Mr Peter Sinclair

Mr Peter Sinclair

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Peter is a dynamic, engaging and highly passionate renal health professional and educator who has been leading seismic changes in the world of renal education. Peter has worked in various nephrology departments throughout the United Kingdom and Australia, but now focuses his time on working with the new generation of nurses.

Research

Peter’s research interests lie in the areas of inter-dialytic weight gain and the utility of e-learning to improve confidence, knowledge, skills and behaviour relating to specialist nursing practice. He comfortable with qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research and is the current honorary research and innovation nephrology conjoint with the Hunter New England Local Health District and is working with clinical nurses to improve patient outcomes in a number of areas.

Teaching & Learning

Peter has extensive experience in the development, design and evaluation of e-simulation and high fidelity e-learning programs at both a national and international level. He has taught both at undergraduate and post-graduate levels primarily in the areas of clinical education & assessment, Communication, Clinical Governance, Mentorship, Leadership and Teaching & Learning.

Administration
Peter was the founder and inaugural chair of the Nephrology Educator’s Network, the education subgroup of the Renal Society of Australasia. He has previously sat as an external director for the Renal Society of Australasia (RSA) as well as chaired the RSA education committee. He sits on the editorial committee of the RSA Journal in addition to being a reviewer for numerous journals.

Collaborations
- Kidney Health Australia

- Renal Society of Australasia


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing, Australian Catholic University
  • Master of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Education
  • Kidney
  • Nephrology
  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • e-learning

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 50
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Dunbar-Reid K, Sinclair PM, Hudson D, 'Advancing renal education: Hybrid simulation, using simulated patients to enhance realism in haemodialysis education', Journal of Renal Care, 41 134-139 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association. SUMMARY: Background: Simulation is a well-established and proven teaching method, yet ... [more]

© 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association. SUMMARY: Background: Simulation is a well-established and proven teaching method, yet its use in renal education is not widely reported. Criticisms of simulation-based teaching include limited realism and a lack of authentic patient interaction. Method: This paper discusses the benefits and challenges of high-fidelity simulation and suggests hybrid simulation as a complementary model to existing simulation programmes. Conclusion: Through the use of a simulated patient, hybrid simulation can improve the authenticity of renal simulation-based education while simultaneously teaching and assessing technologically enframed caring.

