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Professor Nicky Hudson

Director

University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Hudson started her academic career at the University of Adelaide, playing a major role in medical curriculum development and reform, as well as completing a PhD on the challenge of linking theory to practice in medical education. As a foundation staff member (Academic Leader in Human Function) at Peninsula Medical School in the South West of England, she gained further valuable experience to subsequently contribute to the development of an innovative medical curriculum at the Graduate School of Medicine (GSM) at the University of Wollongong. While at Wollongong, Professor Hudson was initially appointed Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Clinical Education providing leadership in establishing the Clinical Education curriculum, the clinical placements and Clinical Skills Centres, and the integrated Assessment Program. Subsequently as Professor and Associate Dean Community Based Health Education she led the development and implementation of longitudinal integrated clinical clerkships in regional, rural or remote New South Wales for all senior students at the GSM.  She joined the Joint Medical Program (JMP) of the Universities of Newcastle and New England in 2012, initially as Professor of Innovation in Medical Education and Rural Medicine at the University of New England.  In 2013, she took up her current position as Director of Rural Health at the University of Newcastle, NSW.  In this role she is Director of the Rural Clinical School of the JMP, and Director of the University Department of Rural Health Program at the University of Newcastle.  Professor Hudson's research interests in her current role as Director of the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health include investigating the outcomes of regional and rural community-based health education from the perspectives of patients, students, clinicians, and the communities involved; community engagement and interprofessional education.

Her academic work is underpinned by prior clinical practice in-patient and community psychiatry, and urban general practice in Adelaide; Indigenous health general practice at Nunkuwarrin Yunti in Adelaide for many years and general practice with the Royal Flying Doctor Service in remote South Australia. 

Research Expertise
Professor Hudson's research interests include: -- Medical education: The challenge of linking theory to practice -- Educational Impact of Assessment Strategies -- Peer-assisted Learning -- Inter-professional health education -- Patient involvement in medical education -- Community-based health education and rural workforce

Teaching Expertise
Professor Hudson's teaching expertise includes Research Higher Degree supervision and lecturing at both Undergraduate and Postgraduate Levels at numerous Universities (including Peninsula Medical School and the Universities of Adelaide and Wollongong). Professor Hudson has also contributed to curriculum and assessment reform at the University of Adelaide as well as the development of the new Graduate School of Medicine in Wollongong, where she implemented a program of placements for medical students in which each student lives, learns, and works for one academic year in regional, rural or remote NSW.

Administrative Expertise
Professor Hudson brings her extensive administrative experience to her role as Director of the University Department of Rural Health. In her previous role as Professor of Innovation and Deputy Head of School at the University of New England, Professor Hudson was outreach director for programs targeting the delivery of health care to under-served and disadvantaged populations. She has also previously held the position of Professor and Associate Dean Community Based Health Education at the University of Wollongong. While in this role at the University of Wollongong, Professor Hudson led the development and implementation of longitudinal integrated clinical clerkships in regional, rural or remote New South Wales for all senior students. She also led the implementation of a competency-based assessment programme, and as leader of the Clinical Competency theme developed two clinical skills centres and the associated skills program.

Collaborations
Current primary research collaborations are with current or past colleagues at the University of Wollongong in relation to Community Based Health Education and Interprofessional Learning; with colleagues in the Department of Rural Health focused on Interprofessional Education and Community Engagement; and with national rural health colleagues exploring a project on enhancing access to health care for rural communities.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Medical Education), University of Adelaide
  • Bachelor of Science (Biochemistry & Microbiology), University of Western Australia
  • Master of Science (Virology), Queens University Ontario - Canada
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, Flinders University

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Community Based Health Education
  • Medical Education
  • Peer-Assisted Learning
  • Problem Based Learning
  • Rural Health

