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Emeritus Professor Alison Dean

Emeritus Professor

Faculty of Business and Law (Marketing)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Alison Dean has two major areas of research interest. The first is service marketing and management, which includes customer loyalty, consumer participation in service delivery, co-created value, and service quality. Alison is particularly interested in the connections between elements of marketing theory and how each element contributes to effective practice. She is currently engaged in a study about consumer participation and responses in different industries. Alison's second area of research interest is pedagogy in business courses, with special emphasis on graduate attributes, and assessment. She was the lead in the Newcastle team in a collaborative ALTC project with Griffith University on commencing students' perceptions of assessment (2009-2010).

Teaching Expertise
Alison has extensive teaching experience in distance, online, face-to-face and block modes; including management of multi-campus and multi-mode offerings. Her areas of teaching specialty include services marketing and management, marketing research, and business research methods. She has a long standing interest in generic skills development, graduate attributes and technology-enabled learning. Her first accomplishment in using technology dates back to 1994-5, when she was team leader in developing computer simulations for distance students; and subsequently publishing an evaluation instrument for such innovations. As noted above, Alison has been the recipient of various teaching awards, including the 2009 University of Newcastle Vice Chancellor's Faculty Award for Supervision Excellence (Faculty of Business & Law). She has supervised more than 20 Honours, Masters and PhD students to completion.

Administrative Expertise
Alison has considerable experience and expertise in administration, having held a wide variety of leadership and management roles. She is currently Head of Newcastle Business School (commenced November 2010), a complex operation with more than 80 academics, located on four campuses. Her other roles since joining the University of Newcastle in 2005, include Assistant Dean (Teaching and Learning) (2006-June 2008), Head of Marketing Discipline (2009), Director Honours Program (2010) and Assistant Dean (Research Training). Alison is the inaugural Director of the Lucy Mentoring Program for Final Year Women Students in the faculty (2007-ongoing). 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Monash University
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Sydney
  • Diploma in Education, University of Sydney
  • Graduate Diploma of Business (Management), Monash University
  • Master of Business, Southern Cross University

Keywords

  • business research methods
  • customer commitment and loyalty
  • generic skills of graduates
  • marketing research
  • service management
  • service quality
  • services marketing
  • value

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130203 Economics, Business and Management Curriculum and Pedagogy 15
150503 Marketing Management (incl. Strategy and Customer Relations) 45
150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/9/2008 - 1/11/2008 Visiting Scholar University of La Rochelle
France
1/4/2006 - 1/6/2008 Assistant Dean - Teaching and Learning, Faculty of Business and Law University of Newcastle
Faculty of Business and Law
Australia
1/1/2009 - 1/12/2009 Head of Marketing Discipline - Newcastle Business School University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
1/7/2010 - 1/3/2011 Assistant Dean - Research Training, Faculty of Business and Law University of Newcastle
Faculty of Business and Law
Australia
1/6/2010 -  Head of School - Newcastle Business School University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
1/2/1998 - 1/3/1999 Deputy Head - Department of Management Monash University
Australia
1/2/1992 - 1/2/2005 Senior Lecturer Monash University
Faculty of Business & Economics
Australia

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2009 UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE VICE CHANCELLOR’S FACULTY AWARD FOR SUPERVISION EXCELLENCE
University of Newcastle
2002 The 2002 Gippsland Excellence in Disability Support Award for an Academic Staff Member
Monash University
1998 1998 Monash University Vice-Chancellor's Award for Distinguished Teaching
Monash University
1995 1995 CAUT Award for Exemplary Practice
Monash University
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2008 Marimuthu M, Dean AM, 'Developing pre-relational trust in technology service providers', Trust and New Technologies: Marketing and Management on the Internet and Mobile Media, Edward Elgar Publishing, London 227-243 (2008) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2005 Dean A, Rainnie A, 'Symbolic Analysts in the New Economy: Call Centres in Less Favoured Regions', New regionalism in Australia, Ashgate Publishing, Surrey, United Kingdom 103-122 (2005) [B1]

Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Dean A, Indrianti N, 'Transformative service research at the BoP: the case of Etawa goat farmers in Indonesia', JOURNAL OF SERVICES MARKETING, (2020)
DOI 10.1108/JSM-07-2019-0251
2020 Chen T, Dean A, 'Editorial', Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30 1-4 (2020)
DOI 10.1108/JSTP-01-2020-310
Co-authors Tom Chen
2020 Ellway BPW, Dean A, 'Habitus as a value lens to link customer engagement and value cocreation', Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30 57-77 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/JSTP-04-2019-0093
2018 Fisk RP, Dean AM, Alkire (née Nasr) L, Joubert A, Previte J, Robertson N, Rosenbaum MS, 'Design for service inclusion: creating inclusive service systems by 2050', Journal of Service Management, 29 834-858 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to challenge service researchers to design for service inclusion, with an overall goal of achieving inclu... [more]

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to challenge service researchers to design for service inclusion, with an overall goal of achieving inclusion by 2050. The authors present service inclusion as an egalitarian system that provides customers with fair access to a service, fair treatment during a service and fair opportunity to exit a service. Design/methodology/approach: Building on transformative service research, a transformative, human-centered approach to service design is proposed to foster service inclusion and to provide a platform for managerial action. This conceptual study explores the history of service exclusion and examines contemporary demographic trends that suggest the possibility of worsening service exclusion for consumers worldwide. Findings: Service inclusion represents a paradigm shift to higher levels of understanding of service systems and their fundamental role in human well-being. The authors argue that focused design for service inclusion is necessary to make service systems more egalitarian. Research limitations/implications: The authors propose four pillars of service inclusion: enabling opportunity, offering choice, relieving suffering and fostering happiness. Practical implications: Service organizations are encouraged to design their offerings in a manner that promotes inclusion and permits customers to realize value. Originality/value: This comprehensive research agenda challenges service scholars to use design to create inclusive service systems worldwide by the year 2050. The authors establish the moral imperative of design for service inclusion.

DOI 10.1108/JOSM-05-2018-0121
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 28
2017 Wattanacharoensil W, Schuckert M, Graham A, Dean A, 'An analysis of the airport experience from an air traveler perspective', Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 32 124-135 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 This study investigates the nature of airport experience (AE) from the perspective of air travelers. This study elaborates experiential components within the airport contex... [more]

© 2017 This study investigates the nature of airport experience (AE) from the perspective of air travelers. This study elaborates experiential components within the airport context and highlights the associations among the components of this experience through text analysis. This study also aims to clarify how air travelers perceive airports in relation to destinations. The analysis of passenger reviews on Skytrax indicates that AE differs from the concepts of customer and tourist experiences, because hedonic and aesthetic consumptions are not primarily associated with the memorable feelings of consumers and tourists, but with aspects of functional experience and service personnel. This study reviews three aspects that air travelers associate airports with a destination. First, an airport is a representative of a destination. Second, an airport exhibits the positive characteristics of a destination. Finally, an airport is perceived as an internal component of tourism experience. This study provides theoretical and managerial implications for airport and tourism industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhtm.2017.06.003
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
2017 Dean A, Alhothali GT, 'Enhancing service-for-service benefits: potential opportunity or pipe dream?', Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27 193-218 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to elucidate service-for-service benefits emerging from co-creation in everyday banking. It does so by ... [more]

