Dr Dylan Cuskelly

Lecturer

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at the University of Newcastle in Mechanical Engineering with a focus on the synthesis of novel materials. Through my early work, I investigated advanced ceramics known as MAX phases, discovering previously unknown phases and developing new synthesis processes. This work remains active today and has expanded into the emerging group of MAB phases where the discovery of new phases any reaction pathways are being explored. 

While working in the Advanced Materials group at Newcastle, Dr Heber Sugo, Prof Erich Kisi and I developed a new call of metal alloys that can be used for storing thermal energy. We called these materials MGAs and after many years of fundamental research investigating their low-risk high storage capacity, these materials have emerged as commercially viable energy storage media. This has lead to the commercialisation of the technology through the founding of the company MGA Thermal which I am a director. This has given me a rare experience to see a technology move from conceptual all the way through the research phase into commercial applications. 

My other passion is Education - specifically engaging teaching of engineering and STEM concepts at a university level. I have designed developed and deliver a new engineering practice course and am perpetually working on other courses to improve the ways in which we can best deliver content to help students learn. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical) (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Energy Storage
  • Materials Science
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • STEM Education
  • Technical Ceramics
  • engineering

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department

Awards

Teaching Award

Year Award
2017 Excellence in Teaching and Learning
University of Newcastle
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Kisi E, Sugo H, Cuskelly D, Fiedler T, Rawson A, Post A, et al., 'Miscibility Gap Alloys: A New Thermal Energy Storage Solution', Transition Towards 100% Renewable Energy: Selected Papers from the World Renewable Energy Congress WREC 2017, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 523-532 (2018) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-69844-1_48
Co-authors James Bradley, Thomas Fiedler, Erich Kisi

Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Richardson PJ, Keast VJ, Cuskelly DT, Kisi EH, 'Theoretical and experimental investigation of the W-Al-B and Mo-Al-B systems to approach bulk WAlB synthesis', Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 41 1859-1868 (2021)

© 2020 Elsevier Ltd MAB phases are a family of ternary transition metal borides with a layered crystal structure, that provides them with properties likely to be suitable for appl... [more]

© 2020 Elsevier Ltd MAB phases are a family of ternary transition metal borides with a layered crystal structure, that provides them with properties likely to be suitable for applications within extreme environments. Here, we report a computational and experimental examination of the W-Al-B system compared to the isostructural Mo-Al-B system. Utilising DFT calculations, WAlB and MoAlB were found to be thermodynamically favourable compared to their most stable competing phases, with respective total energy differences of -0.15 eV and -0.28 eV at 0 K. Partial substitution of W on the Mo-site of MoAlB was observed for certain solid solution compositions. The experimental results indicate that synthesis of (Mo,W)AlB compounds is driven by in-situ formation of metal boride solid solutions, (Mo,W)B, which further react with Al, Mo-Al, W-Al or (Mo,W)-Al compounds to obtain the MAB phase structure. Finally, reactive hot-pressing was shown to be a promising avenue for the production of dense engineering (Mo,W)AlB-containing components.

DOI 10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2020.10.066
Co-authors Vicki Keast, Erich Kisi
2021 Richardson P, Cuskelly D, Brandt M, Kisi E, 'Effects of furnace annealing on in situ reacted Ti

© 2020 Elsevier B.V. The ability to deposit mm-scale coatings that are metallurgically bonded to substrates shows great promise for the fabrication of components coated with expen... [more]

© 2020 Elsevier B.V. The ability to deposit mm-scale coatings that are metallurgically bonded to substrates shows great promise for the fabrication of components coated with expensive materials, for their resistance to heat, radiation damage or oxidation in extreme environments. Although considered excellent candidates, in situ laser clad MAX phase coatings on metal substrates have found limited success due to the low proportion of MAX phase in the products. In this work, low-purity laser clad MAX phase coatings were subjected to post-deposition furnace annealing at 1350 °C to improve the Ti2AlC purity. Aside from a thin oxide layer on the coating surface, a pure Ti2AlC layer was formed immediately below. In total, the coatings were found to exist as seven microstructurally unique sub-layers due to equilibration of supersaturated phases formed during the laser cladding process. No delamination between any layers was observed. The phase identification and microstructure, as determined using XRD, SEM and EDS, are described in detail. Some unique microstructures were observed, including dendritic Ti2AlC MAX phase grains produced from a topochemical reaction between TiCx and TiyAlz regions, and a-Ti supersaturated with up to 33 at.% C. The kinetically trapped phases produced within the coating using this process may offer a strong combination of material properties which could be advantageous for use in extreme environments.

