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Professor Peter Howe

Research Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Nutrition and Dietetics)

Career Summary

Biography

Peter is Professor of Nutrition Research in the School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy and Director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, a new cross institutional research collaboration based at the University of Newcastle. He is also an Adjunct Professor in Nutritional Physiology at the University of South Australia and Adjunct Professor in Physiology at the University of Adelaide. With an extensive track record of multidisciplinary preclinical and clinical research in nutrition, cardiovascular physiology, neuroscience and more recently mental health, he is recognised as an authority on cardiovascular and metabolic health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids and other bioactive nutrients. Peter has published over 200 papers with 4800 citations (H-index = 35). His goal is the scientific substantiation and promotion of health benefits of functional foods and nutraceuticals through collaborative partnerships with industry. He is joint Editor-in-Chief of the online journal Nutrients and a Fellow of the Nutrition Society of Australia.

  Research Expertise
Peter has a long-standing track record of preclinical and clinical research in cardiovascular/autonomic physiology and in nutrition addressing the pathogenesis, prevention and management of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. His current research focuses on the role of diet and lifestyle in health optimisation: the impact of nutritional and exercise interventions on biomarkers of cardiovascular, metabolic and mental health; the elucidation of underlying mechanisms of action; the development of an integrated approach to risk factor management (including nutrients as adjunct therapy). Peter's research also encompasses food sources, bioavailability and intake recommendations for nutrients, esp. omega-3 fatty acids.

Teaching Expertise
Peter has extensive experience in supervising honours and PhD students and in mentoring postdoctoral and early career researchers, having supervised 18 higher degree research and 26 honours research students. Peter has also given invited lectures in both Human Nutrition and Nutrition & Dietetics courses at the University of South Australia, where he conducted Human Research Ethics training workshops. Peter also has experience both lecturing and coordinating undergraduate students from his work at the University of Wollongong, University of Adelaide and Flinders University.

Administrative Expertise
Peter was the inaugural Director of the Smart Foods Centre at the University of Wollongong (1999) and founded and directed the Nutritional Physiology Research Centre at the University of South Australia (2003-2009). He was also Director and Chair of Executive Committee for the Australian Technology Network Centre for Metabolic Fitness from 2005 – 07, a national collaboration researching diet and lifestyle approaches to optimise physical and mental health. Peter has had significant experience on several Human Research Ethics and Experimental Animal Research Ethics committees and is currently Human Research Ethics Advisor at the University of South Australia. He has also held a number of key roles in both the CSIRO and University based research administration. Peter is a regular assessor of grant applications for the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council.

Collaborations
Peter has held several significant leadership roles in collaborative research concentrations at Australian universities and is currently Director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), a collaborative initiative between research concentrations at University of Newcastle, University of South Australia and Swinburne University of Technology. He previously founded the following research collaborations: Smart Foods Centre (an ARC Key Centre of Teaching and Research at the University of Wollongong); Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, University of South Australia; ATN Centre for Metabolic Fitness Peter has also built strategic alliances with both primary producers and food manufacturers to develop healthier foods and he convenes the Annual Industry Forum for Nutrition Research. He has also worked as a consultant with many organisations including Food Standards Australia New Zealand and the Australian Food & Grocery Council.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Monash University
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Sydney
  • Master of Science, University of Oxford - UK

Keywords

  • Bioactive nutrients
  • Cardiorespiratory Physiology
  • Cardiovascular and metabolic health
  • Human Nutrition
  • Mental Health
  • Nutrients and Metabolism
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids
  • Pathophysiology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111103 Nutritional Physiology 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 -  Human Research Ethics Advisor University of South Australia
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Editor - Nutrients Nutrients
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Adjunct Professor The University of Adelaide
School of Medical Sciences
Australia
1/06/2005 -  Research Professor University of South Australia
Nutritional Physiology
Australia
1/01/2001 -  Membership - Nutrition Australia Nutrition Australia
Australia
1/01/1998 - 31/12/2000 Membership - Australasian Clinical Research Network (Management Committee) Australasian Clinical Research Network (Management Committee)
Australia
1/01/1997 -  Membership - American Oil Chemists Society (Australasian Chapter) American Oil Chemists Society (Australasian Chapter)
United States
1/01/1995 -  Membership - International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids & Lipids International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids & Lipids
Australia
1/01/1986 -  Membership - International Society of Hypertension International Society of Hypertension
Australia
1/01/1984 -  Fellow - Nutrition Society of Australia Nutrition Society of Australia
Australia
1/01/1980 -  Membership - High Blood Pressure Research Council of Australia High Blood Pressure Research Council of Australia
Australia

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2011 Nutrients and Circulatory Function
Organisation: Food Industry Forum for Nutrition Research

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2014 5th International Conference on Natural Products for Health and Beauty
Organisation: Phuket, May Description: .
2014 8th Congress, International Society for Nutrigenetics & Nutrigenomics
Organisation: Gold Coast, May Description: .
2013 Omega-3 Symposium & AAOCS Biennial Workshop
Organisation: Newcastle, November Description: .
2012 Vasoactive Nutrients & Brain Function
Organisation: DSM Nutritional Products & Frutarom Description: .
2012 Vasoactive Nutrients & Brain Function
Organisation: Glaxo Smith Kline Description: .
2012 Nutrients and Circulatory Function
Organisation: 3rd Annual Food Industry Forum for Nutrition Research Description: .

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Science of Nutrition in Medicine Conference
Organisation: Sydney, May Description: .
2012 Vasoactive Nutrients and Brain Function
Organisation: Canadian Nutrition Society Description: Invited Speaker at annual conference.
2012 Circulatory dysfunction and chronic inflammation: a common target for nutrient intervention
Organisation: Nutrition Society of Australia Newcastle Group meeting Description: .
2012 Student Masterclass
Organisation: Nutrition Society of Australia annual meeting Description: .
2012 Resveratrol 2012
Organisation: University of Leicester Description: .
2011 Omega Index
Organisation: RCPA AACB Chemical Pathology Course
2011 Cardiometabolic/mental health benefits of vasoactive nutrients
Organisation: University of Newcastle
2011 Cardiometabolic and mental health benefits of vasoactive nutrients
Organisation: Science of Nutrition in Medicine and Healthcare Conference
2011 Cardiovascular, metabolic and mental health benefits of vasoactive nutrients
Organisation: Therapeutic Applications of Functional Foods Description:
2011 Nutrition and Health & Shape Up for Life
Organisation: CPDENT: Dental Practice Update Description:
2011 Nutraceuticals in Health and Disease
Organisation: 5th International Conference on Mechanisms of Action of Nutraceuticals Description:
2011 Erythrocyte omega-3 levels - an alternative basis for intake recommendations
Organisation: Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society Description: Invited speaker at Health and nutrition session.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Alpha-cyclodextrin', iber Ingredients: Food Applications and Health Benefits, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America 9-18 (2009) [B1]
2009 Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and obesity', Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation, AOCS Press, Berlin, Germany 767-786 (2009) [B1]
2009 Murphy K, Howe PRC, 'Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-3 fatty acids', Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation, AOCS Press, Berlin, Germany 787-818 (2009) [B1]
2009 Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Fatty Acids in nuts', Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation, AOCS Press, Berlin, Germany 253-283 (2009) [B1]
2009 Sinn N, Milte C, Howe PRC, 'From ADHD to Alzheimer's: Omega-3 fatty acids and mental health', Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation, AOCS Press, Berlin, Germany 611-641 (2009) [B1]
2006 Buckley J, Hill A, Coates A, Howe PRC, 'Simpler diet and exercise solutions for managing obesity', Physical Activity and Obesity, Smith-Gordon, London, United Kingdom (2006) [B1]
2002 Liu L-X, Howe PRC, Su C-W, Sun F, Zhang R, 'Comparative analysis of the ITS rDNA sequence and nutrient compositions of an unnamed Ganoderma species in Australia', Ganoderma: Genetics, Chemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Beijing Medical University Press, Beijing, China 67-74 (2002) [B1]
2002 Meyer BJ, Larkin T, Owen J, Astheimer L, Tapsell L, Howe PRC, 'The hypocholesterolaemic effect of chronic soy consumption may be linked to equol', Soy and Health 2002, Garant, Antwerp, Belgium 53-61 (2002) [B1]
1989 Howe PRC, 'Effects of chronic enalapril treatment on plasma catecholamines, vasopressor sensitivity and baroreflex function in stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', Current advances in ACE inhibition, Churchill-Livingstone, Edinburgh 275-278 (1989) [B2]
1989 Howe PRC, 'The Role of Salt', Televent 89 Factors Affecting the Choice of Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease, Medical Observer, Sydney 24-26 (1989) [B1]
1986 Howe PRC, Smith RM, King RA, Osbome-White WS, Potter BJ, Field JB, 'Effect of thyroid hormone on the development of central noradrenergic mechanisms', Iodine nutrition, thyroxine, and brain development, TATA McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, New Delhi 168-180 (1986) [B1]
1983 Howe PRC, Smith RM, King RA, 'Myelin Structures and Metabolism', Molecular aspects of neurological disorders, Academic Press, Sydney 221-229 (1983) [B1]
1982 Howe PRC, Tumuls I, Wallman Y, Chalmers JP, 'Central adrenaline nerves in spontaneously hypertensive and stroke prone rats', Hypertensive Mechanisms: The Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat as a Model to Study Human Hypertension, Schatteur, Heidelberg 485-489 (1982) [B1]
1982 Howe PRC, Stead BH, Chalmers JP, 'Central serotonin nerves in spontaneously hypertensive and DOCA salt hypertensive rats', Hypertensive Mechanisms: The Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat as a Model to Study Human Hypertension, Schatteur, Heidelberg 627-631 (1982) [B1]
1979 Howe PRC, 'Cardiac and central histamine in spontaneously hypertensive and stroke prone rats', Nervous System and Hypertension, John Wiley & Sons, New York 244-251 (1979) [B1]
1979 Howe PRC, Blessing WW, Chalmers JP, 'Catecholamine containing cell bodies in rabbit hindbrain', Catecholamines: Basic and Clinical Frontiers, Pergamon Press, New York 1301-1303 (1979) [B1]
1979 Howe PRC, Chalmers JP, Provis JC, West MJ, 'Histamine in the heart and spinal cord of hypertensive rats', Catecholamines, basic and clinical frontiers, Pergamon Press, New York 1164-1166 (1979) [B1]
1979 Chalmers JP, Howe PRC, Provis JC, West MJ, 'Changes in cardiac norepinephrine in spontaneously hypertensive and stroke-prone rats', Catecholamines: Basic and Clinical Frontiers, Elsevier, New York 776-778 (1979)
1975 Howe PRC, Livett BG, Fenwick E, Austin L, 'An immunochemical approach to the transport of axonal vesicular proteins and their release from nerve terminals', Recent Advances in Myology, Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam 215-223 (1975) [B1]
Show 16 more chapters

Journal article (276 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Tsiros MD, Buckley JD, Olds T, Howe PR, Hills AP, Walkley J, et al., 'Impaired Physical Function Associated with Childhood Obesity: How Should We Intervene?', Child Obes, 12 126-134 (2016)
DOI 10.1089/chi.2015.0123
2016 Evans HM, Howe PRC, Wong RHX, 'Clinical evaluation of effects of chronic resveratrol supplementation on cerebrovascular function, cognition, mood, physical function and general well-being in postmenopausal women¿rationale and study design', Nutrients, 8 (2016)

© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Background: This methodological paper presents both a scientific rationale and a methodological approach for investigati... [more]

© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Background: This methodological paper presents both a scientific rationale and a methodological approach for investigating the effects of resveratrol supplementation on mood and cognitive performance in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, which may be at least partly due to loss of beneficial effects of estrogen on the cerebrovasculature. We hypothesise that resveratrol, a phytoestrogen, may counteract this risk by enhancing cerebrovascular function and improving regional blood flow in response to cognitive demands. A clinical trial was designed to test this hypothesis. Method: Healthy postmenopausal women were recruited to participate in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled (parallel comparison) dietary intervention trial to evaluate the effects of resveratrol supplementation (75 mg twice daily) on cognition, cerebrovascular responsiveness to cognitive tasks and overall well-being. They performed the following tests at baseline and after 14 weeks of supplementation: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Cambridge Semantic Memory Battery, the Double Span and the Trail Making Task. Cerebrovascular function was assessed simultaneously by monitoring blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Conclusion: This trial provides a model approach to demonstrate that, by optimising circulatory function in the brain, resveratrol and other vasoactive nutrients may enhance mood and cognition and ameliorate the risk of developing dementia in postmenopausal women and other at-risk populations.

DOI 10.3390/nu8030150
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2016 Wong RH, Nealon RS, Scholey A, Howe PR, 'Low dose resveratrol improves cerebrovascular function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.', Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis, 26 393-399 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.numecd.2016.03.003
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2016 Fan C, Georgiou KR, McKinnon RA, Keefe DMK, Howe PRC, Xian CJ, 'Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats', Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 34 277-290 (2016)

© 2015, The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer Japan. The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among brea... [more]

© 2015, The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer Japan. The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10¿mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5¿mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10¿mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation.

DOI 10.1007/s00774-015-0679-x
2016 Thomson RL, Rogers DK, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, 'Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling', Research in Sports Medicine, 24 1-15 (2016)

© 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was relat... [more]

© 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was related to reductions in exercise performance resulting from acute fatigue. Fourteen triathletes completed testing before and after a 2-h run. rHRI was assessed during 5 min of 100-W cycling and a sigmoidal (rHRIsig) and exponential (rHRIexp) model were applied. Exercise performance was assessed using a 5-min cycling time-trial. The run elicited reductions in time-trial performance (1.34 ± 0.19 to 1.25 ± 0.18 kJ · kg-1, P < 0.001), rHRIsig (2.25 ± 1.0 to 1.14 ± 0.7 beats · min-1 · s-1, P < 0.001) and rHRIexp (3.79 ± 2.07 to 1.98 ± 1.05 beats · min-1 · s-1, P = 0.001), and increased pre-exercise HR (73.0 ± 8.4 to 90.5 ± 11.4 beats · min-1, P < 0.001). Pre-post run difference in time-trial performance was related to difference in rHRIsig (r = 0.58, P = 0.04 and r = 0.75, P = 0.003) but not rHRIexp (r = -0.04, P = 0.9 and r = 0.27, P = 0.4) when controlling for differences in pre-exercise and steady-state HR. rHRIsig was reduced following acute exercise-induced fatigue, and correlated with difference in performance.

DOI 10.1080/15438627.2015.1076414
2016 Thomson RL, Bellenger CR, Howe PRC, Karavirta L, Buckley JD, 'Improved heart rate recovery despite reduced exercise performance following heavy training: A within-subject analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 255-259 (2016)

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Objectives: The recovery of heart rate (HRR) after exercise is a potential indicator of fitness which has been shown to respond to changes in tr... [more]

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Objectives: The recovery of heart rate (HRR) after exercise is a potential indicator of fitness which has been shown to respond to changes in training. This study investigated the within-individual association between HRR and exercise performance following three different training loads. Design: 11 male cyclists/triathletes were tested after two weeks of light training, two weeks of heavy training and two days of rest. Methods: Exercise performance was measured using a 5-min maximal cycling time-trial. HRR was measured over 60 s during supine recovery. Results: Exercise performance decreased 2.2 ± 2.5% following heavy training compared with post-light training (= 0.01), and then increased 4.0 ± 4.2% following rest (= 0.004). Most HRR indices indicated a more rapid recovery of heart rate (HR) following heavy training, and reverted to post light training levels following two days of rest. HRR indices did not differ between post-light training and after the rest period (> 0.6). There were inverse within-subject relationships between indices of HRR and performance (= -0.6, p = 0.004). Peak HR decreased 3.2 ± 5.1 bpm following heavy training (= 0.06) and significantly increased 4.9 ± 4.3 bpm following recovery (= 0.004). There was a moderate within-subject relationship between peak HR and exercise performance (= 0.7, p = 0.001). Controlling for peak HR reduced the relationships between HRR and performance (= -0.4-0.5, p < 0.05). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that HRR tracks short-term changes in exercise performance within-individuals, such that increases in HRR are associated with poorer exercise performance following heavy training. Peak HR can be compromised under conditions of fatigue, and needs to be taken into account in HRR analyses.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.02.010
2015 Davison K, Howe PRC, 'Potential Implications of Dose and Diet for the Effects of Cocoa Flavanols on Cardiometabolic Function', Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 63 9942-9947 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. The metabolic syndrome is a pathological state whereby cardiovascular and metabolic dysfunction coexist and typically progress in a mutual feed-... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. The metabolic syndrome is a pathological state whereby cardiovascular and metabolic dysfunction coexist and typically progress in a mutual feed-forward manner to further dysfunction and ultimately disease. The health and function of the vascular endothelium is integral in this phenomenon and thus represents a logical target for intervention. Consumption of foods high in cocoa flavanols has demonstrated a capacity to markedly improve endothelial function and key markers of the metabolic syndrome including blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. The typically high energy content of foods containing sufficient doses of cocoa flavanols has caused some reservations around its therapeutic use, but this is dependent upon the particulars of the food matrix used. Further to this, the food matrix appears to influence the dose response curve of cocoa flavanols, particularly on blood pressure, with dark chocolate appearing to be 8 times more effective in systolic blood pressure reduction than a cocoa powder drink for the equivalent dose of flavanol. Cocoa flavanol consumption conclusively demonstrates a positive impact on cardiometabolic function; however, more research is needed to understand how best to consume it to maximize the benefit while avoiding excessive fat and sugar consumption.

DOI 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b01492
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Fulton AS, Hill AM, Williams MT, Howe PRC, Coates AM, 'Paucity of evidence for a relationship between long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 73 612-623 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Context: The anti-inflammatory activity of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been established in several chronic inflammatory diseases but has yet to... [more]

© 2015. Context: The anti-inflammatory activity of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been established in several chronic inflammatory diseases but has yet to be demonstrated in inflammatory lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to investigate, using PRISMA guidelines, the relationship between the intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and the prevalence, severity, and health outcomes of COPD. Data Sources: Eight health databases and the World Health Organization's international clinical trial registry were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Experimental or observational studies that were published in English and that assessed long-chain n-3 PUFA intake (by determining habitual consumption and/or tissue levels) in adults with COPD were included. Data Extraction: Publication demographics, participant characteristics, type of intervention or exposure, long-chain n-3 PUFA intake, pulmonary function, COPD mortality, and COPD severity were independently extracted from each article by 2 authors using a prospectively designed data extraction tool. Data Synthesis: All 11 of the studies included in the review were observational. Approximately equal numbers of studies reported significant (n=6, 5 inverse) relationships or no significant relationships (n=5) between either consumption of long-chain n-3 PUFAs or levels of long-chain n-3 PUFAS in tissue and a COPD outcome. Conclusions: Current evidence of a relationship between long-chain n-3 PUFA intake and COPD is limited and conflicting, with studies having wide methodological variation. Registration number: PROSPERO 2013:CRD42013004085.

DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuv017
2015 King TJ, Shandala T, Lee AM, Foster BK, Chen KM, Howe PR, Xian CJ, 'Potential effects of phytoestrogen genistein in modulating acute methotrexate chemotherapy-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone damage in rats', International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 16 18293-18311 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Chemotherapy-induced bone damage is a frequent side effect which causes diminished bone mineral density and fracture in ... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Chemotherapy-induced bone damage is a frequent side effect which causes diminished bone mineral density and fracture in childhood cancer sufferers and survivors. The intensified use of anti-metabolite methotrexate (MTX) and other cytotoxic drugs has led to the need for a mechanistic understanding of chemotherapy-induced bone loss and for the development of protective treatments. Using a young rat MTX-induced bone loss model, we investigated potential bone protective effects of phytoestrogen genistein. Oral gavages of genistein (20 mg/kg) were administered daily, for seven days before, five days during, and three days after five once-daily injections (sc) of MTX (0.75 mg/kg). MTX treatment reduced body weight gain and tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone volume (p < 0.001), increased osteoclast density on the trabecular bone surface (p < 0.05), and increased the bone marrow adipocyte number in lower metaphyseal bone (p < 0.001). Genistein supplementation preserved body weight gain (p < 0.05) and inhibited ex vivo osteoclast formation of bone marrow cells from MTX-treated rats (p < 0.001). However, MTX-induced changes in bone volume, trabecular architecture, metaphyseal mRNA expression of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines, and marrow adiposity were not significantly affected by the co-administration of genistein. This study suggests that genistein may suppress MTX-induced osteoclastogenesis; however, further studies are required to examine its potential in protecting against MTX chemotherapy-induced bone damage.

DOI 10.3390/ijms160818293
2015 Best T, Howe P, Bryan J, Buckley J, Scholey A, 'Acute effects of a dietary non-starch polysaccharide supplement on cognitive performance in healthy middle-aged adults', NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE, 18 76-86 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000101
2015 Tsiros MD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Walkley J, Hills AP, Wood RE, Buckley JD, 'Adiposity is related to decrements in cardiorespiratory fitness in obese and normal-weight children', Pediatric Obesity, (2015)

© 2015 World Obesity. Background: Obese children are typically less physically active than their normal-weight peers and are often assumed to be 'unfit'. Objective: Investigate t... [more]

© 2015 World Obesity. Background: Obese children are typically less physically active than their normal-weight peers and are often assumed to be 'unfit'. Objective: Investigate the relationships between adiposity, physical activity levels and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in obese and normal-weight children. A secondary aim was to examine obese/normal-weight differences in CRF. Methods: Obese (N=107) and normal-weight (N=132) 10-13-year-olds participated. Fat-free mass (FFM), percent fat, physical activity and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) were assessed. Analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic status (SES). Results: Higher percent fat was inversely associated with VO2peak normalized for mass (r=-0.780, P<0.001) even after controlling for physical activity (r=-0.673, P<0.001). While higher percent fat was also inversely associated with VO2peak normalized for FFM, this was only significant in males (r=-0.247, P=0.004) and did not persist after controlling for physical activity (r=-0.059 P=0.526). Compared with normal-weight children, obese children had higher absolute VO2peak, lower VO2peak corrected for mass (P=0.009) and lower VO2peak corrected for FFM (P=0.041) that did not persist after controlling for SES (P=0.086). Conclusion: Obesity-related inefficiencies in CRF were evident. Higher adiposity was associated with poorer CRF relative to mass, irrespective of physical activity levels. However, low physical activity levels may be responsible for associations between adiposity and CRF relative to FFM seen in boys, indicating the importance of encouraging physical activity.

DOI 10.1111/ijpo.12037
2015 Fuller JT, Thomson RL, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, 'Vibration Therapy Is No More Effective Than the Standard Practice of Massage and Stretching for Promoting Recovery From Muscle Damage After Eccentric Exercise', Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 25 332-337 (2015) [C1]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if vibration therapy is more effective than the standard treatment of stretching and massage for improving recovery of muscle... [more]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if vibration therapy is more effective than the standard treatment of stretching and massage for improving recovery of muscle strength and reducing muscle soreness after muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise. Design: A randomized, single-blinded parallel intervention trial design was used. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: Fifty untrained men aged 18 to 30 years completed the study. Interventions: Participants performed 100 maximal eccentric muscle actions (ECCmax) of the right knee extensor muscles. For the next 7 days, 25 participants applied cycloidal vibration therapy to the knee extensors twice daily and 25 participants performed stretching and sports massage (SSM) twice daily. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in markers of muscle damage [peak isometric torque (PIT), serum creatine kinase (CK), and serum myoglobin (Mb)], muscle soreness (visual analog scale), and inflammation [serum C-reactive protein (CRP)] were assessed. Results: After ECCmax, there was no difference in recovery of PIT and muscle soreness or serum CK, Mb, and CRP levels between vibration and SSM groups (P > 0.28). Conclusions: Cycloidal vibration therapy is no more effective than the standard practice of stretching and massage to promote muscle recovery after the performance of muscle-damaging exercise. Clinical Relevance: Prescription of vibration therapy after maximal exercise involving eccentric muscle damage did not alleviate signs and symptoms of muscle damage faster than the standard prescription of stretching and massage.

