Dr Amanda Wilson

Senior Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Amanda Wilson has a strong research background having worked in both clinical and public health research for many years. She has worked in a variety of health care environments including general practice, the community and tertiary teaching hospitals. While completing a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in English, Amanda began working part-time in clinical trials on asthma. This led to full-time employment in clinical respiratory research, involving asthma, COPD and sleep disorders. Her position involved trial design, implementation, data collection, analysis, writing and presentation of results. Amanda was a reviewer with the Cochrane Airways Group and developed and co-authored the first comprehensive report on evidence-based asthma management (Australian Asthma Management Plan 2000).

She published a number of well cited papers in international and Australian peer-review journals, presented at international conferences, produced several industry reports and co-authored of a chapter in "Understanding Asthma: A Management Companion" edited by Dr Christine Jenkins. In 2000, Amanda joined the Newcastle Institute of Public Health (NIPH) as a Research Officer with a research focus on health services research. She produced several papers and reports including the NHMRC “Using Socioeconomic Evidence in Clinical Practice Guidelines Handbook” and the Clinical Service Framework for Respiratory Disease for NSW Department of Health.

As part of her role, she tutored Medical Students at the University of Newcastle. While at NIPH, Amanda co-founded the Media Doctor website (mediadoctor.org.au) with Professor David Henry and has worked on the site as a reviewer and data manager since its inception in 2002. In 2005, Amanda and Professor David Henry were awarded the Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Critical Thinking’ for their work on Media Doctor. During this period (2001 - 2005) Amanda also completed a Master of Creative Arts in writing. She was awarded a full Postgraduate Research Scholarship and began a PhD in the Discipline of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health. Using data from the Media Doctor website, Amanda examined how the media deals with various aspects of health and the impact of the website on the quality of this reporting. Her thesis is one of only a handful worldwide in the area of health reporting and, probably the only one which uses an evidence-based appraisal of the quality of content.

In 2010, her thesis “Assessing the Quality of Health News Stories in the Australian Media Using the Media Doctor Website” was examined with no changes required and PhD awarded. Five papers have been published based on her PhD work, all in high quality peer-review journals, including PLoS Medicine, PLoS One and Medical Journal of Australia. Amanda is currently working with A/Prof Kyp Kypri, as a Research Academic using her research and web skills to perform online studies examining methodology and social desirability bias in the area of alcohol. She also continues her work in the area of health literacy and media content with the Media Doctor website.

Research Expertise
My research background involves expertise in both the humanities and health. I have explored the quality of health media in Australia and impact of this information of health literacy. My ongoing research with mediadoctor.org.au will examine ways of improving the quality of medical and scientific information that is transmitted through the media to the general public and the potential of raising health literacy. I am also exploring the use of web based platforms in health research including the most effective way to employ this medium for participant recruitment, online study data collection and database management. This research involves interventions examining social desirability bias and study methodology in the context of changes in social behaviour such as alcohol use.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Master of Creative Arts, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Health Journalism
  • Health literacy
  • Media
  • Web-based research

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Wilson A, The Medical Office, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 235 (2001)
2001 Wilson AJ, Medical Terminology, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 96 (2001)
2001 Wilson AJ, Medical Terminology, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 96 (2001)

Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Kypri K, Wilson A, Attia J, Sheeran PJ, McCambridge J, 'Effects of study design and allocation on self-reported alcohol consumption: randomized trial.', Trials, 16 127 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0642-0
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, John Attia
2012 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, Ewald BD, Henry D, 'What the public learns about screening and diagnostic tests through the media', Medical Journal of Australia, 197 324-326 (2012) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ben Ewald
2012 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Wilson AJ, 'How should debriefing be undertaken in web-based studies? Findings from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e157 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kypros Kypri
2011 Kypri K, McCambridge J, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sheeran P, Bowe S, Vater T, 'Effects of study design and allocation on participant behaviour- ESDA: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', Trials, 12 42 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-12-42
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors John Attia, Kypros Kypri
2011 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, 'Health news in the media: A dose of critical thinking is the best treatment', Issues, - 18-22 (2011) [C3]
2010 Wilson AJ, Robertson J, McElduff P, Jones AL, Henry DA, 'Does it matter who writes medical news stories?', PLoS Medicine, 7 1-5 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000323
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Mddah01
2010 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Jones AL, Henry DA, 'Deconstructing cancer: What makes a good-quality news story?', Medical Journal of Australia, 193 702-706 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mddah01, Billie Bonevski
2009 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Jones AL, Henry D, 'Media reporting of health interventions: Signs of improvement, but major problems persist', PLoS ONE, 4 e4831 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0004831
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2009 Wilson AJ, Kirkwood I, Henry D, Jones AL, 'Medicine in the news', Issues, 33-36 (2009) [C2]
2008 Bonevski B, Wilson AJ, Henry DA, 'An analysis of news media coverage of complementary and alternative medicine', PLoS ONE, 3 e2406 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0002406
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2006 Aldrich R, Bonevski B, Wilson AJ, 'A case study on determining and responding to health managers' priorities for research to assist health service decision making', Australian Health Review, 30 435-441 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2005 Smith DE, Wilson AJ, Henry DA, 'Monitoring the quality of medical news reporting: Early experience with media doctor', Medical Journal of Australia, 183 190-193 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Mddah01
2005 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sibbritt DW, 'Estimating the prevalence of urinary and faecal incontinence in Australia: systematic review', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 24 19-27 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00063.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, John Attia
2005 Schwitzer G, Mudur G, Henry DA, Wilson AJ, Goozner M, Simbra M, et al., 'What are the roles and responsibilities of the media in disseminating health information?', Plos Medicine, 2 576-582 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020215
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Mddah01
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the community: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of faecal incontinence: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Aldrich R, Kemp L, Stewart Williams JA, Harris E, Simpson S, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Using Socioeconomic evidence in clinical practice guidelines', BMJ, 327 1283-1285 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.327.7426.1283
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Stewartwilliams
2002 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson A, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters E, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma', The Cochrane Library, 2 CD001005 (2002) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2001 Gibson PG, Simpson J, Chalmers AC, Toneguzzi R, Wark PA, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, 'Airway Eosinophilia is associated with Wheeze but is uncommon in Children with Persistent Cough and Frequent Chest Colds', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 164 977-981 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark, Anita Chalmers, Jodie Simpson, Michael Hensley
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Hensley MJ, Walters EH, 'Self-management education and regular practitioner review for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online : Update Software), (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. This review was conducted to examine the strength of evidence supporting Step 6 of the Australian Asthma Management Plan: "Educate and Review Regularly"; to test whether health outcomes are influenced by education and self-management programmes. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of asthma self-management programmes, when coupled with regular health practitioner review, on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of self-management education in adults over 16 years of age with asthma. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for confirmation. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-five trials were included. Self-management education was compared with usual care in 22 studies. Self-management education reduced hospitalisations (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.88); emergency room visits (odds ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval (0.57 to 0.90); unscheduled visits to the doctor (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.82); days off work or school (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0. 79); and nocturnal asthma (odds ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.72). Measures of lung function were little changed. Self-management programmes that involved a written action plan showed a greater reduction in hospitalisation than those that did not (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.68). People who managed their asthma by self-adjustment of their medications using an individualised written plan had better lung function than those whose medications were adjusted by a doctor. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Training in asthma self-management which involves self-monitoring by either peak expiratory flow or symptoms, coupled with regular medical review and a written action plan appears to improve health outcomes for adults with asthma. Training programmes which enable people to adjust their medication using a written action plan appear to be more effective than other forms of asthma self-management.

Citations Scopus - 62
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson
2000 Gibson PG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Hensley MJ, Abramson M, Bauman A, Walters EH, 'Limited (information only) patient education programs for adults with asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online : Update Software), (2000)

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been co... [more]

BACKGROUND: A key component of many asthma management guidelines is the recommendation for patient education and regular medical review. A number of controlled trials have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of asthma education programmes. These programmes improve patient knowledge, but their impact on health outcomes is less well established. At its simplest level, education is limited to the transfer of information about asthma, its causes and its treatment. This review focused on the effects of limited asthma education. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of limited (i.e. information only) asthma education on health outcomes in adults with asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and controlled trials of individual asthma education involving information transfer only in adults over 16 years of age. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study authors were contacted for missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials were included. They were of variable quality. Limited asthma education did not reduce hospitalisation for asthma (weighted mean difference -0.03 average hospitalisations per person per year, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to 0.03). There was no effect on doctor visits, lung function and medication use. The effects on asthma symptoms were variable. There was no reduction in days lost from normal activity, but perceived asthma symptoms did improve after limited asthma education (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.86). In one study, limited asthma education was associated with reduced emergency department visits (weighted mean difference -2.76 average visits per person per year, 95% confidence interval -4.34 to 1.18). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Use of limited asthma education as it has been practiced does not appear to improve health outcomes in adults with asthma. However the use of information in the emergency department may be effective, but this needs to be confirmed.

