The University of Newcastle, Australia

COVID-19 UPDATE FOR WATT SPACE EVENTS

The health and wellbeing of our students, staff and visitors is our top priority and in accordance with the latest Government advice regarding COVID-19, some student and community events have been cancelled or postponed.

The exhibition and events schedule for Watt Space is undergoing revision. We will advise of any further updates or changes as they are made. Thank you for your understanding.

Contemporary and dynamic, Watt Space operates in the University’s Newcastle City precinct in an award winning re-purposed civic building, Northumberland House. Its heritage facade opens to industrial style galleries within, designed by UON alumnus Andrew Donaldson.

Watt Space, the longest running student gallery in Australia, is celebrating 31 years as an inspirational cultural hub for our students and community. In 2020 the gallery welcomes an extended student internship program to support its exciting and diverse calendar of exhibitions. If you are interested in volunteering at Watt Space, you can find more information here.

Watt Space Entry at Night

MARCH EXHIBITIONS

[CENSURATIVA] - Crystian Cruz
EPHEMERAL COMPOSITIONS
- Kathryn Jeanes
COMMUNE WITH NATURE - Mary Graham
UNKNOWN LANDS - Susan Zglinicki

6 - 29 MARCH

OPENING FRIDAY 6 MARCH FROM 5:30PM

Crystian Cruz, [Censurativa] 2020

[CENSURATIVA] - Crystian Cruz

What are the consequences of censorship on activities that involve creative work? Songs, soap operas, newspapers, books and magazines are among the censored artefacts examined in Cruz’s practice-based PhD research. This exhibition presents a visual journey through creative attempts to circumvent censorship during the Brazilian dictatorship (1964-1985). Put your creativity to the test through an interactive typographic experiment that emulates the experience of encountering censorial activities and censored material.

Crystian Cruz, [Censurativa] 2020, digital collage.

Kathryn Jeanes, Ephemeral Compositions 2017

EPHEMERAL COMPOSITIONS - Kathryn Jeanes

This exhibition from Jeanes unites research into a dark colonial period when young girls were incarcerated, with abstract themes derived from reparative art.

Jeanes explores and communicates materiality through the use of decommissioned hospital sheeting - used for the assembly of strait jackets, paper torn from books and cotton thread used to bind.

Kathryn Jeanes, Ephemeral Compositions 2017, photographic print, 45 x 45 cm

Mary Graham, Mad About You 2020

COMMUNE WITH NATURE - Mary Graham

Commune with Nature explores the respect for nature granted by the appreciation of flora through artistic practice, particularly the process of natural dyeing.

Focussing on the colours and textures of the bark and fallen leaves of gum trees, Graham’s work contributes to a contemporary revival of natural dyeing methods and presents an ode to the inherent beauty of nature.

Mary Graham, Mad About You 2020 botanical print on cotton dyed with Madder, 147 x 99 cm

Susan Zglinicki, Unknown Lands 2 2018

UNKNOWN LANDS - Susan Zglinicki

The quality of light, the beauty of the natural world and the use of landscape tap into our primal connection to the earth. This is demonstrated by our ability to be submerged in its isolation and loneliness, with the seemingly contradictory belief that we are in control over it and that its beauty is therefore for our pleasure alone. In our relationship to landscape there is an ebb and flow between knowledge and uncertainty, between complacence and fear. These works echo the transient nature of the landscape and act as a tribute to the transient lives of the women who have, throughout history, painted it.

Susan Zglinicki, Unknown Lands 2 2016, ink on canvas, 27 x 29 cm


COMING SOON

TRUTH: THEN / NOW / EVERYWHEN 
1 APRIL - 3 MAY

Curated by Matt Dickson and Deborah Sims.
Presented in support of the Newcastle Writers Festival 2020.

OPENING FRIDAY 3 APRIL FROM 5:30PM

Sally Mulda, Abbott’s Camp 2016

TRUTH: THEN / NOW / EVERYWHEN emerged from a theoretical exhibition presented in the context of a submission to the editor at a prominent Australian art magazine, exploring ideas around truth-telling, brutality and the story of Australia’s past. On the 250th anniversary of Cook’s voyage to Australia in 1770, the exhibition presents artworks by contemporary Aboriginal artists whose works challenge both the way we approach and tell our history and the very notion of art itself.

In ways that are innovative, poetic and generous, these works transcend the stories of then and now, and instead inhabit the everywhen: an ever-present time that is constantly regenerated.

Sally Mulda, Abbott’s Camp 2016, acrylic on linen 125 x 200 cm. Courtesy Tangentyere Artists and the Sims Dickson Collection.