Dr Hayley Cullen

Dr Hayley Cullen

Associate Lecturer

School of Psychological Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

After submitting my PhD thesis in 2020, I moved to the University of Newcastle as an Associate Lecturer in the School of Psychology. Prior to this, I worked as a casual academic and research assistant in the School of Psychology at the University of Sydney, and as a lecturer at the Australian College of Applied Psychology in Sydney. I have experience as a lecturer, tutor, and course coordinator in several undergraduate and honours level courses. I am dedicated to enriching the student experience and providing students with skills that they can apply beyond university in their professional careers. 

My research focuses on the intersection between psychology and law. Many of the factors that are most common in cases of wrongful convictions - where individuals are convicted of crimes they did not commit - are psychological in nature, such as mistaken eyewitness identification and false confessions. As such, I am passionate about conducting innovative psycho-legal research that has the potential to improve legal procedures and prevent miscarriages of justice like these from occurring. I am likewise passionate about conducting research that can improve victims' access to justice.

Research

My research interests include:

  • Identifying the factors that affect eyewitness recall or identification accuracy
  • Exploring the impact of misinformation in eyewitness settings
  • Identifying public perceptions of psycho-legal phenomena
  • Evaluating the implementation of evidence-based policing in Australia
  • Improving research methodologies in forensic psychology
  • Identifying the factors that affect juror decision-making and memory

My research has included a number of diverse forensic populations, including child witnesses, lawyers, and police officers. My research has featured in podcasts and newspaper articles, on television, and in legal cases.

Teaching

I am currently involved in the following courses:


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy (Science), University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cognition
  • Eyewitness memory
  • Juries
  • Memory
  • Policing

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
520402 Decision making 20
520404 Memory and attention 20
520103 Forensic psychology 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Psychological Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/6/2020 - 1/2/2021 Lecturer Australian College of Applied Psychology
Discipline of Psychological Science
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2016 - 31/12/2020 Research Assistant University of Sydney
School of Psychology
Australia

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2017 Monash Criminology Postgraduate Prize
Monash University

Scholarship

Year Award
2018 Campbell Perry International Travel Scholarship
School of Psychology, University of Sydney

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC4202 Applications of Psychology: Forensic Psychology
Australian College of Applied Psychology
Course Coordinator 1/9/2020 - 1/2/2021
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Topic lectured: Emotion
Lecturer - Summer School 8/1/2018 - 28/2/2018
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/3/2018 - 30/6/2018
PSYC3888 Interdisciplinary Project Based Unit
University of Sydney
Topics lectured: Research methods
Tutor and Occasional Lecturer 1/8/2019 - 30/11/2019
PSYC3312 Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Australian College of Applied Psychology
Course Coordinator 1/6/2020 - 1/9/2020
PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Topic lectured: Forensic Psychology
Lecturer - Summer School 8/1/2019 - 28/2/2019
PSYC1800 Sex, Drugs and Serial Killers
School of Psychology, College of Engineering, Science, and Environment
Course Coordinator 1/7/2021 - 31/12/2021
PSYC1002 Introduction to Psychology
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/8/2017 - 30/11/2017
CRIM2020 Criminal Psychology
The University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 22/2/2021 - 18/7/2021
PSYC3020 Applications of Psychological Science
University of Sydney
Tutor 1/8/2018 - 30/11/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Cullen HJ, Adam L, van Golde C, 'Evidence-based policing in Australia: an examination of the appropriateness and transparency of lineup identification and investigative interviewing practices', International Journal of Police Science and Management, 23 85-98 (2021)

Psychological research has been pivotal in influencing the way police forces globally approach and undertake criminal investigations. Increasing psychological research in recent y... [more]