Citations Scopus - 30
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
2000 Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long acting beta-agonists versus theophylline for maintenance treatment of asthma.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2000)

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta2-agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent diff... [more]

BACKGROUND: Theophylline and long acting beta2-agonists are bronchodilators used for the management of persistent asthma symptoms, especially nocturnal asthma. They represent different classes of drug with differing side-effect profiles. OBJECTIVES: To assess the comparative efficacy, safety and side-effects of long-acting beta-agonists and theophylline in the maintenance treatment of asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) were identified using the Cochrane Airways Group register. The register was searched using the following terms: asthma and theophylline and long acting beta-agonist or formoterol or foradile or eformoterol or salmeterol or bambuterol or bitolterol. Titles and abstracts were then screened to identify potentially relevant studies. The bibliography of each RCT was searched for additional RCTs. Authors of identified RCTs were contacted for other relevant published and unpublished studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All included studies were RCTs involving adults and children with clinical evidence of asthma. These studies must have compared oral sustained release and/or dose adjusted theophylline with an inhaled long-acting beta-agonist. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Potentially relevant trials, identified by screening titles and/or abstracts, were obtained. Two reviewers independently assessed full text versions of these trials to decided whether the trial should be included in the review, and assessed its methodological quality. Where there was disagreement between reviewers, this was resolved by consensus, or reference to a third party. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by simple agreement. Study authors were contacted to clarify randomisation methods, provide missing data, verify the data extracted and identify unpublished studies. Relevant pharmaceutical manufacturers were also contacted. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials met the inclusion criteria. Five used salmeterol and one, biltoterol. They were of varying quality. There was a trend for salmeterol to improve FEV1 more than theophylline in three studies and salmeterol use was associated with more symptom free nights. Bitolterol, used in only one study, was reported to be less effective than theophylline. Subjects taking salmeterol experienced fewer adverse events than those using theophylline (Relative Risk 0.38; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.25, 0.57). Significant reductions were reported for central nervous system adverse events (Relative Risk 0.51; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.30, 0.88) and gastrointestinal adverse events (Relative Risk 0.32; 95%Confidence Intervals 0.17, 0.59). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Salmeterol may be more effective than theophylline in reducing asthma symptoms including night waking and improving lung function. More adverse events occurred in subjects using theophylline when compared to salmeterol.

Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1999 Gibson PG, Wilson AJ, Wlodarczyk JH, Fakes K, Hensley MJ, 'Different patterns of airway inflammation during asthma exacerbation: a controlled dose reduction study.', JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, 103 S61-S61 (1999)
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Michael Hensley
1996 Woolley KL, Gibson PG, Carty K, Wilson AJ, Woolley MJ, 'Eosinophil apoptosis and the resolution of airway inflammation in asthma', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 154 237-243 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 215Web of Science - 190
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1996 Gibson PG, 'The use of continuous quality improvement methods to implement practice guidelines in asthma', Journal of Quality in Clinical Practice, 16 87-102 (1996)

National asthma management guidelines have improved awareness of the rising morbidity and mortality from asthma but have not been widely implemented at a local level. This paper d... [more]

National asthma management guidelines have improved awareness of the rising morbidity and mortality from asthma but have not been widely implemented at a local level. This paper describes the use of continuous quality improvement techniques to facilitate the implementation of asthma management guidelines within a tertiary hospital setting. A baseline audit demonstrated satisfactory emergency assessment and treatment, but identified poor compliance with the patient education aspects of the asthma management plan. An evaluation of the literature demonstrated that programs combining asthma education and management were effective when directed towards adults with a recent severe asthma exacerbation. An asthma education and management service was developed to address these deficits. A repeat audit was conducted which identified improvements in asthma control and management skills for patients attending the education program, together with reductions in asthma re-admission rates for patients referred to the service. Ongoing quality assessments will target nonattenders to the service and the maintenance of asthma skills. An area Asthma Health Outcomes Council was formed to address the issues of asthma management throughout the area health service.

Citations Scopus - 27
Co-authors Peter Gibson
Show 22 more journal articles

Review (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2004 Wark PA, Gibson PG, Wilson AJ, 'Azoles for Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis Associated With Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001108
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Peter Wark
2004 Shah S, Wilson AJ, Gibson PG, Coughlan J, 'Long Acting Beta-Agonists Versus Theophylline for Maintenance Treatment of Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD001281
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2004 Gibson PG, Powell HG, Coughlan J, Wilson AJ, Abramson M, Haywood P, et al., 'Self-Management Education and Regular Practitioner Review for Adults With Asthma', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2004) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 68
Co-authors Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Bonevski B, Wilson A, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION IN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTINGS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF STAFF AND CLIENT BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Wilson AJ, Assessing the quality of health news stories in the Australian media using the Media Doctor website, University of Newcastle (2010) [T3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $29,097

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $395

ANZAHPE?AMEA 2015, Newcastle Australia, 29 March-1 April 2015$395

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500416
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $28,702

Improving the quality of health news reports in the Australian media$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor David Henry, Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187253
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The quality of health news reports about complementary and alternative medicine in Australian lay media$8,702

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Alison Jones, Associate Professor Billie Bonevski, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Doctor Amanda Wilson
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187836
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Time to Rethink Resilience: New Directions in Theory, Assessment and Treatment Intervention
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Promoting active ageing in older people with mental disorders in Thai Primary Care Units: the development and psychometric testing of an assessment tool
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Amanda Wilson

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email amanda.wilson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49216635
Mobile 0427866688

Office

Room RW235
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan Campus
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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