DOI 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000149
2015 Dale MJ, Thomson RL, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Brown A, Buckley JD, 'Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise', Functional Foods in Health and Disease, 5 34-43 (2015) [C1]
2015 Buckley J, Howe P, 'An update from the editorial board of nutrients', Nutrients, 7 5540-5541 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu7075236
2015 Street SJ, Parletta N, Milte C, Sullivan K, Hills AP, Buckley J, Howe P, 'Interaction of erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic acid and physical activity predicts reduced risk of mild cognitive impairment', AGING & MENTAL HEALTH, 19 885-891 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13607863.2014.971705
2015 Barbour JA, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Bryan J, Coates AM, 'Effect of 12 weeks high oleic peanut consumption on cardio-metabolic risk factors and body composition', Nutrients, 7 7381-7398 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaem... [more]

© 2015, the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance. We investigated effects of high oleic peanut consumption vs. a nut free diet on adiposity and cardio-metabolic risk markers. In a randomised cross-over design, 61 healthy subjects (65 ± 7 years, body mass index (BMI) 31 ± 4 kg/m2) alternated either high oleic peanuts (15%¿20% of energy) or a nut free diet for 12 weeks. Body composition and mass, waist circumference, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipids, glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and after each phase. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) compared the two diets. Consistent with other nut studies, there were no differences in lipids, CRP, glucose and insulin with peanut consumption. In contrast, some reports have demonstrated benefits, likely due to differences in the study cohort. Energy intake was 10% higher (853 kJ, p < 0.05), following peanut consumption vs. control, attributed to a 30% increase in fat intake (p < 0.001), predominantly monounsaturated (increase 22 g, p < 0.05). Despite greater energy intake during the peanut phase, there were no differences in body composition, and less than predicted increase (0.5 kg) in body weight for this additional energy intake, possibly due to incomplete nutrient absorption and energy utilisation.

DOI 10.3390/nu7095343
2015 Fulton A, Coates A, Williams M, Howe P, Hill A, 'Persistent Citation of the Only Published Randomised Controlled Trial of Omega-3 Supplementation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Six Years after Its Retraction', Publications, 3 17-26 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/publications3010017
2015 Milte CM, Parletta N, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Young RM, Howe PRC, 'Increased erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are associated with improved attention and behavior in children with adhd in a randomized controlled three-way crossover trial', Journal of Attention Disorders, 19 954-964 (2015) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2013. Objective: To investigate effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on attention,... [more]

© The Author(s) 2013. Objective: To investigate effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on attention, literacy, and behavior in children with ADHD. Method: Ninety children were randomized to consume supplements high in EPA, DHA, or linoleic acid (control) for 4 months each in a crossover design. Erythrocyte fatty acids, attention, cognition, literacy, and Conners¿ Parent Rating Scales (CPRS) were measured at 0, 4, 8, 12 months. Results: Fifty-three children completed the treatment. Outcome measures showed no significant differences between the three treatments. However, in children with blood samples (n = 76-46), increased erythrocyte EPA + DHA was associated with improved spelling (r =.365, p <.001) and attention (r = -.540, p <.001) and reduced oppositional behavior (r = -.301, p <.003), hyperactivity (r = -.310, p <.001), cognitive problems (r = -.326, p <.001), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) hyperactivity (r = -.270, p =.002) and DSM-IV inattention (r = -.343, p <.001). Conclusion: Increasing erythrocyte DHA and EPA via dietary supplementation may improve behavior, attention, and literacy in children with ADHD.

DOI 10.1177/1087054713510562
2015 Watson NA, Dyer KA, Buckley JD, Brinkworth GD, Coates AM, Parfitt G, et al., 'A randomised trial comparing low-fat diets differing in carbohydrate and protein ratio, combined with regular moderate intensity exercise, on glycaemic control, cardiometabolic risk factors, food cravings, cognitive function and psychological wellbeing in adults with type 2 diabetes: Study protocol', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 45 217-225 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 . Background: Hypocaloric low-fat diets, high in protein with moderate carbohydrate (HP) can enhance weight loss, improve glycaemic control and improve cardiometabolic hea... [more]

© 2015 . Background: Hypocaloric low-fat diets, high in protein with moderate carbohydrate (HP) can enhance weight loss, improve glycaemic control and improve cardiometabolic health risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is unclear whether the metabolic benefits observed during weight loss are sustained during energy-balance and weight maintenance. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of HP diets on food cravings, cognitive function and psychological wellbeing in T2DM, despite carbohydrate food cravings, cognitive impairment and depression being associated with hyperglycaemia. Methods/design: Overweight/obese adults with T2DM were randomised to consume either a HP diet (n. = 32, ~. 32% protein, 33% carbohydrate, 30% fat) or a higher-carbohydrate diet (HC, n. = 29, ~. 22% protein, 51% carbohydrate, 22% fat) for 24 weeks with 30 min of moderate intensity exercise five days/week for the study duration. There were 2 phases: a 12 week weight loss phase followed by a 12 week weight maintenance phase. Primary outcome was glycaemic control (glycosylated haemoglobin; HbA1c). Secondary outcomes were cardiometabolic risk factors (body composition, fasting blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin and C-reactive protein), food cravings, cognitive function (memory; psychomotor and executive function and psychological well-being. Outcomes were measured at baseline and the end of each 12-week intervention phase. Data will be analysed as intention-to-treat using linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: This study will examine the effects of two dietary interventions on health outcomes in T2DM during weight loss and notably following weight maintenance where there is a paucity of evidence.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2015.11.001
2014 Fulton A, Hill A, Williams M, Howe P, Coates A, 'OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS AND COPD: HOW HAS CITING A RETRACTED RCT IMPACTED THE LITERATURE?', RESPIROLOGY, 19 49-49 (2014)
2014 Thomson RL, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Bryan J, Matsumoto M, Buckley JD, 'Increases in plasma lutein through supplementation are correlated with increases in physical activity and reductions in sedentary time in older adults', Nutrients, 6 974-984 (2014) [C1]

Cross-sectional studies have reported positive relationships between serum lutein concentrations and higher physical activity levels. The purpose of the study was to determine whe... [more]

Cross-sectional studies have reported positive relationships between serum lutein concentrations and higher physical activity levels. The purpose of the study was to determine whether increasing plasma lutein levels increases physical activity. Forty-four older adults (BMI, 25.3 ± 2.6 kg/m2; age, 68.8 ± 6.4 year) not meeting Australian physical activity guidelines (150 min/week of moderate to vigorous activity) were randomized to consume capsules containing 21 mg of lutein or placebo with 250 mL of full-cream milk per day for 4 weeks and encouraged to increase physical activity. Physical activity was assessed by self-report, pedometry and accelerometry (daily activity counts and sedentary time). Exercise self-efficacy was assessed by questionnaire. Thirty-nine participants competed the study (Lutein = 19, Placebo = 20). Lutein increased plasma lutein concentrations compared with placebo (p < 0.001). Absolute and percentage changes in plasma lutein were inversely associated with absolute (r = -0.36, p = 0.03) and percentage changes (r = -0.39, p = 0.02) in sedentary time. Percentage change in plasma lutein was positively associated with the percentage change in average daily activity counts (r = 0.36, p = 0.03). Exercise self-efficacy did not change (p = 0.16). Lutein increased plasma lutein, which was associated with increased physical activity and reduced sedentary time in older adults. Larger trials should evaluate whether Lutein can provide health benefits over the longer term. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/nu6030974
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Murphy KJ, Pettman T, Milte C, Coates AM, 'Relationship between erythrocyte omega-3 content and obesity is gender dependent', Nutrients, 6 1850-1860 (2014) [C1]

Epidemiological evidence of an inverse association between consumption of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) and obesity has been conflicting, even thoug... [more]

Epidemiological evidence of an inverse association between consumption of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) and obesity has been conflicting, even though studies in animal models of obesity and limited human trials suggest that LC n-3 PUFA consumption may contribute to weight loss. We used baseline data from a convenience sample of 476 adults (291 women, 185 men) participating in clinical trials at our Centre to explore relationships between erythrocyte levels of LC n-3 PUFA (a reliable indicator of habitual intake) and measures of adiposity, viz. body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat (BF) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Means ± SD of assessments were BMI: 34 ± 7 and 31 ± 5 kg/m2; WC: 105 ± 16 and 110 ± 13 cm; BF: 48 ± 5 and 35% ± 6% in women and men respectively. Erythrocyte levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were similar in men and women while docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) was higher and EPA + DHA (Omega-3 Index) slightly lower in men than in women. Both DHA and EPA + DHA correlated inversely with BMI, WC and BF in women while DPA correlated inversely with BF in men. Quartile distributions and curvilinear regression of the Omega-3 Index versus BMI revealed a steep rise of BMI in the lower range of the Omega-3 Index in women, but no association in men. Thus the results highlight important gender differences in relationships of specific LC n-3 PUFA in erythrocytes to markers of adiposity. If these reflect causal relationships between LC n-3 PUFA consumption and risk of obesity, gender specific targeted interventions should be considered. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/nu6051850
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Voravuthikunchai S, Howe P, 'Report on the fifth International Conference on Natural Products for Health and Beauty (NATPRO 5) held in Thailand, 6¿8th may, 2014', Nutrients, 6 4115-4164 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu6104115
2014 Lee AMC, Shandala T, Nguyen L, Muhlhausler BS, Chen KM, Howe PR, Xian CJ, 'Effects of resveratrol supplementation on bone growth in young rats and microarchitecture and remodeling in ageing rats', Nutrients, 6 5871-5887 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass a... [more]

© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing) on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by µ-computer tomography ((J.-CT) analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03). Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1) were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02) with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone volume during the rapid growth phase but may potentially have negative effects on male skeleton during early ageing.

DOI 10.3390/nu6125871
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Murphy KJ, Parker B, Dyer KA, Davis CR, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PR, 'A comparison of regular consumption of fresh lean pork, beef and chicken on body composition: a randomized cross-over trial.', Nutrients, 6 682-696 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu6020682
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2014 Wong R, Garg M, Wood L, Howe P, 'Antihypertensive Potential of Combined Extracts of Olive Leaf, Green Coffee Bean and Beetroot: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial', Nutrients, 6 4881-4894 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu6114881
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Rachel Wong, Manohar Garg
2014 O'Callaghan N, Parletta N, Milte CM, Benassi-Evans B, Fenech M, Howe PRC, 'Telomere shortening in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment may be attenuated with ¿-3 fatty acid supplementation: A randomized controlled pilot study', Nutrition, 30 489-491 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: Excessive shortening of the telomeric ends of chromosomes is a marker of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress and nutritional deficiency may influence this process. The... [more]

Objectives: Excessive shortening of the telomeric ends of chromosomes is a marker of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress and nutritional deficiency may influence this process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ¿-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (¿-3 PUFA) supplementation on telomeric shortening in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Thirty-three adults ages > 65 y with MCI were randomized to receive a supplement rich in the long-chain ¿-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 1.67 g EPA + 0.16 g docosahexaenoic acid DHA/d; n = 12) or DHA (1.55 g DHA + 0.40 g EPA/d; n = 12), versus ¿-6 PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 2.2 g/d; n = 9) for 6 mo. Results: The intervention did not show an increase in telomere length with treatment and there was a trend toward telomere shortening during the intervention period. Linear mixed modeling produced a robust model although statistically underpowered. Telomere shortening was greatest in the LA group (d = 0.21) than in the DHA (d = 0.12) and EPA groups (d = 0.06). Increased erythrocyte DHA levels were associated with reduced telomere shortening (r = -0.67; P = 0.02) in the DHA group. Conclusion: Telomeric shortening may be attenuated by ¿-3 PUFA supplementation, requiring further investigation in larger samples. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.nut.2013.09.013
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 6
2014 Bellenger CR, Thomson RL, Howe PRC, Karavirta L, Buckley JD, 'Monitoring athletic training status using the maximal rate of heart rate increase', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, (2014)

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Objectives: Reductions in maximal rate of heart rate increase (rHRI) correlate with performance reductions when training load is increased. This... [more]

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Objectives: Reductions in maximal rate of heart rate increase (rHRI) correlate with performance reductions when training load is increased. This study evaluated whether rHRI tracked performance changes across a range of training states. Design: Prospective intervention. Methods: rHRI was assessed during five min of cycling at 100W (rHRIcyc) and running at 8km/h (rHRIrun) in 13 male triathletes following two weeks of light-training (LT), two weeks of heavy-training (HT) and a two-day recovery period (RP). A five min cycling time-trial assessed performance and peak oxygen consumption (V O2peak). Results: Performance likely decreased following HT (Effect size±90% confidence interval=-0.18±0.09), then very likely increased following RP (0.32±0.14). rHRIcyc very likely decreased (-0.48±0.24), and rHRIrun possibly decreased (-0.33±0.48), following HT. Changes in both measures were unclear following RP. Steady-state HR was almost certainly lower (-0.81±0.31) during rHRIcyc than rHRIrun. A large correlation was found between reductions in performance and rHRIrun (r ±90%; CI=0.65±0.34) from LT to HT, but was unclear for rHRIcyc. Trivial within-subject correlations were found between rHRI and performance, but the strength of relationship between rHRIrun and performance was largely associated with V O2peak following LT (r =-0.58±0.38). Conclusions: Performance reductions were most sensitively tracked by rHRIrun following HT. This may be due to rHRIrun being assessed at a higher intensity than rHRIcyc, inferred from a higher steady-state HR and supported by a stronger within-subject relationship between rHRIrun and performance in individuals with a lower V O2peak, in whom the same exercise intensity would represent a greater physiological stress. rHRI assessed at relatively high exercise intensities may better track performance changes.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.07.006
2014 Barbour JA, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Wright GC, Bryan J, Coates AM, 'Lower energy intake following consumption of Hi-oleic and regular peanuts compared with iso-energetic consumption of potato crisps', Appetite, 82 124-130 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Snack foods can contribute a high proportion of energy intake to the diet. Peanuts are a snack food rich in unsaturated fatty acids, protein and fibre which ... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Snack foods can contribute a high proportion of energy intake to the diet. Peanuts are a snack food rich in unsaturated fatty acids, protein and fibre which have demonstrated satiety effects and may reduce total energy intake, despite their high energy density. This study examined the effects of consuming Hi-oleic (oleic acid ~75% of total fatty acids) peanuts and regular peanuts (oleic acid ~50% and higher in polyunsaturated fatty acids) compared with a high carbohydrate snack (potato crisps) on satiety and subsequent energy intake. Using a triple crossover study design, 24 participants (61 ± 1 years) consumed iso-energetic amounts (56-84 g) of Hi-oleic or regular peanuts or (60-90 g) potato crisps after an overnight fast. Hunger and satiety were assessed at baseline, 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes following snack consumption using visual analogue scales, after which a cold buffet meal was freely consumed and energy intake measured. The same snack was consumed on 3 subsequent days with energy intake assessed from dietary records. This protocol was repeated weekly with each snack food. Total energy intake was lower following consumption of Hi-oleic and regular peanuts compared with crisps, both acutely during the buffet meal (-21%; p <.001 and -17%; p <.01) and over the 4 days (-11%; p <.001 and -9%; p <.01). Despite these reductions in energy intake, no differences in perceived satiety were observed. The findings suggest peanuts may be a preferred snack food to include in the diet for maintaining a healthy weight.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.07.015
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Raghu Nadhanan R, Fan CM, Su YW, Howe PRC, Xian CJ, 'Fish oil in comparison to folinic acid for protection against adverse effects of methotrexate chemotherapy on bone', Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 32 587-596 (2014) [C1]

Methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy is known to cause bone loss which lacks specific preventative treatments, although clinically folinic acid is often used to reduce MTX toxicity in ... [more]

Methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy is known to cause bone loss which lacks specific preventative treatments, although clinically folinic acid is often used to reduce MTX toxicity in soft tissues. This study investigated damaging effects of MTX injections (0.75 mg/kg/day for 5 days) in rats and potential protective benefits of fish oil (0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 ml/100 g/day) in comparison to folinic acid (0.75 mg/kg) in the tibial metaphysis. MTX treatment significantly reduced height of primary spongiosa and volume of trabecular bone while reducing density of osteoblasts. Consistently, MTX reduced osteogenic differentiation but increased adipogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells, accompanied by lower mRNA expression of osteogenic transcription factors Runx2 and Osx, but an up-regulation of adipogenesis-related genes FABP4 and PPAR-¿. MTX also increased osteoclast density, bone marrow osteoclast formation, and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, TNF-a, and RANKL/OPG ratio in bone. Fish oil (0.5 or 0.75 ml/100 g) or folinic acid supplementation preserved bone volume, osteoblast density, and osteogenic differentiation, and suppressed MTX-induced cytokine expression, osteoclastogenesis, and adipogenesis. Thus, fish oil at 0.5 ml/100 g or above is as effective as folinic acid in counteracting MTX-induced bone damage, conserving bone formation, suppressing resorption and marrow adiposity, suggesting its therapeutic potential in preventing bone loss during MTX chemotherapy. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 32:587-596, 2014. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/jor.22565
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Tsiros MD, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, Walkley J, Hills AP, Coates AM, 'Musculoskeletal pain in obese compared with healthy-weight children', Clinical Journal of Pain, 30 583-588 (2014) [C1]

OBJECTIVES:: To investigate whether obesity is associated with musculoskeletal pain in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Obese (n=107) and healthy-weight (n=132) 10-to 13-year-old... [more]

OBJECTIVES:: To investigate whether obesity is associated with musculoskeletal pain in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Obese (n=107) and healthy-weight (n=132) 10-to 13-year-old children (132 males, 107 females) participated in an observational case-control study. Children self-reported pain location (excluding abdominal pain), pain intensity (current and prior week), and pain prevalence (overall and lower limb) using the Pediatric Pain Questionnaire. Body composition was assessed (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and children wore an accelerometer for 8 days. RESULTS:: After adjustment for accelerometry (weekly average counts per hour) and socioeconomic status, obese children had more intense pain (worst pain, P=0.006), pain in more locations (P=0.005), and a higher prevalence of lower limb pain (60% vs. 52% respectively, P=0.012) than healthy-weight children. Significant relationships were observed between body mass index and total pain locations (P=0.004, unadjusted and adjusted) and worst pain intensity (P=0.009, adjusted for socioeconomic status/accelerometry). There were no significant relationships between percent body fat and pain variables (unadjusted/adjusted analyses, P=0.262 to 1.0). DISCUSSION:: Obesity in children was associated with increased overall and lower limb musculoskeletal pain, for which body mass index was a stronger predictor than adiposity. Clinicians treating obese children should screen for pain and prescribe exercise programs that take their symptoms into account. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DOI 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Barbour JA, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Bryan J, Coates AM, 'Nut consumption for vascular health and cognitive function', Nutrition Research Reviews, 27 131-158 (2014) [C1]

Nuts are rich in many nutrients that can benefit multiple cardiometabolic functions, including arterial compliance, blood pressure, inflammation, glucoregulation and endothelial v... [more]

Nuts are rich in many nutrients that can benefit multiple cardiometabolic functions, including arterial compliance, blood pressure, inflammation, glucoregulation and endothelial vasodilatation. Impaired vasodilatation may contribute to impaired cognitive performance due to poor cerebral perfusion. The present narrative review examines associations between nut consumption, vascular health and cognitive function. It includes a systematic search which identified seventy-one epidemiological or intervention studies in which effects of chronic nut consumption on blood pressure, glucoregulation, endothelial vasodilator function, arterial compliance, inflammatory biomarkers and cognitive performance were evaluated. Weighted mean changes were estimated where data were available; they indicate that nut consumption reduces blood pressure and improves glucoregulation, endothelial vasodilator function and inflammation, whilst a limited number of studies suggest that nut consumption may also improve cognitive performance. Further clinical trials are warranted to explore relationships between nut consumption, endothelial function and cognitive function. © 2014 The Authors.

DOI 10.1017/S0954422414000079
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2014 Nelson MJ, Thomson RL, Rogers DK, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, 'Maximal rate of increase in heart rate during the rest-exercise transition tracks reductions in exercise performance when training load is increased', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 17 129-133 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.016
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Wong RHX, Scholey A, Howe PRC, 'Assessing Premorbid Cognitive Ability in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus-a Review With Implications for Future Intervention Studies', CURRENT DIABETES REPORTS, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11892-014-0547-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2014 Howe P, Buckley J, 'Metabolic Health Benefits of Long-Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids', MILITARY MEDICINE, 179 138-143 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00154
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Barbour J, Howe P, Buckley J, Bryan J, Coates A, 'THE ROLE OF NUT CONSUMPTION IN MAINTAINING CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, 63 237-237 (2013)
2013 Murphy KJ, Crichton GE, Dyer KA, Coates AM, Pettman TL, Milte C, et al., 'Dairy foods and dairy protein consumption is inversely related to markers of adiposity in obese men and women', Nutrients, 5 4665-4684 (2013) [C1]

A number of intervention studies have reported that the prevalence of obesity may be in part inversely related to dairy food consumption while others report no association. We sou... [more]

A number of intervention studies have reported that the prevalence of obesity may be in part inversely related to dairy food consumption while others report no association. We sought to examine relationships between energy, protein and calcium consumption from dairy foods (milk, yoghurt, cheese, dairy spreads, ice-cream) and adiposity including body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC), and direct measures of body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (% body fat and abdominal fat) in an opportunistic sample of 720 overweight/obese Australian men and women. Mean (SD) age, weight and BMI of the population were 51 ± 10 year, 94 ± 18 kg and 32.4 ± 5.7 kg/m2, respectively. Reduced fat milk was the most commonly consumed dairy product (235 ± 200 g/day), followed by whole milk (63 ± 128 g/day) and yoghurt (53 ± 66 g/day). Overall dairy food consumption (g/day) was inversely associated with BMI, % body fat and WC (all p < 0.05). Dairy protein and dairy calcium (g/day) were both inversely associated with all adiposity measures (all p < 0.05). Yoghurt consumption (g/day) was inversely associated with % body fat, abdominal fat, WC and HC (all p < 0.05), while reduced fat milk consumption was inversely associated with BMI, WC, HC and % body fat (all p < 0.05). Within a sample of obese adults, consumption of dairy products, dairy protein, and calcium was associated with more favourable body composition. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/nu5114665
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2013 Murphy K, Howe P, 'Proceedings of the 2013 meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS)', Nutrients, 5 5065-5096 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu5125065
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Meyer BJ, Grenyer BFS, Crowe T, Owen AJ, Grigonis-Deane EM, Howe PRC, 'Improvement of Major Depression is Associated with Increased Erythrocyte DHA', Lipids, 48 863-868 (2013) [C1]

The aim of this study was to determine if changes in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status following tuna oil supplementation correlated with changes in scores of depression. ... [more]

The aim of this study was to determine if changes in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status following tuna oil supplementation correlated with changes in scores of depression. A total of 95 volunteers receiving treatment for major depression were randomised to consume 8 × 1 g capsules per day of HiDHA (2 g DHA, 0.6 g EPA and 10 mg Vitamin E) or olive oil (placebo) for 16 weeks, whilst undergoing weekly counseling sessions by trained clinical psychologists using a standard empirically validated psychotherapy. Depression status was assessed using the 17 item Hamilton rating scale for depression and the Beck Depression Inventory by a psychodiagnostician who was blind to the treatment. Blood was taken at baseline and 16 weeks (n = 48) for measurement of erythrocyte fatty acids. With HiDHA supplementation, erythrocyte DHA content rose from 4.1 ± 0.2 to 7.9 ± 0.4 % (mean ± SEM, p < 0.001) of total fatty acids but did not change (4.0 ± 0.2 to 4.1 ± 0.2 %) in the olive oil group. The mean changes in scores of depression did not differ significantly between the two groups (-12.2 ± 2.1 for tuna oil and -14.4 ± 2.3 for olive oil). However, analysis of covariance showed that in the fish oil group there was a significant correlation (r = -0.51) between the change in erythrocyte DHA and the change in scores of depression (p < 0.05). Further study of the relationship between DHA and depression is warranted. © 2013 AOCS.

