Professor Jane Goodman-Delahunty

Professor Jane Goodman-Delahunty

Professor

Newcastle Law School

Career Summary

Biography

Jane Goodman-Delahunty is a Professor of the University of Newcastle Law School and a Member of the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal.  Trained in Law and Cognitive Psychology, she conducts transdisciplinary empirical studies to promote evidence-based practice to enhance justice.  She has secured over $9 million in research funding and published over 200 scholarly articles and books.  She was a Visiting Professor in China, England, Hong Kong, India, and Japan.  Appointed a Fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1996, she was Editor of Psychology, Public Policy, and Law.  Before moving to an academic appointment in Australia, she practiced law for 20 years in the private and public sectors.  She was an Administrative Judge for the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and a mediator with JAMS. 

Professor Goodman-Delahunty has led international research projects and produced important recommendations for justice reform on topics such as sexual harassment, police interrogations, questioning processes, legal interpreting, and assessments of psychological injuries.  Professor Goodman-Delahunty works internationally as an expert consultant in relation to human memory, jury behaviour, and child and adult sexual assault.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Washington
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Witwatersrand
  • Juris Doctor, Seattle University

Keywords

  • Assessment of Psychological Injuries
  • Child Sexual Abuse
  • Credibility Assessment
  • Expert Evidence
  • Interpreter-mediated Legal Proceedings
  • Jury Behaviour
  • Law and Psychology
  • Memory as Evidence
  • Questioning of Witnessess
  • Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault
  • Video Link Evidence

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
480406 Law reform 50
480504 Legal institutions (incl. courts and justice systems) 30
480505 Legal practice, lawyering and the legal profession 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
Newcastle Law School
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Foote WE, Goodman-Delahunty J, Understanding Sexual Harassment Evidence-based Forensic Practice, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC (2021)
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Clough J, Spivak B, Ogloff JRP, Ruffles J, Young W, The Jury Project 10 Years on: Practices of Australian and New Zealand Judges., Australasian Institute of Judicial Administration, Melbourne (2019)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Das DK, Trends in Legal Advocacy Interviews with Prosecutors and Criminal Defense Lawyers Across the Globe, Volume One., CRC Press, Boca Raton, 360 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Nolan M, van Gijn-Grosvenor EL, Empirical Guidance on the Effects of Child Sexual Abuse on Memory and Complainants' Evidence., oyal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, Sydney, 185 (2017)
2016 Freckelton I, Qc BIF, Goodman-Delahunty J, Horan J, McKimmie B, Expert Evidence and Criminal Jury Trials., Oxford University Press, USA, UK, 272 (2016)
2016 Tait D, Goodman-Delahunty J, Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror: The Case of the Sydney Bomber., Springer, UK, 292 (2016)
2016 Powell MB, Westera N, Goodman-Delahunty J, Pichler A, An Evaluation of How Evidence Is Elicited from Complainants of Child Sexual Abuse., Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, Sydney (2016)
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Cossins A, Martschuk N, Jury Reasoning in Separate and Joint Trials of Institutional Child Sexual Abuse: An Empirical Study., Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, Sydney (2016)
2015 Goodman-Delahunty J, Green T, Nguyen I, Section III: Australia: Legal system (2015)
DOI 10.1201/b17907
Show 6 more books

Chapter (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Abrahamsom DE, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Working with Others: Future Policing Partnerships', Australian Policing: Critical Issues In 21st Century Police Practice, Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon 199-220 (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Noaln M, 'Law and Psychology in Australia.', World Trends in Law and Psychology., Shin-yo sha, Tokyo (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Juries in the Digital Age.', Australian Courts: Controversies, Challenges and Change., Palgrave, London (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Corbo Crehan A, Brandon S, 'The Ethical Practice of Police Psychology.', Police Psychology: New Trends in Forensic Psychological Science, Elsevier Academic Press, US 1-20 (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, Martschuk N, 'Procedural fairness and jury satisfaction: An analysis of relational dimensions', Procedural Justice and Relational Theory: Empirical, Philosophical, and Legal Perspectives, Routledge, London, UK 44-62 (2021) [B1]
2020 Hale S, Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Interactional Management in a Simulated Police Interview: Interpreter's Strategies.', The Discourse of Police Interviews, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL 220-226 (2020) [B1]
DOI 10.7208/9780226647821-011
2020 Brubacher SP, Benson MS, Powell MB, Goodman-Delahunty J, Westera NJ, 'An overview of best practice investigative interviewing of child witnesses of sexual assault', Child Abuse and Neglect: Forensic Issues in Evidence, Impact and Management, Elsevier Academic Press, London, UK 445-466 (2020) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-819434-8.00022-2
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Hale SB, Brandon SE, 'Interpreted Police Interviews: A Review of Contemporary Research', Advances in Psychology and Law, Springer, Cham, Switzerland 83-136 (2020) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-54678-6_4
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Pichler A, Sharman S, Powell M, Westera N, 'Special Measure Use in Child Sexual Assault Cases.', Child Abuse and Neglect: Forensic Issues in Evidence, Impact and Management, Elsevier Acadmic Press, London 467-518 (2019)
2019 Westera NJ, Powell MB, Milne R, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Police interviewing of sexual assault victims: Current organizational responses and recommendations for improvement', The Routledge International Handbook of Legal and Investigative Psychology 182-197 (2019)

This chapter provides an overview of police organizational approaches to enhancing the quality of evidence obtained from adult and child victims of sexual assault, and reviews the... [more]

This chapter provides an overview of police organizational approaches to enhancing the quality of evidence obtained from adult and child victims of sexual assault, and reviews the degree to which actual organizational strategies are aligned with the guidance on what constitutes recommended (ideal) practice. The long-standing gap between best practice interview technique - as taught in training curricula - and actual practice in the field is a dominant theme in contemporary interviewing research. Based on our understanding of current research on investigative interviewing as well as international police interviewer training practices, we provide an overview of key criteria for evidence-based practice along with a list of common limitations that inhibit adherence to best interviewing practice. The chapter is structured around four main elements that are essential for promoting good interviewing. These elements include: (a) an evidence-based interview framework, (b) opportunities for skill development, (c) quality assurance for interviewer and organizational performance, and (d) a reliable method of recording verbal evidence.

DOI 10.4324/9780429326530-13
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Goodman J, Loftus EE, 'Judgment and memory: The role of expert psychological testimony on eyewitness accuracy', Psychology and Social Policy 267-282 (2019)

A considerable number of psychological studies on non statistical heuristics, such as the base rate fallacy, predict the susceptibility of laypersons to make biased generalization... [more]

A considerable number of psychological studies on non statistical heuristics, such as the base rate fallacy, predict the susceptibility of laypersons to make biased generalizations and judgments concerning memory performance. A review of case law reveals that admissibility of expert testimony on eyewitness identification, like that of other social framework testimony, has been fraught with legal confusion, while reports of disagreement among research scientists have been exaggerated. A number of commentors have questioned what a psychologist may contribute in a case in which eyewitness testimony is the major evidence identifying the defendant as the perpetrator of the crime charged. Psychologists have made considerable progress in several distinct areas of empirical work about eyewitness identifications. The particular way in which a court may use social science findings varies, although oral testimony in court by an expert witness based on his or her professional opinion is most typical, whether in a bench or jury trial.

DOI 10.4324/9781315793030-21
Citations Scopus - 2
2018 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Powell M, Westera N, 'Prosecutorial discretion about special measure use in australian cases of child sexual abuse', The Evolving Role of the Public Prosecutor: Challenges and Innovations 169-187 (2018)

A Prosecutorial Reform Index developed for the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative included discretionary functions among 28 factors that provide ¿an empirical basis f... [more]

A Prosecutorial Reform Index developed for the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative included discretionary functions among 28 factors that provide ¿an empirical basis for examining the status and role of prosecutors and the environment in which they work in transitioning states throughout the globe¿. The chapter examines contemporary practices in Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) cases to present the complainant¿s evidence by reviewing prosecutorial considerations regarding uses of special measures with vulnerable complainants in three Australian jurisdictions. It also examines the extent of prosecutorial support for and use of special measures, reasons for their use or non-use and their impact on case outcomes and decisions to discontinue a case. To improve the experience of CSA complainants, whether adults or children at the time of trial, and the quality of the evidence they provide special measures for the giving of evidence by vulnerable complainants were legislatively implemented in all Australian jurisdictions.

DOI 10.4324/9780429467547
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'Conclusions.', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror, Palgrave Macmillan, UK 273-285 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'Images of Interactive Virtual Environments: Do they Affect Verdicts?', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terro., Palgrave Macmillan, UK 173-191 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Assessing Unfair Prejudice from Extremist Images in Terrorism Trials.', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror, Palgrave Macmillan, UK 87-121 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Das DK, 'Conclusions: Bridging the Gap Between Legal Practice and Evidence-Based Justice.', Trends in Legal Advocacy: Interviews with Prosecutors and Criminal Defence Lawyers Across the Globe, CRC Press, Boca Raton 309-315 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Das DK, 'Legal Advocacy Around the Globe.', Trends in Legal Advocacy: Interviews with Prosecutors and Criminal Defence Lawyers Across the Globe, CRC Press, Boca Raton 1-6 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Taitz M, Sowemimo C, Nguyen I, 'Using Complaints Against the Police to Improve Community-Police Relations.', Global Issues in Contemporary Policing, CRC Press-Taylor & Francis Group, Oakville, Canada 97-120 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'The Effect of Deliberation on Jury Verdicts.', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror, Palgrave Macmillan, UK 235-248 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Horan J, 'The Legal Landscape in Terrorism Trials.', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror, Palgrave Macmillan, UK 11-35 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Cossins A, 'The Application of the Uniform Evidence Law to Delay in Child Sexual Assault Trials.', Critical Perspectives on the Uniform Evidence Law, Federation Press, Annandale, NSW 104-124 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'CSI Effects on Jury Reasoning and Verdicts.', Juries, Science and Popular Culture in the Age of Terror, Palgrave Macmillan, UK 217-233 (2017)
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Insights on Investigative Interviewing from Practitioners and Suspects in Indonesia, the Philippines and Sri Lanka.', International Developments and Practices in Investigative Interviewing and Interrogation: Volume II Suspects, Routledge Press, GB 18-33 (2016)
Citations Scopus - 9
2015 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'James Woods AO QC, New South Wales supreme court', Trends in the Judiciary: Interviews with Judges Across the Globe 57-75 (2015)

Few justices have exerted an impact on as many aspects of the criminal justice system as Justice Wood, in a legal career spanning ve decades. The depth and breadth of his inuence ... [more]

Few justices have exerted an impact on as many aspects of the criminal justice system as Justice Wood, in a legal career spanning ve decades. The depth and breadth of his inuence are apparent in all phases of the criminal justice system in NSW: criminal investigative processes, the adjudication of individual cases, the development of sentencing programs and policy, and legislation and policy making through law reform activities. His career exemplies how expertise developed in the role of judging can lead to extrajudicial responsibilities and substantial contributions beyond courtroom adjudication.