Psychological research has been pivotal in influencing the way police forces globally approach and undertake criminal investigations. Increasing psychological research in recent years has led to the development of best-practice guidelines for conducting police investigations, across a number of key areas of criminal investigation. For example, procedures for creating and conducting lineups as recommended by the American Psychology-Law Society, and the UK-developed PEACE model for investigative interviewing, have both been of influence in Australia. However, the extent to which these evidence-based recommendations have been incorporated into policing practice within Australia is unclear. In this article, we conducted an exploratory review of publicly available policing documents within Australian states and territories, to determine the extent to which best practice lineup identification and investigative interviewing procedures have been adopted into police practice. The review revealed that for lineup identification procedures, many of the basic recommendations for conducting lineups were not incorporated into publicly available policing manuals. For investigative interviewing, it appeared on the surface that elements of the PEACE model were implemented within most Australian jurisdictions, albeit this was often not explicitly stated within policing documents. A key issue identified was a lack of (understandable) public transparency of policing procedure, as a number of Australian jurisdictions failed to have publicly available policing manuals or handbooks against which to evaluate their procedures. Therefore, we argue that there is a need for better collaboration between researchers and law enforcement in order to achieve evidence-based, transparent policing within Australia.

DOI 10.1177/14613557211004618
Citations Scopus - 1
2021 Cullen H, van Golde C, 'The risk of memory blindness when interviewing witnesses: How eyewitnesses can fail to notice mistakes in their witness statements', Police Science: Australia and New Zealand Journal of Evidence Based Policing, 6 8-10 (2021)
2021 Monds LA, Cullen HJ, Kloft L, Sumampouw N, van Golde C, Harrison AW, Otgaar H, 'Police perceptions of eyewitness impairment due to alcohol and other drug use: a cross-cultural comparison', Police Practice and Research, (2021)

Victims, witnesses, and suspects of crime are frequently intoxicated by Alcohol or Other Drugs (AOD) during the event. How intoxication is perceived by investigating officers, and... [more]

Victims, witnesses, and suspects of crime are frequently intoxicated by Alcohol or Other Drugs (AOD) during the event. How intoxication is perceived by investigating officers, and the manner in which this is handled during interview procedures, can affect the quality of information obtained and therefore investigative outcomes. Various factors are likely to contribute to how intoxication is handled during the investigation of a crime, including standard procedures, familiarity with the effects of different substances, and cultural attitudes. While findings with respect to the effect of different substances on memory are still emerging, it is important to investigate whether police beliefs are consistent with available evidence. In this study, Australian and Indonesian police officers were surveyed about their perceptions of memory accuracy and credibility of victims and witnesses intoxicated with various substances (e.g. alcohol, cannabis, amphetamines, and opioids). A higher proportion of Australian police identified larger negative memory effects associated with alcohol intoxication. At the same time, Indonesian police were found to be more likely to report that intoxication with alcohol would make a victim or witness less credible. With regard to timing, across multiple substances, larger proportions of Australian police reported believing that information obtained from witnesses that were still intoxicated would be more accurate than if interviewed after they became sober. It is concluded that, in order to rectify misconceptions about the impact of AOD intoxication on memory and improve investigative practices, both Australian and Indonesian police would benefit from additional training on the effects of intoxication.

DOI 10.1080/15614263.2021.1979397
2021 Monds LA, Cullen HJ, Kloft L, van Golde C, Harrison AW, Flowe H, 'Memory and credibility perceptions of alcohol and other drug intoxicated witnesses and victims of crime', PSYCHOLOGY CRIME & LAW, (2021)
DOI 10.1080/1068316X.2021.1962871
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Cullen HJ, Paterson HM, van Golde C, 'Mock Juror Perceptions of Witness Inattentional Blindness', Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, (2020)

It is possible that eyewitnesses may not notice crimes when focused on something else due to ¿inattentional blindness¿ (IB). However, it is unclear how witnesses who experience IB... [more]

It is possible that eyewitnesses may not notice crimes when focused on something else due to ¿inattentional blindness¿ (IB). However, it is unclear how witnesses who experience IB will be perceived by jurors, and what factors may influence these perceptions. In study 1, mock jurors read a transcript of an assault crime, in which one witness noticed the assault and another witness did not (i.e. experienced IB). It was found that the witness who experienced IB was perceived as less credible than the witness who saw the crime. In study 2, the same trial was manipulated, such that the witnesses were either civilians or police officers, the witness who experienced IB was familiar with the defendant or not, and an expert witness provided testimony on IB or not. It was again found that the witness who experienced IB was perceived as less credible compared to the witness who saw the crime. Participants¿ beliefs about IB differed depending on the presence of an expert, witness role, and witness familiarity with the defendant, but these beliefs did not translate to how the IB witness was perceived. The findings highlight the negative legal implications that may arise when witnesses (particularly civilians) experience IB for a crime.

