Dr Dominiek Coates

Dr Dominiek Coates

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science

Career Summary

Biography

Career summary: Dr Dominiek Coates is a counsellor and social scientist with expertise in working with vulnerable populations, mental health services, women’s health and safety, trauma-informed practice, evidence-based care, research methods, knowledge translation and behaviour change. She has extensive experience leading large research projects across a range of settings, including universities, hospitals, government and community managed organisations. Over the previous 15 years, Dominiek has led a number of research teams, led 25 studies as the principal investigator, and mentored in excess of 150 students and multidisciplinary healthcare professionals undertaking research. 

Dominiek is currently the Research Director for ANROWS, Australian’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. She is also a Senior Research Fellow with the Faculty of Health at the University of Technology Sydney, a Conjoint Senior Lecturer with the Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, and UNSW Medicine, Women 's and Children's Health.

Leadership and capacity building: From 2017 to 2020 she co-led the Maternal, Newborn and Women’s Clinical Academic Group (CAG) of SPHERE – the Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise. In this role Dominiek provided strategic direction in terms of the management of the CAG and played a key leadership role in building capacity in clinicians and students to translate evidence into practice. This CAG is one of 16 SPHERE CAGs that undertake translational research and aims to build implementation science knowledge and capacity in the workforce of two Sydney Local Health Districts (LHDs) and University research communities. 

Between 2012 and 2017, Dominiek worked as a translational researcher as part of the senior management team of the Central Coast Local Health District, where she collaborated with senior managers and clinicians to translate evidence into routine care and develop the District’s research capacity. She supported the District to embed research and service evaluation into ‘business as usual’ through a number of practices; the application of a translational research framework to service improvement initiatives; practices of continuous service evaluation and improvement; and collaboration with academics to enhance research rigour and dissemination. 

Between 2008 and 2012 she was the Research and Program Manager for Blue Knot Foundation. In this capacity, she developed a number of psycho-educational workshops for adult survivors of childhood abuse pertaining to the impacts of stress and trauma on child developing and related mental health impacts. These workshops provide survivors and those supporting them with a safe space in which to learn about the impacts of childhood trauma, and possibilities for the process of recovery. These workshops are now delivered to survivors throughout Australia, and have been a great success.

Knowledge translation and implementation science: Dominiek has expertise in knowledge translation and implementation science, in particular with an aim to improve the health and wellbeing of vulnerable populations, particular women and children and people with mental illness. While Dominiek is a mixed method researcher, she has particular expertise as a qualitative researcher, using participatory action research methodologies to help embed health care improvements into routine care. 

Publications and awards: Over the last ten years Dominiek has authored over 65 peer reviewed publications. She also won the Australian Council on Health Care Standards Quality Improvement Baxter Award in 2014 for a project titled “The Keep Them Safe Whole Family Team Gosford Pilot Project”, which she led in terms of implementation and evaluation.  

Teaching: Dr Dominiek Coates is a conjoint senior lecturer with the University of Newcastle, where she has taught a range of methods, policy and public health related courses, including Primary Health Care; Culture and Health; Health, Social Disadvantage and Substance Abuse; Psychology and Sociology for Health Professionals; and Applied Social Research. As a Lecturer at the Australian College of Applied Psychology between 2009 and 2013, she taught a number of counselling and applied research courses; including Contextualised Self; Research Practices and Methodologies; Applied Social Research; Introduction to Contemporary Society; Counselling Skills and Interpersonal Skills. She takes a student-centred approach to learning and encourages students to regard her as a facilitator of their learning rather than a repository of knowledge. As a qualified and experienced counsellor she has a keen eye for identifying, and breaking down, possible barriers that prevent learning.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Social Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • identity
  • implementation science
  • knowledge translation
  • mental health
  • new religious movements
  • service development
  • service evaluation
  • violence againts women and children
  • women's health
  • women's safety
  • youth mental health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
160807 Sociological Methodology and Research Methods 25
160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified 25

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2014 Quality & Innovation Awards 2014
Central Coast Local Health District. Caring for the Coast
2014 ACHS Quality Improvement Awards 2014
Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS)

Invitations

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Balancing personal autonomy and social connectedness: the role of New Religious Movements or 'Cult' membership from the perspectives of former members
Organisation: PACFA, CAPA and AARC Conference - Complexity and Connectedness in Life and Love: Working with Trauma, Mental Health and Identity Description: Invited Speaker
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Coates DD, 'New religious movements as avenues for self-change and the development of increased emotional connectedness', 40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction, Emerald, Bingley 271-305 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1108/S0163-2396(2013)0000040015
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2013 Coates D, 'Tensions Between Self and "Others" in the Making of the Self: The Role of Childhood Experiences in the Development of Reflexivity', Social Theories of History and Histories of Social Theory, Emerald, London 277-295 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1108/S0278-1204(2013)0000031008

Journal article (60 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Coates D, Donnolley N, Thirukumar P, Lainchbury A, Spear V, Henry A, 'Women s experiences of decision-making and beliefs in relation to planned caesarean section: A survey study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, (2020)

© 2020 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: The caesarean section (CS) rate is over 25% in many high-income countries, with... [more]

© 2020 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: The caesarean section (CS) rate is over 25% in many high-income countries, with a substantial minority of CSs occurring in women with low-risk pregnancies. CS decision-making is influenced by clinician and patient beliefs and preferences, and clinical guidelines increasingly stipulate the importance of shared decision-making (SDM). To what extent SDM occurs in practice is unclear. Aims: To identify women¿s birth preferences and SDM experience regarding planned CS. Material and Methods: Survey of women at eight Sydney hospitals booked for planned CS. Demographic data, initial mode of birth preferences, reason for CS, and experiences of SDM were elicited using questions with multiple choice lists, Likert scales, and open-ended responses. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data using content analysis. Responses of women who perceived their CS as 'requested' vs 'recommended' were compared. Results: Of 151 respondents, repeat CS (48%) and breech presentation (14%) were the most common indications. Only 32% stated that at the beginning of pregnancy they had a definite preference for spontaneous labour and birth. Key reasons for wanting planned CS were to avoid another emergency CS, prior positive CS experience, and logistical planning. Although 15% of women felt pressured (or were unsure) about their CS decision, the majority reported positive experiences, with over 90% indicating they were informed about CS benefits and risks, had adequate information, and understood information provided. Conclusions: The majority (85%) of women appeared satisfied with the decision-making process, regardless of whether they perceived their CS as requested or recommended.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.13255
2020 Coates D, Homer C, Wilson A, Deady L, Mason E, Foureur M, Henry A, 'Indications for, and timing of, planned caesarean section: A systematic analysis of clinical guidelines', Women and Birth, 33 22-34 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There has been a worldwide rise in planned caesarean sections over recent decades, with significant variations in practice betwee... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There has been a worldwide rise in planned caesarean sections over recent decades, with significant variations in practice between hospitals and countries. Guidelines are known to influence clinical decision-making and, potentially, unwarranted clinical variation. The aim of this study was to review guidelines for recommendations in relation to the timing and indications for planned caesarean section as well as recommendations around the process of decision-making. Method: A systematic search of national and international English-language guidelines published between 2008 and 2018 was undertaken. Guidelines were reviewed, assessed in terms of quality and extracted independently by two reviewers. Findings: In total, 49 guidelines of varying quality were included. There was consistency between the guidelines in potential indications for caesarean section, although guidelines vary in terms of the level of detail. There was substantial variation in timing of birth, for example recommended timing of caesarean section for women with uncomplicated placenta praevia is between 36 and 39 weeks depending on the guideline. Only 11 guidelines provided detailed guidance on shared decision-making. In general, national-level guidelines from Australia, and overseas, received higher quality ratings than regional guidelines. Conclusion: The majority of guidelines, regardless of their quality, provide very limited information to guide shared decision-making or the timing of planned caesarean section, two of the most vital aspects of guidance. National guidelines were generally of better quality than regional ones, suggesting these should be used as a template where possible and emphasis placed on improving national guidelines and minimising intra-country, regional, variability of guidelines.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.06.011
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Coates D, Donnolley N, Foureur M, Henry A, 'Women's experiences of decision-making and attitudes in relation to induction of labour: A survey study.', Women Birth, (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2020.02.020
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Coates D, Donnolley N, Foureur M, Spear V, Henry A, 'Exploring unwarranted clinical variation: The attitudes of midwives and obstetric medical staff regarding induction of labour and planned caesarean section', Women and Birth, (2020)