DOI 10.1201/b17907
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'Lay participation in legal decision-making in Australia and New Zealand: Jury trials and administrative tribunals', Understanding World Jury Systems Through Social Psychological Research 47-70 (2013)
DOI 10.4324/9780203759813
Citations Scopus - 5
2004 Malpass RS, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Psychology and the Law, Overview', Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology, Three-Volume Set 171-184 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/B0-12-657410-3/00380-9
Show 23 more chapters

Journal article (102 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Doherty S, Martschuk N, Hale S, 'An Eye-Movement Analysis of Visual Attention and Interpreting Performance in a Remote-Interpreted Investigative Interview.', Applied Cognitive Psychology, (2021)
2021 Hale S, Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Doherty S, 'The Effects of Mode on Interpreting Performance in a Simulated Police Interview.', Translation and Interpreting Studies, (2021)
DOI 10.1075/tis.19081.hal
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Powell M, Martschuk N, 'Judicial Intervention.', TBC, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Tait D, Wallace J, Rowden E, 'Remote Witnesses: Improving their Experience of Technology, Orientation and Environment when Participating via Audio-Visual Links.', TBC, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Harris D, Martschuk N, Powell MB, 'Adult Recollections of Childhood Memories in Individuals Convicted of Sexual Offences: Implications for Narrative Therapy.', TBC, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Harris D, Martschuk N, Powell MB, '"How far back can you go?":What Individuals Convicted of Sexual Offences Recall About Their Early Childhood.', TBC, (2021)
2021 Sivasubramaniam D, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'International consensus on effective and ineffective interviewing strategies: a survey of experienced practitioners', Police Practice and Research, 22 921-937 (2021)

We explored interviewing practitioners¿ views about the effectiveness of a range of diverse interview strategies in the field. An online survey examined 73 interviewing practices ... [more]

We explored interviewing practitioners¿ views about the effectiveness of a range of diverse interview strategies in the field. An online survey examined 73 interviewing practices comprising six broad strategy types and their perceived effectiveness. Interview practices were rated by a multinational sample of 324 criminal investigators and intelligence operators. Experienced interviewers reported preferences for cooperative, non-coercive information-gathering approaches. Rapport-building was rated highly effective in securing reliable information. Interviewers reported some use of coercive techniques, but more commonly employed procedural justice elements of respect, kindness, genuine concern, and addressing basic interviewee needs to build rapport. They favoured non-coercive presentations of testimonial inconsistencies and evidence. Results demonstrate support by a large, experienced, international sample of interviewing practitioners for rapport-based techniques over coercive techniques and revealed broad consensus on effective strategies. Furthermore, findings demonstrated that this consensus centres around the effectiveness of rapport-based investigative interviewing, rather than coercive or accusatorial techniques.

DOI 10.1080/15614263.2019.1628756
2021 Pichler AS, Powell M, Sharman SJ, Westera N, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Discussions about child witness interviews during Australian trials of child sexual abuse', Police Practice and Research, 22 938-952 (2021)

In many jurisdictions, child witness interviews are pre-recorded and played in court as complainants¿ evidence-in-chief in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA). The present study exa... [more]

In many jurisdictions, child witness interviews are pre-recorded and played in court as complainants¿ evidence-in-chief in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA). The present study examined whether and how legal professionals discuss child witness interviews in the course of CSA trials. The trial transcripts of a sample of 85 child sexual abuse complainants (aged 6¿17 years; 19 males) from three Australian jurisdictions were examined. Thematic analysis of all discussions between legal professionals about the child witness interview was conducted. Interviews were discussed for the majority (95.3%) of complainants. Three themes were identified: (1) problems with using the interviews as evidence-in-chief, (2) legal issues around the admissibility of interview topics and judicial directions, and (3) trial planning including availability of interview transcripts for jurors and the loss of recorded interviews. These results highlight the potential downstream effects that child witness interviews can have in CSA trials.

DOI 10.1080/15614263.2019.1689133
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk M, Lee E, Cossins A, 'Greater Knowledge Enhances Compliant Credibility and Increases Jury Convictions for Child Sexual Abuse.', Frontiers in Psychology, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Doherty S, Martschuk N, Hale S, 'A Pupillometric and Blink Rate Analysis of Cognitive Load and Interpreting Performance During Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting Modes in a Remote-Interpreted Investigative Interview.', Frontiers in Psychology, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Blewer R, Powell MB, 'The Importance of the Information-Gathering Process in Sexual Assault Law Reform.', Current Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Wallace A, 'Measuring Trust and Confidence in Courts.', International Journal of Court Administration, (2021)
2021 Goodman-Delahunty J, Hale S, Martschuk N, Lim J, 'Does Interpreter Presence Make a Difference to Performance? A Study of Remote vs Face-to-Face Interpreting in a Simulated Police Interview.', Interpreting, (2021)
2021 Pichler AS, Powell M, Sharman SJ, Zydervelt S, Westera N, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Inconsistencies in complainant's accounts of child sexual abuse arising in their cross-examination', Psychology, Crime and Law, 27 341-356 (2021)
DOI 10.1080/1068316X.2020.1805743
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Hodgson N, Cashmore J, Cowdery N, Martschuk N, Parkinson P, et al., 'The Decision to Prosecute: A Comparative Analysis of Australian Prosecutorial Guidelines.', Criminal Law Journal, 44 155-172 (2020)
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk M, Nolan M, 'Memory Science and the Pell Appeals: Impossibility, Timing and Inconsistencies.', Criminal Law Journal, 44 232-246 (2020)
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Dhami MK, Martschuk NM, Cheung S, Belton I, 'Disengaging and Rehabilitating High-Value Detainees: A Qualitative Study.', Journal for Deradicalization, 22 50-80 (2020)
2020 Hale S, Martschuk N, Goodman-Delahunty J, Taibi M, Xu H, 'Interpreting profanity in police interviews', Multilingua, 39 369-393 (2020)
DOI 10.1515/multi-2019-0065
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Blatch C, O Sullivan K, Goodman-Delahunty J, Willis M, Delaney JJ, 'Effectiveness of a Domestic Abuse Program for Australian Indigenous Offenders', International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 64 1639-1673 (2020)
DOI 10.1177/0306624X19900979
2020 Horan J, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Expert evidence to counteract jury misconceptions about consent in sexual assault cases: Failures and lessons learned', University of New South Wales Law Journal, 43 707-737 (2020)
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Pichler AS, Sharman SJ, Powell M, Westera N, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Association between Interview Quality and Child Sexual Abuse Trial Outcome', Journal of Family Violence, 35 395-403 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s10896-019-00051-5
Citations Scopus - 2
2020 Westera NJ, Powell MB, Goodman-Delahunty J, Zajac R, 'Special measures in child sexual abuse cases: views of Australian criminal justice professionals', Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 32 224-242 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/10345329.2020.1743904
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Securing reliable information in investigative interviews: coercive and noncoercive strategies preceding turning points', Police Practice and Research, 21 152-171 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/15614263.2018.1531752
Citations Scopus - 3
2020 Foote WE, Goodman-Delahunty J, Young G, 'Civil Forensic Evaluation in Psychological Injury and Law: Legal, Professional, and Ethical Considerations', Psychological Injury and Law, 13 327-353 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s12207-020-09398-3
Citations Scopus - 3
2020 Young G, Foote WE, Kerig PK, Mailis A, Brovko J, Kohutis EA, et al., 'Introducing Psychological Injury and Law', Psychological Injury and Law, 13 452-463 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s12207-020-09396-5
Citations Scopus - 4
2020 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Mock Jury and Juror Responses to Uncharged Acts of Sexual Misconduct: Advances in the Assessment of Unfair Prejudice', Zeitschrift fur Psychologie / Journal of Psychology, 228 199-209 (2020)
DOI 10.1027/2151-2604/a000410
Citations Scopus - 3
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Corbo Crehan A, 'Procedural Justice and Complaints about Police.', Salus Journal, 7 58-87 (2019)
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Westera NJ, Powell MB, Zajac R, 'Courtroom Questioning of Child Sexual Abuse Complaints: Views of Australian Criminal Justice Professionals.', Salus Journal, 7 20-41 (2019)
2019 Lee E, Goodman-Delahunty J, Fraser M, Powell MB, Westera NJ, 'Special Measures in Child Sexual Abuse Trials: Criminal Justice Practitioners Experiences and Views.', QUT Law Review, 18 1-27 (2019)
DOI 10.5204/qutlr.v18i2.757
2019 Brubacher SP, Hodgson N, Goodman-Delahunty J, Powell MB, Westera N, 'Children s competence to testify in Australian courts: Implementing the royal commission recommendation', University of New South Wales Law Journal, 42 1386-1410 (2019)

In 2017, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse recommended reforms to the law of competence of child witnesses. We examined Australian judges¿ pr... [more]

In 2017, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse recommended reforms to the law of competence of child witnesses. We examined Australian judges¿ practices in assessing children¿s competence to give sworn evidence. Trial transcripts from 56 victims revealed that 64% were posed competence questions, with fewer to older children. The most frequent manner of posing such questions was to ask children to evaluate the morality of truths and lies. Most questions were yes/no format, and children nearly always answered these satisfactorily. When questions were ¿wh-¿ format, children provided a satisfactory response only 51% of the time. Only nine children testified unsworn, and they were asked more than twice as many competence questions as sworn children. Competence inquiries have been challenged for underestimating children¿s abilities, and because responses to questions about truths and lies are not predictive of behaviour. We discuss how reforms could be implemented.

2019 Danby MC, Earhart B, Brubacher SP, Powell MB, Goodman-Delahunty J, Westera NJ, 'Tracking labels for occurrences of alleged child abuse from police interviews to trials', Legal and Criminological Psychology, 24 41-54 (2019)

Purpose: Labelling (i.e., naming) individual occurrences of repeated abuse allegations with explicit and consistent terms may improve children's reporting of these offences. ... [more]

Purpose: Labelling (i.e., naming) individual occurrences of repeated abuse allegations with explicit and consistent terms may improve children's reporting of these offences. The aim of the present study was to track labels for occurrences of alleged child sexual abuse from the police interview to court proceedings. Methods: We examined the labels used in the police interviews and trials of 23 child complainants (5¿15¿years old at interview). The initiator of each label (child, interviewer, lawyer, or judge), stage of the process in which the label was generated, and the type of information used to label specific occurrences of abuse were recorded. Any subsequent reuse or replacement of the labels was also recorded. Results: Most labels were created by police interviewers. Few children generated labels. Most occurrences of abuse were labelled early in the legal process; 82% were first labelled either in the police interview or in the prosecution's opening statement. The labels were frequently replaced with alternate terms, with an average of three different labels for the same incident. After original labels were established for occurrences, they were just as likely to be replaced as they were to be reused. The most frequently observed label replacement was by defence lawyers during cross-examination. Conclusions: Labels were used inconsistently throughout the police interview and trial. To give children the best chance of describing specific occurrences of abuse during legal proceedings, labels should be created from children's words wherever possible and used consistently thereafter by all justice professionals.

DOI 10.1111/lcrp.12146
2019 Hale S, Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Interpreter performance in police interviews. Differences between trained interpreters and untrained bilinguals', Interpreter and Translator Trainer, 13 107-131 (2019)

In most countries, it is not compulsory to be trained to work as an interpreter in community settings. A comparison across jurisdictions reveals that different requirements exist,... [more]

In most countries, it is not compulsory to be trained to work as an interpreter in community settings. A comparison across jurisdictions reveals that different requirements exist, from a simple self-evaluation of language competence, to passing a certification or accreditation test. Even in countries where certification or accreditation systems exist, such as the USA and Australia, there is no legislation to prevent any bilingual from working as interpreter. In legal settings, this situation has led to a lack of clear guidelines regarding interpreter recruitment, and to many examples of incompetent interpreting that have impacted legal outcomes. Little research has been conducted to systematically assess the value of training on interpreter performance. This paper presents results of a live experimental study conducted in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, showing significant differences between the performance of trained interpreters and untrained bilinguals in simulated police interviews. The study is one of a few to compare performance based on interpreter background, using a large sample and a sophisticated method to assess performance.