DOI 10.1007/s11745-013-3801-7
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2013 Wong RHX, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PR, 'Evidence for circulatory benefits of resveratrol in humans', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1290 52-58 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2013 Wong RHX, Berry NM, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Bryan J, Kunz I, Howe PRC, 'Chronic resveratrol consumption improves brachial flow-mediated dilatation in healthy obese adults', Journal of Hypertension, 31 1819-1827 (2013) [C1]

Background: We have previously demonstrated acute dose-dependent increases of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in the brachial artery after resveratrol consumption in mildly hyperte... [more]

Background: We have previously demonstrated acute dose-dependent increases of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in the brachial artery after resveratrol consumption in mildly hypertensive, overweight/obese adults. Resveratrol supplementation has also been shown to increase cerebral blood flow acutely, without affecting cognition. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of chronic resveratrol supplementation on both FMD and cognitive performance. Method: Twenty-eight obese but otherwise healthy adults (BMI: 33.3±0.6kg/m 2) were randomized to take a single 75 mg capsule of trans-resveratrol (Resvida) or placebo daily for 6 weeks each in a double-blind crossover supplementation trial. Blood pressure, arterial compliance, FMD, and performance on the Stroop Color-Word Test were assessed at the end of each 6-week intervention period while fasted and at least 18 h after taking the last daily capsule. An additional capsule of the same supplement was then taken. FMD assessment was repeated 1 h later. Results: Chronic resveratrol supplementation for 6 weeks was well tolerated and resulted in a 23% increase in FMD compared with placebo (P = 0.021, paired t-test). The extent of increase correlated negatively with baseline FMD (r= -0.47, P=0.01). A single dose of resveratrol (75 mg) following chronic resveratrol supplementation resulted in a 35% greater acute FMD response than the equivalent placebo supplementation. These FMD improvements remained significant after adjusting for baseline FMD. Blood pressure, arterial compliance, and all components of the Stroop Color-Word Test were unaffected by chronic resveratrol supplementation. Conclusion: Daily resveratrol consumption was well tolerated and has the potential to maintain healthy circulatory function in obese adults. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DOI 10.1097/HJH.0b013e328362b9d6
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2013 Wong RHX, Howe PR, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Berry NM, 'Chronic consumption of a wild green oat extract (Neuravena) improves brachial flow-mediated dilatation and cerebrovascular responsiveness in older adults', Journal of Hypertension, 31 192-200 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2013 Meyer BJ, Kolanu N, Griffiths DA, Grounds B, Howe PRC, Kreis IA, 'Food groups and fatty acids associated with self-reported depression: An analysis from the Australian National Nutrition and Health Surveys', NUTRITION, 29 1042-1047 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nut.2013.02.006
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2013 Tsiros MD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Grimshaw PN, Walkley J, Shield A, et al., 'Knee extensor strength differences in obese and healthy-weight 10-to 13-year-olds', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 113 1415-1422 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00421-012-2561-z
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
2013 Fuller JT, Thomson RL, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, 'Effect of vibration on muscle perfusion: a systematic review', CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, 33 1-10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1475-097X.2012.01161.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2013 Fulton AS, Hill AM, Williams MT, Howe PR, Frith PA, Wood LG, et al., 'Feasibility of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation as an adjunct therapy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', TRIALS, 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1468-6708-14-107
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Manohar Garg
2013 Nadhanan RR, Skinner J, Chung R, Su Y-W, Howe PR, Xian CJ, 'Supplementation with Fish Oil and Genistein, Individually or in Combination, Protects Bone against the Adverse Effects of Methotrexate Chemotherapy in Rats', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0071592
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
2013 Tsiros MD, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, Olds T, Walkley J, Taylor L, et al., 'Day-to-day physical functioning and disability in obese 10-to 13-year-olds', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 8 31-41 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2012.00083.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 3
2013 McDonnell MN, Berry NM, Cutting MA, Keage HA, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Transcranial Doppler ultrasound to assess cerebrovascular reactivity: reliability, reproducibility and effect of posture', PEERJ, 1 (2013)
DOI 10.7717/peerj.65
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2012 Howe P, 'Acknowledgment of reviewers', Nutrients, 4 151-153 (2012)
DOI 10.3390/nu4030151
2012 Crichton GE, Murphy KJ, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Bryan J, 'Dairy consumption and working memory performance in overweight and obese adults', Appetite, 59 34-40 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2012 Milte C, Sinn N, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Young R, Howe PRC, 'Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, cognition and behaviour in children with ADHD: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition, 28 670-677 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 34
2012 Haren MT, Misan G, Paterson T-J, Ruffin RE, Grant JF, Buckley JD, et al., 'Abdominal adiposity and obstructive airway disease: testing insulin resistance and sleep disordered breathing mechanisms', BMC PULMONARY MEDICINE, 12 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2466-12-31
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Crichton GE, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Murphy KJ, 'Dairy consumption and cardiometabolic health: outcomes of a 12-month crossover trial', Nutrition and Metabolism, 9 19-29 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 18
2012 Crichton GE, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Murphy KJ, Bryan J, 'Long-term dietary intervention trials: critical issues and challenges', TRIALS, 13 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-13-111
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2012 Haren MT, Misan G, Grant J, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, Taylor AW, et al., 'Proximal correlates of metabolic phenotypes during 'at-risk' and 'case' stages of the metabolic disease continuum', Nutrition and Diabetes, 2 24-24 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Howe P, 'The Australian Paradox', NUTRIENTS, 4 258-258 (2012) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu4040258
2012 Murphy KJ, Thomson RL, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Effects of Eating Fresh Lean Pork on Cardiometabolic Health Parameters', NUTRIENTS, 4 711-723 (2012) [C2]
DOI 10.3390/nu4070711
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2012 Wong RHX, Howe PRC, Bryan J, Coates A, Buckley J, Berry N, 'Chronic effects of a wild green oat extract supplementation on cognitive performance in older adults: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial', Nutrients, 4 331-342 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2011 Sinn N, Milte C, Street SJ, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Petkov J, Howe PRC, 'Effects of omega-3 fatty acids EPA versus DHA on depressive symptoms, quality of life, memory and executive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: A 6-month randomised controlled trial', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, - 1-12 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 62
2011 Wong RHX, Howe PR, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Kunz I, Berry NM, 'Acute resveratrol supplementation improves flow-mediated dilatation in overweight/obese individuals with mildly elevated blood pressure', Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, 21 851-856 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.numecd.2010.03.003
Citations Scopus - 111Web of Science - 88
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2011 Milte C, Sinn N, Street SJ, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Erythrocyte polyunsaturated fatty acid status, memory, cognition and mood in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls', Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 84 153-161 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2011 Berry NM, Robinson MJ, Bryan J, Murphy KJ, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Acute effects of an Avena sativa herb extract on responses to the Stroop colour word test', Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 17 635-637 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
2011 Milte C, Sinn N, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Polyunsaturated fatty acids, cognition and literacy in children with ADHD with and without learning difficulties', Journal of Child Health Care, 15 299-311 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2010 Sinn N, Milte C, Howe PRC, 'Oiling the Brain: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychopathology across the Lifespan', NUTRIENTS, 2 128-170 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu2020128
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 32
2010 Sinn N, Milte C, Howe PRC, 'A review of randomised controlled trials of omega-3 fatty acids in psychopathology across the lifespan', Nutrients, 2 128-170 (2010) [C1]
2010 Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Long-Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids May Be Beneficial for Reducing Obesity - A Review', Nutrients, 2 1212-1230 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 56
2010 Davison K, Bircher S, Hill A, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, 'Relationships between Obesity, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Cardiovascular Function', Journal of Obesity, 2010 1-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2010/191253
Citations Scopus - 15
2010 Sjoberg N, Milte CM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, Coates AM, Saint DA, 'Dose-dependent increases in heart rate variability and arterial compliance in overweight and obese adults with DHA-rich fish oil supplementation', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 103 243-248 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
2010 Berry NM, Davison K, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Impact of cocoa flavanol consumption on blood pressure responsiveness to exercise', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 103 1-5 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 25
2010 Head GA, Mihailidou AS, Duggan KA, Beilin LJ, Berry N, Brown MA, et al., 'Relationship between ambulatory and clinic blood pressure: Defining diagnostic and treatment targets', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 340 1104-1104 (2010) [C1]
2010 Davison K, Berry NM, Misan G, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Dose-related effects of flavanol-rich cocoa on blood pressure', Journal of Human Hypertension, 24 568-576 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 19
2010 Head GA, Mihailidou AS, Duggan KA, Beilin LJ, Berry N, Brown MA, et al., 'Definition of ambulatory blood pressure targets for diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in relation to clinic blood pressure: prospective cohort study', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 340 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.c1104
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 43
2010 Buckley JD, Thomson RL, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Denichilo MO, Rowney MK, 'Supplementation with a whey protein hydrolysate enhances recovery of muscle force-generating capacity following eccentric exercise', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13 178-181 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 19
2009 Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Anti-obesity effects of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids', Obesity Reviews, 10 648-659 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 79Web of Science - 63
2009 Pettman TL, Buckley JD, Misan GM, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Health benefits of a 4-month group-based diet and lifestyle modification program for individuals with metabolic syndrome', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 3 221-235 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2009 Howe P, 'Why Nutrients?', NUTRIENTS, 1 1-2 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.3390/nu1010001
2009 Coates AM, Sioutis S, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Regular consumption of omega-3 fatty acid enriched pork modifies cardiovascular risk factors', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 101 592-597 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
2009 Thorp AA, Sinn N, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Soya isoflavone supplementation enhances spatial working memory in men', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 102 1348-1354 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
2009 Bendyk A, Marino V, Zilm PS, Howe PRC, Bartold PM, 'Effect of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on experimental periodontitis in the mouse.', Journal of Periodontal Research, 44 211-216 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 16
2009 Milte C, Sinn N, Howe PRC, 'Polyunsaturated fatty acid status in ADHD, depression and Alzheimer's disease: towards an omega-3 index for mental health?', Nutrition Reviews, 67 573-590 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25
2009 Eslick G, Howe PRC, Smith C, Priest R, Bensoussan A, 'Benefits of Fish Oil Supplementation in Hyperlipidemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', International Journal of Cardiology, 136 4-16 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 79
2009 Tsiros MD, Olds T, Buckley JD, Grimshaw P, Brennan L, Walkley J, et al., 'Health-related quality of life in obese children and adolescents', International Journal of Obesity, 33 387-400 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 146Web of Science - 121
2009 Buckley JD, Burgess S, Murphy KM, Howe PRC, 'DHA-rich fish oil lowers heart rate during submaximal exercise in elite Australian Rules footballers', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 503-507 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
2008 Mukaro VR, Costabile M, Murphy K, Howe PRC, Hii C, Ferrante A, 'Leukocyte numbers and function in subjects eating n-3 enriched foods: selective depression of natural killer cell levels1-3', Arthritis Research and Therapy, 10 57-57 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2008 Pettman TL, Misan GM, Coates AM, Owen K, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Self-management for obesity and cardiometabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle intervention program of a randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5 53-53 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 12
2008 Pettman TL, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Misan GM, Petkov J, Howe PRC, 'Prevalence and interrelationships between cardio-metabolic risk factors in abdominally-obese individuals', Metabolic Sydnrome and Related Disorders, 7 31-36 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2008 Tsiros M, Sinn N, Brennan L, Coates A, Walkely J, Petkov J, et al., 'Cognitive Behavioural Therapy improves diet and body composition in overweight and obese adolescents', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87 1134-1140 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 33
2008 Milte CM, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Hill AM, Howe PRC, 'Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil on erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid and blood lipid levels', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 99 1083-1088 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
2008 Howe PRC, Ninio DM, Hill AM, 'Docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil improves heart rate variability and heart rate responses to exercise in overweight adults', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 100 1097-1203 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
2008 Sinn N, Howe PRC, 'Mental health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids may be mediated by improvements in cerebral vascular function', Bioscience Hypotheses, 1 103-108 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25
2008 Peoples GE, McLennan PL, Howe PRC, Groeller H, 'Fish oil reduces heart rate and oxygen consumption during exercise', Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 52 540-547 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 57
2008 Davison K, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Effect of cocoa flavanols and exercise on cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese subjects', International Journal of Obesity, 32 1289-1296 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 82Web of Science - 59
2008 Tsiros M, Sinn N, Coates A, Howe PRC, Buckley J, 'Treatment of adolescent overweight and obesity', European Journal of Pediatrics, 167 9-16 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 36
2008 Murphy KJ, Saint DA, Howe PRC, 'Lack of effect of sugar cane and sunflower seed policosanols on plasma cholesterol in rabbits', Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 27 476-484 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2008 Thorp A, Howe PRC, Mori T, Coates A, Buckley J, Hodgson J, et al., 'Soy food consumption does not lower LDL-cholesterol in either equol or non-equol producers', Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 88 298-304 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27
2008 Sioutis S, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Murphy TW, Channon HA, Howe PRC, 'Omega-3 enrichment of pork with fishmeal: effects on production and consumer acceptability', European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology, 110 701-706 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2008 Thorp AA, Howe PRC, Mori TA, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Hodgson J, et al., 'Soy food consumption does not lower LDL cholesterol in either equol or nonequol producers', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 88 298-304 (2008)

Background: Health claims link soy protein (SP) consumption, through plasma cholesterol reduction, to a decreased risk of heart disease. Soy isoflavones (ISOs), particularly in in... [more]

Background: Health claims link soy protein (SP) consumption, through plasma cholesterol reduction, to a decreased risk of heart disease. Soy isoflavones (ISOs), particularly in individuals who produce equol, might also contribute to lipid lowering and thus reduce SP requirements. Objective: The objective was to examine the contributions of SP, ISOs, and equol to the hypocholesterolemic effects of soy foods. Design: Nonsoy consumers (33 men, 58 women) with a plasma total cholesterol (TChol) concentration >5.5 mmol/L participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover intervention trial. The subjects consumed 3 diets for 6 wk each in random order, which consisted of foods providing a daily dose of 1) 24g SP and 70-80 mg ISOs (diet S); 2) 12 g SP, 12 g dairy protein (DP), and 70-80 mg ISOs (diet SD); and 3) 24 gDP without ISOs (diet D). Fasting plasma TChol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (TGs) were measured after each diet. Results: TChol was 3% lower with the S diet (-0.17 ± 0.06 mmol/L; P < 0.05) than with the D diet, and TGs were 4% lower with both the S (-0.14 ± 0.05 mmol/L; P<0.05) and SD (-0.12 ± 0.05 mmol/L; P < 0.05) diets. There were no significant effects on LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or the TChol:HDL cholesterol ratio. On the basis of urinary ISOs, 30 subjects were equol producers. Lipids were not affected significantly by equol production. Conclusions: Regular consumption of foods providing 24 g SP/d from ISOs had no significant effect on plasma LDL cholesterol in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects, regardless of equol-producing status. © 2008 American Society for Nutrition.

Citations Scopus - 35
2008 Tsiros MD, Sinn N, Brennan L, Coates AM, Walkley JW, Petkov J, et al., 'Cognitive behavioral therapy improves diet and body composition in overweight and obese adolescents', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87 1134-1140 (2008)

Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) teaches behavioral and cognitive strategies that focus on achieving and maintaining lifestyle changes. Objective: We examined the ef... [more]

Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) teaches behavioral and cognitive strategies that focus on achieving and maintaining lifestyle changes. Objective: We examined the effectiveness of a CBT program (CHOOSE HEALTH) for improving body composition, diet, and physical activity in overweight and obese adolescents. Design: Adolescents [16 male, 31 female; aged 14.5 ± 1.6 y; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) 30.9 ± 4.2] were block-matched into 2 groups by age, sex, Tanner stage, BMI, and hip and waist circumferences and were randomly assigned to CBT or no treatment (control). CBT consisted of 10 weekly sessions, followed by 5 fortnightly telephone sessions. Results: Compared with the control, over 20 wk, CBT improved (significant group x time interactions) BMI (CBT, -1.3 ± 0.4; control, 0.3 ± 0.3; P = 0.007), weight (CBT, -1.9 ± 1.0 kg; control, 3.8 ± 0.9 kg; P = 0.001), body fat (CBT, -1.5 ± 0.9 kg; control, 2.3 ± 1.0 kg; P = 0.001), and abdominal fat (CBT, -124.0 ± 46.9 g; control, 50.1 ± 53.5 g; P = 0.008). CBT showed a greater reduction in intake of sugared soft drinks as a percentage of total energy (CBT, -4.0 ± 0.9%; control, -0.3 ± 0.9%; P = 0.005 for group x time interaction), which was related to reductions in weight (r = 0.48, P = 0.04), BMI (r = 0.53, P = 0.02), and waist circumference (r = 0.54, P = 0.02). Physical activity did not change significantly. Conclusions: A 10-wk CBT program followed by 10 wk of fortnightly phone contact improved body composition in overweight and obese adolescents. Changes in soft drink consumption may have contributed to this benefit. © 2008 American Society for Nutrition.

Citations Scopus - 48
2008 Murphy KJ, Saint DA, Howe PRC, 'Lack of effect of sugar cane and sunflower seed policosanols on plasma cholesterol in rabbits', Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 27 476-484 (2008)

Objective: To evaluate the potential for a mixture of policosanol extracted from sunflower oil (SFP) to lower blood cholesterol levels in comparison to sugar cane policosanol (SCP... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the potential for a mixture of policosanol extracted from sunflower oil (SFP) to lower blood cholesterol levels in comparison to sugar cane policosanol (SCP) in rabbits. Design: Twenty three Semi-lop rabbits were blocked into three groups matched on fasting plasma cholesterol levels then randomly assigned to one of three parallel treatment arms: Control (Vehicle 28.6% sunflower oil/70% water/1.4% emulsifier) n = 7; SFP, 100 mg/kg in vehicle, n = 8; SCP, 100 mg/kg in vehicle, n = 8. Rabbits were gavaged once every two days for four weeks. Blood was collected and analysed for plasma lipids. Results: Total cholesterol, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol increased significantly following SCP supplementation relative to the control. SFP supplementation had no effect. Triglyceride levels decreased significantly following all dietary treatments (P < 0.05), possibly due to the emulsifier. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of normocholesterolemic rabbits with policosanol from sunflower oil does not appear to have any cholesterol lowering effect. A similar lack of efficacy observed with the commercial SCP product which we evaluated raises doubts about the purported cholesterol-lowering efficacy of these products, as reflected in the current literature.

Citations Scopus - 5
2007 Coates AM, Buckley JD, Ross R, Thielecke F, Howe PRC, Hill AM, 'Can EGCG Reduce Abdominal Fat in Obese Subjects?', Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 26 396-402 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 50
2007 Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Edible nuts and metabolic health', Current Opinion in Lipidology, 18 25-30 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 30
2007 Howe PRC, Buckley J, Meyer B, 'Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in red meat', Nutrition and Dietetics, 64 135-139 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25
2007 Hill AM, Laforgia J, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'Estimating abdominal adipose tissue with DXA and anthropometry', Obesity, 15 504-510 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 37
2007 Hill AM, Buckley JD, Murphy KJ, Howe PRC, 'Combining fish-oil supplements with regular aerobic exercise improves body composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85 1267-1274 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 80
2007 Murphy K, Mansour J, Patch C, Mori T, Meyer B, Tapsell L, et al., 'Impact of foods enriched with n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on erythrocyte n-3 levels and cardiovascular risk factors', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 97 749-757 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 62
2007 Hill A, Worthley C, Murphy K, Buckley J, Ferrante A, Howe PRC, 'n-3 Fatty acid supplementation and regular moderate exercise: Differential effects of a combined intervention on neutrophil function', The British Journal of Nutrition: an international journal of nutritional science, 98 300-309 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2007 Meyer B, Hammervold T, Rustan A, Howe PRC, 'Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation on blood lipids in statin-treated hyperlipidaemic subjects', Lipids, 42 109-115 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
2007 Hill AM, Buckley JD, Murphy KJ, Howe PRC, 'Combining fish-oil supplements with regular aerobic exercise improves body composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85 1267-1274 (2007)

Background: Regular exercise and consuming long-chain n-3 fatty acids (FAs) from fish or fish oil can independently improve cardiovascular and metabolic health, but combining thes... [more]

Background: Regular exercise and consuming long-chain n-3 fatty acids (FAs) from fish or fish oil can independently improve cardiovascular and metabolic health, but combining these lifestyle modifications may be more effective than either treatment alone. Objective: We examined the individual and combined effects of n-3 FA supplements and regular exercise on body composition and cardiovascular health. Design: Overweight volunteers [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): >25] with high blood pressure, cholesterol, or triacylglycerols were randomly assigned to one of the following interventions: fish oil (FO), FO and exercise (FOX), sunflower oil (SO; control), or SO and exercise (SOX). Subjects consumed 6 g tuna FO/d (¿1.9 g n-3 FA) or 6 g SO/d. The exercise groups walked 3 d/wk for 45 min at 75% age-predicted maximal heart rate. Plasma lipids, blood pressure, and arterial function were assessed at 0, 6, and 12 wk. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at 0 and 12 wk only. Results: FO supplementation lowered triacylglycerols, increased HDL cholesterol, and improved endothelium-dependent arterial vasodilation (P < 0.05). Exercise improved arterial compliance (P < 0.05). Both fish oil and exercise independently reduced body fat (P < 0.05). Conclusions: FO supplements and regular exercise both reduce body fat and improve cardiovascular and metabolic health. Increasing intake of n-3 FAs could be a useful adjunct to exercise programs aimed at improving body composition and decreasing cardiovascular disease risk. © 2007 American Society for Nutrition.

