Professor Peter Twining

Professor Peter Twining

Professor

School of Education

Reconceptualising school

Professor Peter Twining’s work explores how we might redesign schooling in the light of challenges the world is experiencing.

Image of Peter Twining

School was not a positive experience for Peter Twining, despite his privileged male/white/middle class background. He knows firsthand how the current industrial model of school is failing students and he is passionate about rethinking our education system in ways that will lead to ‘individual fulfillment and universal wellbeing’.

“I believe that all young people should leave school feeling positive about themselves and enthusiastic about learning. Sadly, that is not the case for a large number of people. Equally problematically, given the radical changes happening in the world, school no longer prepares you well for life outside school,” Twining said.

“We need to rethink what the purposes of school are in a world where automation may mean that many of us are unemployable. We need to empower people to be able to influence the future and tackle wicked problems such as climate change.”

Twining joined the University of Newcastle in 2019 having come from England where he worked on a research initiative to explore the key dimensions of a 'fit for purpose' education system for individuals and society; a project known as SCHOME (not school – not home – schome – the education system for the automation age). He also led a £9.65 million professional development programme focused on how to teach more effectively with and about digital technology. He blogs about his research at https://halfbaked.education.

Twining is focused on bringing about change in our education system, and is excited by some of the innovations Australia is introducing.

“Changing the education system is notoriously difficult. Part of why I moved from England to Australia was that the scope for change in the English system is incredibly limited – indeed the English school system has gone backwards with a renewed focus on ‘facts’ rather than ‘skills and attributes’. There are developments in Australia that seem to offer greater hope for the future – such as Big Picture programmes within mainstream schools and the recent NSW Curriculum Review Interim Report,” he said.

Children’s digital practices inside and outside school

Twining ran a project in England that looked at young people’s use of digital technology outside schools, the extent to which that influences practice inside primary schools, and what the factors were that affect those two things.

The project, known as NP3 had some interesting results.

“I was surprised by the range of expertise that some young people are developing in the use of digital technology outside school. For example, I met Latifah, a ten year old Somalian refugee, who outside school was running her own amazing YouTube channel. However, she hid this from her school because she had seen others be punished by the school for engaging in similar activities. From conceptualising the idea for the channel and it’s content, to her ability to film the videos and deal with comments (including from ‘haters’) she showed a remarkable degree of understanding, sophistication and technical prowess. In contrast, within school, whilst being recognised as a digital leader, the expectations were much lower – for example ensuring that laptops were charged and the interactive whiteboard was switched on in the morning,” Twining observed.

“We found that young people’s digital practices outside school had almost no impact on practices inside schools. Many young people are living in two different worlds, like Latifah who was a creative and competent YouTuber at home, but engaged in much more mundane digital practices at school.”

The project also made Twining question simplistic assumptions about the impact of socio-economic status on ‘access’ to digital technology outside schools. Whilst all of the children in this study had access to mobile devices, the data tentatively suggested that children from wealthier backgrounds often had less ‘free time’ in which to use digital technology because of their other activities (e.g. swimming lessons, drama club, dance practice). They also often seemed to have more restrictions placed on their digital technology use by their parents (in terms of limits on Internet access or close monitoring of their online activities).

The project also highlighted the scope that individual classroom teachers have to be agentive and to change how they teach (even within the same school). For example, whether or not to allow their students to decide or negotiate when they were going to use mobile devices to support their learning.

The apparent link between innovative pedagogy and digital technology use was also evident in the research results. Whilst technology tends to amplify existing pedagogy, Twining found that young people in classrooms with more innovative teachers tended to use digital technology more than those in classrooms with a didactic teacher.

Importantly the NP3 research also reinforced existing evidence about the negative impact of assessment and accountability regimes on school practices.

Point of Learning – an alternative to traditional assessments

Twining believes that in order to change the schooling system we should focus on changing assessment and accountability.

“Quite rightly teachers do what they are held accountable against. If they’re being judged against their students’ results in the HSC and NAPLAN, then they should focus on making sure the kids do well in those tests,” he said. “But those tests don't capture evidence of many things we think are really important today, like creativity, entrepreneurialism, collaboration and teamwork. There is a huge gap between the rhetoric of ‘21st century skills’ and the reality of current high stakes assessments.”

As an alternative to traditional forms of assessment Twining helped developed Point of Learning (PoL), as both a reflective learning tool and a means of collecting evidence about performance against agreed targets.

“PoL is an alternative approach to assessment that should make it possible to collect evidence about aspects of learning which traditional forms of assessment (e.g. exams) cannot capture.”

POL works on the notion that users of the system agree aspirational targets that should be their main focus over the coming period. The users of the system discuss 'what you would see' (practices) if the associated target had been achieved.

The process of agreeing targets and identifying these practices helps to ensure that everyone involved has a shared understanding of what you would have to do to achieve the targets. It also helps to make explicit what might otherwise be tacit knowledge by getting participants to talk about what they do that relates to the targets.

The users then make claims about the targets that have been achieved, using an app on their mobile device.

“You can make a ‘self-claim’ – ‘I just demonstrated that I met that target’. A peer could make a claim for you – ‘I just saw you demonstrate that you have met that target’. Or an independent assessor can make a claim for you. Over time you build up a bank of claims made by a range of people saying they saw you achieving particular targets - it creates a really credible evidence base. It’s a different way of thinking about assessment.”

In his role at UoN the challenge that Peter is tackling is to research new ways of evidencing learning. “The HSC and the ATAR should not be the main focus of schooling, they are too narrow and constraining. We need to find ways to assess the things that matter, not just the things that it is easy to assess. If we can do that we can help to redesign schooling so that it serves all of our needs – ‘individual fulfillment and universal wellbeing’.”