DOI 10.1080/1750399X.2018.1541649
Citations Scopus - 6
2019 Dartnall S, Goodman-Delahunty J, Gullifer J, 'An Opportunity to Be Heard: Family Experiences of Coronial Investigations Into Missing People and Views on Best Practice', Frontiers in Psychology, 10 (2019)

Experiences of 15 family members and friends of missing people of a coronial investigation into the suspected death of a missing person in New South Wales (NSW), Australia were ex... [more]

Experiences of 15 family members and friends of missing people of a coronial investigation into the suspected death of a missing person in New South Wales (NSW), Australia were examined via in-depth interviews. This study explored participant perceptions of the impact of coronial proceedings on well-being, and views on best practice approaches to families in the Coroner¿s Court. Transcripts were thematically analysed, yielding six key themes in participant experiences of inquests: (1) Opportunity to be heard, (2) A chance for education, (3) If you are human with me (sensitive treatment and language), (4) Timely investigations, (5) A public and formal court environment, and (6) Coronial outcomes. Overall, families benefitted from opportunities to have input and feel heard, compassionate treatment, and appropriate education about the process and available support services. A detriment on well-being was described when these factors were precluded. Some participants perceived positive outcomes arising from public awareness of cases of missing people, formalities that conveyed respect, and timeframes that enabled further investigation or preparation for the inquest. Others reported distress and trauma in response to significant delays that led to a loss of evidence, intrusive media and unknown persons in court, and unwelcoming, formal court environments. Some participants were profoundly distressed by a finding of death and by the procedures that followed the inquest, emphasising the need for post-inquest debriefing and ongoing support. These findings deepen our understanding of coronial practices, and of measures to prevent harm, that will be instructive to other coronial jurisdictions. Further research should examine family experiences in contexts where there are variable coronial proceedings or procedures that result in legal findings of death.

DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02322
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Powell M, Westera N, 'Special Measures for Children in Court: Law in Action in a Multi-agency Committee', AUSTRALIAN SOCIAL WORK, 72 503-516 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/0312407X.2019.1624796
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Goodman-Delahunty J, Howes LM, 'High-stakes interviews and rapport development: practitioners' perceptions of interpreter impact', POLICING & SOCIETY, 29 100-117 (2019)
DOI 10.1080/10439463.2017.1293051
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2018 McGrath AJ, Thompson AP, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Differentiating Predictive Validity and Practical Utility for the Australian Adaptation of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory', Criminal Justice and Behavior, 45 820-839 (2018)

The predictive validity for the Australian Adaptation of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory was tested in a large sample (N = 4,401) of community-based juvenile ... [more]

The predictive validity for the Australian Adaptation of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory was tested in a large sample (N = 4,401) of community-based juvenile offenders in New South Wales, Australia. First, we compared gender and ethnic subgroups on domain, total scores, and predictive validity. Both similarities and modest differences emerged in mean scores across subgroups. The pattern of predictive validity results showed comparable indices by gender and ethnic subgroups. Second, we supplemented our quantitative method with a review of 26 case files with the lowest risk scores and a 1-year reoffense, and 25 case files with the highest risk scores and no 1-year reoffense. We discuss implications of the findings for improving the predictive validity and practical utility of risk¿need assessment with juvenile offenders.

DOI 10.1177/0093854818762468
Citations Scopus - 3
2018 Martschuk N, Goodman-Delahunty J, Powell MB, Westera NJ, 'Similarities in modi operandi of institutional and non-institutional child sexual offending: Systematic case comparisons', Child Abuse and Neglect, 84 229-240 (2018)

Little is known about the extent to whichinstitutional child sex offending differs from non-institutional offending. Strategies to secure the compliance of child victims were syst... [more]

Little is known about the extent to whichinstitutional child sex offending differs from non-institutional offending. Strategies to secure the compliance of child victims were systematically compared to compare the modi operandi (prior to, during and following abuse), and the type of power (intimate, aggressive, coercive) applied by child sexual offenders in institutional versus non-institutional settings. A sample of 59 of the most recent child sexual abuse cases referred for prosecution in three Australian states was manually reviewed and coded. Of these, six were cases of institutional abuse, one of which involved crossover offending. Based on complainant age and gender and patterns in offending behaviors, institutional cases were matched with cases of non-institutional abuse. Complainants of both genders ranged in age from 5 to 16 years at abuse onset. Offenders were male family members or friends, priests, an employer and one female school teacher. Results demonstrated commonalities in the modi operandi and grooming methods applied in institutional and non-institutional contexts. Implications for abuse prevention are summarized.

DOI 10.1016/j.chiabu.2018.08.002
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Cossins A, 'What Australian Jurors Know and do not Know in Child Sexual Abuse Cases.', Criminal Law Journal, 41 86-103 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Lee E, Powell MB, Westera N, 'Methods to Evaluate Justice Practices in Eliciting Evidence from Complaints of Child Sexual Abuse.', Newcastle Law Review, 12 42-60 (2017)
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Using Pretest-Posttest Research Designs to Enhance Jury Decisions.', Newcastle Law Review, 12 86-103 (2017)
2017 Earhart B, Brubacher SP, Powell MB, Westera NJ, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Judges delivery of ground rules to child witnesses in Australian courts', Child Abuse and Neglect, 74 62-72 (2017)

Ground rules directions are given to children in forensic interviews to explain what is expected of them, and to reduce their tendency to acquiesce to erroneous or incomprehensibl... [more]

Ground rules directions are given to children in forensic interviews to explain what is expected of them, and to reduce their tendency to acquiesce to erroneous or incomprehensible questions. Ground rules may also be necessary when children provide testimony in court. Drawing on research conducted for the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, the present study examined the use of ground rules directions delivered in court in 52 trials by 24 presiding judges in three jurisdictions to 57 child complainants (aged 7¿17.5 years). Eleven categories of rules were identified. The number of words spoken to deliver each rule was counted, and grade-level readability scores were calculated as a proxy for the complexity of the ground rules. When judges asked comprehension or practice questions, the question types were coded. More than one third of the children (35%) received no ground rules directions from the judge; the remaining 65% received directions on an average of 3.5 types of ground rules out of a maximum of 11 types. While comprehension questions were common, practice questions were rare. Comprehension questions were most often presented in a yes/no format that implied the expected response, although this form of question is unlikely to provide an effective assessment of a child's comprehension. Neither the number of rules delivered nor the number of words used was related to children's age. Implications for children's court testimony are discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.08.005
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Cossins A, 'Validation of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Questionnaire', Psychology, Crime and Law, 23 391-412 (2017)

A validation study of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Questionnaire (CSA-KQ) was conducted on a sample of 1712 non-empanelled jurors in the greater Sydney area, Australia. The CS... [more]

A validation study of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Questionnaire (CSA-KQ) was conducted on a sample of 1712 non-empanelled jurors in the greater Sydney area, Australia. The CSA-KQ contains nine items derived from empirical findings on common misconceptions about typical features of abuse offences, children¿s responses to child sexual abuse, and their ability to give reliable evidence. Study 1 tested the factor structure of the questionnaire in a sample of 843 non-empanelled jurors. The best model indicated by exploratory factor analysis had two factors: the Impact of Sexual Abuse on Children and Contextual Influences on the Report. Study 2 cross-validated the findings and tested the predictive validity of the CSA-KQ in a realistic simulated trial in which an 11-year-old complainant alleged abuse by her grandfather. Confirmatory factor analysis replicated the findings of Study 1, showing strong reliability for each of the factors (¿y = 0.70 to ¿y = 0.80) and for the CSA-KQ (¿y = 0.76). CSA-KQ scores were significantly correlated with the perceived credibility of the complainant (r = 0.23). Moreover, the CSA-KQ scores predicted verdict: jurors with greater knowledge about CSA were more likely to convict the defendant than jurors who knew less about CSA.

DOI 10.1080/1068316X.2016.1258469
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Dhami MK, Goodman-Delahunty J, Desai S, 'Development of an information sheet providing rapport advice for interpreters in police interviews', Police Practice and Research, 18 291-305 (2017)

The present paper reports the development of an information sheet designed to aid interpreters in police interviews in recognizing, conveying and inadvertently obstructing rapport... [more]

The present paper reports the development of an information sheet designed to aid interpreters in police interviews in recognizing, conveying and inadvertently obstructing rapport-building efforts by police interviewers. The contents of this sheet were informed by past research defining rapport, and rapport uses in police interviews. We used a mixed experimental design to test the information sheet. One group (Intervention, n¿=¿35) was randomly assigned to read an information sheet before responding to short vignettes of police interviewing foreign non-English speaking suspects about international crimes, while another (Control) group (n¿=¿37) simply responded to the vignettes. Perceptions of rapport cues by the intervention group exceeded that of the control group. However, the groups performed equally well at identifying appropriate methods to convey/avoid obstructing rapport. Feedback from the intervention group on the helpfulness of the information sheet was largely positive. The findings were used to improve the information sheet which can be used to alert interpreters to the importance of rapport in suspect interviews.

DOI 10.1080/15614263.2017.1291580
Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Cossins A, Martschuk N, 'National Jury Research Published.', Judicial Officers' Bulletin, 28 45-48 (2016)
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Cossins A, 'Programmatic Pretest-Posttest Research to reduce Jury Bias in Child Sexual Abuse Cases.', Onati Socio-Legal Series, 6 283-314 (2016)
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, 'Risks and Benefits of Interpreter-Mediated Police Interviews.', Varstvoslovje: Journal of Criminal Justice and Security, 18 451-470 (2016)
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Howes LM, 'Social persuasion to develop rapport in high-stakes interviews: qualitative analyses of Asian-Pacific practices', Policing and Society, 26 270-290 (2016)

Motivating cooperation in official police interviews is a central professional challenge across jurisdictions and cultures. Rapport-building is regarded as a critical antecedent o... [more]

Motivating cooperation in official police interviews is a central professional challenge across jurisdictions and cultures. Rapport-building is regarded as a critical antecedent of interviewee cooperation, but relatively little is known about how rapport is developed in practice. A total of 123 experienced intelligence and investigative interviewers from five Asian-Pacific jurisdictions (Australia, Indonesia, Philippines, South Korea and Sri Lanka) participated in in-depth interviews (mean 68 min) about rapport-building techniques used with high-value interviewees. The majority of participants had more than 10 years' experience and 63% had conducted between 100 and 500 interviews. Responses were recorded, transcribed and de-identified for systematic deductive analysis according to the principles of persuasion outlined by Cialdini, to assess the nature and extent of forms of social influence strategies applied. Reported rapport-development techniques were classifiable as one or more of these six principles of persuasion: reciprocity, commitment, social proof, authority, liking and scarcity. Results revealed that liking and reciprocity were the principles that encompassed the most ubiquitously and frequently reported rapport-development strategies across jurisdictions. Liking was established through similarity and humour, although at times dissimilarity was effective. Few practitioners simulated liking; the majority were sincere. Techniques encompassed by the principles of authority, commitment-consistency and social proof were culture-bound and more diverse. Results confirmed the generalisability of social influence theory to the policing context across diverse legal systems and cultures. By applying psychological theory to advance understanding of rapport-building, best practices and policies were identified in a field where few standards exist. Notwithstanding the limitations of self-reports, strong practitioner support emerged for the effectiveness of noncoercive social persuasion strategies in high-stakes police interviews.