Citations Scopus - 106
2007 Greyner B, Crowe T, Meyer B, Owen A, Grigonis-Deane E, Caputi P, Howe PRC, 'Fish oil supplementation in the treatment of major depression: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial', Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 31 1393-1396 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 64
2006 Buckley JD, Thorp AJ, Murphy KJ, Howe PRC, 'Dose-dependent inhibition of the post-prandial glycaemic response to a standard carbohydrate meal following incorporation of a-cyclodextrin', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism: European journal of nutrition metabolic diseases and dietetics, 50 108-114 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
2006 Howe PRC, Meyer BJ, Record S, Baghurst K, 'Dietary intake of long chain w-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: contribution of meat sources', Nutrition, 22 47-53 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 165Web of Science - 154
2005 Patch CS, Tapsell LC, Mori TA, Meyer BJ, Murphy KJ, Mansour J, et al., 'The use of novel foods enriched with long-chain n-3 fatty acids to increase dietary intake: a comparison of methodologies assessing nutrient intake', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105 1918-1926 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2005 Tenikoff D, Murphy KJ, Le M, Howe PRC, Howarth GS, 'Lyprinol (stabilised lipid extract of New Zealand green-lipped mussel): a potential preventative treatment modality for inflammatory bowel disease', Journal of Gastroenterology, 40 361-365 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2005 Ninio DM, Murphy KJ, Howe PRC, Saint DA, 'Dietary fish oil protects against stretch-induced vulnerability to atrial fibrillation in a rabbit mode', Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, 16 1189-1194 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 83Web of Science - 54
2005 Tenikoff D, Murphy KJ, Le M, Howe PR, Howarth GS, 'Lyprinol (stabilised lipid extract of New Zealand green-lipped mussel): a potential preventative treatment modality for inflammatory bowel disease.', Journal of gastroenterology, 40 361-365 (2005)

BACKGROUND: Lyprinol (Pharmalink International), the stabilised lipid extract of the New Zealand green-lipped mussel, is currently used to relieve symptoms of arthritis. We invest... [more]

BACKGROUND: Lyprinol (Pharmalink International), the stabilised lipid extract of the New Zealand green-lipped mussel, is currently used to relieve symptoms of arthritis. We investigated the effect of pretreatment with Lyprinol (LYP) on experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in mice. METHODS: Male C57BL/6 mice (aged 6 weeks) were gavaged daily for 13 days with (150 microl) olive oil (OO; n = 7), fish oil (FO; n = 8), or LYP (n = 8). Mice consumed 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 6 days, starting on day 7. Body weight and disease activity index (DAI) scores were recorded daily. Colonic damage was determined by histopathology. Colonic inflammation was quantified by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. RESULTS: LYP treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced body weight loss, DAI scores, crypt area losses, and cecum and colon weights, compared with FO treatment. MPO activity was not significantly affected by any treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide preliminary evidence that Lyprinol may be potentially useful in ameliorating symptoms of IBD. The benefit, however, is unlikely to be due to the omega-3 fatty acid content. Dose-response evaluation of Lyprinol in experimental IBD is warranted.

Citations Scopus - 31
2004 Meyer BJ, Larkin TA, Owen AJ, Astheimer LB, Tapsell LC, Howe PRC, 'Limited Lipid-Lowering Effects of Regular Consumption of Whole Soybean Foods', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism: European journal of nutrition metabolic diseases and dietetics, 48 67-78 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 48
2004 Howe PRC, Murphy KJ, 'Nutrients as Adjunct Therapy in Cardiovascular Risk Management. Current Medical Literature', Clinical Nutrition, 13 1-5 (2004) [C1]
2003 Meyer BJ, Mann NJ, Lewis JL, Milligan G, Sinclair AJ, Howe PRC, 'Dietary intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids', Lipids, 38 391-398 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 271Web of Science - 231
2003 Murphy SM, McAllen R, Campbell GD, Howe PRC, Anderson CR, 'Re-establishment of neurochemical coding of preganglionic neurons innervating transplanted targets', Neuroscience, 117 347-360 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2003 Howe PR, Meyer BJ, Record S, Baghurst K, 'Contribution of red meat to very long chain omega-3 fatty acid (VLCOmega3) intake.', Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, 12 S27 (2003)
2003 Murphy KJ, Mansour J, Patch CS, Weldon G, Ross D, Mori TA, et al., 'Development and evaluation of foods enriched with omega-3 fatty acids (Omega3) from fish oil.', Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, 12 S35 (2003)
2003 Mann NJ, Sinclair AJ, Percival P, Lewis JL, Meyer BJ, Howe PRC, 'Development of a database of fatty acids in Australian foods', Nutrition and Dietetics, 60 34-37 (2003) [C1]
2002 Howe PRC, Downing J, Greyner B, Grigonis-Deane E, Bryden W, 'Tuna fishmeal as a source of docosahexaenoic acid for omega-3 enrichment of pork and chicken meat and eggs', Lipids, 37 1067-1076 (2002) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 42
2002 Howe PRC, Grigonis-Deane E, 'Omega-3 enrichment of chicken', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 11 S254 (2002)
2002 Howe PRC, 'Nutrient-drug synergies to optimise therapeutic benefit', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 11 S294 (2002)
2002 Meyer BJ, Larkin TA, Owen AJ, Astheimer LB, Tapsell LC, Howe PRC, 'Improvement in plasma lipid levels (including lipoprotein (a)) after chronic soy consumption may be linked to equol', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 11 S286 (2002)
2002 Howe PRC, 'The Omega Workshop Report', Food Australia, 54 505-506 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2002 Liu L, Howe PRC, Zhou Y-F, Hocart C, Zhang R, 'Fatty acid profiles of leaves of nine edible wild plants: An Australian study', Journal of Food Lipids, 9 65-71 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 8
2002 Howe P, 'The omega workshop: Report and presentations', Food Australia, 54 505-506 (2002)
Citations Scopus - 1
2002 Liu L, Howe P, Zhou YF, Hocart C, Zhang R, 'Fatty acid profiles of leaves of nine edible wild plants: An Australian study', Journal of Food Lipids, 9 65-71 (2002)

Nine species (Amaranthus viridis L., Atriplex nummularia L., Chenopodium album L., Plantago major L., Portulaca oleracea L., Solarium nigrum L., Sonchus oleraceus L., Stellaria me... [more]

Nine species (Amaranthus viridis L., Atriplex nummularia L., Chenopodium album L., Plantago major L., Portulaca oleracea L., Solarium nigrum L., Sonchus oleraceus L., Stellaria media L. and Taraxacum officinale W.) of edible wild plants grown in Australia were examined for their fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. The total fatty acid contents in the young leaves of these species ranged from 8.75 to 29.12 mg/g of dry matter, and were predominantly comprised of the alpha-linolenic acid (4.78 to 19.88 mg/g). These plants did not contain any of the longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids, namely eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid or docosapentaenoic acid.

Citations Scopus - 13
2001 Ridges L, Sunderland R, Moerman K, Meyer B, Astheimer L, Howe PRC, 'Cholesterol lowering benefits of soy and linseed enriched foods', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 10 204-211 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
2001 Howe PRC, 'The salt story', Nutridate, 12 5-7 (2001) [C1]
2001 Howe PRC, 'Nutritional intervention in the management of established cardiovascular risk factors', Medical Observer, 16 36-37 (2001) [C1]
2001 Howe PRC, 'Fish, Omega-3 and stroke ¿ benefit, not risk', Perspectives in Food & Nutrition, 8 (2001) [C3]
2001 Ridges L, Sunderland R, Moerman K, Meyer B, Astheimer L, Howe P, 'Cholesterol lowering benefits of soy and linseed enriched foods', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 10 204-211 (2001)

Foods such as breads and breakfast cereals enriched with a combination of soy protein (soy grits and/or soy flour) and whole linseed are gaining popularity. Regular consumption of... [more]

Foods such as breads and breakfast cereals enriched with a combination of soy protein (soy grits and/or soy flour) and whole linseed are gaining popularity. Regular consumption of either whole grains or soy protein can lower risk factors for coronary heart disease. Furthermore, linseed is a rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid, a-linolenic acid (LNA), with purported cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of daily consumption of soy and linseed containing foods and Canola (as an added source of LNA) on plasma lipid concentrations in 20 mildly hypercholesterolaemic postmenopausal women. Fasted blood samples were taken initially and after 3 and 8 weeks to assay plasma lipids and both plasma and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. Urinary isoflavones were also measured. Data from 18 subjects were used for analysis. Plasma total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations fell significantly (10, 12.5 and 12%, respectively) within 3 weeks. Although attenuated, there were still significant reductions in total and non-HDL cholesterol (5 and 6.5%, respectively) after 8 weeks of intervention. These reductions were associated with increases in urinary isoflavone excretion. This pilot study indicates that regular inclusion of foods containing soy and linseed in the diet may improve plasma lipids in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia.

Citations Scopus - 29
2000 Liu L, Howe PRC, Zhou Y-F, Xu Z-Q, Hocart C, Zhang R, 'Fatty Acids and ß-Carotene in Australian Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) Varieties', Journal of Chromatography A, 893 207-213 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 68
2000 Howe PRC, 'What makes a functional food functional?', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 9 108-112 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2000 Anderson CR, Penkethman S, Howe PRC, Murphy SM, 'Rodent noradrenergic chromaffin cells contain calbindin d28k-immunoreactivity', Neuroreport, 11 1199-1202 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2000 Howe PRC, Nestel P, 'Dietary guidelines for a new millennium', Nutrition and Dietetics, 57 128-129 (2000) [C1]
2000 Howe PRC, 'Why are we ignoring the dietary salt guideline?', Nutrition and Dietetics, 57 225-226 (2000) [C1]
2000 Howe PRC, 'Fish - the missing guideline?', Nutridate, 11 5-7 (2000) [C1]
2000 Howe PRC, Nestel PJ, 'Conference report: dietary guidelines for a new millenium', Food Australia, 52 211 (2000) [C3]
2000 Howe PRC, 'What makes a functional food functional?', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 9 S108-S112 (2000)

Functional foods are foods that, by nature or design, can deliver benefits beyond that of sustenance. They bridge the traditional gap between food and drugs, offering consumers gr... [more]

Functional foods are foods that, by nature or design, can deliver benefits beyond that of sustenance. They bridge the traditional gap between food and drugs, offering consumers greater opportunity to take their health care into their own hands. Rapidly increasing knowledge of the physiological effects of nutrients and their potential health benefits offers exciting prospects for the food industry and consumers alike. However, we must ensure that newly developed functional foods are indeed functional. The mere presence in a food of nutrients with well-publicised health attributes can infer that the food will deliver health benefits. We need to be certain that it will be efficacious for the indication specified and the nature and extent of benefit will be clearly understood by consumers. With the introduction of health claims, the onus will be on food manufacturers to provide scientific substantiation based not only on the literature related to an active nutrient, but also on intervention trials that demonstrate bioavailability and efficacy of the nutrient when delivered in a specific type of food. Such an approach, while demanding in terms of research and development investment, offers significant opportunities for product innovation. We can extend the variety of foods through which consumers may source a particular health-giving nutrient. Moreover, recognizing that a particular condition such as heart or bowel health may be influenced by more than one type of nutrient, manufacturers can design and evaluate unique foods with appropriate combinations of nutrients to optimise health status. Even though a new type of food may be shown to be efficacious in short-term, controlled clinical trials, can we be certain that consumers will derive long-term benefits free from adverse affects? Will food manufacturers undertake postmarketing surveillance or will this task be left to consumer watchdogs? The transition from traditional foods and herbal remedies of uncertain value to designer foods with guaranteed health benefits could be facilitated by adopting aspects of the pharmaceutical approach to substantiation and regulation.

Citations Scopus - 5
1999 Ollis TE, Meyer BJ, Howe PRC, 'Australian food sources and intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 43 346-355 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 42
1999 Howe P, 'Smart foods centre formed', FOOD AUSTRALIA, 51 78-78 (1999)
1999 Meyer BJ, Tsivis E, Howe PRC, Tapsell L, Calvert GD, 'Polyunsaturated fatty acid content of foods: differentiating between long and short chain omega-3 fatty acids', FOOD AUSTRALIA, 51 81-95 (1999)
Citations Web of Science - 7
1999 Sinclair AJ, Howe PRC, 'Recommended intakes of polyunsaturated fatty acids', FOOD AUSTRALIA, 51 524-524 (1999)
1999 Howe P, Phillips P, Saini R, Kassler-Taub K, 'The antihypertensive efficacy of the combination of irbesartan and hydrochlorothiazide assessed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION, 21 1373-1396 (1999)
DOI 10.3109/10641969909070855
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
1996 McLennan P, Howe P, Abeywardena M, Muggli R, Raederstorff D, Mano M, et al., 'The cardiovascular protective role of docosahexaenoic acid', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 300 83-89 (1996)
DOI 10.1016/0014-2999(95)00861-6
Citations Scopus - 158Web of Science - 153
1996 Hobbs LM, Rayner TE, Howe PRC, 'Dietary fish oil prevents the development of renal damage in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 23 508-513 (1996)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1996.tb02770.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
1996 Howe PRC, 'Fish oil supplements and hypertension', ISSFAL Newsletter, 3 2-5 (1996) [C3]
1996 Hobbs LM, Rayner TE, Howe PRC, 'Dietary fish oil prevents the development of renal damage in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 23 508-513 (1996)

1. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) fed a high salt diet rapidly develop proteinuria, a marker of renal damage. We have recently shown that supplementing the d... [more]

1. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) fed a high salt diet rapidly develop proteinuria, a marker of renal damage. We have recently shown that supplementing the diet of these rats with pure omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit the development of proteinuria. The aim of the present study was to examine the underlying renal pathology and to see whether a similar benefit could be obtained with fish oil or canola oil. 2. Diets containing sodium (2% by weight) and 5% fish oil, canola oil, olive oil or safflower oil (the latter two serving as controls) were fed to groups of eight young SHRSP and the development of hypertension and proteinuria was monitored. After 9 weeks, rats were killed and their kidneys were taken for histological examination and fatty acid analysis. Urinary protein was characterized electrophoretically. 3. Patterns of protein excretion were consistent with the appearance of pathological changes in both glomeruli and tubules. Fish oil inhibited the elevation of blood pressure, prevented the development of proteinuria and minimized histological lesions. However, in rats fed canola oil, hypertension and renal damage were equally severe as in rats fed olive or safflower oil. 4. The prevention of hypertensive renal damage by dietary fish oil may be attributable to increased incorporation of long-chain omega- 3 fatty acids in the kidney.

Citations Scopus - 12
1995 Suzukawa M, Abbey M, Howe PRC, Nestel PJ, 'Effects of fish oil fatty acids on low density lipoprotein size, oxidizability, and uptake by macrophages', Journal of Lipid Research, 36 473-484 (1995)

The effect of fish oil and corn oil supplementation on plasma lipids and lipoproteins and on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation was examined in 20 treated hypertensive subjec... [more]

The effect of fish oil and corn oil supplementation on plasma lipids and lipoproteins and on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation was examined in 20 treated hypertensive subjects. The randomized double-blind crossover study consisted of two 6-week interventions with 4 g/day of a highly purified fish oil or corn oil. Fish oil significantly (-24%, P < 0.01) reduced plasma triglyceride, and increased LDL-cholesterol (+6%, P < 0.01 compared to corn oil). LDL particles were larger (P < 0.01) after fish oil compared to baseline and LDL size was inversely correlated with plasma triglyceride (P < 0.001) both before and after fish oil supplementation, and positively correlated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.01). Fish oil reduced lag time before onset of copper-induced LDL oxidation (-25%, P < 0.001) and significantly increased production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) during oxidation, compared with corn oil. Corn oil had no significant effect on lag time and oxidation rate. Fish oil increased macrophage uptake of copper-oxidized LDL and of macrophage-modified LDL. Corn oil was without effect. Additionally, macrophages that were supplemented with fish oil fatty acids in vitro displayed a significantly (P < 0.001) higher capacity to oxidize LDL than either control cells or cells supplemented with corn oil fatty acids. We conclude that from the standpoint of atherosclerosis, fish oil fatty acids adversely raise the susceptibility of LDL to copper-induced and macrophage-mediated oxidation but that the increase in plasma LDL cholesterol concentration reflects an increase in size that may be favorable.

Citations Scopus - 152
1995 Rayner TE, Howe PRC, 'Purified ¿-3 fatty acids retard the development of proteinuria in salt-loaded hypertensive rats', Journal of Hypertension, 13 771-780 (1995)

Objective: To determine whether purified ¿-3 and ¿-6 fatty acids influence the progression of hypertensive renal failure in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive r... [more]

Objective: To determine whether purified ¿-3 and ¿-6 fatty acids influence the progression of hypertensive renal failure in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) with established hypertension or during the developmental stage of their hypertension. Design: Groups of eight SHRSP aged 1 or 4 months were fed, for 12 weeks, synthetic diets containing 2% sodium (wt: wt) and either 5% olive oil or 4.5% ¿-linolenic acid (¿-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (¿-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (¿-3). Methods: Urinary protein excretion and blood pressure were measured after 6, 9 and 12 weeks. The rats were killed and their tissues were collected for fatty acid and eicosanoid analysis. Results: Young rats (aged 1 month) fed diets containing ¿-linolenic acid or olive oil developed marked proteinuria by 9 weeks, whereas no change was observed after 12 weeks in rats fed docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid. Blood pressure was lower in those fed docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid than in the ¿ -linolenic acid or olive oil groups. Adult rats (aged 4 months) fed the docosahexaenoic acid diet had significantly lower proteinuria than those fed ¿-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid or olive oil, but there were no differences in blood pressure among the groups. Kidneys from rats fed ¿-3 fatty acids had increased levels of docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid, or both, whereas those from rats fed y-linolenic acid and olive oil contained virtually no ¿-3 fatty acids. Thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production in renal cortex extracts was lowest in rats fed docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. Conclusion: Dietary ¿-3 fatty acids retard the development of hypertension-induced proteinuria. This may be caused by a favourable influence on fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism and reduction of blood pressure. © Lippincott-Raven Publishers.

Citations Scopus - 18
1995 Jablonskis LT, Howe PRC, 'Plasma adrenaline responses to long-term modification of blood pressure in normotensive rats and hypertensive rats', Journal of Hypertension, 13 319-325 (1995)

Objective: To examine the relationship between plasma adrenaline and hypertension. Design: Plasma adrenaline responses to chronic manipulations of blood pressure were tested in no... [more]

Objective: To examine the relationship between plasma adrenaline and hypertension. Design: Plasma adrenaline responses to chronic manipulations of blood pressure were tested in normotensive and in hypertensive rats. Methods: Hypertension was induced in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats by administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), and blood pressure was lowered in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) by administering hydralazine. Plasma catecholamine responses were monitored using blood samples from conscious unrestrained rats under resting conditions. Results: Twenty-four hours after starting L-NAME treatment, mean arterial pressure was 22 mmHg higher than in control WKY rats. Heart rate and plasma noradrenaline were reflexly reduced, but plasma adrenaline was unaffected. After 4 weeks of L-NAME treatment mean arterial pressure was 48 mmHg higher than in untreated rats. At this stage heart rate had returned to normal, but plasma noradrenaline was 33% higher and plasma adrenaline was 117% higher than in untreated rats. The elevation of plasma adrenaline was confirmed in a study of longer duration, in which plasma adrenaline had doubled after 10 weeks of L-NAME treatment. Conversely, 24 h after hydralazine treatment in SHRSP, mean arterial pressure was reduced by 49 mmHg and there was a reflex elevation of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline and heart rate. However, after 19 days of blood pressure reduction with hydralazine, plasma noradrenaline and heart rate had returned to normal, but plasma adrenaline had fallen to 30% below normal. Most of the change in mean arterial pressure observed with either chronic L-NAME or hydralazine could be attributed to modulation of neurally mediated vasoconstriction, estimated from mean arterial pressure responses to acute autonomic blockade. Conclusion: Selective changes in plasma adrenaline levels were induced by chronic experimental manipulations of blood pressure. This implies that the high plasma adrenaline level observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats might be a consequence rather than a cause of their hypertension. © Current Science Ltd ISSN 0263-6352.

Citations Scopus - 4
1995 SUZUKAWA M, ABBEY M, HOWE PRC, NESTEL PJ, 'EFFECTS OF FISH-OIL FATTY-ACIDS ON LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN SIZE, OXIDIZABILITY, AND UPTAKE BY MACROPHAGES', JOURNAL OF LIPID RESEARCH, 36 473-484 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 151Web of Science - 134
1995 JABLONSKIS LT, HOWE PRC, 'PLASMA ADRENALINE RESPONSES TO LONG-TERM MODIFICATION OF BLOOD-PRESSURE IN NORMOTENSIVE RATS AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 13 319-325 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
1995 RAYNER TE, HOWE PRC, 'PURIFIED OMEGA-3-FATTY-ACIDS RETARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROTEINURIA IN SALT-LOADED HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 13 771-780 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
1994 LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, ABBEY M, NESTEL PJ, HOWE PRC, 'REDUCTION OF BLOOD-PRESSURE AND PLASMA TRIGLYCERIDES BY OMEGA-3-FATTY-ACIDS IN TREATED HYPERTENSIVES', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 12 1041-1045 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 45
1994 LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, HOWE PRC, 'IMPROVED DETECTION OF A BLOOD-PRESSURE RESPONSE TO DIETARY INTERVENTION WITH 24-HOUR AMBULATORY MONITORING', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 7 1115-1117 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
1994 HOWE PRC, LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, COBIAC L, DANDY G, NESTEL PJ, 'EFFECT OF SODIUM RESTRICTION AND FISH-OIL SUPPLEMENTATION ON BP AND THROMBOTIC RISK-FACTORS IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH ACE-INHIBITORS', JOURNAL OF HUMAN HYPERTENSION, 8 43-49 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 17
1994 MCMURCHIE EJ, BURNARD SL, PATTEN GS, SMITH RM, HEAD RJ, HOWE PRC, 'SODIUM-TRANSPORT ACTIVITY IN CHEEK EPITHELIAL-CELLS FROM ADOLESCENTS AT INCREASED RISK OF HYPERTENSION', JOURNAL OF HUMAN HYPERTENSION, 8 329-336 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 5
1994 Jablonskis LT, Howe PRC, 'Elevated plasma adrenaline in spontaneously hypertensive rats', Blood Pressure, 3 106-111 (1994)

Having found that circulating adrenaline (AD) is selectively elevated in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), we extended th... [more]

Having found that circulating adrenaline (AD) is selectively elevated in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), we extended the comparison to include other normotensive and hypertensive rat strains. Aortic catheters were implanted in young (5-7 weeks) and old (7-9 months) WKY, Black-Hooded Wistar (BHW), Sprague Dawley (SD), spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and SHRSP for repeated measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and blood sampling under conscious resting conditions. In the young SHR and SHRSP, MAP was already significantly higher than in age-matched WKY but MAP in the SD rats was similar. Plasma AD was significantly higher in SHR and lower in SD rats when compared with WKY. There was no difference in plasma noradrenaline (NA) between strains at this age. At the older age, MAP was 40-60 mmHg higher in SHR and SHRSP than in WKY and BHW but was significantly lower in the SD strain. Circulating AD did not differ between the normotensive strains but was 3-4 times higher in the hypertensive strains. Plasma NA was elevated in SHR only. The acute reduction of MAP caused by ganglion blockade (an index of the sympathetically mediated component of resting blood pressure) was greater in SHR and SHRSP than in WKY at the older age only. However, the residual MAP after ganglion blockade was significantly higher in the hypertensive strains at both ages. Regression analysis showed that in the older rats, plasma AD was correlated with resting MAP, the reduction in MAP with ganglion blockade, the residual MAP and plasma NA. In the young rats, however, plasma AD levels were not correlated with either plasma NA or resting MAP. Thus, even though plasma AD is elevated in the hypertensive strains at an early age, it is not clear whether this increase contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. © 1994 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/08037059409101529
Citations Scopus - 12
1994 Lungershausen YK, Abbey M, Nestel PJ, Howe PRC, 'Reduction of blood pressure and plasma triglycérides by omega-3 fatty acids in treated hypertensives', Journal of Hypertension, 12 1041-1045 (1994)

Objective: To assess the effects of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid supplementation on blood pressure and plasma lipids in hypertensives treated with diuretics or beta-blockers. Design: ... [more]