© 2020 Australian College of Midwives Background: Unexplained clinical variation is a major issue in planned birth i.e. induction of labour and planned caesarean section. Aim: To ... [more]

© 2020 Australian College of Midwives Background: Unexplained clinical variation is a major issue in planned birth i.e. induction of labour and planned caesarean section. Aim: To map attitudes and knowledge of maternity care professionals regarding indications for planned birth, and assess inter-professional (midwifery versus medical) and intra-professional variation. Methods: A custom-created survey of medical and midwifery staff at eight Sydney hospitals. Staff were asked to rate their level of agreement with 45 ¿evidence-based¿ statements regarding caesareans and inductions on a five-point Likert scale. Responses were grouped by profession, and comparisons made of inter- and intra-professional responses. Findings: Total 275 respondents, 78% midwifery and 21% medical. Considerable inter- and intra-professional variation was noted, with midwives generally less likely to consider any of the planned birth indications ¿valid¿ compared to medical staff. Indications for induction with most variation in midwifery responses included maternal characteristics (age=40, obesity, ethnicity) and fetal macrosomia; and for medical personnel in-vitro fertilisation, maternal request, and routine induction at 39 weeks gestation. Indications for caesarean with most variation in midwifery responses included previous lower segment caesarean section, previous shoulder dystocia, and uncomplicated breech; and for medical personnel uncomplicated dichorionic twins. Indications with most inter-professional variation were induction at 41+ weeks versus 42+ weeks and cesarean for previous lower segment caesarean section. Discussion: Both inter- and intra-professional variation in what were considered valid indications reflected inconsistency in underlying evidence and/or guidelines. Conclusion: Greater focus on interdisciplinary education and consensus, as well as on shared decision-making with women, may be helpful in resolving these tensions.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2020.07.003
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Coates D, Thirukumar P, Spear V, Brown G, Henry A, 'What are women's mode of birth preferences and why? A systematic scoping review', Women and Birth, 33 323-333 (2020)

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: The optimal caesarean section rate is estimated to be between 10¿15%; however, it is much higher in high and many middle-income c... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: The optimal caesarean section rate is estimated to be between 10¿15%; however, it is much higher in high and many middle-income countries and continues to be lower in some middle and low-income countries. While a range of factors influence caesarean section rates, women's mode of birth preferences also play a role. The aim of this study was to map the literature in relation to women's mode of birth preferences, and identify underlying reasons for, and factors associated with, these preferences. Method: Using a scoping review methodology, quantitative and qualitative evidence was systematically considered. To identify studies, PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, MEDLINE, and Web of Science were searched for the period from 2008 to 2018, and reference lists of included studies were examined. Findings: A total of 65 studies were included. While the majority of women prefer a vaginal birth, between 5¿20% in high-income countries and 1.4 to 50% in low-middle-income countries prefer a caesarean section. The six main reasons or factors associated with a mode of birth preference were: (1) perceptions of safety; (2) fear of pain; (3) previous birth experience; (4) encouragement and dissuasion from health professionals; (5) social and cultural influences; and (6) access to information and educational levels. Conclusion: To help ensure women receive the required care that is aligned with their preferences, processes of shared decision-making should be implemented. Shared decision-making has the potential to reduce the rate of unnecessary interventions, and also improve the willingness of women to accept a medically-indicated caesarean section in low-income countries.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.09.005
Citations Scopus - 4
2020 Coates D, Homer C, Wilson A, Deady L, Mason E, Foureur M, Henry A, 'Induction of labour indications and timing: A systematic analysis of clinical guidelines', Women and Birth, 33 219-230 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There is widespread and some unexplained variation in induction of labour rates between hospitals. Some practice variation may st... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There is widespread and some unexplained variation in induction of labour rates between hospitals. Some practice variation may stem from variability in clinical guidelines. This review aimed to identify to what extent induction of labour guidelines provide consistent recommendations in relation to reasons for, and timing of, induction of labour and ascertain whether inconsistencies can be explained by variability guideline quality. Method: We conducted a systematic search of national and international English-language guidelines published between 2008 and 2018. General induction of labour guidelines and condition-specific guidelines containing induction of labour recommendations were searched. Guidelines were reviewed and extracted independently by two reviewers. Guideline quality was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II Instrument. Findings: Forty nine guidelines of varying quality were included. Indications where guidelines had mostly consistent advice included prolonged pregnancy (induction between 41 and 42 weeks), preterm premature rupture of membranes, and term preeclampsia (induction when preeclampsia diagnosed =37 weeks). Guidelines were also consistent in agreeing on decreased fetal movements and oligohydramnios as valid indications for induction, although timing recommendations were absent or inconsistent. Common indications where there was little consensus on validity and/or timing of induction included gestational diabetes, fetal macrosomia, elevated maternal body mass index, and twin pregnancy. Conclusion: Substantial variation in clinical practice guidelines for indications for induction exists. As guidelines rated of similar quality presented conflicting recommendations, guideline variability was not explained by guideline quality. Guideline variability may partly account for unexplained variation in induction of labour rates.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.06.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2020 Coates D, Thirukumar P, Henry A, 'The experiences of shared decision-making of women who had an induction of labour', Patient Education and Counseling, (2020)

© 2020 Elsevier B.V. Objectives: The importance of shared decision-making (SDM) in relation to induction of labour (IOL) is recognised, little is known about women's experien... [more]