Image of Peter Twining

Reconceptualising school

Professor Peter Twining’s work explores how we might redesign schooling in the light of challenges the world is experiencing.School was not a positive experience for Peter Twining, despite his privileged male/white/middle class background. He knows firsthand how the current industrial…

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Career Summary

Biography

I am passionate about enhancing education systems, with a particular focus on school age learners. 

I am currently the Professor of Education (Innovation in Schooling & Educational Technology) at the University of Newcastle (Australia), having previously been Professor of Education (Futures) at the Open University (UK). I have been a primary school teacher, initial teacher educator, the Head of Department of Education at the Open University, the Co-Director of the Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology, and Co-Editor in Chief of Computers & Education. I have brought in over £10million (approx. $AU18million of external funding, most of which was focussed on issues to do with the purposes of education, the management of educational change, and enhancing education systems, informed by understandings of learning, pedagogy and the potentials of digital technology. I blog at https://halfbaked.education and am @PeterT on Twitter.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Open University UK

Keywords

  • assessment
  • change
  • curriculum
  • digital technology
  • education
  • futures
  • pedagogy
  • qualitative research
  • school

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators 30
130199 Education Systems not elsewhere classified 40
130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2013 - 31/7/2019 Professor of Education (Futures) The Open University
United Kingdom
1/10/2003 - 30/9/2013 Senior Lecturer The Open University
United Kingdom
1/1/2015 - 31/12/2017 Co-Editor in Chief

This is the leading journal in the field of educational technology

Computers & Education
United Kingdom

Awards

Nomination

Year Award
2008 Times Higher Education Award
Times Higher Education
2007 Edublog Award
Edublog
2000 European Academic Software Awards
EASA

Prize

Year Award
1998 European Academic Software Awards
EASA

Recognition

Year Award
2017 Open University Merit Award
The Open University
2001 Open University Special Award
The Open University
2000 Open University Special Award
The Open University
1997 Open University Special Award
The Open University

Teaching Award

Year Award
2005 Open University Teaching Award
The Open University

Invitations

Committee Member

Year Title / Rationale
2019 English Government’s EdTech Leadership Group
2013 Teaching Agency’s Expert Group on ICT in Primary Initial Teacher Education

Contributor

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Education Technology Action Group
I lead the strand on accountability and assessment. See the ETAG Report

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2019 Alternative assessment and reflective practice
BERA SIG Conference: Learning differently – new frontiers for community collaboration, agency and identity
2018 Nieuwe doelen. Nieuwe praktijken. Nieuwe pedagogiek? (New Purposes. New Practices. New Pedagogy?)
2016 Digital technology strategies in schools: looking back, looking forward
2016 Children's digital practices, pedagogy & assessment - revolution, stasis & constraints
Naace Regional Conference
2015 Digital technology strategies in schools: looking back, looking forward
2014 What does it mean for schools? New pedagogy in classrooms.
New Technologies in Education Conference
2014 Bringing Innovative Technology & Educators Together
2014 Does digital technology really enhance engagement?
2014 Assessment – new frontiers?
The Surpass Conference
2013 The new ICT Computing National Curriculum: An update
2013 What is going on with ICT in England?
2012 A Vital Update: Whither ICT?
Guardian Conference on ICT in schools
2012 Creativity, Digital Literacy and Open Educational Resources
HEA/JISC ‘OER Workshop’
2012 Embracing the new freedoms: An update on ICT and the NC review
2012 The state of ICT - an update on the National Curriculum review
NTAB Conference for Teaching Schools with ICT funding
2011 Enhancing the teaching of ICT across the curriculum
2010 Revitalising ICT CPD
2010 Revitalising ICT CPD
2009 Mistakes we have made: learning from the Schome Park Programme
2009 ICT CPD – exploring effective practice
Naace Members Autumn Conference (Building the Future)
2008 Education systems for the future?
JISC RSC Conference: Journeys into Virtual Worlds
2008 Open 2 the net? Exploring pedagogy, pragmatics and rationales
International e-Learning Conference
2004 From innovation to embedding
The Microsoft Innovative Teachers' Conference

Panel Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Closing keynote panel
The Australian Computers in Education Conference

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
EE830 Educating the next generation
The Open University
Team member 31/8/2016 - 31/3/2017
EE811 Educational leadership: agency, professional learning and change
The Open University
Course chair (production & presentation) 1/1/2015 - 4/5/2016
F01 The 'new' Masters in Education
The Open University
Developing the 'generic' Supporting your study materials for use across all Stage 1 MA in Education modules 1/10/2015 - 30/6/2016
Vital Vital Professional Development
The Open University

This three year programme provided professional development for staff in state funded 5-19 education in England to enhance their teaching of and with digital technology. The programme provided a range of professional learning opportunities - see Twining & Henry (2013) for more information.