DOI 10.1080/10439463.2014.942848
Citations Scopus - 21
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Crehan AC, 'Enhancing Police Responses to Domestic Violence Incidents: Reports From Client Advocates in New South Wales', Violence Against Women, 22 1007-1026 (2016)

In an online survey about experiences with the police complaint system, 239 client advocates described a recent incident in which a client with grounds to lodge a complaint declin... [more]

In an online survey about experiences with the police complaint system, 239 client advocates described a recent incident in which a client with grounds to lodge a complaint declined to do so. Almost one third of those incidents involved domestic violence. Thematic analysis of case descriptions revealed that many police did not take domestic violence reports seriously. A typology of problematic police conduct was developed. Many officers failed to observe current procedures and appeared to lack knowledge of relevant laws. Citizens feared retaliatory victimization by police and/or perceived that complaining was futile. Implications of these findings are reviewed in light of procedural justice theory.

DOI 10.1177/1077801215613854
Citations Scopus - 18
2016 Dartnall S, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The coronial investigation of suspected deaths: Prevalence and outcomes in New South Wales', Journal of Law and Medicine, 23 609-627 (2016)

In Australia, the investigation of a missing person who remains unlocated may be reported to the coroner as a suspected death. In the first study of its kind in Australia, archiva... [more]

In Australia, the investigation of a missing person who remains unlocated may be reported to the coroner as a suspected death. In the first study of its kind in Australia, archival records on suspected deaths investigated by New South Wales coroners from 2000 to 2013 were aggregated to assess the number of inquests, investigation timeframes, findings, recommendations and responses thereto. Of 322 suspected deaths, 96% resulted in an inquest, with the majority (94%) yielding a finding that the missing person was deceased with the cause (81%) and manner (73%) of death predominantly unknown. In one-third of the cases, more than 20 years lapsed from the date of disappearance to closure of the coronial investigation. Formal recommendations were made in 15% of the cases. These findings on the processes and outcomes of suspected death investigations are of particular import to relatives of missing people. Challenges in accessing records and the broader implications of the findings are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Ockenden E, 'Effects of Terrorist Charges and Threatening Conduct on Mock Jurors Decisions', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 23 696-708 (2016)

Terror management theory posits that fear of death influences judgments in criminal cases. A between-subjects study examined the influence of mortality and terrorism salience in t... [more]

Terror management theory posits that fear of death influences judgments in criminal cases. A between-subjects study examined the influence of mortality and terrorism salience in the context of life-threatening versus non-threatening criminal conduct on mock jurors¿ emotions and judgments of convictions by 485 jury-eligible Australian citizens. Mortality salience did not impact upon mock jurors¿ judgments, indicating that exposure to a criminal trial mitigated the effect. The participants reported more negative emotions with a suspect charged with a terrorism than non-terrorism crime, independently of criminal conduct. Mock jurors were more likely to convict a suspected terrorist (66.4%) than a defendant charged with murder when the criminal conduct entailed throwing a paint bomb (54.0%). When the actus reus was life-threatening, they were more likely to convict a defendant charged with intent to murder (81.5%) than with a terrorist crime (69.7%). The findings indicated that jurors can be influenced by numerous factors at court, including fear of death.

DOI 10.1080/13218719.2015.1120247
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Goodman-Delahunty J, Schuller R, Martschuk N, 'Workplace Sexual Harassment in Policing: Perceived Psychological Injuries by Source and Severity', Psychological Injury and Law, 9 241-252 (2016)

Relatively little is known about employee perceptions of workplace psychological injuries following sexual and nonsexual harassment. In quasi-military occupational organizations, ... [more]

Relatively little is known about employee perceptions of workplace psychological injuries following sexual and nonsexual harassment. In quasi-military occupational organizations, such as policing, the rate of sexual harassment to workplace injuries from other sources is comparatively high. In an exploratory 5 × 2 between-subjects factorial experimental projection study, 220 New South Wales Police Force officers responded to one of ten experimental vignettes in which sources of psychological injury and the gender of the injured worker were systematically varied. Results revealed an unexpected effect of experience. Employees aged 30¿years and older were significantly more likely to anticipate psychological consequences and clinically diagnosable symptoms than their younger counterparts. As hypothesized, a main effect of injury source, but not gender of the target, emerged for the severity of psychological consequences: a physical injury was perceived to produce significantly more severe psychological injuries than sexual harassment in the form of coercion and unwanted sexual attention. Contrary to the hypothesis, participants rated gender-based hostility higher than other types of sexual harassment as a source of severe psychological harm. Participants believed that gender-based hostility requires more professional intervention and predicted more negative workplace consequences than other psychological injuries caused by other workplace events. As hypothesized, women employees were generally viewed as significantly more vulnerable to negative workplace outcomes than men. The police officers who participated in this study considered women as more likely to experience workplace problems following sexual coercion than other types of workplace injury. Physical injuries, gender-based hostility, and sexual coercion were distinguished from nonsexual harassment and unwanted sexual attention as significantly more likely to produce clinically diagnosable injuries, irrespective of target gender. Implications of these findings for research, practice, and legal policy are discussed.

DOI 10.1007/s12207-016-9265-3
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Howes LM, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Teachers career decisions: Perspectives on choosing teaching careers, and on staying or leaving', Issues in Educational Research, 25 18-35 (2015)

For early-career teachers in particular, teacher attrition and retention has been the focus of international research. We aimed to provide a more holistic view of teacher attritio... [more]

For early-career teachers in particular, teacher attrition and retention has been the focus of international research. We aimed to provide a more holistic view of teacher attrition and retention in an Australian educational context by including the perspectives of a cross-section of current and former teachers with various lengths of teaching service. We explored the similarities and differences in considerations about past career decision points reported by the teachers in different groups. Australian teachers (N = 133) who were staying in teaching (n = 59), or undecided about staying (n = 34), and former teachers who had changed careers (n = 40) completed free-response questionnaires about their decisions to choose and to stay in (or to leave) teaching careers. Thematic analysis suggested that three overarching themes were salient across all three groups of teachers at different decision points in the career. These overarching themes were personal fulfilment, practical considerations, and lack of alternatives or barriers to change. Strategies to retain teachers should aim to foster collegial relationships, address workload, respond to needs for job security or flexibility, and provide new opportunities within teaching.

Citations Scopus - 24
2015 Howes LM, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Predicting Career Stability and Mobility: Embeddedness and Boundarylessness', Journal of Career Development, 42 244-259 (2015)

This study tested occupational embeddedness and boundaryless career attitudes as a complementary explanation for career stability and mobility, in occupations previously known for... [more]

This study tested occupational embeddedness and boundaryless career attitudes as a complementary explanation for career stability and mobility, in occupations previously known for lifetime employment. Current and former Australian teachers and police officers (n = 315) completed an online survey about their careers. Consistent with the hypothesis, logistic regression analyses confirmed that embeddedness-related variables such as financial responsibility and age predicted having made an active decision to stay in the chosen occupation, and boundaryless career attitudes predicted having left that occupation to change careers. Contrary to the hypothesis, years in the career predicted a history of mobility and years of career-specific education did not add predictive utility to the model. Overall, the findings partially supported the complementary explanation for career stability and mobility. By including current and former occupational members, and identifying predictors of career behavior, this study contributed to deeper understanding of the changing nature of previously lifelong careers.

DOI 10.1177/0894845314548722
Citations Scopus - 7
2015 Howes LM, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Career decisions by Australian police officers: a cross-section of perspectives on entering, staying in and leaving policing careers', Police Practice and Research, 16 453-468 (2015)

Australian police officers (N¿=¿182) who were staying in policing (n¿=¿96), or undecided about staying (n¿=¿57), and former police officers who had changed careers (n¿=¿29) comple... [more]

Australian police officers (N¿=¿182) who were staying in policing (n¿=¿96), or undecided about staying (n¿=¿57), and former police officers who had changed careers (n¿=¿29) completed free-response questionnaires about their decisions to choose and stay in (or leave) policing careers. Thematic analysis of responses revealed different considerations by group. Categories of the kaleidoscope career model were used to evaluate the relative importance of themes by group. Retention strategies to meet police officers¿ needs for authenticity, balance and challenge were suggested in light of salient themes at each major decision point.

DOI 10.1080/15614263.2014.951936
Citations Scopus - 10
2015 Dhami MK, Belton I, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Quasirational models of sentencing', Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 4 239-247 (2015)

Cognitive continuum theory points to the middle-ground between the intuitive and analytic modes of cognition, called quasirationality. In the context of sentencing, we discuss how... [more]

Cognitive continuum theory points to the middle-ground between the intuitive and analytic modes of cognition, called quasirationality. In the context of sentencing, we discuss how legal models prescribe the use of different modes of cognition. These models aim to help judges perform the cognitive balancing act required between factors indicating a more or less severe penalty for an offender. We compare sentencing in three common law jurisdictions (i.e., Australia, the US, and England and Wales). Each places a different emphasis on the use of intuition and analysis; but all are quasirational. We conclude that the most appropriate mode of cognition will likely be that which corresponds best with properties of the sentencing task. Finally, we discuss the implications of this cognition-task correspondence approach for researchers and legal policy-makers.

DOI 10.1016/j.jarmac.2014.07.009
Citations Scopus - 13
2014 Goodman-Delahunty J, O'Brien K, 'Parental sexual offending: Managing risk through diversion', TRENDS AND ISSUES IN CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE, 1-9 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Goodman-Delahunty J, Gumbert-Jourjon T, Hale S, 'The biasing influence of linguistic variations in DNA profiling evidence', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 46 348-360 (2014)

Extensive psychological research has confirmed that probabilistic statistical information that is mathematically equivalent, if presented in different linguistic forms, is not psy... [more]

Extensive psychological research has confirmed that probabilistic statistical information that is mathematically equivalent, if presented in different linguistic forms, is not psychologically equivalent. Commentators have argued that certain forms of evidence are more prejudicial than probative and should be excluded from trial. In a recent homicide case based on circumstantial evidence, the sole evidence linking a suspect to crime scene was mitochondrial DNA profiling evidence derived from a single loose hair found at the crime scene. Variations in the form of the linguistic evidence presented by DNA forensic scientists and research about its differential impact were cited as the basis for appeal of the conviction to the Australian High Court. A review of the research revealed that presentation of statistical information using natural frequencies is a recommended best practice. Random match probabilities expressed as frequencies are less susceptible of misinterpretation by legal professionals and lay jurors, and lead to fewer false convictions. © 2014 Australian Academy of Forensic Sciences.

DOI 10.1080/00450618.2013.877080
Citations Scopus - 5
2014 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Profiling parental child sex abuse', Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, 1-8 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Goodman-Delahunty J, Martschuk N, Dhami MK, 'Interviewing high value detainees: Securing cooperation and disclosures', Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28 883-897 (2014)

Four types of coercive and noncoercive interview strategies (legalistic, physical, cognitive and social) used to facilitate disclosure by high value detainees were examined in an ... [more]

Four types of coercive and noncoercive interview strategies (legalistic, physical, cognitive and social) used to facilitate disclosure by high value detainees were examined in an international sample of practitioners and detainees (N=64). Predictive analyses confirmed that the accusatorial approach was positively correlated with physically coercive strategies (rs=.58) and negatively with forms of social persuasion (rs=-.31). In response to social strategies, detainees were more likely to disclose meaningful information [odds ratio (OR)=4.2] and earlier in the interview when rapport-building techniques were used (OR=14.17). They were less likely to cooperate when confronted with evidence (OR=4.8). Disclosures were more complete in response to noncoercive strategies, especially rapport-building and procedural fairness elements of respect and voice. These findings augmented past theory on interactional processes and the evidence-base of international best practices in suspect interviews.