DOI 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2020.126597
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2020 Richardson P, Cuskelly D, Brandt M, Kisi E, 'Microstructural analysis of in-situ reacted Ti2AlC MAX phase composite coating by laser cladding', Surface and Coatings Technology, 385 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2020.125360
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2019 Copus M, Fraser B, Reece R, Hands S, Cuskelly D, Sugo H, et al., 'On-sun testing of Miscibility Gap Alloy thermal storage', SOLAR ENERGY, 177 657-664 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.solener.2018.11.048
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors James Bradley, Erich Kisi
2018 Tegg L, Cuskelly D, Keast VJ, 'Plasmon Responses in the Sodium Tungsten Bronzes', PLASMONICS, 13 437-444 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11468-017-0528-y
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Vicki Keast
2018 Tegg L, Cuskelly D, Keast VJ, 'Bulk scale fabrication of sodium tungsten bronze nanoparticles for applications in plasmonics', NANOTECHNOLOGY, 29 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/1361-6528/aad34b
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Vicki Keast
2017 Rawson AJ, Cuskelly DT, Driver SL, Carpenter MA, 'Elastic and anelastic properties of metals near their melting points from miscibility gap alloy composites', MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING A-STRUCTURAL MATERIALS PROPERTIES MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROCESSING, 681 18-24 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msea.2016.11.008
2017 Tegg L, Cuskelly D, Keast VJ, 'The sodium tungsten bronzes as plasmonic materials: fabrication, calculation and characterization', MATERIALS RESEARCH EXPRESS, 4 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/2053-1591/aa6c40
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Vicki Keast
2016 Cuskelly DT, Kisi EH, 'Single-Step Carbothermal Synthesis of High-Purity MAX Phase Powders', Journal of the American Ceramic Society, 99 1137-1140 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The American Ceramic Society. The Mn+1AXn phases Cr2GeC and Cr2GaC were synthesized with high phase-purity directly from Cr2O3; Ge or Ga; and C using a single-step carbothe... [more]

© 2016 The American Ceramic Society. The Mn+1AXn phases Cr2GeC and Cr2GaC were synthesized with high phase-purity directly from Cr2O3; Ge or Ga; and C using a single-step carbothermal reduction. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis of the materials shows them to be >99 mol% Cr2GeC and 92 mol% Cr2GaC, respectively. Extension to non-Cr systems is briefly demonstrated by applying the method to the synthesis of V2GeC.

DOI 10.1111/jace.14170
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2016 Cuskelly D, Richards E, Kisi E, 'MAX phase - Alumina composites via elemental and exchange reactions in the Ti

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Extension of the aluminothermal exchange reaction synthesis of Mn+1AXn phases to systems where the element 'A' is not the reduc... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Extension of the aluminothermal exchange reaction synthesis of Mn+1AXn phases to systems where the element 'A' is not the reducing agent was investigated in systems TiO2-A-Al-C for A=Al, Si, Ga, Ge, In and Sn as well as Cr2O3-Ga-Al-C. MAX phase-Al2O3 composites were made in all systems except those with A=Ga or In. The effectiveness of conversion to MAX phases was generally in the range 63-96% without optimisation of starting ratios. Optimisation in the Ti-Si-C system gave a MAX phase component with >98% Ti3SiC2.

DOI 10.1016/j.jssc.2016.01.014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2016 Cuskelly DT, Kisi EH, Sugo HO, 'MAX phase - Alumina composites via exchange reaction in the Mn+1AlCn systems (M=Ti, V, Cr, Nb, or Ta)', JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY, 233 150-157 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jssc.2015.10.024
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2015 Cuskelly DT, Richards ER, Kisi EH, Keast VJ, 'Ti3GaC2 and Ti3InC2: First bulk synthesis, DFT stability calculations and structural systematics', JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY, 230 418-425 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jssc.2015.07.028
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Vicki Keast, Erich Kisi
2015 Hasan MM, Cuskelly D, Sugo H, Kisi EH, 'Low temperature synthesis of low thermionic work function (La

