Dr  Robert Chapman

Dr Robert Chapman

Senior Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

I am a senior lecturer in chemistry in the School of Environmental and Life Sciences, and hold a joint appointment as an adjunct lecturer at the School of Chemistry at UNSW. I work on the use of high throughput polymerisation techniques to design polymer therapeutics, to control the folding of polymers into protein-like mimics, and to design polymers that will bind to proteins, enzymes and antibodies. I have expertise in a broad range of polymer chemistry, peptide driven self assembly, drug delivery, tissue engineering and in nanoparticle based biosensing.

Prior to joining the University of Newcastle, I completed a BEng in Industrial Chemistry (2002-07) at UNSW. After a year working in management consulting for the Boston Consulting Group, I moved to the University of Sydney for my PhD in Chemistry (2009-12) under Profs. Sebastien Perrier and Katrina Jolliffe, where I studied the synthesis and self assembly of cyclic peptide - polymer conjugates. I subsequently worked as a postdoctoral research associate in the lab of Prof. Molly Stevens at Imperial College London (2013-15) on the development of nanomaterial based biosensors and scaffolds for tissue engineering, before returning to the School of Chemistry at UNSW as a Vice-Chancellors Research Fellow (2016) and then Lecturer and DECRA fellow (2017-20). In 2020 I moved to my present appointment at the University of Newcastle.

For further information see the group website here: www.chapmangroup.org


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Engineering (Honours), University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Nanomedicine
  • Polymer chemistry

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
340308 Supramolecular chemistry 40
340302 Macromolecular materials 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
College of Engineering, Science and Environment
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2017 - 31/12/2020 Lecturer and DECRA fellow UNSW
School of Chemistry
Australia
1/1/2016 - 31/12/2016 Vice Chancellors Research Fellow UNSW
School of Chemistry
Australia
5/10/2012 - 31/12/2015 Postdoctoral Research Fellow Imperial College London
Department of Materials
United Kingdom

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
CHEM2021 Organic chemistry
UNSW
Lecturer 1/1/2017 - 31/1/2020
CHEM2201 Analytical and Medicinal Chemistry
Discipline of Chemistry, University of Newcastle
Lecturer 1/7/2020 - 31/12/2020
CHEM2921 Food Chemistry
UNSW
Lecturer 1/1/2019 - 31/12/2020
CHEM3061 Chemistry of Materials
UNSW
Lecturer 1/1/2019 - 31/12/2020
CHEM3550 Medicinal and Biological Chemistry
Discipline of Chemistry, University of Newcastle
Lecturer 1/7/2020 - 31/12/2020
NANO1001 Introduction to Nanomaterials
UNSW
Lecturer 1/1/2017 - 31/12/2018
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Chapman R, Jung K, Boyer C, 'PhotoRAFT Polymerization', RAFT Polymerization: Methods, Synthesis and Applications: Volume 1 and 2, Wiley, Weinheim, Germany 611-645 (2021) [B1]
DOI 10.1002/9783527821358.ch12
Citations Scopus - 12

Journal article (56 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2024 Farazi S, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, 'Confinement of folding motifs within central blocks improves single chain polymer nanoparticle folding', Polymer Chemistry, 15 332-340 [C1]
DOI 10.1039/d3py01166f
2023 Robertson H, Willott JD, Gregory KP, Johnson EC, Gresham IJ, Nelson ARJ, et al., 'From Hofmeister to hydrotrope: Effect of anion hydrocarbon chain length on a polymer brush.', J Colloid Interface Sci, 634 983-994 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2022.12.114
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica Wanless, Grant Webber, Hayden Robertson
2023 Han Z, Li Z, Raveendran R, Farazi S, Cao C, Chapman R, Stenzel MH, 'Peptide-Conjugated Micelles Make Effective Mimics of the TRAIL Protein for Driving Apoptosis in Colon Cancer.', Biomacromolecules, 24 5046-5057 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.biomac.3c00668
2022 Fang G, Lu H, Al-Nakashli R, Chapman R, Zhang Y, Ju LA, et al., 'Enabling peristalsis of human colon tumor organoids on microfluidic chips', Biofabrication, 14 (2022) [C1]

Peristalsis in the digestive tract is crucial to maintain physiological functions. It remains challenging to mimic the peristaltic microenvironment in gastrointestinal organoid cu... [more]

Peristalsis in the digestive tract is crucial to maintain physiological functions. It remains challenging to mimic the peristaltic microenvironment in gastrointestinal organoid culture. Here, we present a method to model the peristalsis for human colon tumor organoids on a microfluidic chip. The chip contains hundreds of lateral microwells and a surrounding pressure channel. Human colon tumor organoids growing in the microwell were cyclically contracted by pressure channel, mimicking the in vivo mechano-stimulus by intestinal muscles. The chip allows the control of peristalsis amplitude and rhythm and the high throughput culture of organoids simultaneously. By applying 8% amplitude with 8 ~ 10 times min-1, we observed the enhanced expression of Lgr5 and Ki67. Moreover, ellipticine-loaded polymeric micelles showed reduced uptake in the organoids under peristalsis and resulted in compromised anti-tumor efficacy. The results indicate the importance of mechanical stimuli mimicking the physiological environment when using in vitro models to evaluate nanoparticles. This work provides a method for attaining more reliable and representative organoids models in nanomedicine.