DOI 10.1002/acp.3087
Citations Scopus - 43
2014 Howes LM, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Life Course Research Design: Exploring Career Change Experiences of Former School Teachers and Police Officers', Journal of Career Development, 41 62-84 (2014)

Once associated with lifetime employment, policing and teaching have become increasingly associated with employee attrition. We used a life course research design to explore caree... [more]

Once associated with lifetime employment, policing and teaching have become increasingly associated with employee attrition. We used a life course research design to explore career turning points and transitions, in the context of preceding and following careers. Former police officers (n = 9) and former teachers (n = 15) from around Australia participated in 30- to 60-min interviews about their careers and career decision making. Transcribed interview responses were analyzed using contextualizing and categorizing methods. Although participants' experiences of ruptures preceding voluntary career change differed, the theme of feeling undervalued as a result of ruptures was common among participants. Participants felt valued in subsequent careers when prior skills were recognized and opportunities existed to acquire and apply new skills. Practical implications include the need for organizations to offer supportive workplace environments that value individual members and their contributions. © Curators of the University of Missouri 2013.

DOI 10.1177/0894845312474370
Citations Scopus - 11
2014 Harmer AL, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Practitioners' Opinions of Best Interests of the Child in Australian Legislation', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 21 251-271 (2014)

An online survey of 710 Australian practitioners working in child and family law investigated their views on the best interests of the child (BIC) criteria enumerated in s60CC of ... [more]

An online survey of 710 Australian practitioners working in child and family law investigated their views on the best interests of the child (BIC) criteria enumerated in s60CC of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth). This research inquired about BIC applied to younger (1-2 years) versus older (11-12 years) children. A mixed-model (within and between) analysis of variance demonstrated that 14 of 24 s60CC criteria have more significance for older children. Protecting the child from harm was rated most important regardless of the child's age, whereas the rated importance of a relationship with both parents was more variable. The criterion with the greatest variability for age was "the child's views". Exploratory factor analysis suggested that the high number of s60CC criteria encompass common underlying themes and some redundancy. Findings and implications are reviewed in relation to BIC decision-making and the weight accorded to particular issues by various practitioners. © 2013 © 2013 The Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law.

DOI 10.1080/13218719.2013.808977
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Goodman-Delahunty J, Beckley A, Martin M, 'Complaints against the New South Wales Police Force: analysis of risks and rights in reported police conduct', Australian Journal of Human Rights, 20 81-105 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/1323-238X.2014.11882151
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Sivasubramaniam D, Goodman-Delahunty J, Fraser M, Martin M, 'Protecting human rights in Australian investigative interviews: the role of recording and interview duration limits', Australian Journal of Human Rights, 20 107-132 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/1323-238X.2014.11882152
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Abrahamson DE, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Impediments to information and knowledge sharing within policing: A study of three canadian policing organizations', SAGE Open, 4 (2014)

Information sharing is the lifeblood of policing, yet information/knowledge sharing within and across organizations remains problematic. This article elaborated on previous resear... [more]

Information sharing is the lifeblood of policing, yet information/knowledge sharing within and across organizations remains problematic. This article elaborated on previous research on organizational information culture and its impact on information use outcomes in policing by examining perceived impediments to information sharing of 134 officers in three Canadian police organizations. Inductive qualitative analysis of an open-ended question revealed seven mutually exclusive impediment themes: processes/technology, individual unwillingness, organizational unwillingness, workload/overload, location/structure, leadership, and risk management. When viewed from the knowledge management infrastructure perspective, organizational structure was the single most common impediment identified, followed closely by organizational culture. Each organization had unique constellations of information sharing impediments. Recommendations for policy and practice are discussed.

DOI 10.1177/2158244013519363
Citations Scopus - 11
2013 Goodman-Delahunty J, Dhami MK, 'A Forensic Examination of Court Reports', Australian Psychologist, 48 32-40 (2013)

Advice to professionals who conduct forensic evaluations for courts on how to write an effective report has been driven by legal evidentiary principles and best practices in asses... [more]

Advice to professionals who conduct forensic evaluations for courts on how to write an effective report has been driven by legal evidentiary principles and best practices in assessment. Surprisingly, little attention has been paid to how salient information is integrated within a report, and how non-informational aspects of reports (e.g., order and format of information) may impact the fact-finding process. Experts are required to integrate both qualitative and quantitative information from a variety of different sources, with varying degrees of reliability and validity. Nevertheless, it is assumed that the trier of fact relatively weights and integrates the relevant information contained in a report in order to form a conclusion, and that this conclusion is then itself weighted and integrated with other evidence in order to formulate the final decision in a case. We apply theories and findings from the field of decision science to critically evaluate these assumptions and extend their application to outcomes of empirical studies on forensic reports. By drawing together the findings from these two areas of research, we identify research gaps and provide some recommendations on ways to structure and format expert reports to enhance their appropriate impact on the trier of fact. © 2012 The Australian Psychological Society.

DOI 10.1111/j.1742-9544.2012.00082.x
Citations Scopus - 10
2013 Swan AC, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The Relationship between Drug Use and Crime among Police Detainees: Does Gender Matter?', International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 12 107-115 (2013)

Research has shown a relationship between substance use and offending, but the nature of this relationship remains unclear, especially for women. To explore this, 867 female polic... [more]

Research has shown a relationship between substance use and offending, but the nature of this relationship remains unclear, especially for women. To explore this, 867 female police detainees in New South Wales were interviewed to examine the temporal order of substance use and offending, correlates of substance use and offending, and relationships between social background, substance use, and offending. Offenses relating to substance use, such as possession, were excluded. Canonical correlations revealed a significant association between substance use and offending. Results of t-tests showed that substance use significantly preceded criminal offending. Younger, less-educated women self-reported more heroin and cannabis dependency. Women who self-reported drug dependency had higher levels of offending than those who did not. These results are markedly different from patterns observed in most male offenders. We review the implications of these findings for crime prevention, rehabilitation and substance abuse treatment. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/14999013.2013.787561
Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Goodman-Delahunty J, Foote WE, 'Using a Five-Stage Model to Evaluate Workplace Discrimination Injuries', Psychological Injury and Law, 6 92-98 (2013)

Psychological assessment for workplace discrimination injuries is often complex, as each complainant has a particular personal history and context, including different coping skil... [more]

Psychological assessment for workplace discrimination injuries is often complex, as each complainant has a particular personal history and context, including different coping skills, psychopathologies and unique life circumstances. A five-stage model based on best practice guidelines can assist forensic assessment practitioners in determining compensatory damages for psychological or psychiatric injuries and in formulating defensible, evidence-based reports that meet legal standards. The model incorporates legally relevant theories of causation to guide the evaluating psychologist to discern the nature and extent of any injury, and whether discrimination was the likely proximate cause. The focus is not on diagnosis but on functional performance (cognitive, affective, interpersonal and physical) in four key contexts: activities of daily living, relationships, the workplace and hedonic pursuits. This assessment method compares functioning in the complainant's life until the "day before" the alleged discrimination event with the complainant's condition at the time of the alleged discrimination, and any symptoms or reactions experienced subsequently. The five-stage model provides a systematic method to examine compensatory damages claims and increase the comprehensiveness and accuracy of the forensic evaluation. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOI 10.1007/s12207-013-9154-y
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Abrahamson DE, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The impact of organizational information culture on information use outcomes in policing: An exploratory study', Information Research, 18 (2013)

Introduction. The information management practices of an organization along with the information behaviour and values of its personnel impact on organizational performance and the... [more]

Introduction. The information management practices of an organization along with the information behaviour and values of its personnel impact on organizational performance and the achievement of specific information use outcomes, positively and/or negatively. The aim of this study was to determine whether a theoretical model previously used in other fields to study the information management and information culture of organizations was applicable to policing, and examine which factors had the greatest impact on the achievement of the outcomes of problem solving, creating beneficial work, and information sharing within three Canadian police organizations. Method. A total of 134 sworn officers from various ranks across three Canadian police organizations completed an online survey. Analysis. Factor analysis and regression analysis were conducted using statistical analysis SPSS software. Results. Considering six information factors, regression analysis revealed that information pro-activeness and information management played significant roles in the achievement of the three information use outcomes. Factor analysis, using information management and five information behaviours, uncovered two new factors (information quality control and pro-active collaboration) that accounted for 71% of variance in the achievement of information use outcomes within this policing context. Conclusion. A conceptual framework for future police organization analysis is presented and the need for information use outcome scales is explored.

Citations Scopus - 17
2012 Butler L, Goodman-Delahunty J, Lulham R, 'Effectiveness of Pretrial Community-Based Diversion in Reducing Reoffending by Adult Intrafamilial Child Sex Offenders', Criminal Justice and Behavior, 39 493-513 (2012)

To investigate whether diversion to a pretrial community-based diversion program reduced sexual recidivism in adult intrafamilial child sex offenders, 208 offenders assessed for t... [more]

To investigate whether diversion to a pretrial community-based diversion program reduced sexual recidivism in adult intrafamilial child sex offenders, 208 offenders assessed for treatment between 1989 and 2003 were monitored for periods ranging from 2.8 to 18 years. Participants accepted for treatment (n = 88) were compared to those who declined (n = 120). After applying propensity score analysis to control for selection bias, Probit regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate rates of desistance between the groups. Although differences were not statistically significant, estimated rates of sexual reoffending were lower and time taken to sexually reoffend was longer in the diverted than the undiverted group. An overall effect size for treatment was large (OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.18, 1.5), and examination of the recidivists in the treatment group supported inferences of positive treatment effects. Limitations of this study are examined, and future directions for intrafamilial sex offender treatment are discussed. © 2012 International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology.

DOI 10.1177/0093854811433675
Citations Scopus - 8
2012 Titcomb C, Goodman-Delahunty J, De Puiseau BW, 'Pretrial Diversion for Intrafamilial Child Sexual Offending: Does Biological Paternity Matter?', Criminal Justice and Behavior, 39 552-570 (2012)

Diversion programs are generally reserved for offenders rated as low risk. The scant recidivism data on incest offenders classify intrafamilial offenders as lower risk than extraf... [more]

Diversion programs are generally reserved for offenders rated as low risk. The scant recidivism data on incest offenders classify intrafamilial offenders as lower risk than extrafamilial pedophiles. Even so, few community-based treatment programs accommodate offenders who sexually abuse children. Access to treatment programs for intrafamilial offenders is rare. Using a sample of 214 intrafamilial offenders who pled guilty on referral to a community-based pretrial diversion program for intrafamilial offenders, the authors explored whether biological fathers, typically classified as incest offenders, and nonbiological fathers, traditionally classified as extrafamilial pedophiles, benefited equally from diversion. Biological and nonbiological fathers were systematically compared to determine whether diversion programs should take the victim's relationship to the offender-biological or nonbiological-into account when determining diversion eligibility. Effect sizes confirmed that the two subgroups of intrafamilial offenders were substantially similar on demographic features, characteristics of the index victim and index offense, and prior offending history. The victim-offender relationship was unrelated to acceptance into treatment, treatment completion, and sexual reoffending. These findings advance knowledge of sex offender subtypes and indicate that policies and practices that distinguish biological from nonbiological father offenders should be reconsidered. At a minimum, exclusion of nonbiological intrafamilial sex offenders from community-based treatment programs appears unwarranted. © 2012 International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology.