Objective: To assess the effects of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid supplementation on blood pressure and plasma lipids in hypertensives treated with diuretics or beta-blockers. Design: Double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial consisting of a 4-week run-in phase and two 6-week intervention phases. Patients: A total of 43 patients of either sex taking a beta-blocker only (n = 29), a diuretic only (n = 3) or a beta-blocker plus diuretic (n = 11) for hypertension were recruited from general practice. One patient from the latter group was withdrawn. Methods: Seated blood pressure was measured every 2 weeks in the clinic with a Dinamap. After the run-in phase, participants were randomly assigned to take a supplement of either Omacor (85% n-3 fatty acid concentrate) or corn oil (four 1-g capsules/day) for 6 weeks, after which they crossed over to the other supplement. Fasted blood samples were taken at the end of each phase for lipid analysis. Main outcome measures: The within-individual differences in systolic and diastolic pressure and plasma lipids between Omacor and corn oil treatment. Results: Systolic/diastolic blood pressures measured during the run-in phase were normal (132±2/76±1 mmHg, n = 42) but decreased further with n-3 fatty acid supplementation. The mean within-individual difference in blood pressure compared with corn oil supplementation was 3.1 ±1.0/1.8±0.6mmHg (P<0.01). This was accompanied by a 21% reduction in plasma triglycérides (P<0.01) and a 15% increase in high-density lipoprotein-2 cholesterol (P<0.01) but there were no significant differences in total or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusion: The antihypertensive and hypotriglyceridaemic effects of n-3 fatty acid supplementation seen in the present study suggest that it may be a useful adjunct to antihypertensive therapy with beta-blockers or diuretics. © Current Science Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 54
1994 Lungershausen YK, Howe PRC, 'Improved detection of a blood pressure response to dietary intervention with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring', American Journal of Hypertension, 7 1115-1117 (1994)

Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring was undertaken in 25 hypertensives on ß-blocker monotherapy who completed a double-blind crossover trial to compare the effects of fish... [more]

Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring was undertaken in 25 hypertensives on ß-blocker monotherapy who completed a double-blind crossover trial to compare the effects of fish oil and com oil supplements on BP. Clinic BP was measured with a Dinamap monitor on two consecutive days at the end of each treatment phase. ABP was recorded during the intervening 24-h period with a Spacelabs 90207 monitor. Averages of 24-h, daytime, and nighttime ABP readings correlated closely with Dinamap readings. Within-subject BP differences between fish oil and corn oil treatment were similar for Dinamap (3.2 ± 1.8/2.5 ± 1.0 mm Hg) and for 24-h ABP (2.5 ± 1.0/2.3 ± 0.8 mm Hg), but were more significant with the latter. Thus detection of the antihypertensive effects of dietary intervention can be improved by the use of ABP. Am J Hypertens 1994;7:1115¿1117. © 1994 by the American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

DOI 10.1093/ajh/7.12.1115
Citations Scopus - 13
1994 Howe PRC, Lungershausen YK, Cobiac L, Dandy G, Nestel PJ, 'Effect of sodium restriction and fish oil supplementation on BP and thrombotic risk factors in patients treated with ACE inhibitors', Journal of Human Hypertension, 8 43-49 (1994)

Effects of dietary sodium restriction combined with fish oil supplementation on BP and related risk factors were assessed in hypertensives treated with angiotensin converting enzy... [more]

Effects of dietary sodium restriction combined with fish oil supplementation on BP and related risk factors were assessed in hypertensives treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. After a four week run-in phase, a six week intervention trial was conducted in which four matched groups of 14 patients, taking either captopril or enalapril, were assigned to one of four dietary treatments: low sodium (80 mmol/day) with fish oil (5 g of omega-3 fatty acids per day); normal sodium (150 mmol/day) with fish oil; low sodium with olive oil; normal sodium with olive oil. All subjects adopted a low sodium diet and adjustments of nutrient intake were made by double-blind administration of sodium and oils in supplementary tablets and capsules. BP fell in all treatment groups during intervention. However, the reduction of SBP was 4.2 mmHg greater in subjects on a low sodium intake than in those taking normal sodium. There were no differences in BP between those taking olive oil and those taking fish oil but plasma triglycerides and serum thromboxane production were reduced by 27% and 51%, respectively in the latter. Thus the antihypertensive effect of ACE inhibitors can be augmented by sodium restriction alone but supplementing the diet with fish oil may yield additional cardiovascular benefits.

Citations Scopus - 14
1994 Mcmurchie EJ, Burnard SL, Patten GS, King RA, Howe PRC, Head RJ, 'Depressed cheek cell sodium transport in human hypertension', Blood Pressure, 3 328-335 (1994)

Na+ transport activity was measured in cheek cells from untreated hypertensive subjects and age-matched normotensive controls identified from a blood pressure screening program. C... [more]

Na+ transport activity was measured in cheek cells from untreated hypertensive subjects and age-matched normotensive controls identified from a blood pressure screening program. Cheek cells were isolated by a simple mouth wash procedure and Na+ transport activity was measured as the proton-dependent uptake of 22Na+ using a rapid filtration assay. The rate of Na+ uptake was about 45% lower in hypertensive subjects and this difference persisted in a follow up study 2 years later involving those subjects who remained untreated for their hypertension. The proton independent Na+ uptake was also reduced by about 46% in the hypertensive group. The increase in the rate of cheek cell Na+ transport with increasing transcellular proton gradient values was also significantly lower in hypertensive subjects. The reduced cheek cell Na+ transport observed in hypertensive subjects may indicate decreased activity of the Na+/H+ antiporter and/or changes in the ion permeability properties of the cheek cell plasma membrane in the hypertensive state. This novel assay provides a biochemically based method for discriminating between normotensive and hypertensive subjects and makes use of tissue which can be obtained in a relatively non-invasive manner. © 1994 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/08037059409102282
Citations Scopus - 2
1994 Jablonskis LT, Howe PRC, 'Lack of influence of circulating adrenaline on blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive rats', Blood Pressure, 3 112-119 (1994)

The relationship between circulating adrenaline and blood pressure was examined by manipulating plasma adrenaline levels in both normotensive and hypertensive rats: bilateral adre... [more]

The relationship between circulating adrenaline and blood pressure was examined by manipulating plasma adrenaline levels in both normotensive and hypertensive rats: bilateral adrenalmedullectomy was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats; adrenaline bitartrate was infused chronically (25-32 µg/kg/h s.c.) into Wistar Kyoto, Sprague Dawley and stroke-prone rats via osmotic minipumps. Arterial and venous catheters were subsequently implanted for direct measurement of mean arterial pressure, blood sampling and drug administration in conscious rats. Adrenaline infusion for 5-6 weeks in Wistar Kyoto rats did not affect resting blood pressure (118 ± 3 versus 119 ± 1 mmHg in controls) even though plasma adrenaline was elevated 12-fold. Plasma noradrenaline was marginally elevated. Blood pressure was also unaffected by adrenaline infusion in Sprague Dawley or stroke-prone hypertensive rats. One week after adrenal medullectomy, plasma adrenaline was reduced 89% in spontaneously hypertensive rats, but blood pressure was unaffected. Ten weeks after adrenal medullectomy in young stroke-prone rats, resting blood pressure was slightly higher (167 ± 2 mmHg) than in control rats (157 ± 2 mmHg), although adrenaline was reduced by 34% in plasma and 67% in adrenal glands. Nitroprusside was infused acutely to lower blood pressure and reflexly elevate plasma noradrenaline. Neither of these responses were affected by chronic adrenaline infusion or adrenal medullectomy. In both adrenaline-infused Wistar Kyoto and medullectomised stroke-prone rats, autonomic blockade reduced blood pressure to a similar extent as in controls, indicating that the degree of sympathetic vasoconstriction was not altered by either treatment. Moreover, pressor responses to i.v. phenylephrine were similar in all groups, indicating that changes in plasma adrenaline did not affect post-synaptic receptor sensitivity. We conclude that elevated plasma adrenaline seen in spontaneous hypertensive rats is unlikely to contribute to their hypertension. © 1994 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/08037059409101530
Citations Scopus - 6
1994 Bexis S, Lungershausen YK, Mano MT, Howe PRC, Kong JQ, Birkle DL, et al., 'Dietary fish oil administration retards blood pressure development and influences vascular properties in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) but not in the stroke prone-spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-SP)', Blood Pressure, 3 120-126 (1994)

In the present study, we compared the blood pressure in the SHR-SP and in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) after dietary administration of fish oil from 4 to 17 weeks of a... [more]

In the present study, we compared the blood pressure in the SHR-SP and in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) after dietary administration of fish oil from 4 to 17 weeks of age. The retarding influence of dietary fish oils on the development of hypertension was prominent in the SHR (26 mmHg) and not evident in the SHR-SP (8 mmHg). The enhanced development of blood pressure in both the SHR and the SHR-SP is characterised by an elevated maximum contraction in the mesenteric vascular bed to sympathetic nerve stimulation and to injected noradrenaline. In SHR, but not SHR-SP, this maximum contraction was significantly attenuated by dietary fish oil. Likewise, acetylcholine mediated relaxation of the isolated aorta was enhanced in preparations from the SHR but not the SHR-SP. These physiological changes were also associated with a change in the total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content in vascular tissue, which were inversely proportional to the prevailing blood pressure values seen in all three strains of rat receiving dietary fish oils. Platelet activated thromboxane production was equally depressed in WKY (Wistar Kyoto), SHR and SHR-SP rats. The results indicate that the blood pressure lowering effect of fish oil when administered during the period of development of hypertension is much greater in the SHR than it is in the SHR-SP. Furthermore the lowering of blood pressure by fish oil administration is related to a restoration of normal vascular contraction and normal vascular relaxation, but not related to a suppression of serum thromboxane production. © 1994 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/08037059409101531
Citations Scopus - 13
1993 NESTEL PJ, CLIFTON PM, HOWE PR, 'ENHANCED BLOOD-PRESSURE RESPONSE TO DIETARY SALT-GENDER DIFFERENCE AND EFFECT OF WAIST-HIP RATIO (WHR)', CIRCULATION, 88 455-455 (1993)
1993 NESTEL PJ, CLIFTON PM, NOAKES M, MCARTHUR R, HOWE PR, 'ENHANCED BLOOD-PRESSURE RESPONSE TO DIETARY SALT IN ELDERLY WOMEN, ESPECIALLY THOSE WITH SMALL WAIST-HIP RATIO', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 11 1387-1394 (1993)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-199312000-00011
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 36
1993 JABLONSKIS LT, HOWE PRC, 'VASOPRESSIN COMPENSATES FOR ACUTE LOSS OF SYMPATHETIC PRESSOR TONE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 20 380-383 (1993)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1993.tb01711.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
1993 MARLEY AM, ROGERS PF, LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, HOWE PRC, 'COMBINED EFFECTS OF DIETARY FISH OIL AND SODIUM RESTRICTION ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN ENALAPRIL-TREATED HYPERTENSIVE RATS', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 6 121-126 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
1993 Nestel PJ, Clifton PM, Noakes M, McArthur R, Howe PR, 'Enhanced blood pressure response to dietary salt in elderly women, especially those with small waist:hip ratio', Journal of Hypertension, 11 1387-1394 (1993)

Objective: To determine the blood pressure responses in elderly normotensive men and women to dietary sodium and to the diunsaturated fatty acid dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA), ... [more]

Objective: To determine the blood pressure responses in elderly normotensive men and women to dietary sodium and to the diunsaturated fatty acid dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA), which is derived from linoleic acid. Design: Blood pressure responses were assessed in 66 subjects (36 male, 30 female; mean age 65 years) on two diets differing by approximately 70 mmol/day sodium, combined with daily supplements of either 1 g DGLA or 1 g safflower oil, giving a four-group parallel design. After a common period of salt restriction and salt supplementation, two sets of parallel groups continued with either salt or placebo tablets. The study was blinded, except for dietary adjustments based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion values measured once every 2 weeks. Blood pressures were also measured automatically once every 2 weeks. Results: Urinary sodium excretion (sodium intake) correlated significantly with systolic and diastolic blood pressures. A strong interaction with sex (P<0.001 for systolic blood pressure) reflected greater responsiveness in women to changing sodium intake. A second major determinant of blood pressure responsiveness was the waist: hip ratio, an index of central obesity; this correlation was independent of the initial sodium intake, initial blood pressure or body mass index. The waist: hip ratio was a powerful predictor of blood pressure changes with sodium intake in women only; women with android fat distribution were, similarly to men, less sensitive to dietary sodium. Daily supplements of 1 g DGLA doubled the concentration of DGLA in plasma but did not influence blood pressure. Conclusions: Among elderly normotensive subjects, women responded to changes in sodium intake with greater changes in blood pressure than men did. Furthermore, this response was strongly related to the gynaecoid distribution of body fat. © Current Science Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 41
1993 Marley AM, Rogers PF, Lungershausen YK, Howe PRC, 'Combined effects of dietary fish oil and sodium restriction on blood pressure in enalapril-treated hypertensive rats', American Journal of Hypertension, 6 121-126 (1993)

Sodium restriction and fish oil supplementation are effective dietary measures for preventing or treating mild hypertension. However, their usefulness as an adjunct to drug treatm... [more]

Sodium restriction and fish oil supplementation are effective dietary measures for preventing or treating mild hypertension. However, their usefulness as an adjunct to drug treatment of hypertension requires further evaluation. In the present study, we examined the influence of dietary sodium and fish oil on the antihypertensive effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Rats were fed experimental diets containing fish oil or olive oil (5% w/w) and low (0.04% w/w) or normal (0.23% w/w) sodium from 1 to 4 months of age. Tail-cuff blood pressure (BP) rose by 8.4 and 4.3 mm Hg/week, respectively, in untreated and enalapril-treated (2.5 mg/kg/day, orally) rats fed the olive oil/normal sodium diet. Feeding fish oil further reduced the rise in enalapril-treated rats to 2.8 mm Hg/week. When sodium intake was also restricted, the BP rise was almost prevented (1.1 mm Hg/week). In older rats with established hypertension, the low sodium/fish oil diet also potentiated the blood pressure reduction by enalapril (tail-cuff BP fell by 61 mm Hg compared to 25 mm Hg with enalapril alone). These observations were confirmed by direct BP recording in conscious rats following the implantation of aortic catheters. Factorial analysis revealed a highly significant antihypertensive effect of fish oil in both young and adult SHRSP receiving enalapril, and a further interactive effect of dietary sodium restriction with fish oil feeding in young rats. The antihypertensive effects of the dietary interventions were associated with further reductions of cardiac hypertrophy. The possibility that dietary fish oil supplementation may improve the antihypertensive efficacy of ACE inhibitors, especially when sodium intake is restricted, warrants evaluation in humans. Am J Hypertens 1993;6:121-126. © 1993 by the American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

DOI 10.1093/ajh/6.2.121
Citations Scopus - 3
1992 McMurchie E, Patten GS, Bumard SL, Smith RM, Howe PRC, 'Human cheek cell Na+/H+ antiporter activity in essential hypertension: Use as a novel predictive test', Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 24 93112-93116 (1992) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/0022-2828(92)93116-2
1992 JABLONSKIS LT, ROGERS PF, LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, HOWE PRC, 'CHRONIC CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION OF ENALAPRILAT LOWERS BLOOD-PRESSURE IN STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 39 119-126 (1992)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(92)90052-I
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
1992 COBIAC L, NESTEL PJ, WING LMH, HOWE PRC, 'A LOW-SODIUM DIET SUPPLEMENTED WITH FISH OIL LOWERS BLOOD-PRESSURE IN THE ELDERLY', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 10 87-92 (1992)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-199201000-00014
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 45
1992 Howe PRC, Nestel PJ, 'Antihypertensive effects of fish oil combined with a low sodium diet', Heartbeat, 3 3-4 (1992) [C3]
1992 Cobiac L, Nestel PJ, Wing LMH, Howe PRC, 'A low-sodium diet supplemented with fish oil lowers blood pressure in the elderly', Journal of Hypertension, 10 87-92 (1992)

Objective: To examine effects of dietary fish oil supplementation with sodium restriction on blood pressure in the elderly. Design: In a double-blind dietary intervention lasting ... [more]

Objective: To examine effects of dietary fish oil supplementation with sodium restriction on blood pressure in the elderly. Design: In a double-blind dietary intervention lasting 4 weeks, parallel comparisons of blood pressure were made in volunteers assigned to one of four treatment groups: fish oil and low sodium; fish oil and normal sodium; sunflower oil and low sodium; or sunflower oil and normal sodium. Setting: Subjects lived at home and attended our nutrition research clinic at fortnightly intervals for dietary counselling and blood pressure measurement. Participants: Health volunteers aged 60-80 years were sought by advertisement. A total of 114 men and women were enrolled in two cohorts; 106, with an initial mean blood pressure of 132/77 mmHg, satisfactorily completed the study. Intervention: All subjects adopted a low-sodium diet and dietary changes were effected by double-blind administration of slow-release sodium chloride or placebo tablets, along with capsules containing either fish or sunflower oil. Main outcome measure: The primary measure was the within-subject change in blood pressure after 4 weeks of intervention in each dietary treatment group. Results: Urinary sodium excretion in subjects on low-sodium diets decreased whilst potassium excretion was unaffected. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) fell in the group taking sunflower oil with low sodium, but there was only a transient fall in diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In those taking fish oil with normal sodium, the change in blood pressure was not significant, except after adjustment for initial blood pressure and weight changes. When fish oil was combined with low sodium, however, both SBP and DBP were substantially reduced; the reduction in DBP was significantly greater than in the other treatment groups. Conclusion: Dietary fish oil and sodium restriction can interact to lower DBP in the elderly. © Current Science Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 35
1991 ROGERS PF, HEAD GA, LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, HOWE PRC, 'EFFECTS OF DEPLETING CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL ADRENALINE STORES ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 34 9-16 (1991)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(91)90004-M
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
1991 HOWE PRC, COBIAC L, SMITH RM, 'LACK OF EFFECT OF SHORT-TERM CHANGES IN SODIUM-INTAKE ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN ADOLESCENT SCHOOLCHILDREN', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 9 181-186 (1991)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-199102000-00014
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
1991 HOWE PRC, LUNGERSHAUSEN YK, ROGERS PF, GERKENS JF, HEAD RJ, SMITH RM, 'EFFECTS OF DIETARY-SODIUM AND FISH OIL ON BLOOD-PRESSURE DEVELOPMENT IN STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 9 639-644 (1991)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-199107000-00009
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 22
1991 Howe PRC, Lungershausen YK, Rogers PF, Gerkens JF, Head RJ, Smith RM, 'Effects of dietary sodium and fish oil on blood pressure development in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', Journal of Hypertension, 9 639-644 (1991)

The postulated antihypertensive effect of dietary fish oil and the influence of dietary sodium on this effect were evaluated in young stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats ... [more]

The postulated antihypertensive effect of dietary fish oil and the influence of dietary sodium on this effect were evaluated in young stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) by direct intra-arterial measurement of blood pressure. Weaning rats were fed synthetic diets containing olive oil or eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched fish oil (5% of dry weight) with normal (0.23%) or high (2.8%) sodium content. Catheters were implanted after 3 months for blood pressure measurement under resting conditions and to sample blood for catecholamine determinations. Effects of fish oil on vascular reactivity were assessed in the in situ blood-perfused mesentery. The overall observation, from a series of experiments, was that feeding diets containing 5% fish oil to young SHRSP resulted in a small but consistent suppression of the development of hypertension. This effect could be counteracted, however, by increasing dietary sodium intake. Observations after ganglion blockade indicate that the antihypertensive effect of fish oil is unlikely to result from a reduction in sympathetic vascular tone. © Current Science Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 22
1990 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, LUNGERSHAUSEN Y, 'EARLY INCREASE OF PRESSOR SENSITIVITY TO VASOCONSTRICTORS IN STROKE-PRONE HYPERTENSIVE RATS', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 183 838-839 (1990)
DOI 10.1016/0014-2999(90)92657-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
1990 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, MINSON JB, 'DIETARY-SODIUM LOADING ELEVATES BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BARORECEPTOR DENERVATED RATS', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 29 151-156 (1990)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(90)90180-Q
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
1990 HALLIDAY GM, LI YW, BLUMBERGS PC, JOH TH, COTTON RGH, HOWE PRC, et al., 'NEUROPATHOLOGY OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICALLY IDENTIFIED BRAIN-STEM NEURONS IN PARKINSONS-DISEASE', ANNALS OF NEUROLOGY, 27 373-385 (1990)
DOI 10.1002/ana.410270405
Citations Scopus - 226Web of Science - 215
1990 Halliday GM, Li YW, Blumbergs PC, Joh TH, Cotton RGH, Howe PRC, et al., 'Neuropathology of immunohistochemically identified brainstem neurons in Parkinson's disease', Annals of Neurology, 27 373-385 (1990)

Regional loss of immunohistochemically identified neurons in serial sections through the brainstem of 4 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease was compared with equivalent s... [more]

Regional loss of immunohistochemically identified neurons in serial sections through the brainstem of 4 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease was compared with equivalent sections from 4 age-matched control subjects. In the Parkinson brains, the catecholamine cell groups of the midbrain, pons, and medulla showed variable neuropathological changes. All dopaminergic nuclei were variably affected, but were most severely affected in the caudal, central substantia nigra. The pontine noradrenergic locus ceruleus showed variable degrees of degeneration. There was also a substantial loss of substance P-containing neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. However, the most severely affected cell group in the pons was the serotonin-synthesizing neurons in the median raphe. In the medulla, substantial neuronal loss was found in several diverse cell groups including the adrenaline-synthesizing and neuropeptide Y-containing neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, the serotonin-synthesizing neurons in the raphe obscurus nucleus, the substance P-containing neurons in the lateral reticular formation, as well as the substance P-containing neurons in the dorsal motor vagal nucleus. Lewy bodies were present in immunohistochemically identified neurons in many of these regions, indicating that they were affected directly by the disease process. These widespread but region- and transmitter-specific changes help account for the diversity of motor, cognitive, and autonomic manifestations of Parkinson's disease.