DOI 10.1088/1758-5090/ac2ef9
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 11
2022 Han Z, McAlpine SR, Chapman R, 'Delivering hydrophilic peptide inhibitors of heat shock protein 70 into cancer cells.', Bioorganic chemistry, 122 105713 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bioorg.2022.105713
Citations Scopus - 1
2022 Melodia D, Di Pietro Z, Cao C, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, 'Traceless pH-Sensitive Antibody Conjugation Inspired by Citraconic Anhydride.', Biomacromolecules, 23 5322-5329 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.biomac.2c01125
Citations Scopus - 1
2022 Li Z, Han Z, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, 'A High Throughput Approach for Designing Polymers That Mimic the TRAIL Protein.', Nano letters, 22 2660-2666 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c04469
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
2022 Mustafa AZ, Kent B, Chapman R, Stenzel MH, 'Fluorescence enables high throughput screening of polyelectrolyte-protein binding affinities', POLYMER CHEMISTRY, 13 6108-6113 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/d2py01056a
2022 Foster H, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, 'PET-RAFT Enables Efficient and Automated Multiblock Star Synthesis', Macromolecules, 55 5938-5945 (2022) [C1]

We show that photoinitiated electron/energy transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) enables vastly superior control over the polymerization of multibl... [more]

We show that photoinitiated electron/energy transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) enables vastly superior control over the polymerization of multiblock star copolymers compared to conventional techniques. Monomodal distributions with dispersities <1.3 could be achieved after the 10th block despite pushing the polymerization to >95% conversion in each block extension. The improvement in control is likely due to the reabsorption of the free radical at the propagating chain end by the excited catalyst, which would otherwise lead to a termination product. Simple modeling shows the dramatic effect that this has in the case of star polymerizations. Because PET-RAFT is also tolerant to oxygen, we were able to automate the synthesis of up to heptablock stars at short block lengths, providing a useful technique for screening the effect of polymer composition on the solution structure.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.2c00936
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 1
2021 Wang Y, Milewska M, Foster H, Chapman R, Stenzel MH, 'The Core-Shell Structure, Not Sugar, Drives the Thermal Stabilization of Single-Enzyme Nanoparticles', Biomacromolecules, 22 4569-4581 (2021) [C1]

Trehalose is widely assumed to be the most effective sugar for protein stabilization, but exactly how unique the structure is and the mechanism by which it works are still debated... [more]

Trehalose is widely assumed to be the most effective sugar for protein stabilization, but exactly how unique the structure is and the mechanism by which it works are still debated. Herein, we use a polyion complex micelle approach to control the position of trehalose relative to the surface of glucose oxidase within cross-linked and non-cross-linked single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs). The distribution and density of trehalose molecules in the shell can be tuned by changing the structure of the underlying polymer, poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] acrylamide (PDMAPA). SENs in which the trehalose is replaced with sucrose and acrylamide are prepared as well for comparison. Isothermal titration calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, and asymmetric flow field-flow fraction in combination with multiangle light scattering reveal that two to six polymers bind to the enzyme. Binding either trehalose or sucrose close to the enzyme surface has very little effect on the thermal stability of the enzyme. By contrast, encapsulation of the enzyme within a cross-linked polymer shell significantly enhances its thermal stability and increases the unfolding temperature from 70.3 °C to 84.8 °C. Further improvements (up to 92.8 °C) can be seen when trehalose is built into this shell. Our data indicate that the structural confinement of the enzyme is a far more important driver in its thermal stability than the location of any sugar.

DOI 10.1021/acs.biomac.1c00871
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 4
2021 Al-Nakashli R, Oh H, Chapman R, Stenzel MH, Lu H, 'Regulating the uptake of poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide)-based micelles in cells cultured on micropatterned surfaces', Biointerphases, 16 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1116/6.0001012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2021 Chapman R, Jung K, Boyer C, 'Photo
DOI 10.1002/9783527821358.ch12
2020 Massi L, Najer A, Chapman R, Spicer CD, Nele V, Che J, et al., 'Tuneable peptide cross-linked nanogels for enzyme-triggered protein delivery', Journal of Materials Chemistry B, 8 8894-8907 (2020) [C1]

Many diseases are associated with the dysregulated activity of enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This dysregulation can be leveraged in drug delivery to achieve d... [more]

Many diseases are associated with the dysregulated activity of enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This dysregulation can be leveraged in drug delivery to achieve disease- or site-specific cargo release. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles are versatile drug carrier materials due to the accessible diversity of polymer chemistry. However, efficient loading of sensitive cargo, such as proteins, and introducing functional enzyme-responsive behaviour remain challenging. Herein, peptide-crosslinked, temperature-sensitive nanogels for protein delivery were designed to respond to MMP-7, which is overexpressed in many pathologies including cancer and inflammatory diseases. The incorporation ofN-cyclopropylacrylamide (NCPAM) intoN-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based copolymers enabled us to tune the polymer lower critical solution temperature from 33 to 44 °C, allowing the encapsulation of protein cargo and nanogel-crosslinking at slightly elevated temperatures. This approach resulted in nanogels that were held together by MMP-sensitive peptides for enzyme-specific protein delivery. We employed a combination of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to precisely decipher the morphology, self-assembly mechanism, enzyme-responsiveness, and model protein loading/release properties of our nanogel platform. Simple variation of the peptide linker sequence and combining multiple different crosslinkers will enable us to adjust our platform to target specific diseases in the future.