© 2020 Elsevier B.V. Objectives: The importance of shared decision-making (SDM) in relation to induction of labour (IOL) is recognised, little is known about women's experiences of and satisfaction with decision-making and how this can be improved. The aim of this study was to 1) gain insight into women's experiences of SDM in relation to IOL, 2) understand the factors associated with satisfaction versus dissatisfaction during SDM, and 3) identify recommendations for service improvement. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 32 women who had a recent IOL at one of eight public hospitals in Sydney, Australia. An inductive approach to coding and categorisation of themes was used. Results: While women reported varied experiences with SDM, many reported not feeling that they had a choice about IOL, not being presented with the risks and benefits of different birth options, and receiving insufficient information about the IOL process and methods. Satisfaction versus dissatisfaction with SDM appeared more closely related to a woman's willingness to have an IOL and their willingness to defer decision-making, rather than the process of SDM. Recommendations for improvement included improved SDM practices, access to guidelines and continuity of care. Conclusion: There is a need to improve SDM processes around IOL. Practice implications: Particular areas for improvement include more comprehensive discussions surrounding the pros and cons of different birth methods and the IOL process. Decision aids and clinician training may assist with SDM.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2020.08.020
2020 Coates D, Thirukumar P, Henry A, 'Making shared decisions in relation to planned caesarean sections: What are we up to?', Patient Education and Counseling, 103 1176-1190 (2020)

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To map the literature in relation to shared decision making (SDM) for planned caesarean section (CS), particularly women's experiences in rece... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To map the literature in relation to shared decision making (SDM) for planned caesarean section (CS), particularly women's experiences in receiving the information they need to make informed decisions, their knowledge of the risks and benefits of CS, the experiences and attitudes of clinicians in relation to SDM, and interventions that support women to make informed decisions. Methods: Using a scoping review methodology, quantitative and qualitative evidence was systematically considered. To identify studies, PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, MEDLINE, and Web of Science were searched for the period from 2008 to 2018. Results: 34 studies were included, with 9750 women and 3313 clinicians. Overall women reported limited SDM, and many did not have the information required to make informed decisions. Clinicians generally agreed with SDM, while recognising it often does not occur. Decision aids and educational interventions were viewed positively by women. Conclusion: Many women were not actively involved in decision-making. Decision aids show promise as a SDM-enhancing tool. Studies that included clinicians suggest uncertainty regarding SDM, although willingness to engage. Practice implications: Moving from clinician-led decision-making to SDM for CS has potential to improve patient experiences, however this will require considerable clinician training, and implementation of SDM interventions.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2019.12.001
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Simmons MB, Grace D, Fava NJ, Coates D, Dimopoulos-Bick T, Batchelor S, et al., 'The Experiences of Youth Mental Health Peer Workers over Time: A Qualitative Study with Longitudinal Analysis', COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, 56 906-914 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s10597-020-00554-2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2020 Rogers HJ, Hogan L, Coates D, Homer CSE, Henry A, 'Responding to the health needs of women from migrant and refugee backgrounds Models of maternity and postpartum care in high-income countries: A systematic scoping review', Health and Social Care in the Community, 28 1343-1365 (2020)

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Pregnant women from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in high-income countries (HIC) are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes co... [more]

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Pregnant women from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in high-income countries (HIC) are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with women born in the host country. Women from migrant and refugee background have perinatal healthcare needs that are recognised internationally as a public health priority. The aim of this study was to identify, appraise and synthesise available evidence on the effectiveness of models of care in pregnancy or first 12¿months postpartum for women from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in HIC. Care models were mapped in terms of (a) effectiveness at improving service access, (b) effectiveness at improving maternal and infant health outcomes, (c) acceptability and appropriateness from the perspective of women and (d) acceptability and appropriateness from the perspective of service providers. Using systematic scoping review methodology, qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research published in English 2008¿2019 were included. The databases MEDLINE, Embase, Emcare, PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Joanna Briggs Institute were searched between 27 February 2019 and updated 27 December 2019. Qualitative and quantitative data were analysed narratively. Seventeen studies, involving 1,499 women and 203 service providers, were included. A diverse range of interventions were identified, including bilingual/bicultural workers, group antenatal care and specialised clinics. All identified interventions were acceptable to women, and improved access, however, few provided evidence of improved perinatal outcomes. Gaps identified for future research include the use of qualitative and quantitative approaches to ascertain the experiences of women, their families, service providers and impact on perinatal outcomes. Synthesis of the included studies indicates the key elements of acceptable and accessible models, which were as follows: culturally responsive care, continuity of care, effective communication, psychosocial and practical support, support to navigate systems, flexible and accessible services.

DOI 10.1111/hsc.12950
2020 Coates D, Makris A, Catling C, Henry A, Scarf V, Watts N, et al., 'A systematic scoping review of clinical indications for induction of labour', PLoS ONE, 15 (2020)

© 2020 Coates et al. Background The proportion of women undergoing induction of labour (IOL) has risen in recent decades, with significant variation within countries and between h... [more]

© 2020 Coates et al. Background The proportion of women undergoing induction of labour (IOL) has risen in recent decades, with significant variation within countries and between hospitals. The aim of this study was to review research supporting indications for IOL and determine which indications are supported by evidence and where knowledge gaps exist. Methods A systematic scoping review of quantitative studies of common indications for IOL. For each indication, we included systematic reviews/meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and case control studies that compared maternal and neonatal outcomes for different modes or timing of birth. Studies were identified via the databases PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, CINAHL, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov from between April 2008 and November 2019, and also from reference lists of included studies. We identified 2554 abstracts and reviewed 300 full text articles. The quality of included studies was assessed using the RoB 2.0, the ROBINS-I and the ROBIN tool. Results 68 studies were included which related to post-term pregnancy (15), hypertension/preeclampsia (15), diabetes (9), prelabour rupture of membranes (5), twin pregnancy (5), suspected fetal compromise (4), maternal elevated body mass index (BMI) (4), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (3), suspected macrosomia (3), fetal gastroschisis (2), maternal age (2), and maternal cardiac disease (1). Available evidence supports IOL for women with post-term pregnancy, although the evidence is weak regarding the timing (41 versus 42 weeks), and for women with hypertension/preeclampsia in terms of improved maternal outcomes. For women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (24-37 weeks), highquality evidence supports expectant management rather than IOL/early birth. Evidence is weakly supportive for IOL in women with term rupture of membranes. For all other indications, there were conflicting findings and/or insufficient power to provide definitive evidence. Conclusions While for some indications, IOL is clearly recommended, a number of common indications for IOL do not have strong supporting evidence. Overall, few RCTs have evaluated the various indications for IOL. For conditions where clinical equipoise regarding timing of birth may still exist, such as suspected macrosomia and elevated BMI, researchers and funding agencies should prioritise studies of sufficient power that can provide quality evidence to guide care in these situations.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0228196
Citations Scopus - 3
2020 Thirukumar P, Coates D, Henry A, 'Women's experiences of intrapartum care and recovery in relation to planned caesarean sections: An interview study', Women and Birth, (2020)

© 2020 Australian College of Midwives Problem and background: Approximately one third of women in high-income countries give birth by caesarean section (CS). Better understanding ... [more]