Citations Scopus - 229
1989 Chalmers JP, Doyle AE, Hopper JL, Howe PRC, Matthews PG, Mathews J, et al., 'Fall in blood pressure with modest reduction in dietary salt intake in mild hypertension', Lancet, 1 399-402 (1989)
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 33
1989 WAN DCC, SCANLON D, CHOI CL, BUNN SJ, HOWE PRC, LIVETT BG, 'CO-LOCALIZATION OF RNAS CODING FOR PHENYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE AND PROENKEPHALIN-A IN BOVINE AND OVINE ADRENALS', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 26 231-240 (1989)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(89)90172-0
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
1989 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, SMITH RM, 'ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECT OF ALCOHOL IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', HYPERTENSION, 13 607-611 (1989)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
1989 SCHOBER M, HOWE PRC, SPERK G, FISCHERCOLBRIE R, WINKLER H, 'AN INCREASED POOL OF SECRETORY HORMONES AND PEPTIDES IN ADRENAL-MEDULLA OF STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', HYPERTENSION, 13 469-474 (1989)
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 43
1989 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, HEAD GA, 'LIMITED BAROREFLEX CONTROL OF HEART-RATE IN YOUNG STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 7 69-75 (1989)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-198901000-00011
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 19
1989 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, SMITH RM, 'EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION AND ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 7 387-393 (1989)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-198905000-00007
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
1989 'Effects of replacing sodium intake in subjects on a low sodium diet: A crossover study', Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, A11 1011-1024 (1989)

Eighty-eight untreated subjects (mean age 58.6 ± 1.1 years; 73 males and 15 females) with diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg were recruited to the study. Subjects w... [more]

Eighty-eight untreated subjects (mean age 58.6 ± 1.1 years; 73 males and 15 females) with diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg were recruited to the study. Subjects were seen fortnightly and after four pre-diet visits were randomised into a normal sodium intake group (44 subjects receiving > 80 mmol sodium daily in the diet plus 80 mmol of sodium supplement as eight slow release sodium chloride tablets daily) or a low sodium intake group (44 subjects receiving < 80 mmol sodium daily in the diet plus eight slow release sodium chloride placebo tablets daily). Eight weeks later, subjects crossed over to the alternate tablets while continuing with the reduced sodium diet for another period o f 8 weeks. The difference in urine sodium between the low sodium phase and the normal sodium phase was 67 2 4 mmol/day independent of the order in which the treatments were given: the corresponding difference in urine potassium excretion was 1.2 5 1.4 mmol/day and was not significant. The differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures between the low sodium and normal sodium phases for all 88 subjects were 3.6 ± 0.7 mmHg (95% confidence intervals 2.2-5.0) and 2.1 ± 0.4 mmHg (95% confidence intervals 1.3-2.9) respectively, and were independent of the order in which treatments were given (p < 0.005). On the other hand, comparison of the blood pressures of the two cohorts of subjects as parallel groups during the first test phase revealed that the falls in pressure were greater by 5.3 ± 1.4 (95% confidence intervals 2.7-8.1) mmHg (systolic) and 3.4 ± 0.8 (95% confidence intervals 1.8-5.0) mmHg (diastolic) in subjects with low sodium intake compared with those with normal sodium intake. These differences in blood pressure reduction obtained by analysis of the crossover study and of the parallel group study were not significant, with clear overlap of the 95% confidence intervals. Moderate dietary salt restriction causes reductions in blood pressure and around 3.5-5.5 mmHg (systolic) and 2-3.5 mmHg (diastolic) of these falls can be attributed specifically to reduction o f sodium chloride intake. © 1989 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/10641968909035388
Citations Scopus - 19
1989 Chalmers JP, Doyle AE, Hopper JL, Howe PRC, Matthews PG, Mathews J, et al., 'Fall in blood pressure with modest reduction in dietary salt intake in mild hypertension', Lancet, 1 399-402 (1989)

111 untreated subjects (mean [SEM] age 58.4 [1.0] years; 93 male, 18 female) with diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg were seen fortnightly, and after four pre-diet v... [more]

111 untreated subjects (mean [SEM] age 58.4 [1.0] years; 93 male, 18 female) with diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg were seen fortnightly, and after four pre-diet visits they were randomised into a low sodium intake group (53 subjects; diet containing less than 80 mmol sodium/day plus 8 placebo tablets daily) or a normal sodium intake group (55 subjects; same dietary sodium plus 8 slow-release sodium chloride [10 mmol] tablets daily). 103 subjects completed the intervention phase of 8 weeks. Urinary sodium fell significantly in the low sodium group but not in the normal sodium group. Urinary potassium excretion did not change in either group. Mean (SEM) systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell by 6.1 (1.1) and 3.7 (0.6) mmHg, respectively, in the low sodium group, but by only 0.6 (1.0) and 0.9 (0.6) mmHg in the normal sodium group. Multivariate analysis allowing for the effects of pre-diet blood pressure, weight, and age, reduced the effect of lowering the sodium intake on the systolic pressure from 5.5 (SEM 1.5) mmHg to 4.8 (1.3) mmHg (p < 0.005) but the effect on diastolic pressure was not changed significantly.

Citations Scopus - 29
1989 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Smith RM, 'Antihypertensive effect of alcohol in spontaneously hypertensive rats', Hypertension, 13 607-611 (1989)

The influence of ethanol (alcohol) consumption on blood pressure during and after the development of hypertension was examined by using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and s... [more]

The influence of ethanol (alcohol) consumption on blood pressure during and after the development of hypertension was examined by using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and stroke-prone SHR (SHRSP). Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were also used for comparison. Substituting alcohol (5-20%) for drinking water at 1 month of age retarded the age-dependent rise of blood pressure in all three strains so that, at 7 months, blood pressure measured by a tail-cuff method was 24 mm Hg, 26 mm Hg, and 41 mm Hg lower in the alcohol-treated WKY rats, SHR, and SHRSP, respectively, than in untreated rats. Significant differences in blood pressure were seenin each strain after only 3 months. Withdrawal of alcohol at this stage caused an acute rise of blood pressure then a return to subnormal levels, which persisted for a further 3 months. Administration of 15% alcohol to adult WKY rats and SHR for 2 months had no significant effect on blood pressure. Increasing alcohol content to 20% for a further 2 months prevented rises of blood pressure in both strains. Thus, although continuous drinking of alcohol does not lower blood pressure, it appears to counteract the development of hypertension in rats.

Citations Scopus - 16
1989 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Head GA, 'Limited baroreflex control of heart rate in young stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', Journal of Hypertension, 7 69-75 (1989)

Controversy regarding possible differences of baroreflex gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their relationship to the rise in blood pressure may be due in part to v... [more]

Controversy regarding possible differences of baroreflex gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their relationship to the rise in blood pressure may be due in part to variations in the methods used to assess baroreflex function. In this study, we have compared the baroreflex control of heart rate in normotensive (Wistar¿Kyoto, WKY) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rats at 1 and at 7 months of age. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were monitored in conscious rats following implantation of arterial and venous catheters. Phenylephrine and nitroprusside were given intravenously and the peak responses of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were recorded. In the young rats, these recordings were repeated under anaesthesia. Individual slopes for responses to phenylephrine or nitroprusside were obtained by linear regression. A single relationship covering both sets of responses was also obtained by fitting the data to a sigmoidal curve. The latter approach enabled the baroreflex to be represented as a single function which has a single determinant of gain, operates within defined limits and can be readily related to resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate. This approach demonstrated that: (1) in adult SHRSP, the baroreflex had reset to operate at higher resting levels of mean arterial pressure; (2) the range of heart rate control was smaller in both young and adult SHRSP compared with WKY; (3) average gain was slightly, but not significantly lower in adult SHRSP; (4) anaesthesia reduced heart rate range and average gain in both strains of rat. The results indicate that in SHRSP, even before hypertension develops, there is a deficiency in the baroreflex mechanism which may compromise its ability to counteract pressor influences. © Gower Academic Journals Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 13
1988 HALLIDAY GM, LI YW, JOH TH, COTTON RGH, HOWE PRC, GEFFEN LB, BLESSING WW, 'DISTRIBUTION OF MONOAMINE-SYNTHESIZING NEURONS IN THE HUMAN MEDULLA-OBLONGATA', JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, 273 301-317 (1988)
DOI 10.1002/cne.902730303
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 77
1988 McMillen IC, Mulvogue HM, Coulter CL, Browne CA, Howe PRC, 'Ontogeny of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes and enkephalins in the sheep adrenal medulla: An immunocytochemical study', Journal of Endocrinology, 118 221-226 (1988) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Caroline Mcmillen
1988 HOWE PRC, HEAD GA, ROGERS PF, 'PRESSOR RESPONSIVENESS OF THE SUB-RETROFACIAL NUCLEUS AND THE MIDBRAIN RETICULAR-FORMATION IN THE RAT AFTER 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE-INDUCED LESIONS OF ASCENDING AND DESCENDING CATECHOLAMINE PATHWAYS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 6 443-450 (1988)
DOI 10.1097/00004872-198806000-00003
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
1988 ANDERSON CR, HOWE PRC, 'IS PHENYLETHANOLAMINE-N-METHYLTRANSFERASE (PNMT) CONTAINED IN RAT HYPOTHALAMIC NEURONS', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 93 164-169 (1988)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(88)90075-4
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 15
1988 HALLIDAY GM, LI YW, OLIVER J, JOH TH, COTTON RGH, HOWE PRC, et al., 'THE DISTRIBUTION OF NEUROPEPTIDE-Y-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN THE HUMAN MEDULLA-OBLONGATA', NEUROSCIENCE, 26 179-191 (1988)
DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(88)90136-4
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 37
1988 HALLIDAY GM, LI YW, JOH TH, COTTON RGH, HOWE PRC, GEFFEN LB, BLESSING WW, 'DISTRIBUTION OF SUBSTANCE P-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN THE HUMAN MEDULLA-OBLONGATA - CO-LOCALIZATION WITH MONOAMINE-SYNTHESIZING NEURONS', SYNAPSE, 2 353-370 (1988)
DOI 10.1002/syn.890020403
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 38
1988 McMillen IC, Mulvogue HM, Coulter CL, Browne CA, Howe PRC, 'Ontogeny of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes and enkephalins in the sheep adrenal medulla: An immunocytochemical study', Journal of Endocrinology, 118 221-226 (1988)

An immunocytochemical staining technique was used to investigate the development of the sheep adrenal medullary cells containing enkephalins and the catecholamine synthetic enzyme... [more]

An immunocytochemical staining technique was used to investigate the development of the sheep adrenal medullary cells containing enkephalins and the catecholamine synthetic enzymes dopamine ß-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyl transferase (PNMT). No staining was observed in the adrenocortical cells with any of the antisera used in this study. Positive staining with anti-DBH was observed throughout the medulla in both adult and fetal adrenal glands from 80 days of gestation. Positive staining with anti-PNMT was observed in all glands from as early as 80 days of gestation, and staining with this antiserum was mainly confined to the peripheral medullary cells, which were adjacent to, and interdigitated between, the cells of the adrenal cortex. In the fetus between 80 and 120 days of gestation, staining for the enkephalins was observed in both the peripheral columnar and the central polygonal adrenal medullary cells. After 125 days of gestation and in the adult ewe, the peripheral columnar cells were uniformly stained with anti-enkephalin whereas many unstained cells were present in the central medullary region. Therefore, enkephalin-containing peptides are present in the catecholamine cells of the fetal and adult sheep adrenal and there appears to be a changing pattern in the distribution of the enkephalins in the fetal adrenal in late gestation.

Citations Scopus - 23
1987 LEVIN MC, SAWCHENKO PE, HOWE PRC, BLOOM S, POLAK JM, 'ORGANIZATION OF GALANIN-IMMUNOREACTIVE INPUTS TO THE PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO CATECHOLAMINERGIC AFFERENTS', JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, 261 562-582 (1987)
DOI 10.1002/cne.902610408
Citations Scopus - 119Web of Science - 161
1987 HEAD GA, HOWE PRC, 'EFFECTS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE AND THE PNMT INHIBITOR LY134046 ON PRESSOR-RESPONSES TO STIMULATION OF THE SUBRETROFACIAL NUCLEUS IN ANESTHETIZED STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 18 213-224 (1987)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(87)90120-2
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
1987 CROFTS JN, HOWE PRC, 'LIMITED DEPLETION OF CENTRAL ADRENALINE STORES FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF ADRENALINE SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS IN RATS', NEUROCHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL, 10 347-353 (1987)
DOI 10.1016/0197-0186(87)90109-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1986 RATTIGAN S, HOWE PRC, CLARK MG, 'THE EFFECT OF A HIGH-FAT DIET AND SUCROSE DRINKING OPTION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF OBESITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 56 73-80 (1986)
DOI 10.1079/BJN19860086
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
1986 BLESSING WW, HOWE PRC, JOH TH, OLIVER J, WILLOUGHBY JO, 'DISTRIBUTION OF TYROSINE-HYDROXYLASE AND NEUROPEPTIDE Y-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN RABBIT MEDULLA-OBLONGATA, WITH ATTENTION TO COLOCALIZATION STUDIES, PRESUMPTIVE ADRENALINE-SYNTHESIZING PERIKARYA, AND VAGAL PREGANGLIONIC CELLS', JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, 248 285-300 (1986)
DOI 10.1002/cne.902480211
Citations Scopus - 133Web of Science - 191
1986 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, MORRIS MJ, CHALMERS JP, SMITH RM, 'PLASMA-CATECHOLAMINES AND NEUROPEPTIDE-Y AS INDEXES OF SYMPATHETIC-NERVE ACTIVITY IN NORMOTENSIVE AND STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOLOGY, 8 1113-1121 (1986)
DOI 10.1097/00005344-198611000-00004
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 69
1986 PILOWSKY P, MINSON J, HODGSON A, HOWE P, CHALMERS J, 'DOES SUBSTANCE-P COEXIST WITH ADRENALINE IN NEURONS OF THE ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLA IN THE RAT', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 71 293-298 (1986)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(86)90636-1
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 46
1986 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, SMITH RM, JUREIDINI KF, 'EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM MODIFICATION OF DIETARY-SODIUM INTAKE ON PLASMA-CATECHOLAMINES AND BLOOD-PRESSURE IN PREHYPERTENSIVE CHILDREN', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 13 305-309 (1986)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1986.tb00353.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1986 Blessing WW, Howe PRC, Joh TH, Oliver JR, Willoughby JO, 'Distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in rabbit medulla oblongata, with attention to colocalization studies, presumptive adrenaline-synthesizing perikarya, and vagal preganglionic cells', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 248 285-300 (1986)
Citations Scopus - 12
1986 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Smith RM, Jureidini KF, 'Effects of short-term modification of dietary sodium intake on plasma catecholamines and blood pressure in prehypertensive children', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 13 305-309 (1986)

1. The influence of dietary sodium intake on plasma catecholamines was examined as part of a dietary intervention study in 21 prehypertensive school children. 2. Diastolic blood p... [more]

1. The influence of dietary sodium intake on plasma catecholamines was examined as part of a dietary intervention study in 21 prehypertensive school children. 2. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly elevated in girls after 3 weeks on a high sodium diet compared with a low sodium diet. Plasma adrenaline levels were raised slightly by the high sodium intake but plasma noradrenaline was significantly reduced. 3. Increases of plasma catecholamines in response to standing or cold stress were unaffected by changes in sodium intake. 4. The results indicate that the pressor effect of dietary sodium in children is not attributable to increased sympathetic nerve activity.

Citations Scopus - 4
1986 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Morris MJ, Chalmers JP, Smith RM, 'Plasma catecholamines and neuropeptide-Y as indices of sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats', Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 8 1113-1121 (1986)

The suitability of plasma catecholamines (CAs) and neuropeptide-Y (NPY) as biochemical indices of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) has been investigated, and these parameters have... [more]

The suitability of plasma catecholamines (CAs) and neuropeptide-Y (NPY) as biochemical indices of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) has been investigated, and these parameters have been compared between adult normotensive (WKY) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Plasma norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and NPY were measured in venous and arterial blood samples taken from conscious, unrestrained rats. Under resting conditions, both CAs were significantly higher in SHRSP than in WKY; plasma E in particular was raised threefold. SHRSP had higher plasma levels of NPY in arterial blood but not in venous blood. Acute hydralazine-induced hypotension caused a slight rise in NPY and striking increases of CAs, which were accentuated in SHRSP. Ganglion blockade with pentolinium reversed these increases but the differences in basal plasma CA levels between strains still persisted. Barbiturate anaesthesia had little effect on plasma levels of NPY or NE, but plasma E levels were depressed, particularly in SHRSP, so that the strain difference in plasma E taken from venous blood was no longer apparent. The results indicate that plasma levels of CAs but not NPY are useful indices of SNA in conscious rats. Comparisons between WKY and SHRSP after drug treatment demonstrate a major contribution by the adrenal medulla to plasma CA levels in SHRSP which, under resting conditions, may not be sympathetically evoked.

Citations Scopus - 50
1985 SAWCHENKO PE, SWANSON LW, GRZANNA R, HOWE PRC, BLOOM S, POLAK JM, 'COLOCALIZATION OF NEUROPEPTIDE-Y IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN BRAIN-STEM CATECHOLAMINERGIC NEURONS THAT PROJECT TO THE PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS OF THE HYPOTHALAMUS', JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, 241 138-153 (1985)
DOI 10.1002/cne.902410203
Citations Web of Science - 607
1985 HOWE PRC, 'BLOOD-PRESSURE CONTROL BY NEUROTRANSMITTERS IN THE MEDULLA-OBLONGATA AND SPINAL-CORD', JOURNAL OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, 12 95-115 (1985)
DOI 10.1016/0165-1838(85)90054-2
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 46
1985 HOWE PR, ROGERS PF, MINSON JB, 'INFLUENCE OF DIETARY-SODIUM ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BARORECEPTOR-DENERVATED RATS', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 3 457-460 (1985)
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 30
1985 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, SMITH RM, 'RETARDED DEVELOPMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS FOLLOWING CHRONIC ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 12 273-277 (1985)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1985.tb02646.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 10
1985 Howe PRC, Jureidini KF, Smith RM, 'Sodium and blood pressure in children: a short term dietary intervention study', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Australia, 10 121-124 (1985) [C3]
1985 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Minson JB, 'Rapid communication influence of dietary sodium on blood pressure in baroreceptor-denervated rats', Journal of Hypertension, 3 457-460 (1985)

One possible explanation for the salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP) in certain hypertensive individuals is that neural mechanisms which normally counteract the pressor effect... [more]

One possible explanation for the salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP) in certain hypertensive individuals is that neural mechanisms which normally counteract the pressor effect of a high dietary sodium intake are defective. We have tested this possibility in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) by surgically ablating the arterial baroreflex mechanism. This manoeuvre, by itself, conferred substantial salt-sensitivity on the WKY rats whose BP is normally relatively insensitive to dietary sodium intake. The treated rats responded to a high sodium diet with a significant rise in systolic BP which was reversed by substituting a low sodium diet. Thus, impaired baroreflex function which has been observed in essential hypertension and in hypertensive animals, may be responsible for the hypertensive effect of sodium. © Gower Medical Publishing Ltd.

Citations Scopus - 30
1985 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Smith RM, 'Retarded development of hypertension in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats following chronic alcohol consumption', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 12 273-277 (1985)

1. The influence of chronic alcohol consumption on blood pressure was examined in normotensive Wistar/Kyoto rats (WKY) and in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP)... [more]

1. The influence of chronic alcohol consumption on blood pressure was examined in normotensive Wistar/Kyoto rats (WKY) and in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP). 2. Ethanol, administered in drinking water from 5 weeks of age to produce moderate blood alcohol levels, substantially retarded the development of hypertension in SHR-SP and caused a mild reduction of blood pressure in WKY. 3. Alcohol withdrawal caused an acute rise in blood pressure in both strains, followed by a reduction to the subnormal levels previously induced by alcohol treatment. 4. This sustained antihypertensive effect of alcohol was not attributable to reductions of body weight or fluid intake.

Citations Scopus - 7
1984 SMITH RM, HOWE PRC, OLIVER J, WILLOUGHBY JO, 'GROWTH-HORMONE RELEASING-FACTOR IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN RAT HYPOTHALAMUS', NEUROPEPTIDES, 4 109-115 (1984)
DOI 10.1016/0143-4179(84)90121-5
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 52
1984 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, BLESSING WW, 'VISUALIZATION OF CATECHOLAMINE-FLUORESCENT NERVE-CELL BODIES IN THE RAT-BRAIN AFTER COLCHICINE TREATMENT', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 52 287-292 (1984)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(84)90176-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 10
1984 GOODCHILD AK, MOON EA, DAMPNEY RAL, HOWE PRC, 'EVIDENCE THAT ADRENALINE NEURONS IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLA HAVE A VASOPRESSOR FUNCTION', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 45 267-272 (1984)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(84)90237-4
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 84
1984 CHALMERS JP, MINSON J, DENOROY L, STEAD B, HOWE PRC, 'BRAIN-STEM PNMT NEURONS AND EXPERIMENTAL-HYPERTENSION IN THE RAT', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION PART A-THEORY AND PRACTICE, 6 243-258 (1984)
DOI 10.3109/10641968409062563
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 13
1984 Howe PRC, 'Influence of sodium on neural control of blood pressure in animal models', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Australia, 9 27-34 (1984) [C3]
1983 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, KING RA, SMITH RM, 'A BIOCHEMICAL AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CENTRAL SEROTONIN NERVES IN RATS WITH CHRONIC THIAMINE-DEFICIENCY', BRAIN RESEARCH, 270 19-28 (1983)
DOI 10.1016/0006-8993(83)90787-4
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
1983 HOWE PRC, KUHN DM, MINSON JB, STEAD BH, CHALMERS JP, 'EVIDENCE FOR A BULBOSPINAL SEROTONERGIC PRESSOR PATHWAY IN THE RAT-BRAIN', BRAIN RESEARCH, 270 29-36 (1983)
DOI 10.1016/0006-8993(83)90788-6
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 143
1983 HOWE PRC, MOON E, DAMPNEY RAL, 'DISTRIBUTION OF SEROTONIN NERVE-CELLS IN THE RABBIT BRAIN-STEM', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 38 125-130 (1983)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(83)90028-9
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 29
1983 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, KING RA, SMITH RM, 'ELEVATION OF BLOOD-PRESSURE IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS AFTER LESIONING SEROTONIN NERVES IN THE DORSOMEDIAL MEDULLA-OBLONGATA', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 10 273-277 (1983)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1983.tb00196.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 7
1982 HOWE PRC, CUELLO AC, COSTA M, FURNESS JB, 'IMPROVED IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL VISUALIZATION OF CENTRAL SEROTONIN NERVES AFTER LOADING WITH 5,7-DIHYDROXYTRYPTAMINE', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 29 1-6 (1982)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(82)90354-8
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 15
1982 HOWE PRC, STEAD BH, LOVENBERG W, CHALMERS JP, 'EFFECTS OF CENTRAL SEROTONIN NERVE LESIONS ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN NORMOTENSIVE AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 9 335-339 (1982)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1982.tb00817.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 14
1982 LIVETT BG, DAY R, ELDE RP, HOWE PRC, 'CO-STORAGE OF ENKEPHALINS AND ADRENALINE IN THE BOVINE ADRENAL-MEDULLA', NEUROSCIENCE, 7 1323-1332 (1982)
DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(82)91138-1
Citations Scopus - 97Web of Science - 157
1982 Howe PRC, 'Visualisation of central 5 hyroxytryptamine nerves', Proceedings of the Australian Physiological and Pharmacological Society, 13 60-65 (1982) [C3]
1982 Howe PRC, Stead BH, Lovenberg W, Chalmers JP, 'Effects of central serotonin nerve lesions on blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 9 335-339 (1982)

Separate ascending and descending pathways of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) nerves in the rat central nervous system have been selectively lesioned by localized intracereb... [more]

Separate ascending and descending pathways of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) nerves in the rat central nervous system have been selectively lesioned by localized intracerebral administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) after pretreatment with desipramine (DMI). Bilateral injections of 5,7-DHT into the medial forebrain bundle or the cervical spinal cord caused extensive losses of 5-HT and tryptophan hydroxylase in the anterior hypothalamus and thoracic spinal cord, respectively, without affecting noradrenaline (NA) levels. The hypothalamic lesions caused only a slight, transient reduction of systolic blood pressure in normotensive rats. A more pronounced and sustained hypotension occurred in normotensive rats but not in hypertensive rats after the spinal lesions.