DOI 10.1111/jorc.12112
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Bickhoff L, Levett-Jones T, Sinclair PM, 'Rocking the boat - nursing students' stories of moral courage: A qualitative descriptive study', Nurse Education Today, 42 35-40 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Aim: This paper profiles a qualitative study that examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situati... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Aim: This paper profiles a qualitative study that examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situations that negatively impact the quality of patient care and/or patient experience and the factors that encouraged or inhibited their willingness to speak up when they identified poor practice. Background: Clinical placements are an essential component of nursing programmes. However, placements are a reported source of stress for students, with many witnessing, or feeling compelled to participate in, poor practice. In these instances, nursing students require the moral courage to raise concerns in order to protect patient safety and dignity. Methods: This was a qualitative descriptive study. Nine nursing students and one nursing graduate from one semi-metropolitan university in Australia were interviewed and the data were thematically analysed. Findings: Four key themes emerged: (1) patient advocate identity, which had two sub-themes of knowing one's own moral code and previous life experiences; (2) consequences to the patient and to the participant; (3) the impact of key individuals; and (4) picking your battles. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of undergraduate nursing students identifying as patient advocates, the multitude of consequences students face when questioning the practice of a registered nurse, and the influence supervising nurses and clinical facilitators have on a student's decisions to intervene to protect patient safety. Further research is required to examine the factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that influence nursing students' moral courage and their decisions to intervene when poor practice is witnessed.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.03.030
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Sinclair PM, Kable A, Levett-Jones T, Booth D, 'The effectiveness of Internet-based e-learning on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes: A systematic review', International Journal of Nursing Studies, 57 70-81 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The contemporary health workforce has a professional responsibility to maintain competency in practice. However, some difficulties exist with acc... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The contemporary health workforce has a professional responsibility to maintain competency in practice. However, some difficulties exist with access to ongoing professional development opportunities, particularly for staff in rural and remote areas and those not enrolled in a formal programme of study. E-learning is at the nexus of overcoming these challenges. The benefits of e-learning have been reported in terms of increased accessibility to education, improved self-efficacy, knowledge generation, cost effectiveness, learner flexibility and interactivity. What is less clear, is whether improved self-efficacy or knowledge gained through e-learning influences healthcare professional behaviour or skill development, whether these changes are sustained, and whether these changes improve patient outcomes. Objective: To identify, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence for the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on health care professional behaviour and patient outcomes. Design: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted to assess the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes. Electronic databases including CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, MEDLINE, Mosby's Index, Scopus and Cochrane - CENTRAL were searched in July 2014 and again in July 2015. Quality assessment and data extraction: Studies were reviewed and data extracted by two independent reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute standardised critical appraisal and data extraction instruments. Data synthesis: Seven trials met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Due to substantial instructional design, subject matter, study population, and methodological variation between the identified studies, statistical pooling was not possible and a meta-analysis could not be performed. Consequently, the findings of this systematic review are presented as a narrative review. Results: The results suggest that e-learning was at least as effective as traditional learning approaches, and superior to no instruction at all in improving health care professional behaviour. There was variation in behavioural outcomes depending on the skill being taught, and the learning approach utilised. No papers were identified that reported the effectiveness of an e-learning programme on patient outcomes. Conclusion: This review found insufficient evidence regarding the effectiveness of e-learning on healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes, consequently further research in this area is warranted. Future randomised controlled trials should adhere to the CONSORT reporting guidelines in order to improve the quality of reporting, to allow evaluation of the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on healthcare professional behavio ur and patient outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2016.01.011
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2016 Sinclair P, Day JL, Kable, Levett-Jones, 'The barriers and facilitators to opportunistic CKD screening by general practice nurses', Nephrology, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/nep.12856
Co-authors Jenny Day, Ashley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones

Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Bennett PN, Sinclair PM, Schoch M, 'Caring for people with kidney dysfunction', Medical-surgical nursing: Critical thinking in client care (3rd Australian ed.), Pearson, Frenchs Forrest (2016)
2013 Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Dempsey IJ, Sinclair PM, 'Caring for a person with fluid and electrolyte imbalance', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 30-52 (2013) [B2]
Co-authors Kerry Hoffman, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011 Sinclair PM, Bennett P, 'Nursing care of clients with kidney disorders', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 900-948 (2011) [B2]

Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Bickhoff L, Sinclair PM, Levett-Jones T, 'Moral courage in undergraduate nursing students: A literature review', Collegian, 24 71-83 (2017) [C1]

© 2015 Australian College of Nursing Ltd Aim The aim of this review was to explore factors which facilitate or inhibit undergraduate nursing students¿ willingness to demonstrate... [more]