DOI 10.1039/d0tb01546f
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 13
2020 Li Z, Ganda S, Melodia D, Boyer C, Chapman R, 'Well-Defined Polymers for Nonchemistry Laboratories using Oxygen Tolerant Controlled Radical Polymerization', Journal of Chemical Education, 97 549-556 (2020) [C1]

We present the use of an oxygen tolerant controlled radical polymerization (photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, ... [more]

We present the use of an oxygen tolerant controlled radical polymerization (photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, PET-RAFT) as a simple method for preparing controlled radical polymers in an undergraduate laboratory. Unlike conventional techniques, PET-RAFT polymerizations require no deoxygenation, heating, or special equipment. This removes hazards and complexity from the experimental setup, as well as sources of error and variability in the polymers produced. In this program, students used PET-RAFT to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coated gold nanoparticles and studied the effect of the polymer on the size, optical properties, and aggregation state of the nanoparticles in response to temperature. In parallel, students used PET-RAFT to study the chemistry of radical copolymerization by measuring the reactivity ratios of a range of vinylic monomers. Both experiments would be very difficult to perform in an undergraduate laboratory by conventional controlled radical polymerization techniques. The PET-RAFT technique we present can be used to prepare well-defined polymers easily for any number of applications beyond this, particularly in materials, biology, engineering, and physics laboratories that are not set up for complicated polymer synthesis.

DOI 10.1021/acs.jchemed.9b00922
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2020 Wang Y, Cheng YT, Cao C, Oliver JD, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, Chapman R, 'Polyion Complex-Templated Synthesis of Cross-Linked Single-Enzyme Nanoparticles', Macromolecules, 53 5487-5496 (2020) [C1]

Single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs), which encapsulate individual enzymes in a thin polymer network, offer exciting possibilities for stabilizing enzymes and tuning their activity,... [more]

Single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs), which encapsulate individual enzymes in a thin polymer network, offer exciting possibilities for stabilizing enzymes and tuning their activity, but most approaches to date rely on covalent modification of the enzyme. We introduce here a new approach to their synthesis in which a pre-prepared polymer synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization is first tethered to the surface via electrostatic interactions. Isothermal titration calorimetry and asymmetric flow field-flow fraction (AF4) in combination with multiangle light scattering (MALS) reveal weak binding of 2-5 chains/enzymes. The strength of binding can be tuned based on the charge density of the bound polymer. AF4-MALS and small-angle X-ray scattering confirm the formation of a thin cross-linked shell around the enzyme following chain extension of this polymer in the presence of a bis-functional monomer. The mild conditions of this method of SEN formation, which avoids any covalent modification of the enzyme, result in no loss in activity on our model enzyme (glucose oxidase) and 4-fold increase in thermal stability. It offers much greater control over the chemistry of the SEN, which we demonstrate by incorporation of trehalose between the enzyme and cross-linked shell.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.0c00528
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
2020 Li K, Chen F, Wang Y, Stenzel MH, Chapman R, 'Polyion Complex Micelles for Protein Delivery Benefit from Flexible Hydrophobic Spacers in the Binding Group', Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 41 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/marc.202000208
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2020 Farazi S, Chen F, Foster H, Boquiren R, McAlpine SR, Chapman R, 'Real time monitoring of peptide delivery: In vitro using high payload pH responsive nanogels', Polymer Chemistry, 11 425-432 (2020) [C1]

Nanogels are attractive delivery vehicles for small hydrophilic cargo, such as peptides, but there is a limited understanding of how the structure of both the nanogel and cargo af... [more]

Nanogels are attractive delivery vehicles for small hydrophilic cargo, such as peptides, but there is a limited understanding of how the structure of both the nanogel and cargo affect the drug loading and release properties, particularly in biological environments. We have used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the loading and release behaviour of a series of hydrophilic charged peptides (SNKAY, SNKKY and SNDDY) in a set of pH-responsive methacrylic acid (pMAA) core crosslinked nanogels that were prepared through miniemulsion polymerisation from a PEGMEMA-DMAEMA-tBuMA terblock copoylmer. Our nanogels show an extremely high loading capacity of the positively charged peptides (400-800 wt% in the best cases), absorbing them from solution at pH 7.4 without any need for purification. At pH values below 6, the peptide is rapidly expelled from the nanogel due to the collapse of the core and protonation of the positively charged inner shell. By combining FRET with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), we were able to monitor this in vitro and found that most of the drug is released within the first 10 min after cell uptake.

DOI 10.1039/c9py01120j
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9
2020 Zheng P, Zhang X, Duan Y, Yan M, Chapman R, Jiang Y, Li H, 'Oxidation of graphene with variable defects: alternately symmetrical escape and self-restructuring of carbon rings', Nanoscale, 12 10140-10148 (2020) [C1]

Variable defects such as vacancies and grain boundaries are unavoidable in the synthesis of graphene, but play a central role in the activation of oxidation. Here, we apply reacti... [more]

Variable defects such as vacancies and grain boundaries are unavoidable in the synthesis of graphene, but play a central role in the activation of oxidation. Here, we apply reactive molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the underpinning mechanisms of oxidation in graphene with or without defects at the atomic scale. There exist four oxidation modes generating CO2 or CO in different stages, beginning from a single-atom vacancy, and proceeding until the ordered structure broken down into carbon oxide chains. The oxidation process of the graphene sheets experiences four typical stages, in which alternately symmetrical escape phenomenon is observed. Importantly, disordered rings can self-restructure during the oxidation of grain boundaries. Of all defects, the oxidation of vacancy has the lowest energy barrier and is therefore the easiest point of nucleation. This study demonstrates the crucial role of defects in determining the oxidation kinetics, and provides theoretical guidance for the oxidation prevention of graphene and the production of functionalized graphene.