DOI 10.1177/0093854811433678
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Goodman-Delahunty J, Cossins A, O'Brien K, 'A comparison of expert evidence and judicial directions to counter misconceptions in child sexual abuse trials', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY, 44 196-217 (2011)
DOI 10.1177/0004865811405140
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 20
2011 Bright DA, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Mock juror decision making in a civil negligence trial: The impact of gruesome evidence, injury severity, and information processing route', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 18 439-459 (2011)

Legal doctrine in common law jurisdictions reflects a concern that some types of evidence may lead to bias in jury decision making, and that prejudice can be driven by the emotion... [more]

Legal doctrine in common law jurisdictions reflects a concern that some types of evidence may lead to bias in jury decision making, and that prejudice can be driven by the emotional reactions of jurors to the evidence. The current study extends previous research by examining the synergistic influence of gruesome details and injury severity In a mock jury study, 240 first-year psychology students were assigned to one of two visual evidence conditions: neutral and gruesome photographs, and one of two injury severity conditions: moderate injury severity and high injury severity. Participants were further assigned to one of two information processing conditions in which they were instructed to process information in either the rational or experiential mode. The main findings were: (1) mock jurors who read about a more severely injured plaintiff were more sympathetic towards the plaintiff compared with mock jurors who read about a less severely injured plaintiff; (2) mock jurors exposed to gruesome photographs rated the defendant as significantly more negligent compared with mock jurors exposed to neutral photographs. Implications of these findings are that gruesome photographic evidence may bias jurors' perceptions of the responsibility of the plaintiff and defendant. © 2011 The Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law.

DOI 10.1080/13218719.2010.492095
Citations Scopus - 9
2011 Verbrugge HM, Goodman-Delahunty J, Frize MCJ, 'Risk assessment in intellectually disabled offenders: Validation of the suggested ID supplement to the HCR-20', International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 10 83-91 (2011)

The overrepresentation of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) in the criminal justice system is an established phenomenon. Recently there has been an increased focus ... [more]

The overrepresentation of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) in the criminal justice system is an established phenomenon. Recently there has been an increased focus in the literature on risk assessment of offenders with an ID. A supplemental guide to the HCR-20 (Webster, Douglas, Eaves, & Hart, 1997) for offenders with ID was proposed to increase the standardization and reliability of risk assessment for ID offenders. The current project empirically evaluated the validity of these adaptive recommendations in a sample of 59 community-based ID offenders with a history of violent offending. By employing a retrospective approach, this study examined differences in the relationship between predicted risk and actual reoffending over a minimum of two years, as assessed by using the HCR-20 and HCR-20 with ID Supplement. Their predictive validity was also compared to that of the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG; Quinsey, Harris, Rice, & Cormier, 1998). Predictive validity was generally good. Although statistical significance could not be determined, use of the ID Supplement resulted in a small improvement in predictive validity relative to the HCR-20 and VRAG. Implications of the findings for practitioners and recommendations for further research are discussed. © International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services.

DOI 10.1080/14999013.2011.555934
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Goodman-Delahunty J, Graham K, 'The influence of victim intoxication and victim attire on police responses to sexual assault', Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling, 8 22-40 (2011)

Limited research exists on the impact of contextual factors such as victim intoxication and victim attire on police processing of a case of sexual assault. The effects of these va... [more]

Limited research exists on the impact of contextual factors such as victim intoxication and victim attire on police processing of a case of sexual assault. The effects of these variables were examined in a simulated sexual assault case. Participants were 125 detectives from the New South Wales Police Department. Officers read controverted witness statements and viewed photographs pertaining to an investigation of a report of date rape. Contrary to findings in earlier studies, complainant intoxication, 'provocative' dress, and gender of the officer had no influence on the likelihood of charging the alleged offender. Factors predictive of pressing charges were the perceived credibility of the complainant and culpability of the alleged offender. Credibility and guilt judgements were themselves influenced by the level of rape myth acceptance endorsed by the officers. Rape myth acceptance also exerted a number of other effects on case evaluations. Implications for future studies and education and training programmes for police on sexual assault were discussed. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/jip.127
Citations Scopus - 37
2010 Goodman-Delahunty J, Cossins A, O'Brien K, 'Enhancing the Credibility of Complainants in Child Sexual Assault Trials: The Effect of Expert Evidence and Judicial Directions', BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES & THE LAW, 28 769-783 (2010)
DOI 10.1002/bsl.936
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 27
2010 Goodman-Delahunty J, Granhag PA, Hartwig M, Loftus EF, 'Insightful or wishful: Lawyers' Ability to Predict Case Outcomes', Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 16 133-157 (2010)

Lawyers' litigation forecasts play an integral role in the justice system. In the course of litigation, lawyers constantly make strategic decisions and/or advise their client... [more]

Lawyers' litigation forecasts play an integral role in the justice system. In the course of litigation, lawyers constantly make strategic decisions and/or advise their clients on the basis of their perceptions and predictions of case outcomes. The study investigated the realism in predictions by a sample of attorneys (n = 481) across the United States who specified a minimum goal to achieve in a case set for trial. They estimated their chances of meeting this goal by providing a confidence estimate. After the cases were resolved, case outcomes were compared with the predictions. Overall, lawyers were overconfident in their predictions, and calibration did not increase with years of legal experience. Female lawyers were slightly better calibrated than their male counterparts and showed evidence of less overconfidence. In an attempt to reduce overconfidence, some lawyers were asked to generate reasons why they might not achieve their stated goals. This manipulation did not improve calibration. © 2010 American Psychological Association.

DOI 10.1037/a0019060
Citations Scopus - 67
2009 Cossins A, Goodman-Delahunty J, O'Brien K, 'Uncertainty and Misconceptions About Child Sexual Abuse: Implications for the Criminal Justice System', PSYCHIATRY PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW, 16 435-452 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/13218710902930234
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23
2008 Hewson L, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Using multimedia to support jury understanding of DNA profiling evidence', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 40 55-64 (2008)

Jury difficulties in understanding and according suitable weight to probabilistic scientific expert evidence about DNA profiling are well established. Traditional legal aids, incl... [more]

Jury difficulties in understanding and according suitable weight to probabilistic scientific expert evidence about DNA profiling are well established. Traditional legal aids, including note-taking and allowing jury questions, have had limited success in diminishing their problems. This study examined the potential of multimedia instruction to enhance jury comprehension. Mock jurors reviewed a homicide case in which DNA evidence linked the suspect to the crime scene. Instructional media on 'Forensic DNA Technology' and/or 'Random Match Probability' accompanied the oral expert evidence to support juror understanding. Pre-test-post-test comparisons of juror conceptions about forensic uses of DNA determined whether these multimedia facilitated juror comprehension. Analyses of responses to the expert evidence acknowledged the incidence of 'CSI' effects in which jurors have increased expectations of scientific evidence after viewing popular crime investigations on television. Since multimedia instruction for juries can apply to all forms of forensic evidence, we propose the use of structured instructional media for courts developing policies on uses of visual evidence. © 2008 Australian Academy of Forensic Sciences.

DOI 10.1080/00450610802050782
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 McLean R, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The influence of relationship and physical evidence on police decision-making in sexual assault cases', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 40 109-121 (2008)

Limited research has explored the influence of relationship type and presence of physical injuries on police decision-making in sexual assault cases. This study investigated the e... [more]

Limited research has explored the influence of relationship type and presence of physical injuries on police decision-making in sexual assault cases. This study investigated the effects of these evidentiary variables on police decision-making in sexual assault claims. Participants were 73 police officers from the Australian Federal Police who read witness statements of a sexual assault and rated their perceptions of the complainant, the alleged offender and the claim of sexual assault. Findings revealed that the relationship between the complainant and the alleged offender and the presence of physical injury significantly influenced officers' perceptions of the complainant and the suspect and their evaluations of the claim of sexual assault. © 2008 Australian Academy of Forensic Sciences.

DOI 10.1080/00450610802452210
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 Bradford D, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Detecting deception in police investigations: Implications for false confessions', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 15 105-118 (2008)

A great deal of psychological research suggests that fact finders are unable to successfully distinguish truths from lies at levels significantly greater than chance. This article... [more]

A great deal of psychological research suggests that fact finders are unable to successfully distinguish truths from lies at levels significantly greater than chance. This article addresses the shortcomings in deception detection accuracy in forensic settings and focuses on the implications for the elicitation of false confessions and the assessment of confession evidence. In particular, we review the empirical psychological literature on detecting deception while highlighting the limitations on performance accuracy in forensic contexts. The consequences of these performance errors are discussed with reference to police interviews and the elicitation of potentially unreliable confessions. Next, this article outlines the conditions under which innocent people may falsely confess and considers the psychological factors that may mediate an individual's decision to make a false confession. The authors argue that false confessions are very persuasive and are difficult to discern from truthful confessions elicited in an investigative context. The implications for assessing the credibility of confessions and possible directions for future research are discussed.

DOI 10.1080/13218710701873932
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Betts S, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The case of Kathleen Folbigg: How did justice and medicine fare?', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 39 11-24 (2007)

Using the example of a multiple filicide, we review challenges facing medical experts who examine unexplained multiple infant deaths in the context of a criminal trial. These incl... [more]

Using the example of a multiple filicide, we review challenges facing medical experts who examine unexplained multiple infant deaths in the context of a criminal trial. These include the complex and contradictory nature of evidence, the difficulty in achieving medical consensus to explain multiple sudden deaths, errors and vulnerabilities associated with clinical judgment, and pressure from legal practitioners to achieve a favorable result. In Folbigg, evidentiary rules regarding coincidence and tendency appear to have skewed expert opinion, and consequently, fact-finder reasoning. A central problem was the limitation of medicine to clearly account for each of the four deaths, let alone all four. Medical experts were required to identify similar cases in their experience or concede that multiple sudden infant deaths could be accounted for only by suspicious circumstances. Empirical research on decision-making under conditions of complexity, uncertainty, and adverse outcomes reveals the potential for judgmental errors. The propensity for error increases when experts testify in court and transform probabilistic medical judgments into statements of certainty. © 2007 Australian Academy of Forensic Sciences.