Twining, P. & Henry, F. (2013)  Enhancing ‘ICT teaching’ in English schools: Vital lessons. World Journal of Education, Vol.4, No.2, pp.12-36. ISSN 1925-0746(Print), ISSN 1925-0754(Online). doi:10.5430/wje.v4n2p12 

Director of Vital Professional Development 1/7/2009 - 31/3/2013
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Twining P, 'Planning to use ICT in schools?', Education 3-13: 40 years of research on primary, elementary and early years education 144-156 (2013)
DOI 10.4324/9780203078761
2012 Gillen J, Ferguson R, Peachey A, Twining P, 'Seeking planning permission to build a gothic cathedral on a virtual Island', Virtual Literacies: Interactive Spaces for Children and Young People 190-207 (2012)
DOI 10.4324/9780203096468
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Twining P, 'When educational worlds collide', Virtual Worlds: Controversies at the Frontier of Education 125-142 (2011)

The Schome Park Programme set out in 2007 to use a virtual world, complemented by a wiki and forum, to explore radically different models of education systems, which can genuinely... [more]

The Schome Park Programme set out in 2007 to use a virtual world, complemented by a wiki and forum, to explore radically different models of education systems, which can genuinely empower learners to take control of and responsibility for their own learning. This chapter explores the culture and approaches that were adopted within the Schome Park Programme and contrasts them with those found in schools. It provides specific examples to illustrate clashes of culture between self-directed learning in Schome Park and the culture of schools in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA). © 2010 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Twining P, 'Educational information technology research methodology: Looking back and moving forward', Researching IT in Education: Theory, Practice and Future Directions 153-168 (2009)
DOI 10.4324/9780203863275
Citations Scopus - 6
2004 Twining P, 'The computer practice framework: A tool to enhance curriculum development relating to ICT', ICT for Curriculum Enhancement 41-56 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Butler D, Leahy M, Twining P, Akoh B, Chtouki Y, Farshadnia S, et al., 'Education Systems in the Digital Age: The Need for Alignment', Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 23 473-494 (2018)

© 2018, Springer Nature B.V. The focus of Thematic Working Group 1 at EDUsummIT 2017 centred on the need for alignment in education systems and was driven by two key questions rel... [more]

© 2018, Springer Nature B.V. The focus of Thematic Working Group 1 at EDUsummIT 2017 centred on the need for alignment in education systems and was driven by two key questions relating to (a) if and how all the parts of an education system work together to support the type of learning envisioned in the twenty-first century, and (b) if there is alignment, what is the purpose/vision of that education system and does it meet the needs of its learners. Arising from the discussions held, the group advocated the use of a tool such as the UNESCO framework (ICT competency standards for teachers: competency standards modules, UNESCO, Paris, 2008a; ICT competency standards for teachers: policy framework, UNESCO, Paris, 2011) as a way to conceptualize a systemic approach to reform and to enable policy makers and stakeholders in a system to think about ways in which they can align changes with the goals of any proposed reform. Taking the Irish Education system as an example, this paper illustrates how the UNESCO framework has enabled policy makers in Ireland to adopt a systemic approach to policy formulation which aligns educational strategies across a range of elements ¿to leverage strengths, coordinate investments, consolidate gains, and advance national development goals and visions¿ (Kozma in Hum Technol Interdiscip J Hum ICT Environ 1(2):117¿156, 2005). To counter the potential danger of a top-down imposition of the UNESCO framework, the group also proposed the Educational Vision and Mission Framework (EVMF) as a tool to support system wide (both top-down and bottom-up) reflection on the purposes of schooling in a rapidly changing world. The group concluded that what is defined as the purpose of education should inform alignment and suggest that application of the UNESCO framework and EVMF could enable the necessary alignment to support the educational, social, and economic transformation necessary for the complex connected global world of today and tomorrow.

DOI 10.1007/s10758-018-9388-6
Citations Web of Science - 1
2017 Maher D, Twining P, 'Bring your own device a snapshot of two Australian primary schools', Educational Research, 59 73-88 (2017)

© 2016 NFER. Background: The use of 1:1 and Bring Your Own Device strategies in schools is in its infancy and little is known about how mobile devices such as tablets are being us... [more]

© 2016 NFER. Background: The use of 1:1 and Bring Your Own Device strategies in schools is in its infancy and little is known about how mobile devices such as tablets are being used to support educational practice. Purpose: In this article, two suburban primary schools in Sydney, Australia were focused on with an aim to understand how mobile device strategies were developed and implemented and how the devices were being used in the schools. Design and method: This qualitative study uses a case study method. It draws upon questionnaires, interviews and classroom observations, and builds upon previous research in English and Australian schools. Findings: Results of the research indicate that the devices have only recently been incorporated into the school and suggest that their usage has been generally embraced by both school staff and parents. Key issues highlighted by these two schools included the importance of the school¿s vision and uncertainty about the differences between models of provision. Participant responses also referenced some positive impacts on classroom practice, which amplify constructivist pedagogy: there were examples of device use extending student learning by supporting peer assessment, collaboration, research skills and projects.

DOI 10.1080/00131881.2016.1239509
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2017 Pérez-Sanagustín M, Nussbaum M, Hilliger I, Alario-Hoyos C, Heller RS, Twining P, Tsai CC, 'Research on ICT in K-12 schools A review of experimental and survey-based studies in computers & education 2011 to 2015', Computers and Education, 104 A1-A15 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.compedu.2016.09.006
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 31
2017 Twining P, Heller RS, Nussbaum M, Tsai CC, 'Some guidance on conducting and reporting qualitative studies', Computers and Education, 106 A1-A9 (2017)

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd This paper sets out to address the problem of the imbalance between the number of quantitative and qualitative articles published in highly ranked research jou... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd This paper sets out to address the problem of the imbalance between the number of quantitative and qualitative articles published in highly ranked research journals, by providing guidelines for the design, implementation and reporting of qualitative research. Clarification is provided of key terms (such as quantitative and qualitative) and the interrelationships between them. The relative risks and benefits of using guidelines for qualitative research are considered, and the importance of using any such guidelines flexibly is highlighted. The proposed guidelines are based on a synthesis of existing guidelines and syntheses of guidelines from a range of fields.