DOI 10.1039/c9nr10613h
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
2019 Li Z, Kosuri S, Foster H, Cohen J, Jumeaux C, Stevens MM, et al., 'A dual wavelength polymerization and bioconjugation strategy for high throughput synthesis of multivalent ligands', Journal of the American Chemical Society, 141 19823-19830 (2019) [C1]

Structure¿function relationships for multivalent polymer scaffolds are highly complex due to the wide diversity of architectures offered by such macromolecules. Evaluation of this... [more]

Structure¿function relationships for multivalent polymer scaffolds are highly complex due to the wide diversity of architectures offered by such macromolecules. Evaluation of this landscape has traditionally been accomplished case-by-case due to the experimental difficulty associated with making these complex conjugates. Here, we introduce a simple dual-wavelength, two-step polymerize and click approach for making combinatorial conjugate libraries. It proceeds by incorporation of a polymerization friendly cyclopropenone-masked dibenzocyclooctyne into the side chain of linear polymers or the a-chain end of star polymers. Polymerizations are performed under visible light using an oxygen tolerant porphyrin-catalyzed photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition¿fragmentation chain-transfer (PET-RAFT) process, after which the deprotection and click reaction is triggered by UV light. Using this approach, we are able to precisely control the valency and position of ligands on a polymer scaffold in a manner conducive to high throughput synthesis.

DOI 10.1021/jacs.9b09899
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
2019 Oliver S, Zhao L, Gormley AJ, Chapman R, Boyer C, 'Living in the Fast Lane - High Throughput Controlled/Living Radical Polymerization', Macromolecules, 52 3-23 (2019) [C1]

Combinatorial and high throughput (HTP) methodologies have long been used by the pharmaceutical industry to accelerate the rate of drug discovery. HTP techniques can also be appli... [more]

Combinatorial and high throughput (HTP) methodologies have long been used by the pharmaceutical industry to accelerate the rate of drug discovery. HTP techniques can also be applied in polymer chemistry to more efficiently elucidate structure-property relationships, to increase the speed of new material development, and to rapidly optimize polymerization conditions. Controlled living/radical polymerization (CLRP) is widely employed in the preparation of potential materials for bioapplications being suitable for a large variety of polymeric materials with various architectures. The versatility of CLRP makes it an ideal candidate for combinatorial and HTP approaches to research, and recently, the development of oxygen tolerant CLRP techniques has greatly simplified the methodology. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of conventional CLRP, including automated parallel synthesizers, as well as oxygen tolerant CLRP applications for HTP polymer research.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.8b01864
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 61
2019 Rahimi MN, Foster HG, Farazi SN, Chapman R, McAlpine SR, 'Polymer mediated transport of the Hsp90 inhibitor LB76, a polar cyclic peptide, produces an Hsp90 cellular phenotype', Chemical Communications, 55 4515-4518 (2019) [C1]

LB76 is a cyclic peptide that shows great promise as a selective heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor. However despite strong binding to and inhibition of Hsp90 in cell lysate ... [more]

LB76 is a cyclic peptide that shows great promise as a selective heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor. However despite strong binding to and inhibition of Hsp90 in cell lysate its polar structure prevents it from crossing the cell membrane. We have developed a pH responsive polymer nanoparticle that effectively encapsulates LB76 from solution without need for purification. The nanoparticle releases the molecule upon crossing the cell membrane. Treatment of human colon cancer HCT116 cells with nanoparticles laden with LB76 produces the typical phenotype associated with Hsp90 inhibition, providing evidence of a therapeutically active payload.

DOI 10.1039/c9cc00890j
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2019 Chen F, Raveendran R, Cao C, Chapman R, Stenzel MH, 'Correlation between polymer architecture and polyion complex micelle stability with proteins in spheroid cancer models as seen by light-sheet microscopy', Polymer Chemistry, 10 1221-1230 (2019) [C1]

Polyion complex (PIC) micelles are frequently used as a means to deliver biologics such as proteins. While it is known that the polymer structure can affect the stability of these... [more]

Polyion complex (PIC) micelles are frequently used as a means to deliver biologics such as proteins. While it is known that the polymer structure can affect the stability of these micelles, few studies have investigated their stability in biological settings. In this paper, we have prepared a library of poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate]-block-poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate)s (PPEGMEA-b-PCEA) and poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate]-block-poly(acrylic acid)s (PPEGMEA-b-PAA), each with varying chain length of the charged polymer block. In addition terpolymers were prepared that included hydrophobic n-butyl acrylate (BA) units randomly incorporated along the charged block and as triblock terpolymers (PPEGMEA-b-(PCEA-co-PBA), PPEGMEA-b-PCEA-b-PBA or PPEGMEA-b-PBA-b-PCEA). These polymers were condensed with lysozyme to generate PIC micelles of various compositions. While stable in the intracellular space, the diblock PIC micelles readily disassembled inside the cells of spheroid cancer models as evidenced by light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies. Terpolymer PIC micelles were more resistant to disassembly, but only when the hydrophobic BA groups were randomly distributed within the pCEA blocks and not when incorporated as a separate block. These results show that simple PIC micelles will rapidly deliver biological cargo after cell internalization and their stability can be tuned by the introduction of hydrophobic units within the charged block.