DOI 10.1080/00450610701324916
Citations Scopus - 4
2007 Saunders P, Huynh A, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Defining workplace bullying behaviour professional lay definitions of workplace bullying', International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 30 340-354 (2007)

As is commonly the case in new areas of research, workplace bullying researchers and practitioners have struggled to establish a single agreed-upon definition of this phenomenon. ... [more]

As is commonly the case in new areas of research, workplace bullying researchers and practitioners have struggled to establish a single agreed-upon definition of this phenomenon. As a consequence, there are numerous definitions of workplace bullying currently in use around the world to investigate this serious workplace issue, to educate the workforce about this form of harassment and to assess claims involving allegations of workplace bullying. Additionally, little is known about how employees and people in general define workplace bullying behaviour, and whether current researcher, practitioner and legal definitions coincide with lay definitions of bullying. To compare researcher, practitioner and legal definitions of workplace bullying with lay definitions, the content of definitions composed by adults from diverse personal and professional backgrounds (N = 1095) was analysed. Results confirmed that components commonly used by researchers and practitioners, including the occurrence of harmful and negative workplace behaviours, were frequently cited by participants as central defining components of bullying behaviour. In addition, lay definitions often included themes of fairness and respect. The emergence of these themes has important consequences for organisations responding to, and attempting to prevent the occurrence of workplace bullying behaviour in that organisations in which bullying is tolerated may violate both local laws as well as their ethical responsibility to provide employees with a safe, professional and respectful workplace. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijlp.2007.06.007
Citations Scopus - 101
2006 Dartnall S, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Enhancing Juror Understanding of Probabilistic DNA Evidence', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 38 85-96 (2006)

DNA experts, researchers, and legal professionals agree that laypersons experience difficulty understanding and applying aspects of DNA expert evidence. This paper reviews empiric... [more]

DNA experts, researchers, and legal professionals agree that laypersons experience difficulty understanding and applying aspects of DNA expert evidence. This paper reviews empirical research on documented problems that jurors experience in response to probabilistic forensic evidence. A 2x2 between subjects study tested the sensitivity of 200 mock jurors to the probative value of DNA evidence with and without error rates, and the efficacy of a post-trial judicial caution intended to prevent jurors from assigning undue weight to the DNA evidence. When DNA evidence was included in a weak, circumstantial criminal case, although the majority of the participants voted to acquit, the conviction rate increased significantly. However, participants were insensitive to variations in the probative weight of a probabilistic DNA match in the context of error rates. Contrary to expectations, the model judicial caution on applying the DNA evidence failed to reduce the rate of convictions or perceived factual guilt. These results suggest that DNA evidence can be influential, but that jurors are not overwhelmed by its presence. Jurors may benefit more from pre-trial training and presentation of the judicial caution earlier in the trial. Additional research is needed on techniques to assist jurors in more appropriately evaluating and applying probabilistic expert evidence. © 2006 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/00450610609410635
Citations Scopus - 12
2006 Goodman-Delahunty J, Tait D, 'DNA and the Changing Face of Justice', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 38 97-106 (2006)

Focusing on the impact of DNA evidence in jury trials, evidence for the existence of multiple posited forms of the ¿CSI effect¿ is reviewed. The most popular version of the effect... [more]

Focusing on the impact of DNA evidence in jury trials, evidence for the existence of multiple posited forms of the ¿CSI effect¿ is reviewed. The most popular version of the effect, that it produces unrealistic expectations of the prosecution and thus results in unwarranted acquittals, remains unsupported. The converse effect, that unwarranted convictions result from the overweighting of DNA expert evidence, has received some support from archival analyses, a substantial field study, and several simulation studies. The precise factors that produce these trends are yet not well-understood. Future research should examine the source of these findings, explore ways to assist jurors in according DNA evidence appropriate probative weight, and take into account the influence of jury deliberations. © 2006 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/00450610609410636
Citations Scopus - 15
2006 Bright DA, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Gruesome evidence and emotion: Anger, blame, and jury decision-making', Law and Human Behavior, 30 183-202 (2006)

Judges assume that gruesome evidence can influence juror verdicts, but little is known about the manner in which the influence is manifested. In a 2 x 3 study that varied the grue... [more]

Judges assume that gruesome evidence can influence juror verdicts, but little is known about the manner in which the influence is manifested. In a 2 x 3 study that varied the gruesome content of photographic and verbal evidence, gruesome verbal evidence did not influence mock juror emotional states, and had no impact on the conviction rate. Mock jurors who saw gruesome photographs, compared with those who saw no photographs, reported experiencing significantly more intense emotional responses, including greater anger at the defendant. The conviction rate when visual evidence in the form of gruesome or neutral photographs was included was significantly higher than the conviction rate without photographic evidence. Mean ratings of the inculpatory weight of prosecution evidence by mock jurors presented with gruesome photographs were significantly higher than those by mock jurors who did not view any photographs. Further analyses revealed that mock juror anger toward the defendant mediated the influence of the gruesome photographs in enhancing the weight of inculpatory evidence. © American Psychology-Law Society/Division 41 of the American Psychological Association 2006.

DOI 10.1007/s10979-006-9027-y
Citations Scopus - 133
2006 Sivasubramaniam D, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Trust and power-distance: A psychological perspective on fairness in restorative justice conferences', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 13 203-219 (2006)

Psychological research indicates that trust in the independent third party affects the way in which disputants rate the fairness of legal procedures. This article addresses proced... [more]

Psychological research indicates that trust in the independent third party affects the way in which disputants rate the fairness of legal procedures. This article addresses procedural variation in restorative justice practices, in the context of psychological research on procedural and distributive fairness. In particular, we describe differences in the ways in which high and low power-distance participants determine fairness in conferencing procedures. This article outlines the way in which convenor variation in conferencing programs may affect participants' perceptions of bias in these conference procedures, and the moderating effect of power-distance on the consequences of this perceived bias. The authors argue that a sensitive analysis of the ability of restorative justice procedures to deliver effective justice requires consideration of individual difference factors in conjunction with situational factors.

DOI 10.1375/pplt.13.2.203
Citations Scopus - 4
2004 Bright DA, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'The influence of gruesome verbal evidence on Mock Juror verdicts', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 11 154-166 (2004)

Judges assume that gruesome evidence can influence juror verdicts. Legal safeguards such as exclusionary evidentiary doctrines are in place to protect defendants against the misus... [more]

Judges assume that gruesome evidence can influence juror verdicts. Legal safeguards such as exclusionary evidentiary doctrines are in place to protect defendants against the misuse of visual gruesome evidence by jurors. However, little is known about the impact of gruesome evidence on juror decision-making. The current study investigated the hypothesis that convictions are more likely in cases in which gruesome evidence is admitted. When inculpatory evidence was held constant, 34.4% of mock jurors presented with gruesome evidence convicted the defendant, whereas only 13.9% of the mock jurors who reviewed no gruesome evidence did so. When inculpatory evidence was legally insufficient for conviction and gruesome evidence was presented, mock jurors rated the likelihood of the guilt of the defendant significantly higher compared with ratings from mock jurors to whom no gruesome facts were presented. The presence of gruesome facts also significantly enhanced the inculpatory value of one item in evidence. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1375/pplt.2004.11.1.154
Citations Scopus - 29
2000 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Psychological impairment under the Americans with disabilities act: Legal guidelines', Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 31 197-205 (2000)

This article introduces mental health care providers to changes in the law defining a disability within the meaning of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The impact of these cha... [more]

This article introduces mental health care providers to changes in the law defining a disability within the meaning of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The impact of these changes, based on recent U.S. Supreme Court cases, is reviewed in terms of how they affect psychologically disabled persons who allege employment discrimination on the basis of their impairment. Common pitfalls are identified for practitioners to avoid when consulting about psychologically impaired employees. Critical threshold questions are outlined, and 5 types of discrimination claims involving mentally impaired individuals are illustrated. The potential contribution of psychologists in disability cases is examined.

DOI 10.1037/0735-7028.31.2.197
Citations Scopus - 11
1999 Foote WE, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Same-sex harassment: Implications of the Oncale decision for forensic evaluation of plaintiffs', Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 17 123-139 (1999)

The US Supreme Court recently rendered an opinion in Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services, Inc. (1998), holding that same-sex sexual harassment of a male by another male provides... [more]

The US Supreme Court recently rendered an opinion in Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services, Inc. (1998), holding that same-sex sexual harassment of a male by another male provides a basis for a title VII hostile work environment claim. Social scientists have recently begun to research same-sex sexual harassment. The data indicate that men are the predominant targets of intra-gender sexual harassment, and that patterns of same-sex harassment differ from those of inter-gender harassment. The clinical research on male victims of sexual abuse suggests that symptom pictures for same-sex victims may differ from models based upon women's experience of hostile work environments. Implications for social science research and clinical practice are discussed.

DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0798(199901/03)17:1<123::AID-BSL334>3.0.CO;2-V
Citations Scopus - 8
1999 Greene E, Downey C, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Juror decisions about damages in employment discrimination cases', Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 17 107-121 (1999)

This article examines influences on mock juror and jury decision making regarding damages in an employment discrimination case. We examined the effects of expert economic testimon... [more]

This article examines influences on mock juror and jury decision making regarding damages in an employment discrimination case. We examined the effects of expert economic testimony, suggested awards, and conflicting economic testimony on decisions regarding lost wages and benefits and pain and suffering. Participants heard excerpts of an age discrimination lawsuit in which liability had previously been determined in the plaintiff's favor. We varied whether suggested awards were included and if so, whether they were presented by attorneys, a plaintiffs expert economist, or both a plaintiff's and defendant's expert economist. Results tentatively showed that attorney's suggestions were not persuasive and hat the effects of expert testimony depend on its nature and on the particular decision task at hand.

DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0798(199901/03)17:1<107::AID-BSL330>3.0.CO;2-X
Citations Scopus - 19
1999 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Pragmatic support for the reasonable victim standard in hostile workplace sexual harassment cases', Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 5 519-555 (1999)

The development of the objective reasonableness standard in Title VII sexual harassment cases is reviewed. The author examines major policies or goals that underlie subjective and... [more]

The development of the objective reasonableness standard in Title VII sexual harassment cases is reviewed. The author examines major policies or goals that underlie subjective and objective aspects of the test to determine whether harassing conduct is sufficiently abusive and hostile to violate the law: (a) elimination of gender-biased norms, (b) eradication of harassment, and (c) uniformity. Four formulations of objective reasonableness are distinguished: the reasonable person, victim, woman, and employee. Problems demonstrated by courts in applying objective reasonableness standards are specified, many of which are attributed to inadequate definitional content. Empirical support for flexibility in the standard leads to recommendations favoring a reasonable victim standard that takes into account variations in the identity and circumstances of the victim including pertinent gender differences. Potential expert testimony to address these concerns is discussed.

DOI 10.1037/1076-8971.5.3.519
Citations Scopus - 8
1998 Goodman-Delahunty J, Greene E, Hsiao W, 'Construing motive in videotaped killings: The role of jurors' attitudes toward the death penalty', Law and Human Behavior, 22 257-271 (1998)

Death-qualified jurors are generally able to impose the death penalty, whereas excludable jurors are generally either unable or unwilling to do so. A long line of research studies... [more]

Death-qualified jurors are generally able to impose the death penalty, whereas excludable jurors are generally either unable or unwilling to do so. A long line of research studies has shown that the former are more likely than the latter to convict criminal defendants. Ellsworth (1993) argues that jurors' attitudes toward the death penalty predict verdicts because they are embedded in a cluster of beliefs and theories about the criminal justice system. Her studies show that jurors interpret ambiguous conduct based on these belief structures. The present study examines the possibility that death penalty attitudes also influence jurors' conceptions of criminal intent. We showed mock jurors the filmed murder of a convenience store clerk and examined the inferences they drew from this evidence. Jurors who favored the death penalty tended to read criminal intent into the defendant's actions and jurors who opposed the death penalty were less likely to do so. These data provide further explanation of the conviction-proneness of death- qualified jurors.

DOI 10.1023/A:1025750321795
Citations Scopus - 15
1998 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Approaches to gender and the law: Research and applications', Law and Human Behavior, 22 129-143 (1998)

Three paradigms for gender research are reviewed, illustrated by examples from employment discrimination law to highlight issues in research on gender and the law. Next, an agenda... [more]

Three paradigms for gender research are reviewed, illustrated by examples from employment discrimination law to highlight issues in research on gender and the law. Next, an agenda for research on gender, social science, and the law is outlined, and the five articles in this special issue are reviewed in terms of that agenda. Finally, research ideas for the future and practical applications of the research presented in the five articles are considered, specifically, the use of the reasonable woman standard and expert testimony in sexual harassment cases, and the influence of sex roles and sex stereotypes in producing gender effects. © 1998 American Psychology-Law Society/Division 41 of the American Psychological Association.