DOI 10.1016/j.compedu.2016.12.002
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 44
2013 Twining P, Raffaghelli J, Albion P, Knezek D, 'Moving education into the digital age: The contribution of teachers' professional development', Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29 426-437 (2013)

This article introduces the main outcomes of discussions at EDUsummIT 2011 by the specific Technical Working Group on Teacher Professional Development (TWG3). The focus was to exp... [more]

This article introduces the main outcomes of discussions at EDUsummIT 2011 by the specific Technical Working Group on Teacher Professional Development (TWG3). The focus was to explore how professional development of teachers may ensure that teachers are better prepared to use information and communication technology (ICT) to promote 21st century learning. The article is organized into three main sections: a review of key literature on professional development of teachers (TPD), in general and with specific reference to ICT; a summary of the key points emerging from TWG3's discussions; and recommendations for action. On the basis of discussions held within the TWG3, the authors concluded that effective TPD requires changes at several levels of educational systems (political, institutional and individual), and that ICTs should be seen as an opportunity for introducing new goals, structures and roles that support these changes. It is significant that while many of the issues highlighted by the group are well established, addressing them continues to be problematic globally. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/jcal.12031
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 40
2012 Bradshaw P, Twining P, Walsh CS, 'The Vital Program: Transforming ICT Professional Development', American Journal of Distance Education, 26 74-85 (2012)

Developing a model for effective large-scale continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers remains a significant obstacle for many governments worldwide. This article des... [more]

Developing a model for effective large-scale continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers remains a significant obstacle for many governments worldwide. This article describes the development and evolution of Vital-a CPD program designed to enhance the teaching of information communication technology in state-funded primary and secondary schools in England. The article concludes that the success of the program comes from its innovative bottom-up response and reconceptualization of CPD as being more than just externally designed courses. The program encourages and responds to teachers' reflective practice matching the teaching and learning demands of the twenty-first century. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/08923647.2012.655553
Citations Scopus - 9
2012 Gillen J, Ferguson R, Peachey A, Twining P, 'Distributed cognition in a virtual world', Language and Education, 26 151-167 (2012)

Over a 13-month period, the Schome Park Programme operated the first 'closed' (i.e. protected) Teen Second Life 1 project in Europe. The project organised diverse educat... [more]

Over a 13-month period, the Schome Park Programme operated the first 'closed' (i.e. protected) Teen Second Life 1 project in Europe. The project organised diverse educational events that centred on use of a virtual world and an associated asynchronous forum and wiki. Students and staff together exploited the affordances of the environment to develop skills and enhance community spirit. One popular activity, initiated by students, involved sailing boats around the project's virtual island, a technically challenging task for beginners. This paper studies the records of one of these sailing regattas. Organising and implementing this event involved considerable technical and interactional challenges. We analyse the following: How do people work together, including through the use of (virtual) artefacts, to solve problems? What particular qualities of the literacy practices surrounding the regatta appear to us to involve learning? Simultaneously, we contribute to the development of methodologies for studying learning in virtual worlds by employing a virtual literacy ethnography. Findings include a diversity of creative approaches that are used when solving problems, the significance of adult behaviour in authentically modelling learning and the value of humour in fostering a learning community. The notion of distributed cognition has implications for characterising learning and analytical approaches to analysis. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/09500782.2011.642881
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 11
2010 Twining P, 'Virtual worlds and education', Educational Research, 52 117-122 (2010)
DOI 10.1080/00131881.2010.482730
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
2009 Twining P, 'Exploring the educational potential of virtual worlds - Some reflections from the SPP', British Journal of Educational Technology, 40 496-514 (2009)

This paper describes and reflects on the development of the Schome Park Programme (SPP), which was established with the specific aim of extending our thinking about schome, which ... [more]

This paper describes and reflects on the development of the Schome Park Programme (SPP), which was established with the specific aim of extending our thinking about schome, which aims to be the optimal educational system for the 21st century. In an earlier stage of the Schome Initiative, it became clear that people find it almost impossible to break free from established conceptions of education. Open virtual worlds like Second Life® virtual world offer opportunities for people to have radically different 'lived experiences' of educational systems and thus seemed to be the ideal vehicle for exploring alternative models of education. The SPP therefore set out in late 2006 to use Teen Second Life® virtual world to support the development of the vision of schome, informed by current understandings about learning, pedagogy and the 'tools' available to us today. This paper provides an overview of the first three phases of the SPP and briefly outlines the research methodologies used within it. This leads into a discussion of the potential of virtual worlds to support pedagogical exploration, which in turn leads to consideration of three dimensions of practice that emerged from the SPP. These three dimensions, which correspond closely with a framework developed in post-compulsory education, are illustrated by use of descriptions of activities and other data from the SPP. The paper concludes by raising questions about the extent to which pedagogical practices will change in the future as a result of the opportunities offered by virtual worlds. © 2009 Becta.

DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00963.x
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 46
2007 Rix J, Twining P, 'Exploring education systems: Towards a typology for future learning?', Educational Research, 49 329-341 (2007)

Background In recent years there has been increasing interest in creating diversity of educational provision to meet the full range of needs presented by learners. This is both a ... [more]

Background In recent years there has been increasing interest in creating diversity of educational provision to meet the full range of needs presented by learners. This is both a reflection, and a partial consequence, of the three central agendas for schooling in many countries - standards, choice and inclusion, and the growth in information communication technologies and associated systems. The complexity of available 'school' types makes it increasingly difficult for individuals to explore the differences between the educational programmes on offer. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to map the different forms of provision into a typology that will provide theorists, practitioners, users and policy-makers with a clear set of descriptors to explore current structures and to consider future developments. Nine types of education programme are categorized. Theoretical origins The paper takes the three distinct alternative education types, identified by Raywid, as a starting-point for this Educational Programmes Typology. It also draws upon the work of Aron, in which the characteristics of alternative education are outlined according to their relationship to other education systems, their target population, primary purpose, operational setting, educational focus, administrative entity, credentials offered and funding sources. Main argument The paper broadens Raywid's and Aron's typologies so as to include the identifiers for the full range of education programmes offered to learners, not just those who typically have additional needs. Six additional educational programme types are presented, which describe current provision within open entry, selective entry, special educational, home learning and adult learning settings. Type 8 is proposed as representing a possible educational system of the future. This reflects social and cultural developments, the evolution of information communication technologies and other technologies, and our changing understandings of learning theories and practices. Conclusions The proposed typology needs to be tested against a wide range of possible settings in different countries and education systems, but offers a useful tool for looking across boundaries of culture and practice. It provides an accessible vocabulary for exploring current learning programmes and those we create in the future.

DOI 10.1080/00131880701717180
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2007 Twining P, 'Discussing ICT, aspirations and targets for Education: international perspectives', International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, 3 154-170 (2007)

The discussing ICT, aspirations and targets for Education (dICTatEd) project is predicated on the assumptions that investments in ¿educational¿ Information and Communications Tech... [more]

The discussing ICT, aspirations and targets for Education (dICTatEd) project is predicated on the assumptions that investments in ¿educational¿ Information and Communications Technology (ICT) are not having the scale of impact within the education system that might be expected at least in part due to lack of shared understandings about why we should be using ICT in education. This paper analyses data from over 9000 responses from 94 countries to the dICTatEd online questionnaire. It explores the extent to which respondents from different countries have similar or different perspectives on ¿educational¿ ICT use. This paper concludes that whilst there is general agreement that ICT should be being used in order to prepare people for living in a society permeated with technology there is a lack of shared educational vision about the role ICT should play in education. © 2007 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

DOI 10.1504/ijkl.2007.015549
Citations Scopus - 8
2002 Macdonald J, Twining P, 'Assessing activity-based learning for a networked course', British Journal of Educational Technology, 33 603-618 (2002)

Networked environments offer new scope for presenting activity based courses, in which activities and reflection form the central backbone of course pedagogy. Such courses promise... [more]

Networked environments offer new scope for presenting activity based courses, in which activities and reflection form the central backbone of course pedagogy. Such courses promise an enriching approach to study, but there are also challenges for the design of assessment. This paper describes a qualitative study of student and tutor perspectives on the assessment of an innovative undergraduate course at the UK Open University which has employed an activity-based approach. It discusses the relationship between assessment, student participation, and the development of skills, and then outlines the priorities for the design of assessment for such courses.

DOI 10.1111/1467-8535.00295
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
2002 Twining P, 'Conceptualising computer use in education: Introducing the Computer Practice Framework (CPF)', British Educational Research Journal, 28 95-110 (2002)

There is a growing need to be able to enhance the impact of investing in computer use in education at all levels. The article suggests that one way to approach this problem is thr... [more]

There is a growing need to be able to enhance the impact of investing in computer use in education at all levels. The article suggests that one way to approach this problem is through looking at the impact of such investments on educational practice. This necessitates the use of a coherent framework for conceptualising the educational practice surrounding computer use. A number of important problems with existing frameworks for thinking about the educational practice surrounding computer use are identified and a set of criteria for evaluating such frameworks is presented. A new framework, the Computer Practice Framework (CPF), is then described and its scope and limitations are discussed in the light of these evaluation criteria.

DOI 10.1080/01411920120109775
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 22
2001 Twining P, 'Planning to use ICT in schools?', Education 3-13, 29 9-17 (2001)

This paper argues that despite massive levels of investment in ICT in education there is little evidence of this having had any significant impact on educational practice to date.... [more]

This paper argues that despite massive levels of investment in ICT in education there is little evidence of this having had any significant impact on educational practice to date. It argues that one approach to enhancing the impact of investments in ICT in education is to base them on clearly articulated development plans. Such plans, it is argued, need to link explicit visions about the use of ICT in learning with implementation plans. In order to support the process of developing such plans the paper discusses three questions based on the Computer Practice Framework (CPF). The CPF has been developed over the last five years to support thinking about the educational practice surrounding computer use. In the discussion of the three dimensions of the CPF a range of models of organisation of computer resources are explored. Issues relating to the management of educational change are highlighted and linked to practical constraints that impact on the implementation plan. © 2001, Studies in Education Ltd.

DOI 10.1080/03004270185200031
Citations Scopus - 8
1998 Twining P, 'Information technology in educational management for the schools of the future', COMPUTERS & EDUCATION, 31 251-252 (1998)
1998 Twining P, 'Managing information technology in secondary schools', COMPUTERS & EDUCATION, 31 349-350 (1998)
1995 Twining P, 'Towards an understanding of the links between conceptual understanding of computer systems and information technology competence', Journal of Information Technology for Teacher Education, 4 377-391 (1995)

This paper claims that there is a need for an explicit model of how preservice students develop information technology competence in order to inform course design. It is tentative... [more]