DOI 10.1039/c8py01565a
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2019 Chapman R, Stenzel MH, 'All Wrapped up: Stabilization of Enzymes within Single Enzyme Nanoparticles', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, 141 2754-2769 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jacs.8b10338
Citations Scopus - 142Web of Science - 110
2018 Gormley AJ, Yeow J, Ng G, Conway Ó, Boyer C, Chapman R, 'An Oxygen-Tolerant PET-RAFT Polymerization for Screening Structure Activity Relationships', Angewandte Chemie, 130 1573-1578 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ange.201711044
2018 Yeow J, Joshi S, Chapman R, Boyer C, 'A Self-Reporting Photocatalyst for Online Fluorescence Monitoring of High Throughput RAFT Polymerization', Angewandte Chemie, 130 10259-10263 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ange.201802992
2018 Ishizuka F, Chapman R, Kuchel RP, Coureault M, Zetterlund PB, Stenzel MH, 'Polymeric Nanocapsules for Enzyme Stabilization in Organic Solvents', Macromolecules, 51 438-446 (2018) [C1]

Herein we report an approach to encapsulate enzymes within polymeric nanocapsules dispersed in an organic solvent via inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization (IMEPP). G... [more]

Herein we report an approach to encapsulate enzymes within polymeric nanocapsules dispersed in an organic solvent via inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization (IMEPP). Glucose oxidase (GOx), which has various applications but is unstable at elevated temperature and in organic solvents, was chosen as a model enzyme. In this study, we have explored the use of photoinitiation under visible (blue) light instead of thermal initiation to avoid enzyme denaturation by heating. GOx was successfully encapsulated within polymeric nanocapsules (~200 nm) and showed high activity (71-100% relative to free GOx in PBS) dispersed in toluene/t-BuOH. The nanocapsules were thus able to protect GOx and enable it to function in an organic solvent mixture where native GOx would otherwise undergo denaturation. This approach of enzyme encapsulation is significant as it may lead to increased industrial applications of enzyme biocatalysis, expanding the use of enzymes as nontoxic and environmentally friendly biocompatible catalysts.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.7b02377
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 27
2018 Ng G, Yeow J, Chapman R, Isahak N, Wolvetang E, Cooper-White JJ, Boyer C, 'Pushing the Limits of High Throughput PET-RAFT Polymerization', Macromolecules, 51 7600-7607 (2018) [C1]

We investigate a high throughput approach to polymer synthesis by employing photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polym... [more]

We investigate a high throughput approach to polymer synthesis by employing photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polymerization. Polymerization of a broad range of monomers, including acrylates, methacrylates, acrylamides, and styrenic monomers, was achieved directly in a multiwell plate by employing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphine zinc (ZnTPP) as a photocatalyst under yellow LED light. Various parameters such as monomer concentration and degree of polymerization were investigated with respect to their effect on polymerization rate and the degree of control over the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Finally, the synthesis of well-defined multiblock copolymers (up to a hexablock copolymer) was shown to be achievable entirely within a multiwell plate without any intermediate purification. The versatility and ease of this oxygen tolerant polymerization in high throughput formats make it an excellent technique for the generation of polymer arrays.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.8b01600
Citations Scopus - 83Web of Science - 65
2018 Yeow J, Chapman R, Gormley AJ, Boyer C, 'Up in the air: oxygen tolerance in controlled/living radical polymerisation', CHEMICAL SOCIETY REVIEWS, 47 4357-4387 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c7cs00587c
Citations Scopus - 287Web of Science - 242
2018 Gormley AJ, Yeow J, Ng G, Conway O, Boyer C, Chapman R, 'An Oxygen-Tolerant PET-RAFT Polymerization for Screening Structure-Activity Relationships', ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 57 1557-1562 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/anie.201711044
Citations Scopus - 158Web of Science - 130
2018 Yeow J, Joshi S, Chapman R, Boyer C, 'A Self-Reporting Photocatalyst for Online Fluorescence Monitoring of High Throughput RAFT Polymerization', ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 57 10102-10106 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/anie.201802992
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 39
2018 Milner PE, Parkes M, Puetzer JL, Chapman R, Stevens MM, Cann P, Jeffers JRT, 'A low friction, biphasic and boundary lubricating hydrogel for cartilage replacement', ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, 65 102-111 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.actbio.2017.11.002
Citations Scopus - 94Web of Science - 71
2017 Yeow J, Chapman R, Xu J, Boyer C, 'Oxygen tolerant photopolymerization for ultralow volumes', Polymer Chemistry, 8 5012-5022 (2017) [C1]

A benchtop approach is developed for the synthesis of various polymeric architectures using an aqueous Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) photopolymerization ... [more]

A benchtop approach is developed for the synthesis of various polymeric architectures using an aqueous Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) photopolymerization technique. Under visible green light irradiation (¿ = 530 nm), eosin Y (EY) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AscA) as a reducing agent can initiate RAFT polymerization of a range of monomers (acrylamide, acrylate and methacrylate families) in water. More importantly, this process proceeds rapidly without the need for traditional deoxygenation and thus allows RAFT polymerizations to be performed in ultralow volumes (20 µL). This photopolymerization approach can be applied on a 96-well microtiter plate for the synthesis of a range of homopolymer and diblock copolymers. Furthermore, more complex polymeric architectures such as star polymers (arm first) and polymeric nanoparticles (via a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) approach) were successfully synthesized in low volumes and without prior deoxygenation.

