provide automated nutritional feedback to parents as well as emailed report summaries about purchases made over the course of each term. 

'It's a hard job to make behavioural changes in such a large group of people,' she says.

'One way we can sensibly explore this is through technology.'

'It's a smart way to reach the population.'

Beyond a shadow of a diet

Seven years on in the field of population health, Wyse is a published author, conference presenter, multiple award-winner, postgraduate study supervisor, and a member of several national and international health organisations. According to National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines, she is also outperforming the typical successful public health candidate for early career fellowships.

More recently, Wyse was one of five young researchers selected by the Australian Research Council to attend the Science and Technology in Society Young Leaders' Forum 2014 in Japan. Set to explore many of her research interests in epidemiology, nutrition, and public health, the global conference is Wyse's latest – and perhaps most impressive – achievement.

Dr Rebecca Wyse

Technological travails and smaller scales

Dr Rebecca Wyse is a behavioural scientist with the career objective of reversing increasing population rates of childhood obesity. Her applied research invol

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Career Summary

Biography

Research experience & interests:I am a behavioural scientist with the career objective of reversing increasing population rates of childhood obesity. My applied research involves settings-based interventions in schools and childcare services to change the policies and practices of these organisations in order to facilitate healthy behaviours in the people within them. I was responsible for intervention development, implementation and evaluation for interventions as part of Australia's largest ever childhood obesity prevention project (Good for Kids. Good for Life). This involved implementing interventions across 400 primary schools and 300 childcare centres within the Local Health District. I am particularly interested in using technology to integrate obesity prevention strategies into existing systems within organisations.

Leadership & track record: I am on the Executive Committee of the Australasian Society for Behavioural Health and Medicine (ASBHM). I have supervised Honours and PhD students and have collaborated with other ECRs. I have previously held the position of the early career representative for ASBHM and I am currently responsible for leading the Early Career Researcher Development Strategies within my research group. I have published in leading specialty journals in nutrition, epidemiology, and public health. I have also published a diversity of manuscripts including systematic reviews, epidemiological papers and efficacy and population wide translational trials including RCTs. My work has been presented internationally at conferences in Turkey, The United States, Hungary and New Zealand, included an invited presentation at an international conference. I have reviewed for numerous journals including BMJ. I was the recipient of a Newcastle University Post Graduate scholarship and an APA and was awarded the inaugural Hunter New England Population Health Emerging Researcher Award in 2010. In 2014, I was selected as the University of Newcastle finalist for the STS Young Leaders' Program, and was subsequently accepted as one of only five Australian representatives at the 2014 forum to be held in Kyoto.

Translation to practice: I presented my PhD research to the NSW Office of Preventive Health and this led to the intervention I developed and evaluated being incorporated into the NSW State Obesity Plan. Furthermore, work I undertook as part of the Good for Kids, Good for Life childhood obesity prevention program was used to inform the state-wide roll-out strategy for the Healthy Children’s Initiative by the NSW Ministry of Health. My research is driven by what will work in the real world; interventions that are scalable, fundable, able to shape future policy and practice, and ultimately able to influence health outcomes at a population level. 

