Human Rights & the World's Indigenous Communities

Course code ABOR3380Units 10Level 3000Faculty of Education and ArtsWollotuka School of Aboriginal Studies

Examines Aboriginal Australia's responses to, and use of, international treaty monitoring bodies and agencies as well as the treaties themselves. It offers an insight into the role of such bodies in the effective delivery of social justice for Aboriginal Australians and examines some of the key issues identified by Indigenous peoples globally as significant factors in the delivery of social justice and human rights.

The principal teaching style will be through lecture and tutorial. Mode of delivery is internal, Callaghan.

Available in 2015

On-Line from CallaghanSemester 2
Previously offered in 2014
ObjectivesThe objectives of the course are to:
1. empower the voices and experiences of Indigenous peoples;
2. critically analyse the role of international treaty bodies and agencies such as the United Nations, in the delivery of social justice to Aboriginal Australians;
3. develop an understanding of the significance of the treaty debate and the impact of this on social justice for Aboriginal Australians;
4. gain an insight into Indigenous responses to and use of international treaties and monitoring bodies; and
5. develop an understanding of the significance of the debate surrounding the issues of bio-diversity and bio-technology, ethics and self-determination.
ContentThe course will explore indigenous communities worldwide & their use of human rights instruments. The following will be considered:
? International human rights bodies of relevance to Indigenous peoples;
? International human rights instruments of relevance to Indigenous peoples; ILO Convention 169 and the draft Declaration on Indigenous Peoples Rights.
? The role of Non-Government organisations.
? Australian Aboriginal peoples and the United Nations.
? Indigenous peoples use of the international arena; international case studies
? Response to treaty crisis.
? Protection of Intellectual and Cultural Property Rights.
? Bio-diversity and bio-technology.
? Ethics.
? Self-determination.
? Racism.
? Globalisation.
Replacing Course(s)N/A
TransitionN/A
Industrial Experience0
Assumed KnowledgeStudents need an understanding of Aboriginal society and culture equivalent to ABOR1210/ABOR1110, ABOR1220/ABOR1330, ABOR2100/ABOR2230, ABOR2110/ABOR2240 and ABOR3010/ABOR3120. Students will also be required to have study/experience equivalent to ABOR2380 and ABOR2390.
Modes of DeliveryInternal Mode
Teaching MethodsLecture
Tutorial
Assessment Items
Other: (please specify)Collaborative Talking Circle - 2000 words - 40% (Talking circles are designed to promote knowledge sharing as a collaborative venture and are not dissimilar to tutorials)
Case Scenario/PBL exercises1500 words - 40%
ProjectsGroup Project - 1500 words - 20%
Contact HoursLecture: for 1 hour(s) per Week for Full Term
Tutorial: for 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term
Timetables2015 Course Timetables for ABOR3380