© 2020 Australian College of Midwives Problem and background: Approximately one third of women in high-income countries give birth by caesarean section (CS). Better understanding of women's CS experiences is vital in identifying opportunities to improve women's experience of care. Aim: To identify opportunities for service improvement by investigating Australian women's experiences of care and recovery when undergoing a planned CS. Methods: Qualitative telephone interview study with 33 women who had a planned CS at one of eight Australian hospitals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit women's perspectives, experiences and beliefs surrounding their planned CS. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively using NVivo-12. Results: Women's experiences of CS care were mixed. Regarding intrapartum care, many women stated their planned CS was a positive experience compared to a previous emergency CS, but was scarier and more medicalised compared to vaginal birth. CS recovery was viewed more negatively, with women feeling unprepared. They reported disliking how CS recovery restricted their role as a mother, wanting more time in hospital, and greater support and continuity of care. Discussion: Women reported largely positive intrapartum experiences of planned CS but relatively negative experiences of CS recovery. They wished for time in hospital and support from staff during recovery, and continuity of care. Conclusion: By incorporating shared decision-making antenatally, clinicians can discuss women's birth expectations with them and better prepare them for their planned CS and recovery.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2020.05.001
2020 Coates D, Clerke T, 'Training Interventions to Equip Health Care Professionals With Shared Decision-Making Skills: A Systematic Scoping Review', The Journal of continuing education in the health professions, 40 100-119 (2020)

INTRODUCTION: To support the development, implementation, and evaluation of shared decision-making (SDM) training programs, this article maps the relevant evidence in terms of tra... [more]

INTRODUCTION: To support the development, implementation, and evaluation of shared decision-making (SDM) training programs, this article maps the relevant evidence in terms of training program design and content as well as evaluation outcomes. METHOD: A systematic scoping review methodology was used. To identify studies, the databases PubMed, Medline, and CINAHL were searched from 2009 to 2019, and reference lists of included studies were examined. After removal of duplicates, 1367 articles were screened for inclusion. To be included, studies were to be published in peer-reviewed journals, and should not merely be descriptive but report on evaluation outcomes. Articles were reviewed for inclusion by both authors, and data were extracted using a purposely designed data charting form implemented using REDCap. RESULTS: The review identified 49 studies evaluating 36 unique SDM training programs. There was considerable variation in terms of program design and duration. Most programs included an overview of SDM theories and key competencies, as well as SDM skill development through role plays. Few programs provided training in reflective practice, in identifying and working with patients' individually preferred decision-making style, or in relation to SDM in a context of medical uncertainty or ambiguity. Most programs were evaluated descriptively, mostly using mixed methods, and there were 18 randomized controlled trials, showing that training was feasible, well received, and improved participants' knowledge and skills, but was limited in its impact on patients. DISCUSSION: Although there is limited capacity to comment on which types of training programs are most effective, overall training was feasible, well received, and improved participants' knowledge and skills.

DOI 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000289
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Coates D, Coppleson D, Schmied V, 'Integrated physical and mental healthcare: an overview of models and their evaluation findings', International journal of evidence-based healthcare, 18 38-57 (2020)

BACKGROUND: Comorbid physical and mental health problems are common across the age spectrum. However, services addressing these health concerns are typically siloed and disconnect... [more]

BACKGROUND: Comorbid physical and mental health problems are common across the age spectrum. However, services addressing these health concerns are typically siloed and disconnected. Over the past 2 decades efforts have been made to design integrated services to address the physical and mental health needs of the population but little is known about the characteristics of effective integrated care models. The aim of the review was to map the design of integrated care initiatives/models and to describe how the models were evaluated and their evaluation findings. METHOD: Using a scoping review methodology, quantitative and qualitative evidence was systematically considered. To identify studies, Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, CINAHL were searched for the period from 2003 to 2018, and reference lists of included studies and review articles were examined. RESULTS: The current review identified 43 studies, describing 37 models of integrated physical and mental healthcare. Although modest in terms of evaluation design, it is evident that models are well received by consumers and providers, increase service access, and improve physical and mental health outcomes. Key characteristics of models include shared information technology, financial integration, a single-entry point, colocated care, multidisciplinary teams, multidisciplinary meetings, care coordination, joint treatment plan, joint treatment, joint assessment/joint assessment document, agreed referral criteria and person-centred care. Although mostly modest in term of research design, models were well received by consumers and providers, increased service access and improved physical and mental health outcomes. There was no clear evidence regarding whether models of integrated care are cost neutral, increase or reduce costs. CONCLUSION: Future research is needed to identify the elements of integrated care that are associated with outcomes, measure cost implications and identify the experiences and priorities of consumers and clinicians.

DOI 10.1097/XEB.0000000000000215
2020 Coates D, Mickan S, 'The embedded researcher model in Australian healthcare settings: comparison by degree of embeddedness ', Translational Research, 218 29-42 (2020)

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. The embedded researcher model is a health-academic partnership where researchers are core members of a healthcare organization, with an aim to support evidenc... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. The embedded researcher model is a health-academic partnership where researchers are core members of a healthcare organization, with an aim to support evidence translation. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and experiences of embedded researchers in Australian healthcare settings, and investigate how the model is experienced differently based on the level of ¿embeddedness.¿ This exploratory study utilized a purpose-designed online survey. Responses were described using Word and Excel and analyzed using SPSS. To investigate how the model was experienced based on the level of ¿embeddedness,¿ we tested for differences in responses between respondents with primary academic vs healthcare affiliations. A total of 104 embedded researchers from nursing and midwifery, allied health and medicine completed the survey, with equal numbers reporting a primary academic vs primary healthcare affiliation. Most indicated that research is a strategic objective of the healthcare organization (85.9%) yet almost a third (31%) reported that research outputs were not measured. While 60% agreed that clinical practice informed by research was valued, only 28% reported having adequate resources. Of those with a formal dual affiliation over a quarter reported conflict between expectations of the healthcare and academic organizations. Respondents with a primary academic affiliation were older, more qualified, had more research experience, had been in the role longer, and had more positive perceptions of the research culture of healthcare organizations. This study provides a starting point for healthcare organizations and academic institutions to partner in the further development and implementation of this model.

DOI 10.1016/j.trsl.2019.10.005
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Coates D, Mickan S, 'Challenges and enablers of the embedded researcher model', Journal of Health Organization and Management, 34 743-764 (2020)

© 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The embedded researcher is a healthcare-academic partnership model in which the researcher is engaged as a core member of the healthca... [more]

© 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The embedded researcher is a healthcare-academic partnership model in which the researcher is engaged as a core member of the healthcare organisation. While this model has potential to support evidence translation, there is a paucity of evidence in relation to the specific challenges and strengths of the model. The aim of this study was to map the barriers and enablers of the model from the perspective of embedded researchers in Australian healthcare settings, and compare the responses of embedded researchers with a primary healthcare versus a primary academic affiliation. Design/methodology/approach: 104 embedded researchers from Australian healthcare organisations completed an online survey. Both purposive and snowball sampling strategies were used to identify current and former embedded researchers. This paper reports on responses to the open-ended questions in relation to barriers and enablers of the role, the available support, and recommendations for change. Thematic analysis was used to describe and interpret the breadth and depth of responses and common themes. Findings: Key barriers to being an embedded researcher in a public hospital included a lack of research infrastructure and funding in the healthcare organisation, a culture that does not value research, a lack of leadership and support to undertake research, limited access to mentoring and career progression and issues associated with having a dual affiliation. Key enablers included supportive colleagues and executive leaders, personal commitment to research and research collaboration including formal health-academic partnerships. Research limitations/implications: To support the embedded researcher model, broader system changes are required, including greater investment in research infrastructure and healthcare-academic partnerships with formal agreements. Significant changes are required, so that healthcare organisations appreciate the value of research and support both clinicians and researchers to engage in research that is important to their local population. Originality/value: This is the first study to systematically investigate the enablers and challenges of the embedded researcher model.