Research Expertise
Training: I have completed a PhD (School of Medicine and Public Health) as well as post-graduate courses in Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Health Promotion, Public Health, Health Management and Indigenous Health. I have completed training courses in Structural Equation Modelling and Mediation Analysis, SAS analysis, and conducting literature reviews. Publications: I have published in leading specialty journals in nutrition (AJCN, IJBNPA), epidemiology (Epi), and Public health (The Cochrane Collaboration). I have also published a diversity of manuscripts including systematic reviews, epidemiological papers and efficacy and population wide translational trials including RCTs. My Honours research has been cited over 60 times. My H-Index is very competitive, relative to opportunity. Recognition: I received a Newcastle University Post Graduate scholarship and an Australian Post Graduate award. In recognition of my early publications during my candidature, I was awarding the inaugural Hunter New England Population Health Emerging Researcher Award in 2010. In 2014 I was selected by the Australian Research Council as one of only five Australian representatives to participate in the ‘Young Leaders’ Forum’ as part of the Science and Technology in Society Forum held annually in Kyoto. My work has been presented internationally at conferences in Turkey, The Unites States, Hungary and New Zealand. I delivered an invited presentation at the annual scientific meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society and was invited to present my thesis findings to the NSW Office of Preventive Health. This presentation led to the intervention I developed and evaluated being incorporated into the draft NSW State Obesity Plan. Furthermore, work I undertook as part of the Good for Kids, Good for Life childhood obesity prevention program was used to inform the state-wide roll-out strategy for the Healthy Children’s Initiative by the NSW Ministry of Health. Skills & experience: In my career to date, I have gained experience and skills in my roles on large research trials, funded by nationally competitive grants. The interventions have targeted cancer risk factors (poor nutrition, physical inactivity, excessive weight gain and tobacco use) across a range of key community settings (including health services, schools and childcare services). I have also led trials of intervention strategies directly targeting health behaviours (efficacy trials) as well as strategies to facilitate intervention adoption across community settings (Translational trials). I was responsible for aspects of the evaluation of Good for Kids, Good for Life, Australia’s largest ($7 million) child obesity prevention program in primary schools. I am currently the Research Fellow on an ARC Linkage grant “A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy” ($390,000)” and have previously been the evaluation manager on an ANPHA project grant “Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention” ($660,000) on which I was also listed as a CI. Collaborations: I have coordinated collaboration between the University of Newcastle, Deakin University, Monash University and Hunter New England Population Health which generated 6 published papers, 2 papers under review, an invited presentation at an international conference, and theses for 2 clinical psychology masters students. I also managed a collaboration between four research groups which has resulted in the publication of a Cochrane review (IF = 6.186) and 3 conference presentations. I have also managed collaborations within the Good for Kids. Good for Life childhood obesity prevention project and was responsible for forming an expert group to guide development, implementation and evaluation of the physical activity intervention in primary schools.

Teaching Expertise
PhD Student Supervision: (Enrolled Dec 2012 - School of Medicine and Public Health). Topic: Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention: The Effectiveness of an Intensive Population Based Dissemination Intervention. Honours Student Supervision: (2013 - School of Psychology). Topic: Associations between the home food environment and children’s dietary patterns (fat from dairy products, sweetened drinks and non-core foods): A longitudinal study. (2011 - School of Psychology). Topic: Fast-Food choices for children: An exploration of nutritional labelling and other factors. Lectures: I have delivered obesity prevention lectures to Early Childhood and Education undergraduate students. Mentoring: I have also co-authored student papers which were submitted as part of Masters and Doctorate of Clinical Psychology degrees. I have managed and mentored research staff. Training: I have also provided staff development session to university and health service staff in the conduct of literature searches.

Administrative Expertise
At 15 months post-doc, I was elected to the executive committee of the Australasian Society for Health and Behavioural Medicine. I currently hold the position of secretary. I have previously held the position of PROMISE representative (the affiliated society for early career researchers) where I was responsible for organising mentoring sessions between early career researchers and established researchers, and organising career development workshops to be given by eminent health behaviour researchers. I am currently a member of the scientific committee of the society, and was a member of the local organising committee for the Annual Meeting in Newcastle in 2013.

Collaborations
I have coordinated collaboration between the University of Newcastle, Deakin University, Monash University and Hunter New England Population Health which generated 6 published papers, 2 papers under review, an invited presentation at an international conference, and theses for 2 clinical psychology masters students. I also managed a collaboration between four research groups which has resulted in the publication of a Cochrane review (IF = 6.186) and 3 conference presentations. I have also managed collaborations within the Good for Kids. Good for Life childhood obesity prevention project (the largest obesity prevention project in Australia involving over 300 childcare centres and 400 schools primary schools across the region) and was responsible for forming an expert group to guide development, implementation and evaluation of the physical activity intervention in primary schools.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Commerce, University of Sydney
  • Graduate Certificate in Public Health, University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Childcare
  • Children
  • Healthy Eating
  • Implementation Research
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Online interventions
  • Physical Activity
  • Population Health
  • Prevention
  • Public Health
  • Schools
  • Technology
  • Translation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111104 Public Nutrition Intervention 30
111712 Health Promotion 35
111716 Preventive Medicine 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Assistant University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2014 -  Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2012 - 1/05/2014 Research Assistant University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/05/2008 - 1/11/2012 PhD Candidate University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/04/2005 - 1/11/2006 Researcher Eureka Strategic Research
Social and Market Research
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2008 - 1/05/2009 Project Officer (Acting Manager) Hunter New England Population Health
Good for Kids. Good for Life
1/11/2006 - 1/12/2007 Project Officer Hunter New England Population Health
Smoke Free Health Service
1/02/2004 - 1/03/2005 Clinical Outcomes Coordinator The Northside Group
Northside Clinic
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare Service Centers' Preferences and Intentions to Use a Web-Based Program to Implement Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices: a cross-sectional study.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e108 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment. A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, (2015)