This paper claims that there is a need for an explicit model of how preservice students develop information technology competence in order to inform course design. It is tentatively suggested that there are links between students¿ mental models of computer systems and their IT competence. A pilot feasibility study is described which uses a novel research instrument that attempts to quantify students¿ mental models of computer systems on two scales: level of technical sophistication and level of abstraction. Students¿ scores on these scales are correlated with their self-ratings of their information technology competence on sixteen statements from an Association for Information Technology in Teacher Education questionnaire. The findings suggest that there is no relationship between students¿ information technology competence and the level of technical sophistication of their mental model of computer systems but that there is a link between information technology competence and the level of abstraction of their mental models. Areas where further work is required are identified and implications for the design of information technology courses for preservice students are discussed. © 1995 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/0962029950040309
Citations Scopus - 1
Show 14 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Walsh CS, Bradshaw P, Twining P, 'E-learning through collaborative teacher professional development in primary and secondary schools in England', Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference e-Learning 2011, Part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2011, MCCSIS 2011 (2011)

Creating sustainable 'bottom up' models of continuous professional development (CPD) around the use of information communication technologies (ICT) in primary and second... [more]

Creating sustainable 'bottom up' models of continuous professional development (CPD) around the use of information communication technologies (ICT) in primary and secondary education in England has long been recognized as a significant problem, while providing effective CPD for teachers is seen as even more problematic. While a variety of models of ICT CPD have been reported on in the research, too little attention has been paid to large-scale models that promote collaborative teacher-generated CPD that recognizes their ICT expertise. This paper examines data from Vital, a professional development programme in England which aims to help teachers use ICT to add value to lessons and find new ways to engage their pupils. It focuses on Vital's model of CPD which includes 'TeachMeets' and 'TeachShares'. Both are analysed to explore teachers' participation in, design of and responses to collaborative ICT CPD. This differs significantly from traditional CPD courses which tend to be centralised and a 'one-size-fits-all' approach. The paper argues that collaborative e-Learning through Vital was significant in enhancing teachers' motivation and accomplishment in using ICT in their classroom. We argue this kind of CPD provides a productive framework for future teachers to achieve a greater understanding of the dynamic relationship between ICT and its practical application to their individualized contexts and subject areas. © 2011 IADIS.

2010 Twining P, Footring S, 'The Schome Park Programme: Exploring Educational Alternatives', RESEARCHING LEARNING IN VIRTUAL WORLDS, Milton Keynes, ENGLAND (2010)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-84996-047-2_4
Citations Web of Science - 2
2009 Twining P, Peachey A, 'Open Virtual Worlds as pedagogical research tools: Learning from the Schome Park Programme', IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology (2009)

This paper introduces the term Open Virtual Worlds and argues that they are 'unclaimed educational spaces', which provide a valuable tool for researching pedagogy. Havin... [more]

This paper introduces the term Open Virtual Worlds and argues that they are 'unclaimed educational spaces', which provide a valuable tool for researching pedagogy. Having explored these claims the way in which Teen Second Life® virtual world was used for pedagogical experimentation in the initial phases of the Schome Park Programme is described. Four sets of pedagogical dimensions that emerged are presented and illustrated with examples from the Schome Park Programme. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2009.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-03115-1_28
Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Craft A, Chappell K, Twining P, 'Learners reconceptualising education: Widening participation through creative engagement?', Innovations in Education and Teaching International (2008)

Engaging imaginatively with how education is manifested is necessary for providers both in higher education and in preceding contexts and phases. Fostering dispositions for creati... [more]

Engaging imaginatively with how education is manifested is necessary for providers both in higher education and in preceding contexts and phases. Fostering dispositions for creativity in dynamic engagement and the consideration of pedagogy, curriculum, inclusion, policy and the management of change, requires innovative provision to span school, home, work and higher education learning. Reporting on Aspire Pilot, a National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts-funded initiative at The Open University, which sought to foster creativity of 11-18 year olds in considering future learning systems, this paper offers the beginning of a theoretical frame for considering learning, learners and systems in the Knowledge Age prioritising learner agency. Discussing findings, the paper explores implications for approaches facilitating widening participation in higher education.

DOI 10.1080/14703290802176089
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
2005 Selwood I, Twining P, Underwood J, Ault A, Banyard P, Dillon G, et al., 'Teacher use of broadband technology', 8th IFIP World Conference on Computers in Education, WCCE 2005 (2005)

During the late 1990s, schools accessing the Internet have been a feature of education in many developed countries. There are widely held beliefs that the advent of broadband will... [more]

During the late 1990s, schools accessing the Internet have been a feature of education in many developed countries. There are widely held beliefs that the advent of broadband will have, and is possibly having profound impacts on education (Becta, 2003). The government of the UK therefore agreed to provide funding to deliver broadband connectivity to all points of learning by 2006, with every primary school having connectivity of at least 2Mbps and every secondary school having 8Mbps or more (DfES, 2003). Between October 2003 and January 2004, a team led by Jean Underwood at The Nottingham Trent University carried out a pilot investigation of broadband technology impacts on schools in England. Following a brief explanatory introduction, which sets out the focus of the research and methodologies used, this paper presents the findings of the pilot investigation that relate to teacher usage of broadband technology. The rationale for examining teacher usage is twofold. Firstly, teachers' computer use for planning and preparation is one of the strongest influences on the success of ICT for subsequent classroom use (Ofsted, 2002). Secondly, concerns have grown that excessive teacher workload has become a key negative factor in the recruitment and retention of teachers in the UK, and the 'Teacher Workload Study: Final Report' (PwC, 2001) estimated that the effective use of ICT could save teachers on average between 3.25 and 4.55 hours per week. Findings of the research include: very positive teacher attitudes to broadband; increased use of on-line resources by teachers; changes in patterns of where and how teachers prepare lessons; greater sharing of resources between teachers; and in some cases, changes in where and how teachers assess children's work, communicate with parents and other staff, and staff development. However, whilst broadband was a key driver it was not the only one, and there was an acknowledgement that in order to achieve such positive outcomes there was initially a need for additional staff time and commitment.