DOI 10.1023/A:1025732923376
Citations Scopus - 5
1997 Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Forensic psychological expertise in the wake of Daubert', Law and Human Behavior, 21 121-140 (1997)

Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. established guidelines for screening the admissibility of scientific evidence and overruled the Frye 'general acceptance' do... [more]

Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. established guidelines for screening the admissibility of scientific evidence and overruled the Frye 'general acceptance' doctrine. Guidelines more akin to those advocated by psychologists to assess the trustworthiness of the expert testimony were established in light of the Federal Rules of Evidence on the reliability, relevance, and prejudicial or probative nature of the information. Forensic psychological experts will have to be explicit about the scientific foundations of their opinions. The more flexible formula for the admission of scientific evidence may exert greater quality control than the Frye test, and enhance the relationship of psychology and law by eliminating some sources of controversy within the professional community over expert witnesses. Research needs flowing from the new standards are identified.

DOI 10.1023/A:1024874228425
Citations Scopus - 44
1995 Greene E, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Diagnosis of psychological impairment in employment discrimination claims', Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 13 459-476 (1995)

The United States Supreme Court recently held that while psychological harm or injury is not a prerequisite to proof of liability in employment discrimination lawsuits, such harm ... [more]

The United States Supreme Court recently held that while psychological harm or injury is not a prerequisite to proof of liability in employment discrimination lawsuits, such harm or injury may be considered in determining employer liability. Other recent legal developments have also greatly expanded the opportunity for psychologists and other mental health professionals to contribute to determinations of both liability and damages in this legal context. This article briefly examines some of the aspects of workplace claims that evaluating mental health experts We need to address. Then the article focuses on the role of psychodiagnostic testing in the context of legal decisionmaking. Finally, the article points to gaps in knowledge regarding the role of psychodiagnostic testing in employment cases and suggests areas for future research on this timely but understudied topic. Copyright © 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

DOI 10.1002/bsl.2370130403
Citations Scopus - 3
1995 Goodman-Delahunty J, Foote WE, 'Compensation for pain, suffering, and other psychological injuries: The of Daubert on employment discrimination claims', Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 13 183-206 (1995)

The Daubert standard for admitting expert testimony places increased emphasis on the scientific basis for professional opinions. This article identifies factors mental health prof... [more]

The Daubert standard for admitting expert testimony places increased emphasis on the scientific basis for professional opinions. This article identifies factors mental health professionals should consider to meet that standard and Federal Rule of Evidence 702 when evaluating claims of psychological injuries as authorized by the Civil Rights Act of 1991, in cases of sexual harassment, retaliation, and other forms of employment discrimination. First, the contribution experts can make by presenting a framework to assess and understand the nature, duration, intensity and severity of emotional injuries is outlined. Specialized knowledge helpful in assessing these claims is reviewed in light of the scientific literature on stressors, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and ways in which related symptoms manifest regarding events in the workplace or following loss of employment. Second, the role of qualified experts to facilitate determinations of causation is discussed, highlighting factors that bear on preexisting harm, intervening injurious events, the exclusion of alternate sources of mental distress, emotional harm and humiliation, and mitigation of damages. Copyright © 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

DOI 10.1002/bsl.2370130204
Citations Scopus - 28
1993 Goodman J, 'Evaluating psychological expertise on questions of social fact - The case of Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins', Law and Human Behavior, 17 249-255 (1993)

The empirical evidence summarized in the APA amicus brief in Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins was initially presented at trial, subject to quality control measures contained in the Fed... [more]

The empirical evidence summarized in the APA amicus brief in Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins was initially presented at trial, subject to quality control measures contained in the Federal Rules of Evidence and an opportunity for cross-examination. This evidence was incorporated into the adjudicative facts determined by the trial judge. These unique circumstances rendered the APA brief more akin to a guild brief than to a typical APA science translation or Brandeis brief. As such, the brief was effective. However, the debate about the brief highlights shortcomings in the existing system for evaluating social science facts presented for the first time by a friend of the court. Recommendations are made to take into account the consensus of experts in the field and adverse findings when presenting empirical evidence for the first time in an appeal brief. © 1993 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

DOI 10.1007/BF01045942
Citations Scopus - 5
1992 Severance LJ, Goodman J, Loftus EF, 'Inferring the criminal mind: Toward a bridge between legal doctrine and psychological understanding', Journal of Criminal Justice, 20 107-120 (1992)

Criminal law is concerned with defining when people commit prohibited acts accompanied by culpable mental states (criminal intent, knowledge, recklessness, or negligence). An expe... [more]

Criminal law is concerned with defining when people commit prohibited acts accompanied by culpable mental states (criminal intent, knowledge, recklessness, or negligence). An experiment focused on how laypeople, asked to serve as "jurors," interpret and apply legal instructions on the definitions of culpable mental states. The results pinpoint differences between legal mental state definitions that jurors are expected to apply in deciding criminal cases and laypersons' understanding of those mental states. Laypeople do not comprehend mental state distinctions that are differentiated in legal doctrine. The results are discussed in terms of attribution theory, and practical suggestions are made that may be useful to attorneys. © 1992.

DOI 10.1016/0047-2352(92)90002-Q
Citations Scopus - 9
1992 Schwartz DJ, Goodman J, 'Expert testimony on decision processes in employment cases', Law and Human Behavior, 16 337-355 (1992)

The 1991 Civil Rights Act and recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions have modified standards applicable to psychometric or statistical proof of discrimination in employment cases. Ch... [more]

The 1991 Civil Rights Act and recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions have modified standards applicable to psychometric or statistical proof of discrimination in employment cases. Changes in the legal standards have increased the role for psychological experts to prove or rebut allegations of disparate impact of hiring or promotional criteria, whether those criteria caused the observed disparities in the workforce, and whether the legitimate needs of the employer were substantially served by the employer's selection criteria. Three different methods or approaches to meet the legal standards are discussed: (a) reliance on traditional psychometric validity analyses; (b) regression analysis or the "policy-capturing" method; and (c) the survey data approach. These techniques are illustrated by reference to three cases in which experts successfully presented this evidence. While the application of the 1991 Civil Rights Act remains somewhat unclear, these approaches may prove useful in future employment discrimination cases. © 1992 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

DOI 10.1007/BF01044773
Citations Scopus - 3
1990 Raitz A, Greene E, Goodman J, Loftus EF, 'Determining damages - The influence of expert testimony on jurors' decision making', Law and Human Behavior, 14 385-395 (1990)

How do jurors accomplish the task of awarding damages in a civil lawsuit? to what extent are they influenced by expert testimony? These questions were addressed in a mock juror si... [more]

How do jurors accomplish the task of awarding damages in a civil lawsuit? to what extent are they influenced by expert testimony? These questions were addressed in a mock juror simulation in which jurors from El Paso County (Colorado) read one of three versions of a trial manuscript involving an age discrimination claim in which liability was already determined. They awarded damages and answered follow-up questions. In one version, there was no expert testimony; in a second version, they received plaintiff expert testimony on lost future wages and other economic matters; and in the third version, they received both plaintiff and defense expert testimony. Monetary awards were significantly higher when expert(s) testified. Moreover, jurors were strongly influenced by the expert testimony: Nearly half of them selected a damage award that exactly matched the amounts suggested. Finally, jurors infrequently considered exponential calculations in assessing damages. © 1990 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

DOI 10.1007/BF01068163
Citations Scopus - 31
1989 Goodman J, Croyle RT, 'Social framework testimony in employment discrimination cases', Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 7 227-241 (1989)

The use of social framework testimony by social psychologists in employment discrimination cases is expanding. After reviewing the legal background of this type of testimony, we d... [more]

The use of social framework testimony by social psychologists in employment discrimination cases is expanding. After reviewing the legal background of this type of testimony, we describe its content and discuss an important Title VII case of sex discrimination where the testimony played a critical role. We also distinguish social framework testimony from other types of expert testimony by psychologists. Copyright © 1989 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

DOI 10.1002/bsl.2370070207
Citations Scopus - 9
1988 Goodman J, Loftus EF, 'The Relevance of Expert Testimony on Eyewitness Memory', Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 3 115-121 (1988)
DOI 10.1177/088626088003001013
Citations Scopus - 4
Show 99 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Goodman-Delahunty J, Sporer SL, 'Unconscious influences in sentencing decisions: A research review of psychological sources of disparity', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences (2010)

Drawing on theoretical insights from basic psychological research, influences sourced in unanticipated or extra-legal aspects of criminal cases that can influence sentencing decis... [more]

Drawing on theoretical insights from basic psychological research, influences sourced in unanticipated or extra-legal aspects of criminal cases that can influence sentencing decisions are reviewed. Findings from empirical studies of observed disparities in sentencing decisions are summarized, including archival data, observational studies, field research and experimental investigations of simulated sentencing decisions. A criterion for inclusion was that the factor had to exert an influence outside the conscious awareness of the judge. The paper examines the effects on sentencing of some traditional extra-legal factors, such as judge and offender gender, as well as less traditional elements, such as the judge's attitudes and sentencing philosophy, the physical appearance of the offender, unforeseeable consequences of the crime, and reactions to acts of terrorism. Four sources of potential bias are distinguished: (a) features associated with the judge; (b) features associated with the offender, (c) unanticipated or remote consequences of the offence, and (d) contextual information at the time of the sentencing decision that heightens awareness of mortality. The effectiveness of sentencing reforms to reduce disparities arising from unconscious factors is discussed. The purpose of this review is to advance understanding of the psychology of sentencing and increase judicial and public awareness of unconscious biases and disparities in sentencing determinations. © 2010 Australian Academy of Forensic Sciences.

DOI 10.1080/00450610903391440
Citations Scopus - 21
2008 Sivasubramaniam D, Goodman-Delahunty J, 'Decisions to participate in restorative justice conferences: Effects of convenor identity and power-distance', Psychiatry, Psychology and Law (2008)

One procedural feature on which restorative justice conferencing models differ is the identity of the convenor, with some conferencing models being administered by police. This st... [more]

One procedural feature on which restorative justice conferencing models differ is the identity of the convenor, with some conferencing models being administered by police. This study investigates how convenor type affects decisions to participate in conferences. Research regarding power-distance (Hofstede, 1980, 2001) suggests that this factor may differentiate responses to conferencing among participants from different cultural backgrounds. Convenor type (police vs. civilian) was varied in a between-subjects quasi-experimental design, to determine whether participants' choice to engage in conferencing was affected by their beliefs about police, or by power-distance values. Results showed that participants overestimate the effect of convenor identity on their preferences: although self-report responses indicated a preference for civilian-convened conferences, between-groups effects indicated that participants chose police-convened conferences as frequently as civilian-convened conferences. Also, high power-distance participants displayed a greater preference for court procedures than low power-distance participants. Results are discussed with regard to cultural issues in conferencing. © 2008 The Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law.

DOI 10.1080/13218710802014527
Citations Scopus - 1

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Goodman-Delahunty J, Hodgson N, Martschuk N, Cossins A, 'Responses to Submissions to the Royal Commission s Consultation Paper on Criminal Justice in Relation to the Jury Reasoning Research.', Responses to submissions to the Royal Commission s Consultation Paper on Criminal Justice in relation to the Jury Reasoning Research.: Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse (2017)
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Therapeutic Justice: How do Judges Incorporate Mental Ill-Health into Decisions Regarding Offenders PhD (Psychiatry), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Professor Jane Goodman-Delahunty

Position

Professor
Newcastle Law School
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email jane.delahunty@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5374
Mobile 0421879411

Office

Room X/539
Building NuSpace
Location City campus

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