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111799Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - DirectorUniversity of Newcastle
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - Membership - Deputy Chair, ARHEN ARHEN
Australia
1/01/2013 - Membership - Australian Rural Health Educators Network (ARHEN) BoardAustralian Rural Health Educators Network (ARHEN) Board
Australia
1/02/2012 - 1/12/2014Clinical ProfessorUniversity of Wollongong
Australia
1/01/2012 - 1/12/2014Adjunct ProfessorUniversity of New England
1/01/2012 - 1/02/2013Deputy Head of SchoolUniversity of New England
1/01/2011 - Editorial Board - eMedici JournaleMedici Journal
Australia
1/01/2011 - Membership - Policy Group, Federation of Rural Medical Educators (FRAME)Policy Group, Federation of Rural Medical Educators (FRAME)
Australia
1/01/2006 - 31/12/2015Membership - International Consortium of Longitudinal Integrated ClerkshipsInternational Consortium of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/01/2012Associate Dean - Community Based Health Education, Director Clinical EducationUniversity of Wollongong
Australia
1/08/2004 - 1/12/2005Senior Lecturer - Clinical EducationThe University of Adelaide
Australia
1/04/2002 - 1/07/2004Senior Lecturer - Clinical EducationUniversity of Exeter
United Kingdom
1/01/2002 - Membership - Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (UK)Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (UK)
Australia
1/01/2002 - Membership - American Physiological SocietyAmerican Physiological Society
United States
1/01/1995 - 1/04/2002LecturerThe University of Adelaide
Australia

Awards

Distinction

YearAward
2011Octal Award, Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning (Phase 1 Team)
University of Wollongong
2001The Stephen Cole the Elder Prize for Excellence in Teaching
University of Adelaide
2000Departmental Teaching Award (Physiology)
University of Adelaide

Recognition

YearAward
2004Contribution Based Reward
Unknown

Invitations

External Examiner

YearTitle / Rationale
2010Australian Medical Council (AMC) accreditation team
Organisation: James Cook University

External Reviewer - Departments

YearTitle / Rationale
2012External Review of Assessment
Organisation: School of Medicine, Notre Dame University
2009Dept. Psychological Medicine
Organisation: University of Otago

Participant

YearTitle / Rationale
2012Students and Learning Characteristics
Organisation: 15th Ottawa Conference
2012National Priorities Research Program (NPRP)
Organisation: Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF), Qatar Foundation Description: 2009-2012
2011Fourth International Clinical Skills Conference
Organisation: Monash University
2009Third International Clinical Skills Conference
Organisation: Monash University
2007Preparing health professionals for the world of work: educational/clinical supervision and feedback
Organisation: Second International Clinical Skills Conference
2005The Theory-Practice Gap
Organisation: First International Clinical Skills Conference
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Hudson JN, Weston K, 'The Benefits of Longitudinal Relationships with Patients for Developing Health Professionals: The longitudinal student-patient relationship', Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 211-218 (2014) [B1]
2014Hudson JN, Weston K, 'The Benefits of Longitudinal Relationships with Patients for Developing Health Professionals: The longitudinal student-patient relationship', Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 211-218 (2014) [B1]

Journal article (34 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Malau-Aduli BS, Teague P-A, Turner R, Holman B, D¿souza K, Garne D, et al., 'Improving assessment practice through cross-institutional collaboration: An exercise on the use of OSCEs', Medical Teacher, 1-9 (2015)
DOI10.3109/0142159X.2015.1016487
2015Wilkinson TJ, Hudson JN, McColl GJ, Hu WCY, Jolly BC, Schuwirth LWT, 'Medical school benchmarking - From tools to programmes', Medical Teacher, 37 146-152 (2015)

Background: Benchmarking among medical schools is essential, but may result in unwanted effects. Aim: To apply a conceptual framework to selected benchmarking activities of medical schools. Methods: We present an analogy between the effects of assessment on student learning and the effects of benchmarking on medical school educational activities. A framework by which benchmarking can be evaluated was developed and applied to key current benchmarking activities in Australia and New Zealand. Results: The analogy generated a conceptual framework that tested five questions to be considered in relation to benchmarking: what is the purpose? what are the attributes of value? what are the best tools to assess the attributes of value? what happens to the results? and, what is the likely "institutional impact" of the results? If the activities were compared against a blueprint of desirable medical graduate outcomes, notable omissions would emerge. Conclusion: Medical schools should benchmark their performance on a range of educational activities to ensure quality improvement and to assure stakeholders that standards are being met. Although benchmarking potentially has positive benefits, it could also result in perverse incentives with unforeseen and detrimental effects on learning if it is undertaken using only a few selected assessment tools.