DOI 10.1039/c7py00007c
Citations Scopus - 174Web of Science - 156
2017 Chapman R, Melodia D, Qu JB, Stenzel MH, 'Controlled poly(olefin)s: Via decarboxylation of poly(acrylic acid)', Polymer Chemistry, 8 6636-6643 (2017) [C1]

The preparation of polyolefins using controlled radical polymerisation (CRP) has long been a goal of polymer chemistry, but is hampered by the instability of olefin radicals. Here... [more]

The preparation of polyolefins using controlled radical polymerisation (CRP) has long been a goal of polymer chemistry, but is hampered by the instability of olefin radicals. Herein we propose a simple strategy for the preparation of well-defined polyolefins such as polypropylene, by post-modification of poly(acrylic acid) with dialkylzinc reagents. The starting polymers can be readily synthesised by existing CRP techniques to almost any desired length and architecture. After activation of the carboxylic acid side chain and reaction with the dialkylzinc, a new C-C bond is formed between the alkyl group and the backbone carbon, and the carboxylic acid functionality is lost as CO2. We used this strategy to prepare well-defined polyolefins with methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl side chains. As the dialkylzinc reagents are unreactive towards esters we were also able to use this approach to synthesise and self-assemble a range of PEGMEA-olefin block copolymers.

DOI 10.1039/c7py01466j
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
2017 Qu JB, Chapman R, Chen F, Lu H, Stenzel MH, 'Swollen Micelles for the Preparation of Gated, Squeezable, pH-Responsive Drug Carriers', ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9 13865-13874 (2017) [C1]

Natural variations in pH levels of tissues in the body make it an attractive stimuli to trigger drug release from a delivery vehicle. A number of such carriers have been developed... [more]

Natural variations in pH levels of tissues in the body make it an attractive stimuli to trigger drug release from a delivery vehicle. A number of such carriers have been developed but achieving high drug loading combined with low leakage at physiological pH and tunable controlled release at the site of action is an ongoing challenge. Here we report a novel strategy for the synthesis of entirely hydrophilic stimuli-responsive nanocarriers with high passive loading efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX), which show good stability at pH 7 and rapid tunable drug release at intracellular pH. The particles (Dh = 120-150 nm), are prepared by cross-linking the core of swollen micelles of the triblock copolymer poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate-b-N,N'-di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate-b-tert-butyl methacrylate] (poly(PEGMEM A)-b- PDMAEMA-b-PtBMA)). After subsequent deprotection of the tert-butyl groups a hydrophilic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) core is revealed. Due to the negative charge in the acidic core the particles absorb 100% of the DOX from solution at pH 7 at up to 50 wt % DOX/polymer, making them extremely simple to load. Unlike other systems, the DMAEMA "gating" shell ensures low drug leakage at pH 7, whereas physical shrinkage of the MAA core allows rapid release below pH 6. The particles deliver DOX with high efficiency to human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cell lines, even lowering the IC50 of DOX. As the particles are stable as a dry powder and can be loaded with any mixture of positively charged drugs without complex synthetic or purification steps, we propose they will find use in a range of delivery applications.

DOI 10.1021/acsami.7b01120
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 31
2016 Chapman R, Gormley AJ, Stenzel MH, Stevens MM, 'Combinatorial Low-Volume Synthesis of Well-Defined Polymers by Enzyme Degassing', Angewandte Chemie - International Edition, 55 4500-4503 (2016) [C1]

The synthesis of well-defined polymers in a low-volume, combinatorial fashion has long been a goal in polymer chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a wide range of highly ... [more]

The synthesis of well-defined polymers in a low-volume, combinatorial fashion has long been a goal in polymer chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a wide range of highly controlled homo and block co-polymers by Enz-RAFT (enzyme-assisted reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymerization in microtiter plates in the open atmosphere. The addition of 1 µm glucose oxidase (GOx) to water/solvent mixtures enables polymerization reactions to proceed in extremely low volumes (40 µL) and low radical concentrations. This procedure provides excellent control and high conversions across a range of monomer families and molecular weights, thus avoiding the need to purify for screening applications. This simple technique enables combinatorial polymer synthesis in microtiter plates on the benchtop without the need of highly specialized synthesizers and at much lower volumes than is currently possible by any other technique.

DOI 10.1002/anie.201600112
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 94
2016 Liu NJ, Chapman R, Lin Y, Mmesi J, Bentham A, Tyreman M, et al., 'Point of care testing of phospholipase A2 group IIA for serological diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis', Nanoscale, 8 4482-4485 (2016) [C1]

Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum co... [more]

Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care.

DOI 10.1039/c5nr08423g
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
2016 Liu NJ, Chapman R, Lin Y, Bentham A, Tyreman M, Philips N, et al., 'Phospholipase A2 as a point of care alternative to serum amylase and pancreatic lipase', Nanoscale, 8 11834-11839 (2016) [C1]

Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase ... [more]

Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to serve as high lipase (n = 20), CA19-9 positive (n = 15), and healthy (n = 20) controls. sPLA2-IB concentration correlated well with the serum activity of both amylase and lipase, and performed at least as well as either markers in the differentiation of pancreatitis from controls.