DOI 10.1108/JHOM-02-2020-0043
2020 Coates D, Thirukumar P, Henry A, 'Women s experiences and satisfaction with having a cesarean birth: An integrative review', Birth, 47 169-182 (2020)

© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Background: With around one third of woman having a cesarean birth, better understanding of women's experiences of having a cesarean is vital t... [more]

© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Background: With around one third of woman having a cesarean birth, better understanding of women's experiences of having a cesarean is vital to improve women's experiences of care. The aim of this review was to gain insight into women's experiences of and satisfaction with cesarean and to identify factors that contribute to women's poor experiences of care. Methods: Using an integrative methodology, evidence was systematically considered in relation to women's experiences of cesarean birth and whether they were satisfied with their experience of care. To identify studies, PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, MEDLINE, and Web of Science were searched for the period from 2008 to 2018, and reference lists of included studies were examined. Results: Twenty-six studies were included. Although the majority of women were satisfied with their cesarean, a large minority of women were dissatisfied and reported a negative experience. In particular, women who had an emergency cesarean were less satisfied than women who had a vaginal birth. Nonmedical factors or experiences that appear associated with dissatisfaction include (a) feeling ignored and disempowered; (b) experiencing a loss of control; (c) not being informed; and (d) birth values that favor vaginal birth. Conclusions: Women's experiences of cesarean birth appear influenced by the circumstances (emergency vs planned), the extent to which they felt involved in decision-making and in control of their experience, and their birth values and beliefs. Increasing antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum communication and shared decision-making may help engage women as an active participant in their own birth.

DOI 10.1111/birt.12478
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Coates D, Goodfellow A, Sinclair L, 'Induction of labour: Experiences of care and decision-making of women and clinicians', Women and Birth, 33 e1-e14 (2020)

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There has been a rise in induction of labour over recent decades. There is some tension in the literature in relation to when ind... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: There has been a rise in induction of labour over recent decades. There is some tension in the literature in relation to when induction is warranted and when not, with variability between guidelines and practice. Given these tensions, the importance of shared decision-making between clinicians and women is increasingly highlighted as paramount, but it remains unclear to what extent this occurs in routine care. Method: Using a scoping review methodology, quantitative and qualitative evidence were considered to answer the research question ¿What are the views, preferences and experiences of women and clinicians in relation to induction of labour more broadly, and practices of decision-making specifically?¿ To identify studies, the databases PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched from 2008 to 2018, and reference lists of included studies were examined. Findings: 20 papers met inclusion criteria, in relation to (a) women's preferences, experiences and satisfaction with IOL; (b) women's experience of shared-decision making in relation to induction; (c) interventions that improve shared decision-making and (d) factors that influence decision-making from the perspective of clinicians. Synthesis of the included studies indicates that decision-making in relation to induction of labour is largely informed by medical considerations. Women are not routinely engaged in the decision making process with expectations and preferences largely unmet. Conclusion: There is a need to develop strategies such as decision aids, the redesign of antenatal classes, and clinician communication training to improve the quality of information available to women and their capacity for informed decision-making.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.06.002
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Coates D, Wright L, Moore T, Pinnell S, Merillo C, Howe D, 'The psychiatric, psychosocial and physical health profile of young people with early psychosis: Data from an early psychosis intervention service', CHILD & YOUTH SERVICES, 40 93-115 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/0145935X.2018.1553613
Citations Web of Science - 1
2019 Chivaurah BM, Lienert D, Coates D, 'Amphetamine-type-substance-related presentations to the Emergency Department Mental Health Team of a local health district in Australia', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 27 369-373 (2019)
DOI 10.1177/1039856219848836
2019 Coates D, David M, Roberts B, Duerden D, 'An examination of the profile and journey of patients with mental illness in the emergency department', International Emergency Nursing, 43 15-22 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ienj.2018.06.003
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2019 Coates D, Saleeba C, Howe D, 'Mental Health Attitudes and Beliefs in a Community Sample on the Central Coast in Australia: Barriers to Help Seeking', COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, 55 476-486 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s10597-018-0270-8
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2019 Coates D, Foureur M, 'The role and competence of midwives in supporting women with mental health concerns during the perinatal period: A scoping review', Health and Social Care in the Community, 27 e389-e405 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Perinatal mental health problems are linked to poor outcomes for mothers, babies and families. Despite a recognition of the significance of this... [more]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Perinatal mental health problems are linked to poor outcomes for mothers, babies and families. Despite a recognition of the significance of this issue, women often do not receive the care they need and fall between the gap of maternity and mental health services. To address this, there is a call for reform in the way in which perinatal mental healthcare is delivered. This paper responds to this by exploring the role and competence of midwives in delivering mental healthcare. Using a scoping review methodology, quantitative and qualitative evidence were considered to answer the research question ¿what is the nature of the evidence relevant to the provision of mental health interventions by midwives?¿ To identify studies, the databases PubMed, Maternity and Infant Care, Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Medline, Science Direct and CINAHL were searched from 2011 to 2018, and reference lists of included studies were examined. Studies relevant to the role of midwives in the management and treatment of perinatal mental health issues were included; studies focussed on screening and referral were excluded. Thirty papers met inclusion criteria, including studies about the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of midwives and student midwives; the effectiveness of educational interventions in improving knowledge and skills; the delivery of counselling or psychosocial interventions by midwives; and barriers and enablers to embedding midwife-led mental healthcare in practice. Synthesis of the included studies indicates that midwives are interested in providing mental health support, but lack the confidence, knowledge and training to do so. This deficit can be addressed with appropriate training and organisational support, and there is some evidence that midwife-led counselling interventions are effective. Further research is needed to test midwife-led interventions for women with perinatal mental health problems, and to develop and evaluate models of integrated perinatal mental healthcare.

DOI 10.1111/hsc.12740
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Maralyn Foureur
2018 Coates D, Woodford P, Higgins O, Grover D, 'Evaluation of a general practitioner-led cardiometabolic clinic: Physical health profile andtreatment outcomes for clients on clozapine', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, 27 303-310 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12321
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2018 Coates D, Saleeba C, Howe D, 'Profile of consumers and their partners of a perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) service in Australia', Health and Social Care in the Community, 26 e154-e163 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd The perinatal period is a time of great vulnerability for many women, in particular those with a range of psychosocial vulnerabilities and menta... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd The perinatal period is a time of great vulnerability for many women, in particular those with a range of psychosocial vulnerabilities and mental health risk factors. This paper outlines the psychosocial and mental health profile of consumers and their partners of a perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) service in Australia. To establish the consumer profile, we analysed client vulnerabilities and demographical information maintained over a 6-year period for 406 consumers. Consumer information, including mental health problems, psychosocial vulnerabilities and demographical information, was entered into a standalone database by the allocated clinicians upon service allocation and throughout treatment. The women accepted by PIMH presented with an average of nine different vulnerabilities. Frequently endorsed risk factors included depression (72.66%), anxiety (71.43%), comorbid depression and anxiety (58.13%), self-harm (past, 7.88%, present, 16.26%), a history of family mental health issues (39.66%), childhood trauma (57.88%), limited support (68.84%), relationship conflict with partners (38.92%) and financial stress (47.29%). The women's partners also presented with a range of vulnerabilities, in particular childhood trauma (34.11%) and mental health issues (30.81%). This study contributes to our understanding of the profile of vulnerable women in the perinatal period, and in particular contributes to the literature by highlighting that in addition to depression, anxiety, self-harm and trauma are also significant in PIMH service delivery.