Citations Scopus - 9
1981 HOWE PRC, LOVENBERG W, CHALMERS JP, 'INCREASED NUMBER OF PNMT-IMMUNOFLUORESCENT NERVE-CELL BODIES IN THE MEDULLA-OBLONGATA OF STROKE-PRONE HYPERTENSIVE RATS', BRAIN RESEARCH, 205 123-130 (1981)
DOI 10.1016/0006-8993(81)90724-1
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 40
1981 HOWE PRC, WEST MJ, PROVIS JC, CHALMERS JP, 'CONTENT AND TURNOVER OF NORADRENALINE IN SPINAL-CORD AND CEREBELLUM OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE AND STROKE-PRONE RATS', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 73 123-129 (1981)
DOI 10.1016/0014-2999(81)90083-2
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 25
1981 BUNE AJ, CHALMERS JP, GRAHAM J, HOWE PRC, WEST MJ, WING LMH, 'DOUBLE-BLIND TRIAL COMPARING GUANFACINE AND METHYLDOPA IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL-HYPERTENSION', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 19 309-315 (1981)
DOI 10.1007/BF00544579
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 13
1981 CHALMERS JP, HOWE PRC, WALLMANN Y, TUMULS I, 'ADRENALINE NEURONS AND PNMT ACTIVITY IN THE BRAIN AND SPINAL-CORD OF GENETICALLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS AND RATS WITH DOCA-SALT HYPERTENSION', CLINICAL SCIENCE, 61 S219-S221 (1981)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 5
1981 HOWE PRC, WEST MJ, CHALMERS JP, 'ALTERED CARDIAC NORADRENALINE STORES IN DOCA-SALT HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 8 83-87 (1981)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1981.tb00137.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
1981 HOWE PRC, PROVIS JC, FURNESS JB, COSTA M, CHALMERS JP, 'RESIDUAL CATECHOLAMINES IN EXTRINSICALLY DENERVATED GUINEA-PIG ILEUM', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 8 327-333 (1981)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1981.tb00736.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 5
1981 HOWE PRC, STEAD BH, CHALMERS JP, 'CENTRAL 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE AND TRYPTOPHAN-HYDROXYLASE IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 8 408-408 (1981)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
1981 CHALMERS JP, HOWE PRC, COSTA M, FURNESS J, LOVENBERG W, WALLMAN Y, 'ADRENALINE SYNTHESIZING NERVE-CELLS IN THE MEDULLA OF NORMOTENSIVE AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 8 459-462 (1981)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1981.tb00749.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
1981 CHALMERS JP, BLESSING WW, WEST MJ, HOWE PRC, COSTA M, FURNESS JB, 'IMPORTANCE OF NEW CATECHOLAMINE PATHWAYS IN CONTROL OF BLOOD-PRESSURE', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION, 3 393-416 (1981)
DOI 10.3109/10641968109033673
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 27
1981 Chalmers JP, Howe PRC, Wallmann Y, Tumuls I, 'Adrenaline neurons and PNMT activity in the brain and spinal cord of genetically hypertensive rats and rats with DOCA-salt hypertension', Clinical Science, 61 219S-221S (1981)
Citations Scopus - 2
1981 Howe PRC, Provis JC, Furness JB, Costa M, Chalmers JP, 'Residual catecholamines in extrinsically denervated guinea-pig ileum', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 8 327-333 (1981)

Concentrations of noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine were measured in the submucosa and myenteric plexus of innervated and extrinsically denervated guinea-pig ileum using a se... [more]

Concentrations of noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine were measured in the submucosa and myenteric plexus of innervated and extrinsically denervated guinea-pig ileum using a sensitive radioisotope enzymatic assay for catecholamines. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that the microsomal fraction obtained from both layers of the normal ileum was greatly enriched with noradrenaline compared to the total homogenate. Low levels of adrenaline and dopamine were also detected in both layers of the ileum. After extrinsic denervation of pretreatment with reserpine, noradrenaline was reduced to less than 3% and could no longer be visualized histochemically. Small proportions of the adrenaline and dopamine also disappeared after extrinsic denervation. The residual amounts of noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine present after extrinsic denervation were not sensitive to reserpine and were not concentrated in microsomal fractions, suggesting that these amines are not stored as neurotransmitters in intrinsic neurons of the intestine.

Citations Scopus - 2
1981 Howe PRC, Stead BH, Chalmers JP, 'Central 5-hydroxytryptamine and tryptophan hydroxylase in hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 8 408 (1981)
1981 Chalmers JP, Howe PRC, Costa M, Furness J, Lovenberg W, Wallman Y, 'Adrenaline synthesizing nerve cells in the medulla of normotensive and hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 8 459-462 (1981)

We have studied the number and distribution of adrenaline synthesizing nerve cells in the medulla oblongata of the rat, using a combination of immunofluorescence to visualize the ... [more]

We have studied the number and distribution of adrenaline synthesizing nerve cells in the medulla oblongata of the rat, using a combination of immunofluorescence to visualize the enzyme phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and catecholamine fluorescence to detect central catecholamines. The distribution of adrenaline synthesizing nerve cells was similar in normotensive (Wistar Kyoto) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats, and stroke-prone rats. Few of the cells visualized by PNMT immunofluorescence were detected by the Faglu fluorescence method for catecholamines. The C1 (ventrolateral) and C2 (dorsomedial) groups of PNMT cells were anatomically distinct from the A1 and A2 groups of catecholamine fluorescent cells and lay rostral to these cells within the medulla. There was a third group of adrenaline synthesizing cells close to the midline in the rostral medulla, and we have called this the C3 group. There was a 32% increase in the number of PNMT cells in the medulla of 4-week-old stroke-prone rats. PNMT enzyme activity in a cross-segment of the medulla containing the adrenaline synthesizing cells was also increased by 30% in both spontaneous hypertensive rats and stroke-prone rats.

Citations Scopus - 3
1981 Howe PRC, West MJ, Chalmers JP, 'Altered cardiac noradrenaline stores in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 8 83-86 (1981)

The storage of noradrenaline (NA) in hearts of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was examined after in vivo administration of labelled NA. The cardiac NA concentration and the neuronal ... [more]

The storage of noradrenaline (NA) in hearts of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was examined after in vivo administration of labelled NA. The cardiac NA concentration and the neuronal NA storage capacity were reduced in these rats compared with normotensive controls. The extent of reduction was dependent on the duration of hypertension. These findings are similar to observations on spontaneously hypertensive rats and support the hypothesis that storage of the cardiac sympathetic transmitter is impaired in DOCA-salt hypertension.

Citations Scopus - 2
1980 Furness JB, Costa M, Howe PR, 'Intrinsic amine-handling neurons in the intestine.', Advances in biochemical psychopharmacology, 25 367-372 (1980)
Citations Scopus - 3
1980 HOWE PRC, PROVIS JC, WEST MJ, CHALMERS JP, 'INCREASED NORADRENALINE (NA) CONCENTRATION IN CEREBELLUM AND SPINAL-CORD OF STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 7 63-63 (1980)
1980 HOWE PRC, COSTA M, FURNESS JB, CHALMERS JP, 'SIMULTANEOUS DEMONSTRATION OF PHENYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE IMMUNOFLUORESCENT AND CATECHOLAMINE FLUORESCENT NERVE-CELL BODIES IN THE RAT MEDULLA-OBLONGATA', NEUROSCIENCE, 5 2229-2238 (1980)
DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(80)90139-6
Citations Scopus - 121Web of Science - 184
1979 HOWE PRC, PROVIS JC, WEST MJ, CHALMERS JP, 'CHANGES IN CARDIAC NOREPINEPHRINE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE AND STROKE-PRONE RATS', JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOLOGY, 1 115-122 (1979)
DOI 10.1097/00005344-197901000-00011
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 34
1979 HOWE PRC, CHALMERS JP, MULLER J, PROVIS JC, WEST MJ, 'HISTAMINE LEVELS IN BRAIN, SPINAL-CORD AND HEART OF GENETICALLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 6 216-217 (1979)
1979 Howe PRC, West MJ, Chalmers JP, Provis JC, 'Histamine and noradrenaline in the heart of genetic hypertensive rats', Japanese Heart Journal, 20 325-327 (1979) [C3]
1979 Howe PRC, Provis JC, West MJ, Chalmers JP, 'Changes in cardiac norepinephrine in spontaneously hypertensive and stroke-prone rats', Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 1 115-122 (1979)

The norepinephrine (NE) concentration of cardiac ventricles was determined by radioenzymatic assay in normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), ... [more]

The norepinephrine (NE) concentration of cardiac ventricles was determined by radioenzymatic assay in normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and stroke-prone rats (SPR) at 3-6, 14-19, and over 31 weeks of age. There was no difference between strains prior to hypertension, but a progressive decrease in cardiac NE concentration occurred in SHR and particularly in SPR relative to WKY after hypertension was established. This decrease was not due to cardiac hypertrophy. The cardiac neuronal NE storage capacity in rats over 31 weeks of age was analyzed by determining the maximum concentration of NE obtained in a cardiac microsomal fraction, after saturation in vivo with exogenous NE. The results indicated that, aftera long period of hypertension, there was a reduction in cardiac NE storage capacity resulting from a loss either of sympathetic nerve endings or of storage vesicles. Moreover, in addition to this reduction in the total size of the cardiac NE store, there was an independent reduction in the degree of filling of this store in both SHR and SPR. This could reflect an increased turnover of cardiac NE in chronically hypertensive SHR and SPR. © 1979 Raven Press, New York.

Citations Scopus - 6
1979 Howe PRC, Chalmers JP, Muller J, 'Histamine levels in brain, spinal cord and heart of genetically hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 6 216-217 (1979)
1978 BLESSING WW, CHALMERS JP, HOWE PRC, 'DISTRIBUTION OF CATECHOLAMINE-CONTAINING CELL BODIES IN RABBIT CENTRAL NERVOUS-SYSTEM', JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, 179 407-423 (1978)
DOI 10.1002/cne.901790210
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 140
1978 MALTA E, HOWE PRC, LLOYD JC, CHALMERS JP, 'EFFECTS OF INTRA-VENTRICULAR INJECTIONS OF HISTAMINE ON ARTERIAL BLOOD-PRESSURE AND HEART-RATE IN CONSCIOUS RABBITS', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 5 277-277 (1978)
1978 Blessing WW, Chalmers JP, Howe PRC, 'Distribution of catecholamine-containing cell bodies in the rabbit central nervous system', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 179 407-423 (1978)

A recently developed fluorescence histochemical technique, which both fixes the brain in situ and converts catecholamines to fluorescent derivatives, has been utilised to study th... [more]

A recently developed fluorescence histochemical technique, which both fixes the brain in situ and converts catecholamines to fluorescent derivatives, has been utilised to study the distribution of catecholamine-containing cell bodies in the central nervous system of the rabbit, a species particularly suited to cardiovascular investigation. Catecholamine-containing cells are widely distributed through the brain stem but are absent from the spinal cord, the cerebellum and the telencephalon. In the medulla the cells form separate ventrolateral and dorsomedial groups, while pontine cells form a continuous group, comprising cells of the locus coeruleus, the subcoeruleus and the ventrolateral pontine area. Fluorescent cells are widely distributed in the midbrain including an extensive group in the substantia nigra and a smaller dorsal group in the central gray matter just ventral to the aqueduct. Nearly all fluorescent forebrain cells are found in the hypothalamus, in the arcuate nucleus and in the more caudal regions of the dorsal hypothalamus. Although the general arrangement of the catecholamine-containing cells is similar to that of the rat there are some readily appreciated differences. Ventrolateral medullary cells are more tightly grouped in the rabbit and dorsomedial medullary cells extend further rostrally, some being found within the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Locus coeruleus cells are more loosely arranged in the rabbit and the subcoeruleus group is more extensive. Midbrain cells are closely comparable but the caudal thalamic group described in the rat is less extensive in the rabbit.

Citations Scopus - 11
1978 Malta E, Howe PRC, Lloyd JC, Chalmers JP, 'Effects of intraventricular injections of histamine on arterial blood pressure and heart rate in conscious rabbits', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 5 277 (1978)
1977 HOWE PRC, TELFER JA, LIVETT BG, AUSTIN L, 'EXTRAJUNCTIONAL ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS IN DYSTROPHIC MOUSE MUSCLES', EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY, 56 42-51 (1977)
DOI 10.1016/0014-4886(77)90137-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 5
1977 HOWE PRC, FENWICK EM, ROSTAS JAP, LIVETT BG, 'IMMUNOCHEMICAL COMPARISON OF SYNAPTIC PLASMA-MEMBRANE AND SYNAPTIC VESICLE MEMBRANE ANTIGENS', JOURNAL OF NEUROCYTOLOGY, 6 339-352 (1977)
DOI 10.1007/BF01175195
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Rostas
1976 HOWE PRC, LIVETT BG, AUSTIN L, 'INCREASED BINDING OF ALPHA-BUNGAROTOXIN IN DYSTROPHIC MOUSE MUSCLE', EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY, 51 132-140 (1976)
DOI 10.1016/0014-4886(76)90058-3
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 10
1976 HOWE PRC, TELFER JA, AUSTIN L, 'BINDING-SITES FOR I-125-LABELED ALPHA-BUNGAROTOXIN IN NORMAL AND DENERVATED MOUSE MUSCLE', EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY, 52 272-284 (1976)
DOI 10.1016/0014-4886(76)90171-0
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
1976 FILLENZ M, HOWE PRC, WEST DP, 'VESICULAR NORADRENALINE IN NERVE-TERMINALS OF RAT-HEART FOLLOWING INHIBITION OF MONOAMINE-OXIDASE AND ADMINISTRATION OF NORADRENALINE', NEUROSCIENCE, 1 113-116 (1976)
DOI 10.1016/0306-4522(76)90005-1
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 15
1975 FILLENZ M, HOWE PRC, 'DEPLETION OF NORADRENALINE STORES IN SYMPATHETIC-NERVE TERMINALS', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 24 683-688 (1975)
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 22
1975 HOWE PRC, ROSTAS JAP, FENWICK EM, LIVETT BG, 'FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR INCORPORATION OF SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTEINS INTO SYNAPTOSOMAL PLASMA-MEMBRANES', PROCEEDINGS OF THE AUSTRALIAN BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY, 8 95-95 (1975)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Rostas
1975 Fillenz M, Howe PRC, 'Depletion of noradrenaline stores in sympathetic nerve terminals', Journal of Neurochemistry, 24 683-688 (1975)
Citations Scopus - 11
1972 CRIPPS H, HOWE PRC, DEARNALE D, 'ENHANCEMENT OF NORADRENALINE DEPLETION IN CAT SPLEEN BY PHENOXYBENZAMINE AND PHENTOLAMINE', BRITISH JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, 46 358-& (1972)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 7
1971 Fillenz M, Howe PR, 'The contribution of small and large vesicles to noradrenaline release.', Journal of Physiology, 212 42P-43P (1971)
Citations Scopus - 1
1971 Fillenz M, Howe PR, 'Increase in the vesicular noradrenaline of nerve terminals.', Journal of Physiology, 217 27P-28P (1971)
Citations Scopus - 4
1971 Fillenz M, Howe PR, 'Life cycle of vesicles in sympathetic nerve terminals.', Journal of Physiology, 218 67P-68P (1971)
Citations Scopus - 4
Show 273 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Tsiros MD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, Grimshaw PN, Buckley JD, 'Obesity: The new childhood disability?', Obesity Reviews (2011) [D1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2009.00706.x
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 25

Conference (59 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wong RHX, Jnasen L, Nealon R, Garg ML, Howe PRC, 'A PILOT INVESTIGATION OF CEREBROVASCULAR RESPONSIVENESS TO A NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL TEST BATTERY IN ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS', HYPERTENSION (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Rachel Wong
2015 Wong RHX, Nealon R, Scholey A, Howe PRC, 'Dose response effect of resveratrol on cerebrovascular function in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus', Proceedings of the 2015 Resveratrol Regional Meeting Dijon France (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2015 Wong RHX, Nealon R, Scholey A, Howe PRC, 'Resveratrol consumption improves cerebrovascular function in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2015 Barbour JA, Stojanovski E, Moran LJ, Howe PRC, Coates AM, 'Effect of adding peanuts to the diet on snacking behaviour and total energy intake', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
2015 Fulton AS, Coates AM, Williams MT, Howe PRC, Frith PA, Wood LG, et al., 'Feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of fish oil supplementation in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Lisa Wood
2015 Nealon R, Howe PRC, Jansen L, Garg ML, Wong RHX, 'Impaired cerebrovascular responsiveness to a working memory task in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Wong, Manohar Garg
2015 Watson N, Dyer K, Buckley J, Brinkworth G, Coates A, Parfitt G, et al., 'Low-Fat Diets Differing in Protein and Carbohydrate Content on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes', FASEB JOURNAL (2015) [E3]
2015 Watson N, Dyer K, Buckley J, Brinkworth G, Coates A, Parfitt G, et al., 'Psychological wellbeing in adults with type 2 diabetes following weight loss and weight maintenance', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
2015 Howe PRC, 'Benefits of Omega-3: Heart health and beyond', Blackmores Institute Symposium 2015 Workbook (2015) [E3]
2015 Howe PRC, 'Rapid Research Highlights: Boosting Circulation in the Brain', Blackmores Institute Symposium 2015 Workbook (2015) [E3]
2015 evans H, wong R, Howe PRC, 'Is cognitive impairment in post-menopausal women attributable to poor cerebral perfusion? Baseline results of the ResFem Study', Book of Abstracts (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Wong
2015 Wong RHX, Nealon R, Jansen L, Garg M, Howe PRC, 'Cerebrovascular responsiveness to cognitive stimuli in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus', Combined Abstracts of the 2015 Australian Psychology Conferences (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Wong, Manohar Garg
2015 Howe PRC, 'Understanding Olive Oil - Health Claims and Health Benefits', Conference Program (2015) [E3]
2015 Coates AM, Fitzsimmons TR, Chee B, Park B, Howe PRC, Kapellas K, et al., 'Is fish oil effective as an adjunct therapy for non-surgical treatment of periodontitis?', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2015) [E3]
2015 Howe PRC, 'Bioactive Dietary Polyphenols - Cardiometabolic and Cognitive Outcomes', Yes (2015) [E3]
2014 Coates AM, Cai S, Burres L, Berry NM, Buckley JD, Beltrame J, et al., 'Relationship between erythrocyte content of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and depression in patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure.', Poster abstracts (ISSFAL) 2014 Congress (2014) [E3]
2014 Fan C, Georgiou KR, McKinnon RA, Keefe DM, Howe PR, Xian CJ, 'ADVERSE EFFECTS OF COMBINATION BREAST CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY ON BONE AND BONE MARROW', OSTEOPOROSIS INTERNATIONAL (2014) [E3]
2014 Howe PRC, 'Circulatory effects of bioactive nutrients deliver cardio-metabolic and cognitive benefits', Nutrients (2014) [E3]
2014 Barbour J, Howe PRC, Buckley J, Bryan J, Coates A, 'Consuming Hi-oleic peanuts for 12 weeks can increase energy intake without change in body composition', Book of abstracts (2014) [E3]
2013 Coates A, Barbour J, Buckley J, Bryan J, Howe P, 'Hi-Oleic peanut preload lowers energy intake and energy density of a subsequent meal', FASEB JOURNAL (2013) [E3]
2013 Barbour JA, Howe PRC, Buckley JD, Bryan J, Coates AM, 'Effect of peanut consumption on satiety and energy intake', FASEB JOURNAL (2013) [E3]
2012 Wong RHX, Berry NM, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'REGULAR CONSUMPTION OF A WILD GREEN OAT EXTRACT ENHANCES SYSTEMIC AND CEREBRAL VASODILATOR FUNCTION', HYPERTENSION (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 2
2012 Coates A, Bartold M, Hughes T, Howe P, 'Fish oil supplementation as adjunct therapy for periodontitis', FASEB JOURNAL (2012) [E3]
2009 Davison K, Berry NM, Coates AM, Misan G, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'IS THERE A THRESHOLD EFFECT OF FLAVANOL RICH COCOA ON BLOOD PRESSURE?', HYPERTENSION (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2009 Howe P, Buckley J, 'DIETARY REQUIREMENTS FOR OMEGA-6 AND OMEGA-3 PUFAS - IS THE BALANCE RELEVANT?', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2009 Head G, Mihailidou S, Duggan K, Beilin L, Berry N, Cowley D, et al., 'RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AMBULATORY AND CLINIC BLOOD PRESSURE: A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA INITIATIVE', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION (2009) [E3]
2009 Thorp AA, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Mori TA, Hodgson J, Mansour J, et al., 'EFFECTS OF SOY PROTEIN AND ISOFLAVONE INTAKE ON ARTERIAL FUNCTION', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION (2009) [E3]
2008 Solowij N, Grenyer B, Meyer B, Howe P, 'Increased suicide risk in depressed patients predicted by long-chain fatty acids', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (2008) [E3]
2008 Coates A, Pettman T, Buckley J, Misan G, Howe P, 'Health Benefits of a Group Based Diet and Lifestyle Modification Program for Metabolic Syndrome', OBESITY (2008) [E3]
2008 Davison K, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Howe PRC, 'SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF COCOA FLAVANOLS AND EXERCISE ON CARDIO-METABOLIC RISK FACTORS IN OVERWEIGHT/OBESE SUBJECTS', HYPERTENSION (2008) [E3]
2008 Berry N, Davison K, Buckley JD, Coates AM, Howe PRC, 'Flavanol-rich cocoa attenuates blood pressure responsiveness to exercise', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION (2008) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2007 Hill AM, Coates AM, Buckley JD, Ross R, Thielecke F, Howe PRC, 'Can EGCG reduce abdominal fat in obese subjects?', Journal of the American College of Nutrition (2007)

Objective: To evaluate metabolic effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) supplementation when combined with a program of regular aerobic exercise in overweight/obese post-menop... [more]

Objective: To evaluate metabolic effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) supplementation when combined with a program of regular aerobic exercise in overweight/obese post-menopausal women. Methods: Thirty-eight overweight or obese postmenopausal women exercised at moderate intensity, viz. walking three times per week for 45 min at 75% of age-predicted maximum heart rate (HR), and took a 150 mg capsule of EGCG (Teavigo®) or placebo (lactose) twice daily for 12 weeks. Blood parameters (lipids, glucose and insulin), blood pressure, heart rate, arterial function and anthropometry were assessed at 0, 6 and 12 wk. At wk 0 and 12, body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal fat was assessed by DXA and computed tomography (CT). Results: Waist circumference (p < 0.01), total body fat (p < 0.02), abdominal fat (by DXA) (p < 0.01) and intra abdominal adipose tissue (by CT) (p < 0.01) were reduced in both treatment groups, with no difference between placebo and Teavigo®. Teavigo® significantly decreased resting HR (p < 0.01) and reduced plasma glucose in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Moderate consumption of EGCG can improve the health status of overweight individuals undergoing regular exercise by reducing HR and plasma glucose concentrations. Loss of body fat, however, may require a higher intake of EGCG, other catechins or addition of metabolic stimulants.