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study presents investigations of the microstructure, morphology and emission properties of the promising thermionic material (LaxBa1-x)B6. The material w... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study presents investigations of the microstructure, morphology and emission properties of the promising thermionic material (LaxBa1-x)B6. The material was synthesised by solid-state reaction without post-synthesis purifications. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed that samples prepared at a temperature =1500 °C had formed a significant proportion of solid solution (above 54 mass%). Subsequent sintering at 1950 °C caused the formation of a mixture of three solid solutions with the dominant phase being (La0.31Ba0.69)B6 ~85% (by mass). The Richardson work function and emission constant for this boride mixture were found to be 1.03 eV and 8.44 × 10-6 A cm K-2 respectively.

DOI 10.1016/j.jallcom.2015.02.105
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2015 Keast VJ, Ewald J, De Silva KSB, Cortie MB, Monnier B, Cuskelly D, Kisi EH, 'Optical properties and electronic structure of the Cu-Zn brasses', Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 647 129-135 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The color of Cu-Zn brasses range from the red of copper through bright yellow to grey-silver as the Zn content increases. Here we examine the mechanism by whi... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. The color of Cu-Zn brasses range from the red of copper through bright yellow to grey-silver as the Zn content increases. Here we examine the mechanism by which these color changes occur. The optical properties of this set of alloys has been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and compared to experimental spectroscopy measurements. The optical response of the low Zn content a-brasses is shown to have a distinctly different origin to that in the higher content ß', ¿ and e-brasses. The response of ß'-brass is unique in that it is strongly influenced by an overdamped plasmon excitation and this alloy will also have a strong surface plasmon response.

DOI 10.1016/j.jallcom.2015.06.136
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Vicki Keast, Erich Kisi
2013 Sugo H, Kisi E, Cuskelly D, 'Miscibility gap alloys with inverse microstructures and high thermal conductivity for high energy density thermal storage applications', Applied Thermal Engineering, 51 1345-1350 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2012.11.029
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Erich Kisi
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Copus M, Fraser B, Cuskelly D, Reed S, Post A, Kisi E, 'Unifying capture, storage and discharge of thermal energy using miscibility gap alloys', Proceedings of the 24th SolarPACES International Conference (SolarPACES 2018), Casablanca, Morocco (2019) [E1]
DOI 10.1063/1.5117727
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2019 Cuskelly D, Fraser B, Reed S, Post A, Copus M, Kisi E, 'Thermal storage for CSP with miscibility gap alloys', Proceedings of the 24th SolarPACES International Conference (SolarPACES 2018), Casablanca, Morocco (2019) [E1]
DOI 10.1063/1.5117728
Co-authors Erich Kisi
2017 Cuskelly D, McBride W, 'A new, common, experiential Engineering Practice course', 28th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education (AAEE 2017), Manly, Sydney (2017) [E1]
Co-authors William Mcbride
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $212,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $20,500

Thermal energy storage materials from a specialised family of materials$20,500

Funding body: University of Melbourne

Funding body University of Melbourne
Project Team Doctor Dylan Cuskelly, Mr Mark Copus
Scheme AMSI Australian Postgraduate Research Internships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2001059
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20191 grants / $192,000

Optimisation of the Manufacture of Thermal Energy Storage Modules$192,000

Funding body: MGA Thermal Pty Ltd

Funding body MGA Thermal Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dylan Cuskelly, Professor Erich Kisi
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901499
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Synthesis and Characterisation of the MAB Phases by Induction Heating PhD (Mechanical Engineering), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Synthesis and Characterisation of Ternary Nano-Laminated Ceramics for Emerging Technologies PhD (Mechanical Engineering), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Exploratory Study Into Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Materials and Thermal Coatings for Survival in the Urban Environment PhD (Mechanical Engineering), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 PhD Development and Investigation of Large Scale Miscibility Gap Alloys PhD (Mechanical Engineering), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Synthesis and Characterisation of Sodium Tungsten Bronze Nanoparticles for Applications in Plasmonics PhD (Physics), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Dylan Cuskelly

Position

Lecturer
School of Engineering
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email dylan.cuskelly@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 39240

Office

Room ES315
Building ES
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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