1995 Twining P, 'Making barriers explicit: Some problems with the computer innovation literature', TECHNOLOGY AND TEACHER EDUCATION ANNUAL, 1995, SAN ANTONIO, TX (1995)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 23
Total funding $18,526,422

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20202 grants / $16,260

2020 Faculty of Education and Arts Additional Routes to Success Pilot Study (ARTS-Pilot) Seed Funding$15,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Prof Peter Twining

Scheme 2020 FEDUA Additional Routes to Success Pilot Study (ARTS-Pilot) Seed Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2020 Faculty of Education and Arts Strategic Early Advice and Feedback Scheme$1,260

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Prof Peter Twining

Scheme 2020 FEDUA Strategic Early Advice and Feedback Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20182 grants / $21,960

Point of Learning in Early Years Pilot (PoLEY Pilot)$18,900

Investigating the use of Point of Learning (PoL) to support staff in a day nursery to enhance their practice. See the final report. (£10,500)

Funding body: The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)

Funding body The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Project Team

Peter Twining (Open University, UK); Karen Douthwaite (Open University, UK)

Scheme Education Futures Research Group
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Point of Learning - being a scientist (PoLSci)$3,060

A small scale pilot to explore the use of Point of Learning (PoL) to support sports science undergraduates develop 'the attributes of a scientist'. (£1,700)

Funding body: The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)

Funding body The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Project Team

Peter Twining (Open University, UK); Roger Gosset (London Metropolitan University)

Scheme Education Futures Research Group
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20161 grants / $18,000

Point of Learning (PoL) Desk study$18,000

Developing Point of Learning (PoL), including the first framework and PoL’s theoretical underpinnings. See https://www.imagine.education/developing-point-of-learning/. (£10,000)

Funding body: Imagine Education

Funding body Imagine Education
Project Team

Peter Twining, Jonty Rix, Kieron Sheehy

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

20151 grants / $360,000

New Purposes, New Practices, New Pedagogy (NP3)$360,000

NP3 explored the digital practices that children engage with outside school and the extent to which these are recognised, valued and influence practices inside primary schools. We were concerned with issues to do with social justice and the institutional factors that impact on schools’ responses to pupils’ digital practices. See http://edfutures.net/NP3 for more info. (£200,000)

Funding body: Society for Educational Studies (SES)

Funding body Society for Educational Studies (SES)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Naima Browne, Patricia Murphy, Amelia Hempel-Jorgensen, Stephen Harrison, Neelam Parmar, Fiona Henry, Julia Gillen, Don Passey, Natalia Kucirkova, Sarawatti Dawadi, Els De Geest, David Messer, Felicity Fletcher-Cambell

Scheme National Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20133 grants / $82,798

The Snapshot Studies$66,958

This research involved 13 case studies in schools across Australia, looking at their digital technology strategies. The project involved Peter collaborating with colleagues from Edith Cowan University, University of Melbourne, University of Southern Queensland, Griffith University, University of Tasmania, and University of Technology Sydney. Read the short case study reports or the longer papers based on this research. (£37,199)

Funding body: Department of Education (England)

Funding body Department of Education (England)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Paul Newhouse, Martin Cooper, Jenny Lane, Romina Jamieson-Proctor, Petrea Redmond, Jason Zagami, Damian Maher, Andrew Fluck

Scheme Vital Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N

Your Own Technology Survey (YOTS) Phase 2$9,000

This funding enabled the extension of the original English version of the survey tool through collaborations with colleagues in the USA, Australia, Italy, France, Bangladesh and China - additional versions were created that were customised for use in a range of other countries (including translating the text and adapting the terminology, etc..). The YOTS website is available at http://www.yots.org.uk. (£5,000) 

Funding body: Department of Education (England)

Funding body Department of Education (England)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Fiona Henry, Lewis Stewart, Gary Spruce, Valeri Demouy, Qian Kan, Shohel Mahruf, Andrew Fluck, Martin Crisp,

Scheme Vital Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON N

Your Own Technology Survey (YOTS) Phase 1$6,840

This initial funding enabled the creation of the original version of the YOTS tool in English. See http://www.yots.org.uk. (£3,800)

Funding body: The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)

Funding body The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Fiona Henry, Lewis Stewart

Scheme Education Futures Research Group
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20121 grants / $2,250,000

Vital Professional Development (Phase 3)$2,250,000

The third phase of Vital included 22 case studies looking at digital technology strategies in school and the establishment of the EdFutures.net website as a vehicle for sharing research evidence around the effective use of digital technology in schools. (£1.25million)

Funding body: Department of Education (England)

Funding body Department of Education (England)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Fiona Henry, Don Dyas, Teressa Connolly, Kirsty Gower, Sam Leicester, Kirsten Muirhead, Jo Mapplebeck, Sharon Forder

Scheme Vital Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20111 grants / $4,500,000

Vital Professional Development (Phase 2)$4,500,000

The second phase of Vital extended the range of professional learning opportunities available, including the addition of the In-house Professional Development Partnership (a one year programme supporting a member of school staff to run a professional development programme within the school, linked to their school development plan). (£2.5million)

Funding body: Department of Education (England)

Funding body Department of Education (England)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Fiona Henry, Jon Dyas, Kirsty Gower, Pete Bradshaw, Chris Walsh, Sharon Forder, Jo Mapplebeck, and many more

Scheme Vital Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20091 grants / $10,170,000

Vital Professional Development (Phase 1)$10,170,000

Vital was funded to enhance teaching with and about digital technology in state funded 5-19 education in England. (£5.65million).