DOI 10.1111/hsc.12489
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Coates D, 'Service Models for Urgent and Emergency Psychiatric Care An Overview', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOCIAL NURSING AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES, 56 23-30 (2018)
DOI 10.3928/02793695-20180212-01
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2018 Simmons MB, Coates D, Batchelor S, Dimopoulos-Bick T, Howe D, 'The CHOICE pilot project: Challenges of implementing a combined peer work and shared decision-making programme in an early intervention service', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY, 12 964-971 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/eip.12527
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2018 Dharni A, Coates D, 'Psychotropic medication profile in a community youth mental health service in Australia', Children and Youth Services Review, 90 8-14 (2018)

© 2018 Aim: There has been a rise in the use of psychotropic medication in young people, despite limited risk-benefit profile of psychotropic medication for this population. Given... [more]

© 2018 Aim: There has been a rise in the use of psychotropic medication in young people, despite limited risk-benefit profile of psychotropic medication for this population. Given their side effect profile, the use of psychotropic medications should occur with caution. This study investigated psychotropic prescribing pattern in a public youth community mental health service and gives an estimate of general level of psychotropic medication use in this setting. Methods: A retrospective file review was undertaken of all young people aged 12¿17 who received care from the service in 2016 (N = 189) for a range of mental health problems, excluding psychosis. Files were reviewed for demographical information (age, gender), diagnosis/presenting issues, prescribed medications, indications of medications, and prescriber type (e.g. psychiatrist, general practitioners (GPs), paediatrician). The data was analysed descriptively. Results: Over 60% (60.8%, n = 115) of young people were prescribed psychotropic medications. Over half of the entire sample were on antidepressants (51.32%, n = 97), nearly a quarter (n = 46, 24%) on antipsychotics, 6% on ADHD medications (6.35%, n = 12), and a fifth (19.58%, n = 37) on polypharmacy. Antidepressants and antipsychotics were mostly used off-label, prescribed by public psychiatric staff. Quetiapine was the most prescribed antipsychotic predominantly for insomnia. Fluoxetine and fluvoxamine were the most prescribed antidepressants predominantly for anxiety disorders. Girls are more likely to be prescribed psychotropic medications than boys, specifically antipsychotic medication. Conclusions: A high proportion of young people were prescribed psychotropic medication, including antipsychotic medication, mostly for the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders. There is little evidence around how psychotropic medication is used in youth mental health settings, and this study contributes to this gap.

DOI 10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.05.007
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Coates D, Livermore P, Green R, 'The development and implementation of a peer support model for a specialist mental health service for older people: lessons learned', Mental Health Review Journal, 23 73-85 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: There has been a significant growth in the employment of peer workers over the past decade in youth and adult mental health settings. ... [more]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: There has been a significant growth in the employment of peer workers over the past decade in youth and adult mental health settings. Peer work in mental health services for older people is less developed, and there are no existing peer work models for specialist mental health services for older people in Australia. The authors developed and implemented a peer work model for older consumers and carers of a specialist mental health service. The purpose of this paper is to describe the model, outline the implementation barriers experienced and lesson learned and comment on the acceptability of the model from the perspective of stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach: To ensure the development of the peer work model met the needs of key stakeholders, the authors adopted an evaluation process that occurred alongside the development of the model, informed by action research principles. To identify stakeholder preferences, implementation barriers and potential solutions, and gain insight into the acceptability and perceived effectiveness of the model, a range of methods were used, including focus groups with the peer workers, clinicians and steering committee, consumer and carer surveys, field notes and examination of project documentation. Findings: While the model was overall well received by stakeholders, the authors experienced a range of challenges and implementation barriers, in particular around governance, integrating the model into existing systems, and initial resistance to peer work from clinical staff. Originality/value: Older peer workers provide a valuable contribution to the mental health sector through the unique combination of lived experience and ageing. The authors recommend that models of care are developed prior to implementation so that there is clarity around governance, management, reporting lines and management of confidentiality issues.

DOI 10.1108/MHRJ-09-2017-0043
2017 Coates D, Howe D, 'Improving throughput in a youth mental health service', International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 30 224-234 (2017)

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The discrepancy between increasing demand and limited resources in public mental health is putting pressure on services to continuou... [more]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The discrepancy between increasing demand and limited resources in public mental health is putting pressure on services to continuously review their practices and develop innovative models of care that redress this discrepancy. To ensure the service models continue to meet the needs of all stakeholders, children and young people¿s mental health (CYPMH) conducts regular reviews of its service models. Accordingly, the youth mental health (YMH) model at CYPMH has evolved significantly over time in response to the needs of young people and service demand. The purpose of this paper is to outline the findings of a recent review of the YMH service, and the subsequent changes to the service model. Design/methodology/approach: Informed by a participatory action philosophy, feedback was sought from staff on the service model through a range of methods including a questionnaire, staff consultations through a working party and interviews. This feedback was used to redesign the model, which was then evaluated again. Findings: Staff identified a number of challenges with the service model and a range of service improvement solutions. The key issues included exceedingly high caseloads, workplace tensions, and fragmentation of the client journey. This paper outlines the primary solution to these key concerns, namely, the introduction of brief intervention (BI) as the entry point to the service. Originality/value: BI approaches provide a solution to overly high caseloads as the direct and focussed approach of BI generally reduces the number of sessions people need. BI is an important addition to other treatment options and should be seen as a valid component of the continuum of mental healthcare.