DOI 10.1039/c6nr03376h
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2015 Lin Y, Chapman R, Stevens MM, 'Integrative Self-Assembly of Graphene Quantum Dots and Biopolymers into a Versatile Biosensing Toolkit', ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, 25 3183-3192 (2015)
DOI 10.1002/adfm.201500624
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 52
2015 Harrison RH, Steele JAM, Chapman R, Gormley AJ, Chow LW, Mahat MM, et al., 'Modular and Versatile Spatial Functionalization of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds through Fiber-Initiated Controlled Radical Polymerization', ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, 25 5748-5757 (2015)
DOI 10.1002/adfm.201501277
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34
2015 Jumeaux C, Chapman R, Chandrawati R, Stevens MM, 'Synthesis and self-assembly of temperature-responsive copolymers based on N-vinylpyrrolidone and triethylene glycol methacrylate', POLYMER CHEMISTRY, 6 4116-4122 (2015)
DOI 10.1039/c5py00483g
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2015 Chapman R, Lin Y, Burnapp M, Bentham A, Hillier D, Zabron A, et al., 'Multivalent Nanoparticle Networks Enable Point-of-Care Detection of Human Phospholipase-A2 in Serum', ACS NANO, 9 2565-2573 (2015)
DOI 10.1021/nn5057595
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 84
2014 Lin Y, Chapman R, Stevens MM, 'Label-Free Multimodal Protease Detection Based on Protein/Perylene Dye Coassembly and Enzyme-Triggered Disassembly', ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 86 6410-6417 (2014)
DOI 10.1021/ac500777r
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 29
2014 Chapman R, Gormley AJ, Herpoldt K-L, Stevens MM, 'Highly Controlled Open Vessel RAFT Polymerizations by Enzyme Degassing', MACROMOLECULES, 47 8541-8547 (2014)
DOI 10.1021/ma5021209
Citations Scopus - 156Web of Science - 145
2014 Blunden BM, Chapman R, Danial M, Lu H, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, Stenzel MH, 'Drug Conjugation to Cyclic Peptide-Polymer Self-Assembling Nanotubes', CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL, 20 12745-12749 (2014)
DOI 10.1002/chem.201403130
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 38
2014 Gormley AJ, Chapman R, Stevens MM, 'Polymerization Amplified Detection for Nanoparticle-Based Biosensing', NANO LETTERS, 14 6368-6373 (2014)
DOI 10.1021/nl502840h
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 50
2013 Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Multi-shell Soft Nanotubes from Cyclic Peptide Templates', ADVANCED MATERIALS, 25 1170-1172 (2013)
DOI 10.1002/adma.201204094
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 40
2013 Chapman R, Warr GG, Perrier S, Jolliffe KA, 'Water-Soluble and pH-Responsive Polymeric Nanotubes from Cyclic Peptide Templates', CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL, 19 1955-1961 (2013)
DOI 10.1002/chem.201203602
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 39
2013 Chapman R, Bouten PJM, Hoogenboom R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Thermoresponsive cyclic peptide - poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) conjugate nanotubes', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 49 6522-6524 (2013)
DOI 10.1039/c3cc42327a
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
2013 Chapman R, Koh ML, Warr GG, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Structure elucidation and control of cyclic peptide-derived nanotube assemblies in solution', CHEMICAL SCIENCE, 4 2581-2589 (2013)
DOI 10.1039/c3sc00064h
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 42
2012 Chapman R, Danial M, Koh ML, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Design and properties of functional nanotubes from the self-assembly of cyclic peptide templates', CHEMICAL SOCIETY REVIEWS, 41 6023-6041 (2012)
DOI 10.1039/c2cs35172b
Citations Scopus - 250Web of Science - 224
2012 Wilkinson BL, Day S, Chapman R, Perrier S, Apostolopoulos V, Payne RJ, 'Synthesis and Immunological Evaluation of Self-Assembling and Self-Adjuvanting Tricomponent Glycopeptide Cancer-Vaccine Candidates', CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL, 18 16540-16548 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/chem.201202629
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 50
2012 Junkers T, Delaittre G, Chapman R, Guenzler F, Chernikova E, Barner-Kowollik C, 'Thioketone-Mediated Polymerization with Dithiobenzoates: Proof for the Existence of Stable Radical Intermediates in RAFT Polymerization', MACROMOLECULAR RAPID COMMUNICATIONS, 33 984-990 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/marc.201200128
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
2012 Poon CK, Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Pushing the limits of copper mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to conjugate polymeric chains to cyclic peptides', POLYMER CHEMISTRY, 3 1820-1826 (2012)
DOI 10.1039/c2py00510g
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
2011 Dehn S, Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Synthetic Strategies for the Design of Peptide/Polymer Conjugates', POLYMER REVIEWS, 51 214-234 (2011)
DOI 10.1080/15583724.2011.566404
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 72
2011 Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Modular design for the controlled production of polymeric nanotubes from polymer/peptide conjugates', POLYMER CHEMISTRY, 2 1956-1963 (2011)
DOI 10.1039/c1py00202c
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 72
2010 Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Synthesis of Self-assembling Cyclic Peptide-polymer Conjugates using Click Chemistry', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY, 63 1169-1172 (2010)
DOI 10.1071/CH10128
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 47
Show 53 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Harrison RH, Chapman R, Gormley AJ, Chow LW, Steele JA, Mahat M, et al., 'Free Radical Polymerization for the Controlled and Facile Production of a Cell Repellent and Antifouling Surface in 2-and 3D Systems', TISSUE ENGINEERING PART A, Boston, MA (2015)
2011 Chapman R, Poon CK, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Polymeric nanotubes using a convergent approach with RAFT polymerisation', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, Denver, CO (2011)
2011 Chapman R, Jolliffe KA, Perrier S, 'Peptide directed self assembly of polymeric nanotubes', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, Denver, CO (2011)
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $1,982,279