DOI10.3109/0142159X.2014.932902
2015Bonney A, Knight-Billington P, Mullan J, Moscova M, Barnett S, Iverson D, et al., 'The telehealth skills, training, and implementation project: an evaluation protocol.', JMIR Res Protoc, 4 e2 (2015)
DOI10.2196/resprot.3613Author URL
2015Hudson JN, May JA, 'What influences doctors to work in rural locations?', Med J Aust, 202 5 (2015)
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsJenny May
2015Hudson JN, May JA, 'What influences doctors to work in rural locations?', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 202 5-5 (2015)
DOI10.5694/mja14.01550Author URL
Co-authorsJenny May
2015Hudson JN, Farmer EA, Weston KM, Bushnell JA, 'Using a framework to implement large-scale innovation in medical education with the intent of achieving sustainability', BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 15 (2015)
DOI10.1186/s12909-014-0282-1Author URL
2014Bonney A, Albert G, Hudson JN, Knight-Billington P, 'Factors affecting medical students' sense of belonging in a longitudinal integrated clerkship', AUSTRALIAN FAMILY PHYSICIAN, 43 53-57 (2014) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2014Bonney A, Albert G, Hudson JN, Knight-Billington P, 'Factors affecting medical students' sense of belonging in a longitudinal integrated clerkship', AUSTRALIAN FAMILY PHYSICIAN, 43 53-57 (2014) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2014Weston KM, Hudson JN, 'Clinical scholarship among preceptors supervising longitudinal integrated medical clerkships in regional and rural communities of practice', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 22 80-85 (2014) [C1]

Objective: All senior medical students at the University of Wollongong undertake a longitudinal integrated community-based clerkship, supervised by experienced general practitioners in a regional or rural community. This study investigates the influence of the longitudinal integrated clerkship model of medical education on scholarship among preceptors in these practice communities. Design: General practitioner preceptors were interviewed after the first student cohort had completed their 38-week placements. Analysis of transcripts identified themes supporting clinical scholarship among preceptors. The entire transcript for each preceptor was analysed, permitting a quantitative determination of each theme. Quotations supporting the themes were selected. Setting: The setting was the primary health care practices supervising the longitudinal integrated clerkship medical students. Participants: Twenty-six preceptors who supervised longitudinal integrated clerkship medical students in rural and regional New South Wales participated. None had previously been involved in this model of medical education. Main outcome measure: The study looked for evidence of clinical scholarship among preceptors supervising students in the longitudinal medical student clerkship. Results: Thematic analysis of interview transcripts revealed evidence of clinical scholarship in regional/rural clinical medicine. The 'practice' was validated as a place where scholarship occurs, an 'academy of learning' and part of the university. About half of the preceptors believed the longitudinal integrated clerkship gave students a deeper link with the community. Two thirds of participants perceived an improved quality of care in their practice. Conclusion: Longitudinal integrated clerkships in teaching communities of practice provide the opportunity for emergence of clinical scholarship among preceptors supporting the learning needs of medical students. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

DOI10.1111/ajr.12090
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2014Paliadelis PS, Stupans I, Parker V, Piper D, Gillan P, Lea J, et al., 'The development and evaluation of online stories to enhance clinical learning experiences across health professions in rural Australia', Collegian, (2014)

Clinical placement learning experiences are integral to all health and medical curricula as a means of integrating theory into practice and preparing graduates to deliver safe, high-quality care to health consumers. A growing challenge for education providers is to access sufficient clinical placements with experienced supervisors who are skilled at maximising learning opportunities for students. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an innovative online learning program aimed at enhancing student and clinical supervisors' preparedness for effective workplace-based learning. The evidence-based learning program used 'story-telling' as the learning framework. The stories, which were supported by a range of resources, aimed to engage the learners in understanding student and supervisor responsibilities, as well as the expectations and competencies needed to support effective learning in the clinical environment. Evaluation of this program by the learners and stakeholders clearly indicated that they felt authentically 'connected' with the characters in the stories and developed insights that suggested effective learning had occurred.

DOI10.1016/j.colegn.2014.08.003
2012Hudson JN, Weston KM, Farmer EA, 'Medical students on long-term regional and rural placements: What is the financial cost to supervisors?', Rural and Remote Health, 12 1951-1951 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2012Hudson JN, Knight PJ, Weston KM, 'Patient perceptions of innovative longitudinal integrated clerkships based in regional, rural and remote primary care: A qualitative study', BMC Family Practice, 13 72-72 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2296-13-72
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2012Hudson JN, Rienits H, Corrin L, Olmos M, 'An innovative OSCE clinical log station: A quantitative study of its influence on Log use by medical students', BMC Medical Education, 12 111-111 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1472-6920-12-111
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2011Hudson JN, Weston KM, Farmer EA, 'Engaging rural preceptors in new longitudinal community clerkships during workforce shortage: A qualitative study', BMC Family Practice, 12 103-103 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2296-12-103
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 11
2010Hudson JN, Weston KM, Farmer EE, Ivers RG, Pearson RW, 'Are patients willing participants in the new wave of community-based medical education in regional and rural Australia?', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 150-153 (2010) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2009Norris TE, Schaad DC, DeWitt D, Ogur B, Hunt DD, Jim B, et al., 'Longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical students: An innovation adopted by medical schools in Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the United States', Academic Medicine, 84 902-907 (2009)