© 2015 Australian College of Nursing Ltd Aim The aim of this review was to explore factors which facilitate or inhibit undergraduate nursing students¿ willingness to demonstrate moral courage when confronted by poor patient care. Methods Included papers were those that met the criteria of being qualitative research that explored undergraduate nursing students¿ depictions of situations where moral courage was or was not demonstrated during clinical placements, with a particular focus on situations that impacted or had the potential to impact the quality of patient care. Papers were reviewed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Qualitative Research Checklist. The 15 papers included in the review were then thematically analysed. Findings The literature reports, despite feeling a moral obligation to act, most nursing students lack the moral courage to intervene or speak up when faced with poor practice. While students may subsequently report the behaviour, at the time of the event, they often remain passive spectators and sometimes even active participants. The major themes identified in the literature were: just a student, don't rock the boat, fear of consequences, mentor¿student relationship, and patient advocate identity. The literature also identified that nursing students suffer ongoing moral distress when they do not have the courage to confront poor practice. Conclusion There is a need for further research to explore positive examples of how nursing students demonstrate moral courage when undertaking clinical placements. These narratives have the potential to influence future students¿ attitudes, values and behaviours by providing stimulus materials for teaching.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2015.08.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2017 Sinclair PM, Levett-Jones T, Morris A, Carter B, Bennett PN, Kable A, 'High engagement, high quality: A guiding framework for developing empirically informed asynchronous e-learning programs for health professional educators', Nursing and Health Sciences, 19 126-137 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. E-learning involves the transfer of skills and knowledge via technology so that learners can access meaningful and authentic educationa... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. E-learning involves the transfer of skills and knowledge via technology so that learners can access meaningful and authentic educational materials. While learner engagement is important, in the context of healthcare education, pedagogy must not be sacrificed for edu-tainment style instructional design. Consequently, health professional educators need to be competent in the use of current web-based educational technologies so that learners are able to access relevant and engaging e-learning materials without restriction. The increasing popularity of asynchronous e-learning programs developed for use outside of formal education institutions has made this need more relevant. In these contexts, educators must balance design and functionality to deliver relevant, cost-effective, sustainable, and accessible programs that overcome scheduling and geographic barriers for learners. This paper presents 10 guiding design principles and their application in the development of an e-learning program for general practice nurses focused on behavior change. Consideration of these principles will assist educators to develop high quality, pedagogically sound, engaging, and inter active e-learning resources.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12322
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2016 Bickhoff L, Levett-Jones T, Sinclair PM, 'Rocking the boat - nursing students' stories of moral courage: A qualitative descriptive study', Nurse Education Today, 42 35-40 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Aim: This paper profiles a qualitative study that examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situati... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Aim: This paper profiles a qualitative study that examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situations that negatively impact the quality of patient care and/or patient experience and the factors that encouraged or inhibited their willingness to speak up when they identified poor practice. Background: Clinical placements are an essential component of nursing programmes. However, placements are a reported source of stress for students, with many witnessing, or feeling compelled to participate in, poor practice. In these instances, nursing students require the moral courage to raise concerns in order to protect patient safety and dignity. Methods: This was a qualitative descriptive study. Nine nursing students and one nursing graduate from one semi-metropolitan university in Australia were interviewed and the data were thematically analysed. Findings: Four key themes emerged: (1) patient advocate identity, which had two sub-themes of knowing one's own moral code and previous life experiences; (2) consequences to the patient and to the participant; (3) the impact of key individuals; and (4) picking your battles. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of undergraduate nursing students identifying as patient advocates, the multitude of consequences students face when questioning the practice of a registered nurse, and the influence supervising nurses and clinical facilitators have on a student's decisions to intervene to protect patient safety. Further research is required to examine the factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that influence nursing students' moral courage and their decisions to intervene when poor practice is witnessed.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.03.030
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Bradshaw W, Smith K, Sinclair PM, 'Advance care planning in nephrology care', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 12 26-30 (2016)

On completion of this continuing professional development (CPD) activity, participants will be able to: ¿ describe advanced care planning and its relationship to person-centred c... [more]

On completion of this continuing professional development (CPD) activity, participants will be able to: ¿ describe advanced care planning and its relationship to person-centred care ¿ identify who is responsible for initiating advance care planning discussions in their nephrology department ¿ identify the benefits of advanced care planning ¿ recall conversation triggers for raising the topic of advanced care planning. "A continuously learning health system can deliver truly patient centred care only when patient preferences - informed by medical evidence and provider expertise - Are elicited, integrated, and honoured." (Alston et al., 2012, p. 3).