DOI 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2016-0062
2017 Coates D, Davis E, Campbell L, 'The experiences of women who have accessed a perinatal and infant mental health service: a qualitative investigation', ADVANCES IN MENTAL HEALTH, 15 88-100 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/18387357.2016.1242374
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Linda E Campbell
2017 Coates D, Phelan R, Heap J, Howe D, '"Being in a group with others who have mental illness makes all the difference": The views and experiences of parents who attended a mental health parenting program', CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES REVIEW, 78 104-111 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.05.015
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2017 Coates D, 'Working with families with parental mental health and/or drug and alcohol issues where there are child protection concerns: Inter-agency collaboration', Child and Family Social Work, 22 1-10 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/cfs.12238
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
2017 Howe D, Batchelor S, Coates DD, 'Young Australians with moderate to severe mental health problems: client data and outcomes at Children and Young People's Mental Health', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 11 334-341 (2017) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd Aim: Almost a quarter of young Australians experience a mental health issue that may become chronic if left untreated. Children and Young Peop... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd Aim: Almost a quarter of young Australians experience a mental health issue that may become chronic if left untreated. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH) is a specialist tertiary service for young people with moderate to severe mental health problems on the Central Coast in Australia. This paper presents an overview of client data and service use collected over a 1 year period specific to the Youth Mental Health (YMH) component of the service. Method: Client data, including demographic characteristics, service usage, presenting issues and standardized outcome measures, were analysed using SPSS. Clinicians routinely collect MH-OAT (Mental Health Outcomes and Assessment Tools) measures at different points in a client's episode of care, and each of these measures was analysed separately. Wilcoxon Z and a series of McNemar's tests were used to report on the difference between admission and discharge scores. Results: During a designated 1 year period, 830 referrals to YMH were received. The most prevalent presenting issue was suicidal ideation followed by deliberate self-harm and depression. A comparison of admission and discharge outcome scores shows significant improvement by discharge on a range of measures. Specifically, analysis identified significant differences between admission and discharge HoNOSCA (Health of the Nation Outcomes Scales for Children and Adolescents) and CGAS (Children's Global Assessment Scale) scores for young people aged 12¿17 and HONOS (Health of the Nation Outcomes Scale) scores for young people aged 18¿24. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes for young people are positive with improvements seen on a range of measures.

DOI 10.1111/eip.12252
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2016 Coates D, Howe D, 'An evaluation of a service to keep children safe in families with mental health and/or substance abuse issues.', Australas Psychiatry, 24 483-488 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1039856216634821
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Coates D, 'Client and parent feedback on a Youth Mental Health Service: The importance of family inclusive practice and working with client preferences.', Int J Ment Health Nurs, 25 526-535 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/inm.12240
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Coates D, Howe D, 'Integrating a youth participation model in a youth mental health service: Challenges and lessons learned', Child and Youth Services, 37 287-300 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Crown copyright. Youth participation in mental health settings is fundamental to service design and delivery, and is beneficial for the young people involved as well as the... [more]

© 2016 Crown copyright. Youth participation in mental health settings is fundamental to service design and delivery, and is beneficial for the young people involved as well as the organisation. This paper presents the findings of an evaluation of a youth participation model where tiered participation was attempted in a clinical youth mental health setting. To inform the ongoing development and improvement of a youth participation model, an evaluation was conducted consisting of three focus groups with the youth consultants, consultations with management about the implementation of the tiered participation model, and a review of records. The purpose of this evaluation was to identify possible barriers to implementation early on so these could be addressed and a youth participation model that meets the needs of all key stakeholders could be developed. The findings of this evaluation and the way in which these findings informed the model's development are discussed.

DOI 10.1080/0145935X.2015.1119652
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2016 Coates DD, 'Life inside a deviant "religious" group: Conformity and commitment as ensured through 'brainwashing' or as the result of normal processes of socialisation', International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 44 103-121 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The 'dependency inducing practices', sometimes called 'brainwashing', that are commonly alleged to occur in deviant "religious" ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The 'dependency inducing practices', sometimes called 'brainwashing', that are commonly alleged to occur in deviant "religious" groups such as a cult movements or new religious movements are not well understood and have promoted considerable debate. There is a general agreement that many of these groups are controlled environments in which conformity to behavioural, emotive, cognitive and social expectations as determined by leadership is expected and enforced; however, whether conformity is the result of normal processes of socialisation or deviant practices such as brainwashing that cause harm continues to be disputed. To gain an increased understanding of the conformity and commitment inducing practices that occur in 'cult movements', the accounts of group life of 23 former members of 11 different groups were analysed. A conceptualisation of 'brainwashing' as on a continuum of social influence is proposed, and some legal implications are discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijlcj.2015.06.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2015 Coates D, Howe D, 'Combatting staff burnout in mental health: key managerial and leadership tasks that are fundamental to staff wellbeing and retention', Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management, 10 24-32 (2015) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 4
2015 Coates DD, Howe D, 'The design and development of staff wellbeing initiatives: Staff stressors, burnout and emotional exhaustion at Children and Young People s Mental Health in Australia', Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 42 655-663 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10488-014-0599-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2015 Coates D, Howe D, 'Working with families who experience parental mental health and/or drug and alcohol problems in the context of child protection concerns: Recommendations for service improvement.', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 36 325-341 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/anzf.1113
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2014 Coates D, Howe D, 'The importance and benefits of youth participation in mental health settings from the perspective of the headspace Gosford Youth Alliance in Australia', Children and Youth Services Review, 46 294-299 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Objectives: Young people's participation in decision making that affects them is increasingly recognised and valued as a right. Youth partic... [more]

© 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Objectives: Young people's participation in decision making that affects them is increasingly recognised and valued as a right. Youth participation in mental health settings is fundamental to service design and delivery, and is beneficial for the young people as well as the organisation. Headspace recognises the many benefits of youth participation with its national and local youth participation initiatives. In 2013, headspace Gosford in Australia established its current youth participation model, called the Youth Alliance (YA), consisting of 12 young people. These young people contribute ideas and opinions around service design and delivery, and participate in a range of activities. Method: This paper presents the findings of a focus group conducted with the YA immediately following recruitment. All 12 young people participated in a two hour focus group which sought to identify the key reasons these young people joined the YA, and what they hope to achieve in their capacity of YA consultants. Results: The two main reasons participants joined the YA are to help 'overcome barriers to help seeking and ensure young people get the support they need' and 'to build confidence, social skills and make new friends'. The barriers to help seeking identified by the participants are consistent with those outlined in the literature. Conclusion: Youth participation in youth mental health settings is beneficial to young people as well as organisations and the community, and it is crucial that strategies are put in place to increase youth participation. The ways in which these young people perceive their participation as beneficial to themselves as well as the organisation and the community is the focus of this paper.

DOI 10.1016/j.childyouth.2014.09.012
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2014 Coates DD, 'New Religious Movement Membership and the Importance of Stable 'Others' for the Making of Selves', JOURNAL OF RELIGION & HEALTH, 53 1300-1316 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10943-013-9715-0
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Howe D, Coates D, Batchelor S, 'Headspace Gosford data: The local application of a National model', Australasian Psychiatry, 22 374-377 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: Despite the high prevalence of mental health problems for young Australians, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek help. Until recently t... [more]

Objectives: Despite the high prevalence of mental health problems for young Australians, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek help. Until recently there was a tendency for young Australians to fall between the gap of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Adult Mental Health Services, and this has contributed to low rates of service use for young people. In 2006, the Australian Government sought to redress this gap in service delivery with its establishment of the Australian National Youth Mental Health Foundation, headspace. This paper presents demographic data collected at headspace Gosford over a 5.5-year period. Conclusions: The data presented indicates that headspace Gosford has been successful in improving early access to mental health treatment for young people on the Central Coast, in particular for young people aged 14-18. Headspace Gosford has attracted young people of both sexes, with a higher proportion of females. The majority of young people access headspace for mental health problems, predominantly depression and anxiety; however, a significant proportion report physical health or alcohol and drug-related reasons. The likelihood of these referral reasons is informed by gender and age. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

DOI 10.1177/1039856214540758
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2014 Coates DD, 'New religious movement membership and the importance of stable 'others' for the making of selves', Journal of religion and health, 53 1300-1316 (2014)

Challenging the view that people join New Religious Movements because they have fallen victim to powerful brainwashing techniques, the analysis of in-depth life history interviews... [more]

Challenging the view that people join New Religious Movements because they have fallen victim to powerful brainwashing techniques, the analysis of in-depth life history interviews of 23 former members from 11 different Australian 'cults' suggests that membership was personally negotiated and motivated by a desire for stronger social connections, albeit for different reasons. While for some participants, a desire for social connectedness was related to a strong need for guidance and direction from 'stable' others, for others it reflected a desire for self-change or self-enhancement. To make sense of the participant narratives, symbolic interactionist understandings of the self are applied.