Funding body: Department of Education (England)

Funding body Department of Education (England)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Jon Dyas, Bob Coates, and many more

Scheme Vital Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20081 grants / $27,473

The Schome Park Programme (Phase 3)$27,473

Phase 3 of the Schome Park Programme again adjusted the model of support for learning - shifting to supporting group projects which were lead by members of the community. (£15,263)

Funding body: The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)

Funding body The Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Rebecca Ferguson, Gill Clough, Anna Peachey, and many more

Scheme Education Futures Research Group
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20072 grants / $133,200

The Schome Park Programme (Phase 1)$97,200

The Schome Park Programme set out to explore dimensions of practice that one needs to think about when designing and education system. It used Teen Second Life (TM) to give hundreds of 13 to 65 year olds lived experiences of new ways of supporting learning. In Phase 1 we provided dedicated teaching areas and schedules sessions for Physics (run by the National Physical Laboratory), Philosophy (run by Warwick University) and Archaeology (run by the University of Liverpool). (£54,000)

Funding body: National Association of Gifted and Talented Youth (NAGTY)

Funding body National Association of Gifted and Talented Youth (NAGTY)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Jonty Rix, Kieron Sheehy, and many more

Scheme Outreach
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

The Schome Park Programme (Phase 2)$36,000

Phase 2 of the Schome Park Programme maintained the same aims (exploring dimensions of practice that one needs to think about when designing an education system). The model of support provided was changed - with a shift in focus to individual members of the community being responsible for supporting learning - a major focus on collaboration and independent learning. (£20,000)

Funding body: Becta

Funding body Becta
Project Team

Peter Twining, Rebecca Ferguson, Gill Clough, Anna Peachey, and many more

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20061 grants / $79,380

The Aspire Pilot$79,380

The Aspire Pilot worked with groups of students to support them in developing innovative visions for schooling. 

Funding body: NESTA

Funding body NESTA
Project Team

Peter Twining, Anna Craft, Kerry Chappel

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20051 grants / $86,860

The eStrategy Implementation Review (eSIR)$86,860

Exploring the implementation of aspects of the governments ‘Harnessing Technology Strategy’. Key finding being that the main challenges were political not technical - and had been known about for the past 30 years. Download the report.  (£48,256)

Funding body: Becta

Funding body Becta
Project Team

Peter Twining, Jean Underwood, Alison Twiner, D Morris, Karen Ford, Deirdre Cook, and Roger Broadie

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20041 grants / $172,580

Evaluation of Tablet PCs in English schools$172,580

Exploring the use of Tablet PCs in schools. Download related reports/papers from ResearchGate.  (£95,878)

Funding body: Becta

Funding body Becta
Project Team

Peter Twining, Jean Underwood, Kieron Sheehy, Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, Eileen Scanlon, Deirdre Cook, Diane Evans, A Jelfs

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20031 grants / $35,870

Automated Profiling of Learners’ Understandings of Standards (A+)$35,870

Developing an alternative approach to assessment

Funding body: The Open University

Funding body The Open University
Project Team

Peter Twining

Scheme Teaching and Learning Innovation
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

19981 grants / $538,201

Software Use, Reuse and Customisation in Education (SoURCE)$538,201

Exploring issues surrounding the re-use of software to support learning within higher education. (£299,001)

Funding body: Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP)

Funding body Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP)
Project Team

Peter Twining, Diana Laurillard, Steve Moss, Ann Jones, and many more

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

19971 grants / $7,200

HyperNote$7,200

Developing hypermedia tools for use by students. (£4,000)

Funding body: The Open University

Funding body The Open University
Project Team

Peter Twining, Guy Barrett

Scheme Technology Development
Role Lead
Funding Start 1997
Funding Finish 1997
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

19941 grants / $22,140

The Educational Computing Flexible Learning Project$22,140

Developing self-study materials to support teachers’ use of ICT. (£12,300)

Funding body: Enterprise in Higher Education (EHE)

Funding body Enterprise in Higher Education (EHE)
Project Team

Peter Twining

Scheme Enterprise
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1995
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

19931 grants / $4,500

IT in ITT Partnerships$4,500

Exploring the use of laptops in teacher education. (£2,500)

Funding body: Becta

Funding body Becta
Project Team

Peter Twining

Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Problem Based Learning in STEM Education PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Emerging Technology-Enhanced Complimentary Education Initiatives in Sub-Saharan Africa Education, The Open University Consultant Supervisor
2017 Professional Doctorate Teachers’ digital identities, pedagogy and practice Education, The Open University Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Investigating self-OER
I was the lead supervisor for the first year, and became an advisory supervisor in August 2019.
Education, The Open University Consultant Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 Masters Literacies for learning in a digital age Education, The Open University Co-Supervisor
2014 Professional Doctorate The role of the teacher in relation to children’s personalised online learning Education, The Open University Principal Supervisor
2013 Masters The challenge and impact of ICT on teachers’ pedagogical practices in Nigeria Education, The Open University Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Assessment of ICT at 16: its validity and relationship to students’ formal and informal learning Education, Nottingham Trent University Consultant Supervisor
2009 Professional Doctorate The impact of giving undergraduate Health students a choice of blend for collaborative learning Education, The Open University Co-Supervisor
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Professor Peter Twining

Position

Professor
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email peter.twining@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4055 3189
Links Personal Blogs
Twitter
Personal webpage
Personal webpage

Office

Room HC44
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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