2016 Sinclair PM, Kable A, Levett-Jones T, Booth D, 'The effectiveness of Internet-based e-learning on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes: A systematic review', International Journal of Nursing Studies, 57 70-81 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The contemporary health workforce has a professional responsibility to maintain competency in practice. However, some difficulties exist with acc... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: The contemporary health workforce has a professional responsibility to maintain competency in practice. However, some difficulties exist with access to ongoing professional development opportunities, particularly for staff in rural and remote areas and those not enrolled in a formal programme of study. E-learning is at the nexus of overcoming these challenges. The benefits of e-learning have been reported in terms of increased accessibility to education, improved self-efficacy, knowledge generation, cost effectiveness, learner flexibility and interactivity. What is less clear, is whether improved self-efficacy or knowledge gained through e-learning influences healthcare professional behaviour or skill development, whether these changes are sustained, and whether these changes improve patient outcomes. Objective: To identify, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence for the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on health care professional behaviour and patient outcomes. Design: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted to assess the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes. Electronic databases including CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, MEDLINE, Mosby's Index, Scopus and Cochrane - CENTRAL were searched in July 2014 and again in July 2015. Quality assessment and data extraction: Studies were reviewed and data extracted by two independent reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute standardised critical appraisal and data extraction instruments. Data synthesis: Seven trials met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Due to substantial instructional design, subject matter, study population, and methodological variation between the identified studies, statistical pooling was not possible and a meta-analysis could not be performed. Consequently, the findings of this systematic review are presented as a narrative review. Results: The results suggest that e-learning was at least as effective as traditional learning approaches, and superior to no instruction at all in improving health care professional behaviour. There was variation in behavioural outcomes depending on the skill being taught, and the learning approach utilised. No papers were identified that reported the effectiveness of an e-learning programme on patient outcomes. Conclusion: This review found insufficient evidence regarding the effectiveness of e-learning on healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes, consequently further research in this area is warranted. Future randomised controlled trials should adhere to the CONSORT reporting guidelines in order to improve the quality of reporting, to allow evaluation of the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on healthcare professional behavio ur and patient outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2016.01.011
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2016 Stephenson MD, Sinclair PM, 'Haemodialysis in patents at high risk of bleeding', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 12 62-71 (2016)
2016 Sinclair P, Day JL, Kable, Levett-Jones, 'The barriers and facilitators to opportunistic CKD screening by general practice nurses', Nephrology, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/nep.12856
Co-authors Jenny Day, Ashley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Sinclair PM, Day J, Levett-Jones T, Kable A, 'The barriers and facilitators to opportunistic CKD screening by general practice nurses.', Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.), (2016)
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2015 Dunbar-Reid K, Sinclair PM, Hudson D, 'Advancing renal education: Hybrid simulation, using simulated patients to enhance realism in haemodialysis education', Journal of Renal Care, 41 134-139 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association. SUMMARY: Background: Simulation is a well-established and proven teaching method, yet ... [more]

© 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association. SUMMARY: Background: Simulation is a well-established and proven teaching method, yet its use in renal education is not widely reported. Criticisms of simulation-based teaching include limited realism and a lack of authentic patient interaction. Method: This paper discusses the benefits and challenges of high-fidelity simulation and suggests hybrid simulation as a complementary model to existing simulation programmes. Conclusion: Through the use of a simulated patient, hybrid simulation can improve the authenticity of renal simulation-based education while simultaneously teaching and assessing technologically enframed caring.

DOI 10.1111/jorc.12112
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Sinclair P, Kable A, Levett-Jones T, 'The effectiveness of internet-based e-learning on clinician behavior and patient outcomes: A systematic review protocol', JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 13 52-64 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2015-1919
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2015 Sinclair PM, Pich J, Hennessy M, Wooding J, Williams J, Young S, Schoch M, 'Mentorship in the health disciplines', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 11 41-46 (2015) [C2]

Learning outcomes: On completion of this continuing professional development (CPD) activity, participants will be able to: ¿ identify strategies to support undergraduate students... [more]

Learning outcomes: On completion of this continuing professional development (CPD) activity, participants will be able to: ¿ identify strategies to support undergraduate students and new staff working in a supernumerary role; ¿ define the roles and responsibilities of the mentor and mentee; ¿ identify key attributes of successful mentors; ¿ discuss the stages of the mentor-mentee relationship and the key elements of each; ¿ describe a suitable strategy for engaging mentees and developing a mutually beneficial mentor-mentee partnership; ¿ enable staff to reflect on their current approaches to providing feedback to mentees and identify areas that may require change; and ¿ identify barriers to a successful mentor-mentee relationship;.

Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Tregaskis P, Sinclair PM, Lee A, 'Assessing patient suitability for peritoneal dialysis', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 11 105-110 (2015) [C1]
2015 Schoch ML, Toit DD, Marticorena RM, Sinclair PM, 'Utilising point of care ultrasound for vascular access in haemodialysis', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 11 78-82 (2015) [C2]

© 2015 Renal Society of Australasia Journal. Learning outcomes: On completion of this continuing professional development activity, participants will be able to: ¿ Discuss basic... [more]

© 2015 Renal Society of Australasia Journal. Learning outcomes: On completion of this continuing professional development activity, participants will be able to: ¿ Discuss basic ultrasound principles; ¿ Define the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in point of care ultrasound; ¿ Identify strategies to utilise ultrasound to provide quality cannulation practice; ¿ Identify anatomic structures on an ultrasound picture; ¿ Identify anomalies in the anatomy such as thrombus, stenosis, aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm; ¿ Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using ultrasound for assessment and cannulation; ¿ Enable staff to reflect on their current approaches to assessment and cannulation.

Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Sinclair PM, Carstairs M, Shanahan B, Schoch M, 'The development of a medication calculation competency and quality use of renal medicine e-learning program', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 10 58-60 (2014)

Medication calculation and administration are commonly performed nursing tasks. A consequence of this frequency is the potential for a higher incidence of medication-related error... [more]

Medication calculation and administration are commonly performed nursing tasks. A consequence of this frequency is the potential for a higher incidence of medication-related errors. One strategy to assess proficiency in medication calculation is an annual medication calculation competency quiz. Traditionally, these quizzes are done in paper form at an institutional level and require educators or managers to administer and mark the quiz manually by hand. This paper discusses the rationale, challenges and peer-review process associated with the development of an e-learning programme designed to assess proficiency in medication calculation and the quality use of renal medicines.

Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Bennett PN, Jaeschke S, Sinclair PM, Kerr PG, Holt S, Schoch M, et al., 'Increasing home dialysis knowledge through a web-based e-learning program', Nephrology, 19 345-351 (2014) [C1]

Aim There has been a global decline in the uptake of home-based dialysis therapies in the past 20 years. The ability to provide appropriate information to potential patients in th... [more]

Aim There has been a global decline in the uptake of home-based dialysis therapies in the past 20 years. The ability to provide appropriate information to potential patients in this area may be confounded by a lack of knowledge of home dialysis options. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based education package for health professionals to increase knowledge and positive perceptions of home-based dialysis options. Methods A three-module e-learning package concerning home dialysis was developed under the auspices of the home dialysis first project. These modules were tested on 88 undergraduate health professionals. Changes in attitudes and knowledge of home dialysis were measured using custom designed surveys administered electronically to students who completed the modules. Matched pre and post responses to the survey items were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results The pre survey indicated clear deficits in existing knowledge of home dialysis options. In particular, when asked if haemodialysis could be performed at home, 22% of participants responded 'definitely no' and a further 24% responded 'probably no'. Upon completion of the e-learning, post survey responses indicated statistically significant improvements (P < 0.001) in eight of the nine items. When asked if the e-learning had increased their knowledge about home dialysis, 99% of participants responded 'definitely yes'. Conclusion A suite of web-based education modules can successfully deliver significant improvements in awareness and knowledge around home dialysis therapies. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