DOI 10.1007/s11896-020-09399-7
2020 Cullen HJ, Monds LA, 'Jury simulation studies: To exclude or not to exclude participants based on a lack of comprehension of the case?', APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 34 1224-1233 (2020)
DOI 10.1002/acp.3695
2020 Cullen HJ, Paterson HM, van Golde C, 'Stopping crime? The effect of crime re-enactments on eyewitness memory', PSYCHIATRY PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/13218719.2020.1775151
2018 van Golde C, Dilevski N, Deck S, Cullen H, Paterson H, 'One Statement at a Time: How Memory Research Can Facilitate Prosecution of Domestic and Family Violence', Australia & New Zealand Journal of Evidence Based Policing, 3 12-17 (2018)
Show 5 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'What do legal populations believe about visual detection and inattentional blindness?', Online (2021)
2021 Cullen H, Dilevski N, Nitschke F, Ribeiro G, 'The effect of repeated misinformation during jury deliberation on juror memory and decision-making.', Online (2021)
2020 Cullen H, 'Inattentional blindness in legal contexts', Online (2020)
2020 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'A survey of beliefs about inattentional blindness in different legal populations', Online (2020)
2019 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Juror perceptions of witnesses who experience inattentional blindness for crime', Cape Cod, USA (2019)
2019 Monds L, van Golde C, Cullen H, Kloft L, Ramaekers J, 'Intoxicated witnesses - what are police views on memory reliability and credibility? An international comparison of alcohol and other substances.', Cape Cod, USA (2019)
2019 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Inattentional blindness in police officers: Research challenges and future directions', Cape Cod, USA (2019)
2019 Cullen H, 'Expert testimony on inattentional blindness: Lessons from the Guyger case', Sydney, Australia (2019)
2019 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Witnesses and the media: The effect of crime re-enactments on eyewitness recall', Sydney, Australia (2019)
2019 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, '"Blind" faith in experts? A systematic review on the effect of expertise and experience on inattentional blindness', Victoria, Canada (2019)
2018 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Juror perceptions of witness inattentional blindness during criminal trials', Melbourne, Australia (2018)
2017 van Golde C, Paterson H, Cullen H, Marsh A, '"Wait! When did he say that again?" Adult memory for details of reoccurring events', Sydney, Australia (2017)
2017 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Crime obviousness and awareness: Everyday distractions may reduce awareness even for obvious crime', Sydney, Australia (2017)
2017 Cullen H, Paterson H, van Golde C, 'Crime re-enactment videos: An eyewitness's best friend or worst enemy?', Canberra, Australia (2017)
Show 11 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $10,050

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $2,500

Lockdown support scheme$2,500

Funding body: College of Engineering, Science and Environment, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Engineering, Science and Environment, University of Newcastle
Scheme Lockdown support scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20192 grants / $6,500

Campbell Perry Research Travel Scholarship$6,000

Funding body: School of Psychology, University of Sydney

Funding body School of Psychology, University of Sydney
Scheme Campbell Perry International Travel Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Collaborative Postgraduate Research Grant$500

Funding body: Society of Australasian Social Psychologists

Funding body Society of Australasian Social Psychologists
Scheme Collaborative Postgraduate Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20172 grants / $1,050

Student Research Grant$800

Funding body: Society of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition

Funding body Society of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition
Scheme Student Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Monash Criminology Postgraduate Research Prize$250

Funding body: Monash University

Funding body Monash University
Scheme Monash Criminology Postgraduate Research Prize
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 Honours The effect of wording in media reports on the activation of schemas and its impact on eyewitness memory Psychology, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 Honours News as a form of post-event information: The effect of online media type and source credibility on eyewitness memory. Psychology, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Implementation and Testing of Corrective Interventions Promoting Intergroup Contact Between Young and Elderly People PhD (Psychology - Science), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Dr Hayley Cullen

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Psychological Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email hayley.cullen@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room Enter Building code/room eg CH123.
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