Citations Scopus - 59
2005 Saint DA, Murphy K, Howe P, Ninio D, 'Dietary fish oil protects against stretch-induced atrial fibrillation in a rabbit model', FASEB JOURNAL (2005)
2004 Elliott M, McLennan P, Howe P, 'Dietary modification of hypertension induced cardiac damage', JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR CARDIOLOGY (2004)
2004 Howe PRC, Meyer BJ, 'Lipid-lowering effectiveness of soy protein diets - Is it defined by equol-producing status?', JOURNAL OF NUTRITION (2004)
2003 Ridges L, Martin G, Larkin T, Meyer B, Howe P, 'The effect of the combination of an omega-3 supplement together with soy isoflavone consumption on cardiovascular risk factors in combined hyperlipidaemic subjects', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY (2003)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2002 Howe PRC, 'Modifying foods to meet fatty acid requirements', Proceedings of International Conference on Essential Fatty Acids and Human Nutrition and Health (2002) [E3]
2002 Howe PRC, 'Synergy between Omega-3 fatty acids and Cardiovascular Drugs', Proceedings of international workshop on omega-3 fatty acids & primary prevention of coronary heart disease (2002) [E3]
2002 Meyer BJ, Larkin TA, Owen AJ, Astheimer LB, Tapsell LC, Howe PRC, 'Improvement in plasma lipid levels (including lipoprotein (a)) after chronic soy consumption may be linked to equol', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002)
2002 Howe PRC, Grigonis-Deane E, 'Omega-3 enrichment of chicken', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002)
2002 Howe PRC, 'Nutrient-drug synergies to optimise therapeutic benefit', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002)
1999 Howe PRC, Clifton PM, James MJ, 'Equal antithrombotic and triglyceride-lowering effectiveness of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich and docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil supplements', LIPIDS (1999)
DOI 10.1007/BF02562326
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
1999 Howe PRC, Clifton PM, James MJ, 'Equal antithrombotic and triglyceride-lowering effectiveness of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich and docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil supplements', Lipids (1999)
Citations Scopus - 16
1998 Howe PRC, 'omega 3-enriched pork', RETURN OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS INTO THE FOOD SUPPLY (1998)
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
1998 Howe PRC, 'omega 3 fatty acids - An Australian perspective', RETURN OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS INTO THE FOOD SUPPLY (1998)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
1997 Howe PRC, 'Dietary fats and hypertension - Focus on fish oil', LIPIDS AND SYNDROMES OF INSULIN RESISTANCE (1997)
DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb51846.x
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 27
1997 Lungershausen YK, Howe PRC, Clifton PM, Hughes CRT, Phillips P, Graham JJ, Thomas DW, 'Evaluation of an omega-3 fatty acid supplement in diabetics with microalbuminuria', LIPIDS AND SYNDROMES OF INSULIN RESISTANCE (1997)
DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb51848.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
1996 Howe PRC, Abbey M, Topping DL, Belling B, Illman R, 'Enrichment of pork with omega-3 fatty acids from fishmeal', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, VOL 20 (1996)
Citations Web of Science - 2
1995 HOWE PRC, 'CAN WE RECOMMEND FISH-OIL FOR HYPERTENSION', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY (1995)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1995.tb01980.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
1995 Howe PRC, 'Can we recommend fish oil for hypertension?', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology (1995)

1. The ability of the n-3 fatty acids in fish oil to lower blood pressure has been established. Dietary fish oil supplementation is effective in mild hypertension and, in certain ... [more]

1. The ability of the n-3 fatty acids in fish oil to lower blood pressure has been established. Dietary fish oil supplementation is effective in mild hypertension and, in certain cases, as an adjunct therapy in drug-treated hypertension. Efficacy may be enhanced by restricting sodium intake. 2. The overall benefit of fish oil in hypertension, however, has not yet been fully evaluated. We still need further information on the relative efficacy of individual omega-3 fatty acids and on additional cardiovascular benefits and possible disadvantages of increasing their consumption.

Citations Scopus - 15
1994 McMurchie EJ, Burnard SL, Patten GS, Smith RM, Head RJ, Howe PRC, 'Sodium transport activity in cheek epithelial cells from adolescents at increased risk of hypertension', Journal of Human Hypertension (1994)

Sodium transport including amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ antiporter activity was measured in cheek epithelial cells of adolescents displaying either high or low BP tracking character... [more]

Sodium transport including amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ antiporter activity was measured in cheek epithelial cells of adolescents displaying either high or low BP tracking characteristics and in a subgroup of high BP tracking adolescents exhibiting a positive family history of hypertension. From the BP tracking behaviour of over 500 adolescents measured over a period of three years, 24 low BP tracking and 29 high BP tracking adolescents were recruited for the study. Cheek cells were collected from these subjects and proton-dependent, amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ antiporter activity and the response of this antiporter to a proton gradient were measured. Cheek cell Na+/H+ antiporter activity was 50% lower (P = 0.0004) in the high BP tracking group (1.02 ± 0.15 nmol Na+/mg protein/5 min (mean ± SEM) compared with the activity in the low BP tracking group (2.05 ± 0.24). A significantly lower Na+/H+ antiporter activity (69%; P < 0.01) was also apparent in the high BP tracking adolescents with family history of hypertension (n = 7) compared with the low BP tracking group. The graded response of cheek cell Na+/H+ antiporter activity to the proton gradient was 58% lower (P = 0.0039) for adolescents in the high BP tracking group compared with the low BP tracking group. Passive Na+ influx was also significantly lower in the cheek cells of the high BP tracking group. Our results therefore show that the activity of the Na+/H+ antiporter in cheek cells and the passive Na+ transport activity are lower in those adolescents considered at greatest risk of future development of essential hypertension. These findings parallel recent observations in cheek cells from adult essential hypertensive subjects.

Citations Scopus - 2
1993 MCMURCHIE EJ, BURNARD SL, PATTEN GS, SMITH RM, HEAD RJ, HOWE PRC, 'HUMAN CHEEK EPITHELIAL-CELL SODIUM-TRANSPORT ACTIVITY IN ESSENTIAL-HYPERTENSION', JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION (1993)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 4
1993 Jablonskis LT, Howe PRC, 'Vasopressin compensates for acute loss of sympathetic pressor tone in spontaneously hypertensive rats', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology (1993)

The aim of this study was to examine the pressor response of vasopressin (AVP) to an acute fall in blood pressure induced by ganglion blockade. Aortic catheters were implanted in ... [more]

The aim of this study was to examine the pressor response of vasopressin (AVP) to an acute fall in blood pressure induced by ganglion blockade. Aortic catheters were implanted in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), stroke-prone SHR (SHRSP), normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), black-hooded Wistar (BHW) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, aged 5-7 weeks and 7-9 months, for direct measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) under conscious, resting conditions. The ganglion blocking agent pentolinium was administered intra-arterially, followed by an AVP receptor antagonist specific for the pressor effect of AVP. The basal level of MAP attained with each drug was recorded. In the adult SHR and SHRSP with established hypertension, acute ganglion blockade caused MAP to fall to a similar extent as in WKY, suggesting that the level of sympathetic pressor tone was similar in all three strains. Administration of the AVP antagonist alone did not affect resting MAP. During ganglion blockade, however, it caused a further reduction of MAP in WKY, SHR and SHRSP, the magnitude of which was greater in the hypertensive strains. After both drugs, the total fall in MAP and the residual MAP were significantly greater in the hypertensive rats. In young rats, AVP had little effect on MAP, even during ganglion blockade. The residual level of MAP after both drugs was greater in the hypertensive strains. The extent to which AVP can compensate for an acute fall in MAP increases with age and the development of hypertension. This tends to mask the loss of sympathetic mediated pressor tone after ganglion blockade. By preventing this compensation we have shown that the sympathetically mediated component of blood pressure is elevated in SHRSP with established hypertension.

Citations Scopus - 6
1991 COBIAC L, NESTEL PJ, WING LMH, HOWE PRC, 'EFFECTS OF DIETARY-SODIUM RESTRICTION AND FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTS ON BLOOD-PRESSURE IN THE ELDERLY', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY (1991)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1991.tb01442.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 15
1991 HOWE PRC, ROGERS PF, LUNGERSHAUSEN Y, 'BLOOD-PRESSURE REDUCTION BY FISH OIL IN ADULT-RATS WITH ESTABLISHED HYPERTENSION - DEPENDENCE ON SODIUM-INTAKE', PROSTAGLANDINS LEUKOTRIENES AND ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS (1991)
DOI 10.1016/0952-3278(91)90193-9
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 19
1991 HEAD RJ, MANO MT, BEXIS S, HOWE PRC, SMITH RM, 'DIETARY FISH OIL ADMINISTRATION RETARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF HYPERTENSION AND INFLUENCES VASCULAR NEUROEFFECTOR FUNCTION IN THE STROKE-PRONE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RAT (SHRSP)', PROSTAGLANDINS LEUKOTRIENES AND ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS (1991)
DOI 10.1016/0952-3278(91)90194-A
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 25
1991 Cobiac L, Nestel PJ, Wing LMH, Howe PRC, 'Effects of dietary sodium restriction and fish oil supplements on blood pressure in the elderly', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology (1991)

The effects on blood pressure of dietary fish oil, sodium restriction and a combination of both strategies were examined in a short-term dietary intervention study of 50 healthy e... [more]

The effects on blood pressure of dietary fish oil, sodium restriction and a combination of both strategies were examined in a short-term dietary intervention study of 50 healthy elderly subjects (average age 67 years) with mean initial systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 133 and 77 mmHg, respectively. Subjects were allocated to one of four treatment groups: fish oil with normal sodium, fish oil with low sodium, sunflower oil with normal sodium and sunflower oil with low sodium for 4 weeks. They then crossed over to the alternative sodium treatment for a further 4 weeks whilst remaining on the same oil. The combination of fish oil supplementation with dietary sodium restriction caused significant reductions of blood pressure in the first 4 weeks: systolic blood pressure (SBP) fell by 8.9 mmHg, mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 7.4 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 6.0 mmHg. Fish oil enhanced the effect of sodium restriction on blood pressure. In the crossover protocol, a change in sodium excretion of 92 mmol/day was accompanied by changes of 6.4, 3.3 and 2.2 mmHg for SBP, MAP and DBP, respectively, in the subjects taking fish oil. However in those taking sunflower oil, blood pressure did not change significantly. The results indicate beneficial interactive effect of dietary fish oil and sodium intake on blood pressure.

Citations Scopus - 12
1990 Howe PRC, Rogers PF, Lungerhausen Y, 'Early increase of pressor sensitivity to vasoconstrictors in stroke-prone hypertensive rats', European Journal of Pharmacology (1990)
Citations Scopus - 1
1989 HOWE PRC, HEAD RJ, SMITH RM, 'HIGH DIETARY-SODIUM INTAKE COUNTERACTS ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECT OF FISH OIL IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, VOL 14 (1989)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 59
Total funding $14,983,346

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20162 grants / $111,944

Resveratrol to promote healthy ageing in postmenopausal women$96,000

Funding body: Evolva SA

Funding body Evolva SA
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600602
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Assisting post-menopausal women towards healthy ageing – can resveratrol enhance mood, physical function and cerebrovascular function and counteract cognitive decline?$15,944

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products AG

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products AG
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600385
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

20151 grants / $35,000

Effects of long-chain Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCn-3PUFA) supplementation on cerebral circulation and cognitive function$35,000

Funding body: Westfund Health

Funding body Westfund Health
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500894
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20144 grants / $143,860

Pork consumption and serum irisin levels in type 2 diabetes$50,300

Funding body: CRC for High Integrity Australian Pork

Funding body CRC for High Integrity Australian Pork
Project Team Professor Manohar Garg, Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong
Scheme Innovative Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400612
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Dose response evaluation of resveratrol supplementation on cerebrovascular function, mood and cognitive performance in type 2 diabetes mellitus$45,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong, Professor Andrew Scholey
Scheme Dementia Collaborative Research Centres (DCRC)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400899
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Assisting post-menopausal women towards healthy ageing - can resveratrol enhance mood and counteract cognitive decline?$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong, Professor Andrew Scholey
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401413
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Dose response evaluation of resveratrol supplementation on cerebrovascular function, mood and cognitive performance in type 2 diabetes mellitus$23,560

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products AG

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products AG
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Doctor Rachel Wong, Professor Manohar Garg, Professor Andrew Scholey
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400950
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

20133 grants / $290,000

Clinical evaluation of a novel olive leaf formulation for heart health$165,000

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Professor Peter Howe, Professor Manohar Garg, Doctor Rachel Wong, Associate Professor Lisa Wood
Scheme Administered Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401244
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Towards a fish oil-based omega-3 therapy for preventing bone loss during chronic methotrexate chemotherapy$75,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Fund

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Fund
Project Team

Cory Xian

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Lipemic Index of Pork$50,000

Funding body: CRC for High Integrity Australian Pork

Funding body CRC for High Integrity Australian Pork
Project Team Professor Manohar Garg, Associate Professor Lisa Wood, Professor Peter Howe
Scheme Innovative Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201031
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20122 grants / $373,875

Effect of pork consumption on cardiometabolic health, food cravings, cognition and psychological wellbeing in individuals with type 2 diabetes. $358,875

Funding body: CRC Pork

Funding body CRC Pork
Project Team

.

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Volunteer’s attitudes towards consumption of fresh Australian pork $15,000

Funding body: CRC Pork

Funding body CRC Pork
Project Team

.

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20114 grants / $316,000

iWhyalla (Intervention Whyalla): a workplace-based obesity and diabetes primary and secondary prevention trial$100,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team

Dr Matt Haren

Scheme University Department of Rural Health Scheme research grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Pulse-rich foods for cognitive function and cardiometabolic health$100,000

Funding body: Grains Research and Development Corporation

Funding body Grains Research and Development Corporation
Project Team

A/Prof Jon Buckley

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Lutein-enriched milk and physical activity participation in older adults$61,000

Funding body: Meiji Dairies

Funding body Meiji Dairies
Project Team

Prof PRC Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Effectiveness of cycloid vibration therapy for promoting exercise recovery$55,000

Funding body: Advanced Lifestyle International

Funding body Advanced Lifestyle International
Project Team

A/Prof Jon Buckley

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20105 grants / $1,022,031

Pathophysiology and alternative preventative strategy for breast cancer chemotherapy-induced bone loss$521,706

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Prof Cory Xian

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Effects of omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients on learning and behaviour of Indigenous Australian children from a remote community school$320,325

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Dr Natalie Sinn

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Evaluation of peanuts as a source of bioactive nutrients for enhancement of endothelial function and cognitive performance$110,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Dr Alison M Coates

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Nutrient therapies for preserving bone growth and preventing chemotherapy-induced bone loss in early development.$65,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team

Cory Xian

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Bioactive nutrients in peanuts$5,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Dr Alison M Coates

Scheme UniSA Linkage Project Development Incentive Grant:
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20095 grants / $2,216,646

Capturing the therapeutic value of dairy bioactives$2,035,000

Funding body: The Government of Victoria

Funding body The Government of Victoria
Project Team

Dr Rebecca Thomson

Scheme Victoria's Science Agenda Investment Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Acute effects of Resvida on circulatory function$65,000

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Protective effects of antidote folinic acid in methotrexate chemotherapy induced bone growth defects$65,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation of South Australia

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation of South Australia
Project Team

Prof Cory Xian

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Chronic effects of Resvida on circulatory function$27,000

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

The effect of regular consumption of pork on body composition. $24,646

Funding body: CRC Pork

Funding body CRC Pork
Project Team

Dr Karen Murphy

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20083 grants / $860,000

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for symptoms of depression in cardiovascular disease$465,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team

Dr Geoffrey Schrader

Scheme Strategic Research Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Metabolic health benefits of low fat dairy products $300,000

Funding body: Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology SA & Manitoba Govt

Funding body Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology SA & Manitoba Govt
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Effects of Neuravena® on cerebral blood flow & cognitive performance$95,000

Funding body: Frutarom Switzerland Ltd

Funding body Frutarom Switzerland Ltd
Project Team

Dr. Janet Bryan

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20075 grants / $2,498,000

Building a fit and healthy South Australia$1,318,000

Funding body: The Government of South Australia

Funding body The Government of South Australia
Project Team

Robyn McDermott

Scheme South Australian Premier’s Science and Research Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Dairy Proteins: Effects on athletic performance and recovery$417,000

Funding body: MG Nutritionals Pty Ltd.

Funding body MG Nutritionals Pty Ltd.
Project Team

A/Prof Jon Buckley

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Cognitive and behavioural benefits of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across the lifespan$381,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Fresh pork and cardiometabolic health $318,000

Funding body: CRC Pork

Funding body CRC Pork
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

Improving erythrocyte omega-3 fatty acid profiles and health status in adults through increased consumption of canned tuna$64,000

Funding body: Seafood CRC/Simplot Australia

Funding body Seafood CRC/Simplot Australia
Project Team

Dr Mario Klingler

Scheme CRC Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20064 grants / $523,200

Cardiovascular effects of cocoa$368,000

Funding body: Effem Foods Pty Ltd

Funding body Effem Foods Pty Ltd
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Food Innovation Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Nutrients and muscle damage$80,200

Funding body: Murray Goulburn Co-op

Funding body Murray Goulburn Co-op
Project Team

Prof PRC Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Grape Seed Polyphenols$50,000

Funding body: BioInnovation SA

Funding body BioInnovation SA
Project Team

.

Scheme BioARC Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Effects of green tea on blood glucose$25,000

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20059 grants / $2,864,050

Australian Centre for Metabolic Fitness$1,950,000

Funding body: Australian Technology Network

Funding body Australian Technology Network
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Australian Technology Network (ATN) Research Challenge
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Development and application of an index for substantiating health benefits of omega-3 enriched foods$401,100

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Effects of green tea on body composition$215,000

Funding body: DSM Nutritional Products

Funding body DSM Nutritional Products
Project Team

Alison M Hill

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Health benefits of cocoa polyphenols and exercise$105,000

Funding body: Effem Foods Pty Ltd

Funding body Effem Foods Pty Ltd
Project Team

Prof PRC Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Effect of vespa amino acid mixture on fat oxidation during exercise$73,000

Funding body: Meiji Dairies

Funding body Meiji Dairies
Project Team

Prof PRC Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Antiinflammatory and wound healing properties of emu oil$49,950

Funding body: Technology Investment Company

Funding body Technology Investment Company
Project Team

Prof Tony Ferrante

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Effects of cocoa and whey protein supplements on blood pressure$35,000

Funding body: Effem Foods Pty Ltd

Funding body Effem Foods Pty Ltd
Project Team

Prof PRC Howe

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Glycaemic index of waxy barley products$20,000

Funding body: Grains Research and Development Corporation

Funding body Grains Research and Development Corporation
Project Team

.

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Impact of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a novel cardiovascular risk factor$15,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Dr Alison Morris

Scheme UniSA Australian Competitive Grant (ACG) Development Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20045 grants / $114,500

Development and Application of an Omega-3 Index$50,000

Funding body: Bartlett Grain

Funding body Bartlett Grain
Project Team

.

Scheme Funds granted
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Health benefits of cocoa polyphenols and exercise $25,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme ARC Near Miss Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Effect of novel nutrient on glycaemic index $22,000

Funding body: Wacker Chemie GmbH

Funding body Wacker Chemie GmbH
Project Team

A/Prof Jon Buckley

Scheme Funds granted
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Prenatal alcohol and cardiovascular risk $10,000

Funding body: University of Adelaide

Funding body University of Adelaide
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme NHMRC Near Miss Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

APAI proposal and project proposal$7,500

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme UniSA Linkage Project Incentive Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20031 grants / $283,000

Development and nutritional evaluation of novel foods based on a unique combination of soy and dairy products.$283,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Dr BJ Meyer

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20024 grants / $1,496,000

Development and evaulation of novel foods enriched with very long chain omega-3 fatty acids$616,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Smart Foods$368,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme ARC Centres of Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Human Physiology & Nutrition Research Facility for assessment of metabolic status and vascular function$270,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Development of novel omega-3 enriched poultry products$242,000

Our core research on modifying fatty acid composition of poultry tissues and preliminary studies with our industry partner's proprietary fishmeal product (PorcOmega) have indicated the feasibility of producing novel meat products and eggs with high w-3 contents, which would qualify to carry a new nutrition label. We now propose, in collaboration with our industry partner, to assess the viability of producing such products

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20001 grants / $78,240

Smart Foods for an aging populations$78,240

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Dr LB Astheimer

Scheme Strategic Partnerships with Industry - Research and Training Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19991 grants / $1,757,000

Smart Foods$1,757,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Prof PR Howe

Scheme ARC Centres of Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed26
Current9

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2012 Honours Systemic and cerebral vasodilator function in sedentary adults
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Heart rate response to exercise as an index of cardiovascular health
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Effect of perceptually-regulated exercise training on endothelial function and exercise motivation
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2012 Honours Tracking Training Status in Competitive Cyclists using Heart Rate Parameters
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation as adjunct therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Evaluation of peanuts for enhancement of endothelial function and cognitive performance
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Acute and chronic effects of vasoactive nutrients on cardiovascular biomarkers and cognitive function
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Protective effects of fish oil, genistein or combination on bone in MTX chemotherapy rat models.
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Whey protein supplementation: Effects on muscle hypertrophy, athletic performance and recovery
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2011 Honours Heart rate assessment of fatigue status following an intensive 2 week exercise intervention
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Investigation of the cognitive and behavioural benefits n-3 PUFA supplementation across the lifespan
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 Honours Efficacy of cycloid vibration therapy for promoting exercise recovery
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Obesity - the new disability?
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 Honours Developing an index of physiological recovery following exercise
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2010 Honours Relationshipsbetween endothelial dysfunction in cerebral and peripheral arteries
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2009 Honours Acute effects of resveratrol on circulatory function
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours Effect of endothelial vasodilator function on blood pressure response to exercise
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2008 Masters Effect of dietary Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on experimental periodontitis in the mouse.
Dentistry, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Combined effect of cocoa polyphenols and regular exercise on body composition and cardiovascular risk.
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Dietary combinations capable of lowering cardiovascular risk factors
Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Managing Obesity and Associated Health Issues - A Community-based Program for Change
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours Inflammatory markers in metabolic syndrome
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Evaluation of health benefits of soy isoflavones
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2006 Honours Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Treat Overweight and Obesity in Adolescents
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2006 Honours Development and application of an index for substantiating health benefits of omega-3 enriched foods
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2006 Honours Health benefits associated with eating pork enriched with omega-3 fatty acids
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2006 PhD Diet And Exercise Interventions To Improve Cardiovascular Health
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2005 Honours Evaluation of anti-inflammatory properties of emu oil in humans.
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2004 Honours Effects of omega-3 supplementation on endurance performance in elite athletes
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Predictors of recovery from depression
Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong
Co-Supervisor
2004 Honours Pulsetrace Assessment of Vascular Function During Exercise
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2004 Honours Effect of Exercise and Omega-3 Supplementation on Immune responses in the Metabolic Syndrome
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2003 Honours The Potential of Lyprinol as a Preventative Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide
Co-Supervisor
2003 Honours Digital volume pulse oximetery: a reliable assessor of endothelial function and arterial compliance?
Biological Sciences, University of South Australia
Co-Supervisor
2002 PhD Dietary fish oil supplementation alters rate pressure product in trained cyclists
Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong
Co-Supervisor
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News

Fish oil study for blood pressure and brain performance

Fish oil study for blood pressure and brain performance

March 15, 2016

Adults with slightly elevated blood pressure are wanted for a University of Newcastle (UON) clinical trial evaluating the benefits of taking a fish oil supplement for brain health.

Menopause

Study aims to ease menopausal symptoms

April 27, 2015

Can the health supplement resveratrol curb the notorious hot flushes, insomnia, irritability and occasional mental lapses that often accompany menopause?

Volunteers required to test mental function in type 2 diabetes

Diabetes study testing nutritional approach to delay cognitive decline

January 8, 2015

Researchers in the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre at the University of Newcastle are seeking people with type 2 diabetes to take a new nutritional supplement designed to stimulate blood flow in the brain and reduce the threat of mental impairment.

Are fish oil supplements putting you at risk of prostate cancer?

July 19, 2013

By Peter Howe, Director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, University of Newcastle

A report published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute late last week shows a potential link between omega-3 fatty acids and the risk of developing prostate cancer.

Professor Peter Howe

Position

Research Professor
Director, Clinical Nutrition Research Centre
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Email peter.howe@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7309
Mobile 0402 159 039

Office

Room MS 304
Building Medical Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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