DOI 10.1111/nep.12231
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Blackman IR, Mannix T, Sinclair PM, 'Developing renal nurses' buttonhole cannulation skills using e-learning', Journal of Renal Care, 40 55-63 (2014) [C1]

SUMMARY: Background: It has previously been shown that nurses can learn clinical nursing skills by e-learning (online), and that many variables will influence how well nurses adop... [more]

SUMMARY: Background: It has previously been shown that nurses can learn clinical nursing skills by e-learning (online), and that many variables will influence how well nurses adopt learned clinical skills using distance education. Objectives: This study aimed to identify and measure the strength of those factors which would simultaneously influence registered nurses' (RNs') beliefs about their own learning about buttonhole cannulation, using e-learning. Design: An online Likert style survey consisting of a list of statements related to knowledge and skill domains considered crucial in the area of buttonhole cannulation was distributed to 101 RNs before and after completing an e-learning programme. Participants were required to identify their current level of self-confidence in relationship to each of the statements. Measurements: Measures of RNs' self-rated abilities to assess and implement buttonhole cannulation after completing a related e-learning program were tested using a Partial Least Squares Analysis (PLS-PATH) programme. Results: The study's results strongly identify that the nurses' ability to meet both clinical and educational outcomes of the renal e-learning module can be predicted by six variables, none of which are directly related to the participants' demographic or clinical backgrounds. Conclusion: These findings support the use of e-learning to teach clinical skills to RNs, and demonstrate the value of Partial Least Squares Analysis in determining influential learning factors. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

DOI 10.1111/jorc.12047
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Sinclair PM, Bowen L, Donkin B, 'Professional nephrology nursing portfolios: Maintaining competence to practise', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 9 35-40 (2013) [C1]

Australian and New Zealand nurses are required to make statutory disclosures as part of their nursing registration renewal. One area of self-disclosure relates to maintaining comp... [more]

Australian and New Zealand nurses are required to make statutory disclosures as part of their nursing registration renewal. One area of self-disclosure relates to maintaining competence to practise. Nurses are required to develop and maintain a portfolio that demonstrates their assessment of practice, continuing professional development (CPD) and recency of practice in order to meet their registering bodies' required standards. One of the obstacles for nurses is a clear understanding of what constitutes a professional portfolio as well as what is required of them to demonstrate continuing competence. This paper discusses, from both the Australian and New Zealand regulation authorities' perspectives, the maintenance of competency, the requirements for demonstrating CPD, and how a professional portfolio assists in providing this evidence.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Lynette Bowen
2012 Hudson D, Dunbar-Reid K, Sinclair PM, 'The incorporation of high fidelity simulation training into hemodialysis nursing education: Part 2 a pictorial guide to modifying a high fidelity simulator for use in simulating hemodialysis', Nephrology Nursing Journal, 39 119-123 (2012) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011 Dunbar-Reid K, Sinclair PM, Hudson D, 'The incorporation of high fidelity simulation training into hemodialysis nursing education: An Australian unit's experience', Nephrology Nursing Journal, 38 463-472 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2011 Sinclair PM, Levett-Jones TL, 'The evolution of the Nephrology Educators' Network', Journal of Renal Care, 37 40-46 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1755-6686.2011.00208.x
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2011 Sinclair PM, Schoch M, Black K, Woods M, 'Proof of concept: Developing a peer reviewed, evidence-based, interactive e-learning programme', Journal of Renal Care, 37 108-113 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
2010 Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Harris MA, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the Neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', Nurse Education Today, 30 657-661 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.020
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone, Margaret Harris
2009 Sinclair PM, Parker VT, 'Pictures and perspectives: A unique reflection on interdialytic weight gain', Nephrology Nursing Journal, 36 589-596 (2009) [C1]
Show 20 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Sinclair PM, Parker VT, Kable AK, 'Pictures and perspectives: A unique reflection on interdialytic weight gain', Abstracts. 23rd International Nursing Research Congress (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Ashley Kable
2012 Bennett P, Sinclair PM, Kerr P, 'Home dialysis therapies e-learning project', Home Therapies Conference 2012: Breaking Down the Barriers (2012) [E3]
2012 Blackman I, Mannix T, Sinclair PM, 'Predicting the effectiveness of e-learning for the development of clinical skills in renal nurses', Partnerships: 7th ERGA Conference (2012) [E3]
2012 Sinclair PM, Carter B, 'An interactive poster to demonstrate the use of e-learning in CKD education', Renal Society of Australasia Journal (2012) [E3]
2012 Schoch M, Sinclair PM, Brown L, Shanahan B, Robinson T, Rose A, et al., 'Improving renal patient care without compromising safety: Interactive simulated e-learning', 3rd Conference on Leadership and Practice Development in Health: Quality and Safety through Workplace Learning. Technology and Simulation in Health. Conference Handbook (2012) [E3]
2012 Dunbar-Reid K, Sinclair PM, Hudson D, 'High fidelity simulation training in haemodialysis: An Australian unit's experience', 41st EDTNA/ERCA International Conference Abstract Book (2012) [E3]
2011 Sinclair PM, Herbert RD, Cooke D, Wall C, Barclay B, 'Transforming renal education: A virtual haemodialysis application', Abstracts: Renal Society of Australasia 39th Annual Conference (2011) [E3]
2011 Sinclair PM, Schoch M, Black K, 'Exploring new territory: Transforming renal education through e-learning, an evaluation study', RSA 2011: The Renal Society of Australasia Conference (2011) [E3]
2011 Sinclair PM, 'What does the future of renal nurse education look like?', 2nd Biennial Nephrology Educators Network Symposium 2011: Book of Abstracts (2011) [E3]
2011 Bennett PM, Sinclair PM, Herbert RD, Cooke D, 'Virtual haemodialysis: A training application for the future', 40th EDNTA/ERCA International Conference Abstract Book (2011) [E3]
2010 Sinclair PM, Black K, Schoch M, Blackman I, 'Using e-learning to increase the preparedness and confidence of nurses to perform buttonhole cannulation', 39th EDTNA/ERCA International Conference. Moving Together Education & Innovation in Renal Care (2010) [E3]
2010 Sinclair PM, Parker VT, 'A picture tells a thousand words: Living life with fluid restrictions', 39th EDTNA/ERCA International Conference. Moving Together Education & Innovation in Renal Care (2010) [E3]
2010 Schoch M, Black K, Sinclair PM, 'The development of an e-learning buttonhole cannulation to improve vascular access related outcomes', RSA 2010: Renal Society of Australasia Conference. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2009 Harris MA, Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00648.x
Co-authors Teresa Stone, Margaret Harris, Tracy Levett-Jones
Show 11 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $188,284

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $4,940

Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour small grant rounds $4,940

Funding to assist with the development of a high fidelity e-learning case study to improve opportunistic Chronic Kidney Disease Screening practices in the primary care setting

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Project Team

Peter Sinclair, Ashley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones

Scheme Pilot Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $6,000

Increasing consumer involvement to inform renal professional education $6,000

This project is exploring health consumer and renal nursing perspectives of what educational areas should be the focus of an Australasian renal education curriculum. This project is engaging with the consumers of renal services and nurses to answer three connected research questions:

  1. What do people undergoing peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis believe nurses need to learn in order to provide safe and effective care?
  2. What continuing professional development opportunities do nurses identify as essential to provide safe and effective care to people undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis?
  3. Do people on peritoneal or haemodialysis have convergent views with dialysis nurses regarding continuing professional development priorities?
In doing so, it will simultaneously partner with consumers, meet accreditation requirements and create a research framework for renal simulation, thus enabling staff education to be aligned with NSQHS standards.