Introduction: Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to... [more]

Introduction: Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods: In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results: Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions: There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.', BMJ open, 5 e006969 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services', BMC Public Health, 14 (2014) [C1]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously valid... [more]

Childcare services represent a valuable obesity prevention opportunity, providing access to a large portion of children at a vital point in their development. Few rigorously validated measures exist to measure healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in this setting, and no such measures exist that are specific to the childcare setting in Australia. Methods. This was a cross sectional study, comparing two measures (pen and paper survey and observation) of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services. Research assistants attended consenting childcare services (n = 42) across the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia and observed practices for one day. Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders of the service also completed a pen and paper survey during the day of observation. Kappa statistics and proportion agreement were calculated for a total of 43 items relating to healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Results: Agreement ranged from 38%-100%. Fifty one percent of items showed agreement of greater than or equal to 80%. Items assessing the frequency with which staff joined in active play with children reported the lowest percent agreement, while items assessing availability of beverages such as juice, milk and cordial, as well as the provision of foods such as popcorn, pretzels and sweet biscuits, reported the highest percent agreement. Kappa scores ranged from -0.06 (poor agreement) to 1 (perfect agreement). Of the 43 items assessed, 27 were found to have moderate or greater agreement. Conclusions: The study found that Nominated Supervisors and Room Leaders were able to accurately report on a number of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Items assessing healthy eating practices tended to have higher kappa scores than those assessing physical activity related policies or practices. The tool represents a useful instrument for public health researchers and policy makers working in this setting. © 2014Dodds et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Campbell E, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher A, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention for child fruit and vegetable intake: Long-term follow-up', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99 543-550 (2014) [C1]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, ... [more]

Background: Telephone-based interventions can be effective in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake in the short term (<6 mo). The long-term efficacy of such interventions, however, is unknown. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the short-term (<6 mo) impact of a telephone-based intervention on children's fruit and vegetable intake was sustained over a longer term. A secondary aim of the study was to assess the long-term impact of the intervention on the intake of foods high in fat, salt, or sugar (noncore foods). Design: The study used a cluster randomized controlled trial design. Parents were recruited from Australian preschools between February and August 2010 and allocated to receive an intervention consisting of print materials and 4 telephone-counseling calls delivered over 1 mo or to a print information-only control group. The primary endpoint for the trial was the 18-mo postbaseline follow-up. Linear regression models were used to assess between-group differences in child consumption of fruit and vegetables and noncore foods by subscales of the Children's Dietary Questionnaire. Results: Fruit and vegetable subscale scores were significantly higher, indicating greater child fruit and vegetable intake, among children in the intervention group at the 12-mo (16.77 compared with 14.89; P < 0.01) but not the 18-mo (15.98 compared with 16.82; P = 0.14) follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups at either of the follow-up periods in the noncore food subscale score. Conclusion: Further research to identify effective maintenance strategies is required to maximize the benefits of telephone-based interventions on child diet. This trial was registered at http://www.anzctr.org. au/ as ACTRN12609000820202. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

DOI 10.3945/ajcn.113.071738
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Nichols M, Allender S, Millar L, McElduff P, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of whole of community interventions to prevent excessive population weight gain', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 62 193-200 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.031
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: Findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]

Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community... [more]

Issue addressed: School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. Methods: A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. Results: The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Conclusions: Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. So what?: Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wolfenden L, Carruthers J, Wyse R, Yoong S, 'Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions.', Health Promot J Austr, 25 136-138 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1071/HE13089
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', Health Education Research, 30 262-271 (2014)

Despite significant investment in many countries, the extent of schools' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices has not been widely reported. The aims of this artic... [more]

Despite significant investment in many countries, the extent of schools' adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices has not been widely reported. The aims of this article are to describe Australian schools' adoption of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices over an 8-year period and to determine if their adoption varies according to schools' size, geographic or socio-economic location. Between 2006 and 2013, a representative randomly selected cohort of primary schools (n = 476) in New South Wales, Australia, participated in four telephone interviews. Repeated measures logistic regression analyses using a Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) framework were undertaken to assess change over time. The prevalence of all four of the healthy eating practices and one physical activity practice significantly increased, while the prevalence of one physical activity practice significantly decreased. The adoption of practices did not differ by school characteristics. Government investment can equitably enhance school adoption of some obesity prevention policies and practices on a jurisdiction-wide basis. Additional and/or different implementation strategies may be required to facilitate greater adoption of physical activity practices. Ongoing monitoring of school adoption of school policies and practices is needed to ensure the intended benefits of government investment are achieved.

DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2014 Dodds P, Wyse R, Jones J, Wolfenden L, Lecathelinais C, Williams A, et al., 'Validity of a measure to assess healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in Australian childcare services.', BMC Public Health, 14 572 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-572
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Wyse R, Campbell KJ, Brennan L, Wolfenden L, 'A cluster randomised controlled trial of a telephone-based intervention targeting the home food environment of preschoolers (The Healthy Habits Trial): the effect on parent fruit and vegetable consumption', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0144-6
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams
2013 Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, Finch M, Williams A, Dodds P, Gillham K, Wyse R, 'A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 224-226 (2013) [C1]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a ke... [more]

Issue addressed: Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods: Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, ¿2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions: An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services. © 2013 Australian Health Promotion Association.

DOI 10.1071/HE13055
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2013 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Britton B, James EL, Francis JL, Wyse R, 'Effects of Introductory Information on Self-Reported Health Behavior', EPIDEMIOLOGY, 24 170-172 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182788c98
Co-authors Erica James, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri
2013 Fletcher A, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Bowman J, McElduff P, Duncan S, 'A randomised controlled trial and mediation analysis of the 'Healthy Habits', telephone-based dietary intervention for preschool children', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-43
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2012 Campbell E, Campbell KJ, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, Bowman JA, et al., 'A cluster randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase preschoolers' fruit and vegetable consumption', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96 102-110 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2012 Wolfenden L, Wyse RJ, Britton BI, Campbell KJ, Hodder RK, Stacey FG, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged 5 years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub2
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Erica James, Rebecca Wyse
2012 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Bell AC, Wyse R, Morgan PJ, Butler MT, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: A non-randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 651 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-651
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Wyse R, Wiggers JH, 'A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 534 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-534
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2011 Wyse R, Campbell EM, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, 'Associations between characteristics of the home food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, 11 938 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Butler M, Bell AC, Wyse R, Campbell EM, et al., 'Vegetable and fruit breaks in Australian primary schools: prevalence, attitudes, barriers and implementation strategies', Health Education Research, 26 722-731 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyr033
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A pilot study of a telephone-based parental intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5-year-old children', Public Health Nutrition, 14 2245-2253 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2010 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Brennan L, Campbell KJ, Fletcher AL, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a telephone-based intervention for parents to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in their 3- to 5-year-old children: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 1-12 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-216
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2007 Hodgkinson K, Butow P, Hunt GE, Wyse R, Hobbs KM, Wain G, 'Life after cancer: couples¿ and partners¿ psychological adjustment and supportive care needs', Supportive Care in Cancer, 15 405-415 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-006-0148-0
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse
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Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Campbell K, Wiggers JH, Brennan L, Fletcher A, et al., 'A telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year-old children: 12-month outcomes from the healthy habits cluster randomized trial', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Jenny Bowman
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, 'A telephone-based intervention targeting preschool children can also increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of their parents after 12 months', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2012 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Brennan L, 'Training interviewers to deliver a telephone-based behavioural family intervention encouraging fruit and vegetable consumption', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden
2011 James EL, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Britton B, Campbell K, Hodder R, et al., 'Interventions to increase fruit and vegetable consumption amongst preschool aged children: A systematic review of randomised trials', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Erica James, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Wyse R, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Campbell K, Brennan L, Fletcher AL, et al., 'Efficacy of a telephone-based parent intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in 3-5 year olds: a cluster randomised trial', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $721,833

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $23,805

A randomised trial of an implantation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a state-wide health canteen policy$23,805

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Rebecca Wyse
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400906
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20122 grants / $698,028

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye, Ms Meghan Finch, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Dr Sze Yoong, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101031
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$35,250

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Rebecca Wyse
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201022
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.55

Current Supervision

Commenced Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 An Intervention to Improve Implementation of Nutrition Guidelines in Childcare Services
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012 Creating Childcare Environments Supportive of Child Obesity Prevention: The Effectiveness of an Intensive Population Based Dissemination Intervention
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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News

Rebecca Wyse

UON obesity researcher joins young leaders in Japan

October 8, 2014

A University of Newcastle behavioural scientist, who has been investigating ways to address childhood obesity rates in Australia, was one of only five Australians selected to attend a Young Leaders Forum in Japan this week.

Dr Rebecca Wyse

Position

Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email r.wyse@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6310
Fax (02) 4924 6209

Office

Room RM0038
Building Booth Building
Location WALLSEND

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