Miss Hayley Cullen

Associate Lecturer

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

After submitting my PhD thesis in 2020, I moved to the University of Newcastle as an Associate Lecturer in the School of Psychology. Prior to this, I worked as a casual academic and research assistant in the School of Psychology at the University of Sydney, and as a lecturer at the Australian College of Applied Psychology in Sydney. I have experience as a lecturer, tutor, and course coordinator in several undergraduate and honours level courses. I am dedicated to enriching the student experience and providing students with skills that they can apply beyond university in their professional careers. 

My research focuses on the intersection between psychology and law. Specifically, I am passionate about conducting research that has the potential to improve legal procedures and prevent miscarriages of justice - such as wrongful convictions - from occurring. I have conducted a number of research projects focused around understanding the factors that affect the memory of eyewitnesses to crimes. Additionally, I also conduct research looking at juror decision making and evidence-based policing. My research has included a number of diverse forensic populations, including child witnesses, lawyers, and police officers. My research has featured in podcasts and newspaper articles, on television, and in legal cases.


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cognition
  • Eyewitness memory
  • Juries
  • Memory
  • Policing

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
520401 Cognition 20
520103 Forensic psychology 80

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/6/2020 - 1/2/2021 Lecturer Australian College of Applied Psychology
Discipline of Psychological Science
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2016 - 31/12/2020 Research Assistant University of Sydney
School of Psychology
Australia

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2017 Monash Criminology Postgraduate Prize
Monash University

Scholarship

Year Award
2018 Campbell Perry International Travel Scholarship
School of Psychology, University of Sydney

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC4202 Applications of Psychology: Forensic Psychology
Australian College of Applied Psychology
Course Coordinator 1/9/2020 - 1/2/2021
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Topic lectured: Emotion
Lecturer - Summer School 1/1/0001 - 1/1/0001
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/3/2018 - 30/6/2018
PSYC3888 Interdisciplinary Project Based Unit
University of Sydney
Topics lectured: Research methods
Tutor and Occasional Lecturer 1/8/2019 - 30/11/2019
PSYC3312 Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Australian College of Applied Psychology
Course Coordinator 1/6/2020 - 1/9/2020
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Topic lectured: Forensic Psychology
Lecturer - Summer School 8/1/2019 - 28/2/2019
PSYC1002 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/8/2017 - 30/11/2017
PSYC3020 Applications of Psychological Science
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/8/2018 - 30/11/2018
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Cullen HJ, Paterson HM, van Golde C, 'Mock Juror Perceptions of Witness Inattentional Blindness', Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, (2020)

© 2020, Society for Police and Criminal Psychology. It is possible that eyewitnesses may not notice crimes when focused on something else due to ¿inattentional blindness¿ (IB). Ho... [more]

© 2020, Society for Police and Criminal Psychology. It is possible that eyewitnesses may not notice crimes when focused on something else due to ¿inattentional blindness¿ (IB). However, it is unclear how witnesses who experience IB will be perceived by jurors, and what factors may influence these perceptions. In study 1, mock jurors read a transcript of an assault crime, in which one witness noticed the assault and another witness did not (i.e. experienced IB). It was found that the witness who experienced IB was perceived as less credible than the witness who saw the crime. In study 2, the same trial was manipulated, such that the witnesses were either civilians or police officers, the witness who experienced IB was familiar with the defendant or not, and an expert witness provided testimony on IB or not. It was again found that the witness who experienced IB was perceived as less credible compared to the witness who saw the crime. Participants¿ beliefs about IB differed depending on the presence of an expert, witness role, and witness familiarity with the defendant, but these beliefs did not translate to how the IB witness was perceived. The findings highlight the negative legal implications that may arise when witnesses (particularly civilians) experience IB for a crime.

DOI 10.1007/s11896-020-09399-7
2020 Cullen HJ, Monds LA, 'Jury simulation studies: To exclude or not to exclude participants based on a lack of comprehension of the case?', APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 34 1224-1233 (2020)
DOI 10.1002/acp.3695
2020 Cullen HJ, Paterson HM, van Golde C, 'Stopping crime? The effect of crime re-enactments on eyewitness memory', PSYCHIATRY PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/13218719.2020.1775151
2018 van Golde C, Dilevski N, Deck S, Cullen H, Paterson H, 'One Statement at a Time: How Memory Research Can Facilitate Prosecution of Domestic and Family Violence', Australia & New Zealand Journal of Evidence Based Policing, 3 12-17 (2018)
Show 1 more journal article
Edit

Miss Hayley Cullen

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Psychology
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email hayley.cullen@newcastle.edu.au
Edit