PURPOSE: Integrated clinical clerkships represent a relatively new and innovative approach to medical education that uses continuity as an organizing principle, thus increasing patient-centeredness and learner-centeredness. Medical schools are offering longitudinal integrated clinical clerkships in increasing numbers. This report collates the experiences of medical schools that use longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical student education in order to establish a clearer characterization of these experiences and summarize outcome data, when possible. METHOD: The authors sent an e-mail survey with open text responses to 17 medical schools with known longitudinal integrated clerkships. RESULTS: Sixteen schools in four countries on three continents responded to the survey. Fifteen institutions have active longitudinal integrated clerkships in place. Two programs began before 1995, but the others are newer. More than 2,700 students completed longitudinal integrated clerkships in these schools. The median clerkship length is 40 weeks, and in 15 of the schools, the core clinical content was in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics-gynecology. Eleven schools reported supportive student responses to the programs. No differences were noted in nationally normed exam scores between program participants and those in the traditional clerkships. Limited outcomes data suggest that students who participate in these programs are more likely to enter primary care careers. CONCLUSIONS: This study documents the increasing use of longitudinal integrated clerkships and provides initial insights for institutions that may wish to develop similar clinical programs. Further study will be needed to assess the long-term impact of these programs on medical education and workforce initiatives. © 2009 Association of American Medical Colleges.

DOI10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181a85776
CitationsScopus - 65
2008Page SL, Birden HH, Hudson JN, Thistlethwaite JE, Roberts C, Wilson I, et al., 'Medical schools can cooperate: A new joint venture to provide medical education in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales', Medical Journal of Australia, 188 179-181 (2008) [C1]
2008Hudson JN, Tonkin AL, 'Clinical skills education: Outcomes of relationships between junior medical students, senior peers and simulated patients', Medical Education, 42 901-908 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2923.2008.03107.x
CitationsScopus - 17Web of Science - 10
2007Thistlethwaite JE, Kidd MR, Hudson JN, 'General practice: A leading provider of medical student education in the 21st century?', Medical Journal of Australia, 187 124-128 (2007) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 29Web of Science - 23
2007Thistlethwaite J, Kidd M, Hudson JN, 'Moving more of the medical school curriculum into the community', The Clinical Teacher, 4 232-237 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1743-498X.2007.00189.x
CitationsScopus - 4
2006Chamberlain S, Freeman A, Oldham J, Sanders D, Hudson JN, Ricketts C, 'Innovative learning: Employing medical students to write formative assessments', Medical Teacher, 28 656-659 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1080/01421590600877822
2006Hudson JN, 'Linking neuroscience theory to practice to help overcome student fear of neurology', Medical Teacher, 28 651-653 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1080/01421590600726409
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2005Hudson JN, 'A further example of paired-teacher lecturing to link theory to practice', Medical Education, 39 1254-1254 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2929.2005.02325.x
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2005Hudson N, 'Commentaries', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 12 104-104 (2005)
2005Lewis NJ, Rees CE, Hudson JN, Bleakley A, 'Emotional intelligence medical education: Measuring the unmeasurable?', Advances in Health Sciences Education, 10 339-355 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s10459-005-4861-0
CitationsScopus - 44Web of Science - 41
2004Hudson JN, 'Computer-aided learning in the real world of medical education: Does the quality of interaction with the computer affect student learning?', Medical Education, 38 887-895 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.01892.x
CitationsWeb of Science - 43
2004Hudson JN, Tonkin AL, 'Evaluating the impact of moving from discipline-based to integrated assessment', Medical Education, 38 832-843 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.01893.x
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2004Lewis N, Rees C, Hudson JN, 'Helping medical students identify their emotional intelligence.', Medical Education, 38 563-563 (2004) [C1]
2004Hudson JN, Buckley P, 'An evaluation of case-based teaching: Evidence for continuing benefit and realization of aims', Advances in Physiology Education, 28 15-22 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1152/advan.00019.2002
CitationsScopus - 22Web of Science - 16
2002Hudson JN, Searle J, 'Breaking out of your comfort zone!', Medical Education, 36 1163-1164 (2002) [C1]
DOI10.1046/j.1365-2923.2002.01383.x
2001Tonkin AL, Hudson JN, 'Integration of written assessment is possible in a hybrid curriculum', Medical Education, 35 1072-1073 (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2001Hudson JN, Buckley P, McMillen IC, 'Linking cardiovascular theory to practice in an undergraduate medical curriculum', ADVANCES IN PHYSIOLOGY EDUCATION, 25 193-201 (2001) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsCaroline Mcmillen
2000Hudson JN, Vernon-Roberts JM, 'Assessment - Putting it all together', Medical Education, 34 953-954 (2000) [C1]
DOI10.1046/j.1365-2923.2000.0784h.x
2000Hudson JN, 'Integrating the art and science of medicine at early stages of medical training', Medical Education, 34 954-954 (2000) [C3]
Show 31 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2006Hudson JN, Bristow DR, 'Formative assessment can be fun as well as educational', Advances in Physiology Education (2006) [D1]
DOI10.1152/advan.00040.2005
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 11

Conference (26 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Hudson JN, Lethbridge A, Vella S, 'A decline in medical student attitudes to inter-professional learning and patient-centredness following an interdisciplinary clinical experience', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015)
2015Fisher KA, Brown L, Smith T, Hudson N, 'Evaluation of a community engagement program: What do rural healthcare students gain from experiential community-engaged learning?', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015)
Co-authorsTony Smith, Leanne Brown, Karin Fisher
2014Weston K, Garne D, Hudson JN, Bushnell J, Lloyd S, '"I followed him all the way" - the continuity-of-care experiences of longitudinal clerkship medical students', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
2014Weston K, Lloyd S, Garne D, Hudson JN, Bushnell J, 'What do medical students in an integrated longitudinal clinical placement actually see and do?', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
2014Hudson JN, Weston K, Garne D, Bushnell J, Farmer E, 'Reflection on the value of longitudinal generalist experience for undergraduate medical education', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
2014Fisher K, Wakely L, Squires K, Shipley L, Wakely K, Brown L, et al., 'A model for enhancing community engagement of undergraduate health professional students on rural placement', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsLuke Wakely, Tony Smith, Katrina Wakely, Leanne Brown, Kelly Squires, Karin Fisher
2014Knight-Billington P, Pond D, Gill G, Hudson JN, Hespe C, Mullan J, et al., 'Virtual clinics and vertical medical education', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsDimity Pond
2014Garne D, Weston K, Bushnell J, Hudson JN, 'A medical workforce for regional, remote and rural Australia: are we on track to fulfill our mission?', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
2013Hudson JN, Azer S, Knight P, AlEshaiwi SM, AlGrain HA, AlKhelaif RA, 'Nervous system examination on YouTube', Proceedings of ANZAHPE 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013Hudson JN, Bonney A, Albert G, Knight P, 'Medical Students' Experience of a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship - Lessons Learned', Handbook & Program of ANZAHPE 2013 Professional Development of Health Professional Educators, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013Weston K, Hudson JN, 'The influence of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships on Clinical Scholarship in Regional and Rural Communities of Practice', Handbook & Program of ANZAHPE 2013 Professional Development of Health Professional Educators, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2012Hudson JN, Weston KM, 'A Scholarly spin on practice: the impact of longitudinal integrated clerkships on the development of academic scholarship in general clinical practice', Rendez-vous 2012: Together and Engaged, Thunder Bay, Canada (2012) [E3]
2012Pearson R, Ivers R, Weston K, Farmer E, Hudson JN, 'Does a short-term interprofessional clinical placement early in a graduate-entry medical course affect students' readiness for interprofessional learning?', Rendez-vous 2012: Together and Engaged, Thunder Bay, Canada (2012) [E3]
2011Hudson JN, Rienits H, 'n OSCE clinical log station: driving reflection on clinical competence development', Fifth International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato, Italy (2011) [E3]
2011Hudson JN, Knight P, Weston K, 'The impact of longitudinal integrated clerkships on health care: the patient perspective', Vienna: AMEE, Vienna, Austria (2011) [E3]
2011Thomson B, Knight P, Hudson JN, 'Evaluating the impact of medical education initiatives on healthcare service in a small rural town', Vienna: AMEE, Vienna, Austria (2011) [E3]
2011Hudson JN, Weston K, Farmer E, 'Medical students on long-term placements: a financial help or hindrance to preceptors?', Vienna: AMEE, Vienna, Austria (2011) [E3]
2010Farmer E, Hudson JN, Weston K, 'Why do rural GPs engage in longitudinal integrated community-based clerkships at a time of workforce shortage?', AMEE 2010 Conference: e-Learning Symposium, Glasgow, UK (2010) [E3]
2010Hudson JN, Bushnell J, Lethbridge A, 'Miller's triangle and cutpoints in a competency based assessment programme at a new medical school', AMEE 2010 Conference: e-Learning Symposium, Glasgow, UK (2010) [E1]
2009Hudson JN, Pearson R, Ivers R, Weston K, Farmer E, 'Does a short-term interprofessional clinical placement early in a graduate-entry medical course affect students' readiness for interprofessional learning?', Precedings for Third International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato, Tuscany, Italy (2009) [E1]
2009Hudson JN, Smith B, Farmer E, 'Implementing longitudinal community-based health education using a sustainable change mode', Proceedings of the 2009 AMEE Conference, Malaga, Spain (2009) [E3]
2007Hudson JN, Simpson H, Sanzone S, Vella S, 'Educators Learning Together and Modelling Interprofessional Collaboration', Procedings of ANZAHPE, Canberra (2007) [E1]
2007Hudson JN, Bushnell J, Parker-Newlyn L, McLennan P, 'Old wine, new bottle: putting Millers Triangle to the test.', Procedings of ANZAHPE, Canberra (2007) [E1]
2007Hudson JN, Ogle J, Caputi P, 'The attitudes and expectations of first year medical students to mental health and mental health training.', Procedings of ANZAHPE, Canberra (2007) [E1]
2005Hudson JN, Tonkin AL, 'Does Student support improve performance? Prediction of performance in the final examination from performance early in the medical course', AMEE Abstracts, Amsterdam (2005) [E1]
2005Hudson JN, Tonkin AL, 'Impact of a PBL-based curriculum on student progression and withdrawal rates between year 3 and final examination, in an undergraduate medical program', AMEE Abstracts, Amsterdam (2005) [E1]
Show 23 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Hudson JN, Weston KM, Farmer EA, 'Reply to Comment on: Medical students on longterm regional and rural placements: What is the financial cost to supervisors?', : Australian Rural Health Education Network (2012) [O1]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants6
Total funding$95,100

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $1,500

Muster, Uluru Australia, 27 - 30 October 2014.$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Nicky Hudson
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400917
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20121 grants / $75,000

The validity of UMAT and other selection tools for predicting student academic and non-academic performance in a medical program$75,000

Funding body: ACER (Australian Council for Educational Research)

Funding bodyACER (Australian Council for Educational Research)
Project TeamDoctor Marita Lynagh, Professor Brian Kelly, Doctor Graeme Horton, Conjoint Professor David Powis, Doctor Miles Bore, Conjoint Associate Professor Donald Munro, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Nicky Hudson
SchemeUMAT Consortium Research Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1201096
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20071 grants / $5,000

Moving medical education research to an outcomes-based approach: the effect of medical students on patients and the patients’ perspective$5,000

Funding Body: University of Wollongong Funding Scheme: Faculty Health & Behavioural Science Small Grant Description: .
Funding body: University of Wollongong

Funding bodyUniversity of Wollongong
Project Team
SchemeFaculty Health & Behavioural Science Small Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNo
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20052 grants / $11,200

Faculty of Health Sciences Start-up Grant$10,000

Funding Body: University of Adelaide Funding Scheme: Faculty of Health Sciences Start-up Grant Description: .
Funding body: University of Adelaide

Funding bodyUniversity of Adelaide
Project Team
SchemeFaculty of Health Sciences Start-up Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNo
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Overseas Conference Grant$1,200

Funding Body: University of Adelaide Funding Scheme: Travel Grant Description: .
Funding body: University of Adelaide

Funding bodyUniversity of Adelaide
Project Team
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNo
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

19991 grants / $2,400

Overseas Conference Grant$2,400

Funding Body: University of Adelaide Funding Scheme: Travel Grant Description: .
Funding body: University of Adelaide

Funding bodyUniversity of Adelaide
Project Team
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start1999
Funding Finish1999
GNo
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Professor Nicky Hudson

Position

Director
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Emailnicky.hudson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 6755 3537
Mobile0400493066
Fax(02) 6761 2355

Office

RoomTamworth Education Centre, 118-148 Johnston St, Tamworth 2340
BuildingTamworth Education Centre
LocationTamworth

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