DOI 10.1007/s10943-013-9715-0
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Howe D, Batchelor S, Coates D, Cashman E, 'Nine key principles to guide youth mental health: development of service models in New South Wales', EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY, 8 190-197 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eip.12096
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2013 Coates D, 'The Effect of New Religious Movement Affiliation and Disaffiliation on Reflexivity and Sense of Self', JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, 52 793-809 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jssr.12069
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Coates DD, 'Disaffiliation from a New Religious Movement: The Importance of Self and Others in Exit', Symbolic Interaction, 36 314-334 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/symb.60
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Coates D, 'Balancing Personal Autonomy and Social Connectedness: the Role of New Religious Movements or 'Cult' Membership from the Perspective of Former Members', Psychotherapy in Australia, 19 56-64 (2013) [C1]
2013 Coates DD, 'A symbolic interactionist understanding of the selves of former members of New Religious Movements', Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 16 1066-1079 (2013) [C1]

The current study investigates the construction of self in New Religious Movement (NRM) membership and argues that there is significant variation in the way in which members const... [more]

The current study investigates the construction of self in New Religious Movement (NRM) membership and argues that there is significant variation in the way in which members construct their sense of self. While the majority of the literature suggests that differences in the way in which former members describe and experience NRM membership can be attributed to gender and the nature of the group, analysis of the life histories of 23 former members identified variations in the way in which these participants construct their sense of self as significant to understanding NRM membership. While some participants describe selves that are high in conformity or social connectedness, and depict NRM membership as motivated by a need for guidance and direction, others describe selves that appear high in individuality and personal autonomy and depict membership as motivated by a desire to overcome isolation and develop social connectedness. Even though these two narratives are conceptualised as distinct, they are not viewed as dichotomous but understood as on a continuum. To make sense of the selves of the participants in this study symbolic interactionist understandings of the self as to varying degrees informed by both "self" and "others" are applied. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/13674676.2012.737315
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Coates D, ''Cult commitment' from the perspective of former members: Direct rewards of membership versus dependency inducing practices', Deviant Behavior, 33 168-184 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/01639625.2010.548302
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2012 Coates D, ''I'm now far healthier and better able to manage the challenges of life': The mediating role of new religious movement membership and exit', Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 14 181-208 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/19349637.2012.697372
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012 Coates D, 'The significance and purpose of the 'anti-cult movement' in facilitating disaffiliation from a new religious movement: Resources for self-construction or a justificatory account', International Journal for the Study of New Religions, 3 213-244 (2012) [C1]
2011 Coates D, 'Counselling former members of charismatic groups: Considering pre-involvement variables, reasons for joining the group and corresponding values', Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 14 191-207 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13674670903443404
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 4
2010 Coates D, ''Best Practice' Guidelines for working with Adult Survivors of Childhood Abuse', Counselling Australia, 10 3-12 (2010)
2010 Coates D, 'Post-involvement difficulties experienced by former members of charismatic groups', Journal of Religion and Health, 49 296-310 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10943-009-9251-0
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2010 Coates D, 'Impact of childhood abuse: Biopsychosocial pathways through which adult mental health is compromised', Australian Social Work, 63 391-403 (2010) [C1]

The relationship between childhood abuse and adult mental and physical health problems is well documented. Over the lifespan of victims of child abuse, social, psychological and b... [more]

The relationship between childhood abuse and adult mental and physical health problems is well documented. Over the lifespan of victims of child abuse, social, psychological and biological consequences of abuse interact in complex ways. A biopsychosocial model is applied to the experiences of adult victims of child abuse to make sense of the complex and varied impacts of child abuse. The long-term difficulties experienced by adult victims of child abuse are discussed in relation to the neurobiological impacts of child abuse on the child's developing brain. The impact of child abuse on neuro-endocrine functioning and the structure of the brain, in particular on the amygdala, hippocampus, left hemisphere, and corpus callosum are explored. A number of implications for social work practice are outlined. © 2010 Australian Association of Social Workers.

DOI 10.1080/0312407X.2010.508533
Citations Scopus - 22
2010 Coates D, 'Working with Adult Survivors of Childhood Abuse: a Review of Existing Treatment Models', Psychotherapy in Australia, 17 12-21 (2010) [C1]
2009 Coates D, 'Former members of charismatic groups: Modalities of adjustment', Psychotherapy in Australia, 16 24-31 (2009) [C1]
2008 Kennedy DJ, Coates D, 'Retirement village resident satisfaction in Australia: A qualitative enquiry', Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 22 311-334 (2008) [C1]

There has been limited research into the types of customer satisfaction experienced by residents in leisure-oriented retirement communities, particularly in Australia and the Unit... [more]

There has been limited research into the types of customer satisfaction experienced by residents in leisure-oriented retirement communities, particularly in Australia and the United Kingdom. Focus groups were conducted at a series of retirement communities. Results have lead to the development of a typology of retirement community resident satisfaction containing five different domains, including the Built Environment, the Financial Environment, the Service Delivery Environment, the Social Environment, and the Spiritual Environment. Furthermore, these five satisfaction domains encompass up to 24 distinct types or facets of customer satisfaction experienced by residents. This proposed typology of leisure-oriented retirement communities' resident satisfaction is the most comprehensive investigation of retirement village customer satisfaction to date. Implications for both researchers and practitioners are discussed, including recommendations for the measuring, managing, and marketing of customer satisfaction with retirement community living. © 2008 by The Haworth Press. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/02763890802458403
Citations Scopus - 12
Show 57 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Hanlon MC, O'Brien AP, MacIsaac P, Fogarty M, Bjorksten C, Hunt M, et al., 'Quality clozapine care (QC2): Using the patient journey to understand the lived experience of taking clozapine, to improve value-based person-centered care', EUROPEAN PSYCHIATRY (2018)
Co-authors Mary-Claire Hanlon, Tony Obrien
2018 Dharni A, Coates D, Padencheri S, 'PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATION PROFILE IN YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH SETTINGS IN AUSTRALIA', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2018)
2007 Kennedy D, Coates D, 'Costumer satisfaction in senior living resorts: A qualitative investigation' (2007) [E1]
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Dr Dominiek Coates

Positions

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email dominiek.coates@newcastle.edu.au
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