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20243 grants / $665,144

An in-built depolymerisation solution for polyethylene waste$364,318

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Professor Dominik Konkolewicz, Professor Erica Wanless
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2024
Funding Finish 2026
GNo G2300008
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON Y

Polymer mimics of the TRAIL protein for pancreatic cancer$285,826

Funding body: PanKind Australian Pancreatic Cancer Foundation Limited

Funding body PanKind Australian Pancreatic Cancer Foundation Limited
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Doctor Thomas Fallon, Doctor Thomas Fallon, Prof Kristopher Thurecht, Professor Martina Stenzel, Professor Martina Stenzel
Scheme New Treatment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2024
Funding Finish 2026
GNo G2300915
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON Y

Biomimetic catalysts for the production of ammonia$15,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Doctor Jess Bilyi, Doctor Trevor Rapsom
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2024
Funding Finish 2026
GNo G2300922
Type Of Funding C2200 - Aust Commonwealth – Other
Category 2200
UON Y

20232 grants / $28,311

Novel Polyelectrolytes for NOM removal – Plant Trials$23,600

Funding body: Sydney Water Corporation

Funding body Sydney Water Corporation
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Doctor Robert Chapman, Doctor Thomas Fallon, Dr Heriberto Bustamante
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2023
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2201305
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

An in-built depolymerisation solution for polyethylene waste$4,711

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Professor Erica Wanless
Scheme Pilot Funding Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2023
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2300479
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20221 grants / $9,857

Synthetic TRAIL mimics as novel therapeutics for acute myeloid leukaemia$9,857

Funding body: HMRI Precision Medicine Research Program

Funding body HMRI Precision Medicine Research Program
Project Team

Robert Chapman, Heather Murrary, Nicki Verrills

Scheme 2022 Pilot Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20212 grants / $44,467

Novel polymers for NOM removal and waste water treatment$30,000

Funding body: Sydney Water Corporation

Funding body Sydney Water Corporation
Project Team Doctor Robert Chapman, Dr Heriberto Bustamante
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2100430
Type Of Funding C2400 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Other
Category 2400
UON Y

Novel polymers for flocculation of solids in waste water treatment$14,467

Funding body: College of Engineering, Science and Environment, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Engineering, Science and Environment, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Robert Chapman, Dr Heriberto Bustamante

Scheme CESE Industry Matched Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20201 grants / $7,000

Synthetic protein mimics to control cell behaviour through receptor clustering$7,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Project Team

Robert Chapman

Scheme Fellowship Accelerator
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20191 grants / $25,000

Creating a molecular switch that controls cell stress via heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27)$25,000

Funding body: UNSW

Funding body UNSW
Project Team

Shelli McAlpine, Robert Chapman

Scheme Faculty Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20172 grants / $693,500

Combinatorial design of multivalent polymers for cell receptor clustering$360,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Robert Chapman

Scheme ARC DECRA
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

Polymeric nanoparticles for enzyme stabilisation$333,500


Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Martina Stenzel, Robert Chapman

Scheme ARC Discovery
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

20161 grants / $403,000

Macromolecular therapeutics by combinatorial polymer design$403,000

Funding body: UNSW

Funding body UNSW
Project Team

Robert Chapman

Scheme Vice-Chancellors Postdoctoral Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20151 grants / $106,000

Rapid diagnosis of sepsis at point of care using liposomes to amplify PLA2G2A activity in a lateral flow device$106,000

Funding body: MRC Medical Research Council UK

Funding body MRC Medical Research Council UK
Project Team

Molly Stevens, Anthony Gordon, Robert Chapman

Scheme Confidence in concept
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current9

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2022 PhD Applications And Synthesis Of Substituted Bullvalenes PhD (Chemistry), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD High throughput synthesis of single chain polymer nanoparticles Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Peptide driven folding of single chain polymer nanoparticles Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Interactions on the Nanoscale: What Happens when Nanomaterials meet Complex Fluids PhD (Chemistry), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Drug delivery of Hsp70 regulators using polymeric nanogels Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Multivalent peptide-polymer therapeutics by combinatorial design Organic Chemistry, UNSW Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Delivery of antibodies across the blood brain barrier for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Single enzyme nanogels for enhanced biocatalyst activity and stability Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Design of polymers for protein binding using high throughput techniques Chemical Sciences, UNSW Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Honours Nucleobase polymers for the preparation of complex nanostructures Chemical Sciences, UNSW Sole Supervisor
2020 Honours The combinatorial synthesis of multivalent peptide-polymer conjugates for extracellular death-receptor clustering Chemical Sciences, UNSW Principal Supervisor
2019 Honours Real time monitoring of peptide delivery in vitro using high payload pH responsive nanogels Chemical Sciences, UNSW Principal Supervisor
2019 Honours Peptides as guiding motifs for the directed folding of single chain nanoparticles Chemical Sciences, UNSW Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Enzyme stabilisation by encapsulation within glycopolymer nanoparticles Chemical Sciences, UNSW Principal Supervisor
Edit

News

News • 13 Nov 2023

Seven teams secure $3.7m in ARC Discovery Project grants

The Australian Research Council (ARC) has awarded $3.7m in Discovery Project grants to seven University of Newcastle research teams.

Dr Robert Chapman

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email robert.chapman@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4260

Office

Room C230
Building Chemistry
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit