Building skills and productivity

It has been forecast that by 2025 one-third of all jobs in Australia will require a minimum of a Bachelor degree and the need for high skill jobs will continue to increase as Australia strives to build its knowledge-based economy.

In a move to ensure greater productivity, the Australian Government has defined a set of ambitious targets for participation in higher education including that by 2025, 40 per cent of all 25 to 34 year olds will hold a qualification at Bachelor level or above; and that by 2020, 20 per cent of undergraduates will be from a low SES background.

These participation and equity targets present a challenge to the higher education sector to ensure the increase in access and participation results in the attainment of qualifications and an associated uplift in productivity.

The recent Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People1 (the Behrendt Review) also highlighted some key challenges in enabling access, participation and success of Indigenous students in higher education.

The recommendations of the Review support strategies that encompass building strong relationships and professional partnerships both across universities and with Indigenous communities.

UoN has built a range of alternative pathways for students to enter our programs, and has established longevity and proven performance in our enabling programs. Given these important factors, UoN is well placed to engage with the challenges of ensuring bright people have access to a university education independent of their background or circumstances.


1 Professor Larissa Behrendt, Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People Final Report, July 2012 www.innovation.gov.au/IHER