Funding body: Gambro Pty Limited

Funding body Gambro Pty Limited
Project Team

Kelly Adams, Peter Sinclair, Paul Bennett

Scheme Graham Burnley Memorial Scholarship Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20121 grants / $171,890

Home Dialysis Therapies E-Learning Project (HD-TEL) $171,890

The Home Dialysis First project was one of twelve projects funded by the Victorian Department of Health as an initiative to increase the uptake of home dialysis therapies in Victoria. The aim of the project was to deliver a suite of online educational modules that provides information specific to home dialysis therapies suitable for use by people with kidney disease, healthcare professionals and students.

The paper associated with this grant is available here

Funding body: Victorian Department of Health

Funding body Victorian Department of Health
Project Team

Paul Bennett, Sadie Jaeske, Peter Kerr, Steven Holt, Bridie Kent, Peter Sinclair, Monica Schoch, Leanne Linehan, Francine Lynn, Bobbee Terrill, Penny Paton, Cath Wilson, Jen Howard and Annabel Ryan

Scheme Victoria DoH - Special Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20101 grants / $5,454

Virtual Haemodialysis Project$5,454

Funding body: Gambro Pty Limited

Funding body Gambro Pty Limited
Project Team Mr Peter Sinclair
Scheme Graham Burnley Memorial Scholarship Fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000803
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours Exploring the experiences of being a parent with a child who has Early Onset Scoliosis
&amp;lt;strong&amp;gt;Background&amp;lt;/strong&amp;gt;: Chronic childhood disease has a major impact on health related quality of life. Although an extensive body of research on caring for a child with a chronic illness exists, there is a paucity of literature on the parental experience of caring for a child with Early Onset Scoliosis (EOS). Consequently, the experiences of these parents is not well understood, despite a multitude of interrelated psychological, financial, social, physical and logistical factors that impact on parents of children living with scoliosis.&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;strong&amp;gt;Aim&amp;lt;/strong&amp;gt;: This study aims to identify and describe the experience of parents of children diagnosed with Early Onset Scoliosis living in Australia.&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;strong&amp;gt;Methods&amp;lt;/strong&amp;gt;: A qualitative descriptive design was used. A snowball sampling technique assisted in the recruitment of 12 mothers of children with EOS. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews.&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;strong&amp;gt;Results&amp;lt;/strong&amp;gt;: Four major themes relative to the experiences of parents emerged: emotional rollercoaster ride, a lack of resources, money talks and pervasive burden. Factors that impacted participants ability to confront, manage and endure living with Early Onset Scoliosis were then identified.&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;strong&amp;gt;Conclusion&amp;lt;/strong&amp;gt;: The results suggest there is a multitude of factors that influence the parental role of caring for a child with EOS. The recognition and accurate management of these burdens has the potential to increase the quality of life of parents caring for a child with Early Onset Scoliosis.
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Exploring how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage on clinical placement
&lt;p&gt;This study examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situations that negatively impact the quality of patient care and/or patient experience and the factors that encouraged or inhibited their willingness to speak up when they identified poor practice. The publication outputs of this research are provided below&lt;/p&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Bickhoff, L., Sinclair, P.M., &amp;amp; Levett-Jones, T. (2017). Moral courage in undergraduate nursing students: A literature review. &lt;em&gt;Collegian,&lt;/em&gt; 24(1), 71-83 &lt;em&gt;&amp;nbsp;&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Bickhoff, L., Levett-Jones, T. &amp;amp; &lt;strong&gt;Sinclair, P.M., &lt;/strong&gt;(2016). Rocking the boat - Nursing students' stories of moral courage: A qualitative descriptive study. &lt;em&gt;Nurse Education Today&lt;/em&gt;, 42, 35-40&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;&lt;p&gt;Laurie graduated with Honours (1st Class) and was the recipient of the Faculty of Health &amp;amp; Medicine medal and University medal on graduation&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Mr Peter Sinclair

Position

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Email peter.sinclair@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7436
Fax (02) 4921 6301

Office

Room RW2-36
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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