© 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to elucidate service-for-service benefits emerging from co-creation in everyday banking. It does so by identifying factors that constitute the joint provider/customer co-creation platform, distinguishing them from factors that facilitate customers¿ independent value creation; and exploring benefits and potential opportunities for each party. Design/methodology/approach: Insights were gained by using a qualitative approach involving 33 face-to-face interviews with bank managers (15) and their customers (18) in Saudi Arabia. Content analysis was performed on the data and the two sets of views integrated to compare the reality of service-for-service with theoretical assumptions. Findings: The analysis identified 65 topics, clustered to 12 themes. Three themes represented joint, collaborative activity (problem solving, relationship building, and knowledge and learning) whilst other themes identified facilitation actions by banks. Key opportunities to increase mutual value (service-for-service) emerge from extending interaction via the co-creation platform but additional benefits from these opportunities are not currently realized by participants. The authors thereby note the potential of a service focus but suggest that the locus of value creation will not readily shift from the provider to a collaborative process of co-creation. Research limitations/implications: The qualitative nature of the study limits generalizability. However, the authors expect that the hierarchy of service-for-service will be meaningful in other contexts. Future research may use it as a starting point for identifying innovations from co-creation, how actors realize and measure service-for-service, and how different business models may strengthen value opportunities. Practical implications: The findings provide managers with first, three areas of emphasis to gain and extend mutual service-for-service from direct interactions in everyday banking transactions. Second, the study emphasizes resource characteristics that will facilitate value enhancement for firms and customers by recognition of barriers to collaborative actions, and approaches for pursuit of service-for-service. Originality/value: This study establishes the joint and essential firm/customer co-creation platform in retail banking and distinguishes the platform from other customer value-facilitation actions. The authors integrate the findings with previous literature and present a conceptual framework for levels of service-for-service in exchange. This framework shows a hierarchy of key benefits for providers and customers, and highlights increasing complexities that hinder the reality of achieving service-for-service opportunities arising from the joint co-creation platform.

DOI 10.1108/JSTP-11-2014-0247
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Ellway BPW, Dean AM, 'The reciprocal intertwining of practice and experience in value creation', Marketing Theory, 16 299-324 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Practice and experience are central concepts in service logic (SL), and research has provided increasingly sophisticated accounts of their role withi... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Practice and experience are central concepts in service logic (SL), and research has provided increasingly sophisticated accounts of their role within value creation. However, to date, they have been largely treated separately and despite acknowledgement that they are intertwined, the precise nature of their relationship remains unclear. To respond to this problem, we introduce Bourdieu¿s recursive triad of practice¿habitus¿field as a theoretical lens to articulate how sensemaking processes incorporate an explicit link between practice and experience. We then utilize the theoretical lens to examine value creation for participants of a self-reliance training course. Our article contributes to the theorization of value creation by showing how it is dependent upon the temporal intertwining of practice and experience; how the unconscious or anticipated/foreseen nature of practice and experience become manifested in value creation and how zooming in and zooming out can be simultaneously achieved to acknowledge the individual and contextual influences upon value creation. We present a dynamic model of practice-experience links in value creation, which both extends the theory of SL and provides a basis for further work. The article concludes with managerial implications.

DOI 10.1177/1470593116636088
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
2015 Pires GD, Dean A, Rehman M, 'Using service logic to redefine exchange in terms of customer and supplier participation', Journal of Business Research, 68 925-932 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Service logic emphasises value co-creation, although mostly contending that the customer alone creates actual value. Value co-creation and co-production imply... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Service logic emphasises value co-creation, although mostly contending that the customer alone creates actual value. Value co-creation and co-production imply customer and supplier participation, but the literature mostly omits participation issues. This paper disentangles notions of production and co-production from the creation and co-creation of value propositions, and from the assumptions underlying value-in-use. The focus is on participation in exchange by customers and suppliers and their contributions at various stages of the value creation process. The paper uses service logic to develop a process model of customer and supplier participation in exchange with three phases (production, negotiation and usage), explores why suppliers allow customer participation in value proposition creation, and the motivations compelling customers to participate. Understanding how supplier and customer participation impact on value proposition creation and on value-in-use, provides an impetus for improved targeting practices, enhanced supplier ability to compete, and more focused research.

DOI 10.1016/j.jbusres.2014.09.019
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Guilherme Pires
2013 Dean A, Cowley K, McComb V, 'Developing foundational generic skills in first year business students: Confirmations and contradictions', International Journal of Learning in Higher Education, 20 1-17 (2013) [C1]

One of the key issues surrounding graduate attributes and their foundational generic skills is that of how to effectively embed them into university curricula. This study reinforc... [more]

One of the key issues surrounding graduate attributes and their foundational generic skills is that of how to effectively embed them into university curricula. This study reinforces and extends the discourse, evaluating specific learning interventions concerned with information literacy and academic integrity embedded into the curriculum of a first year marketing course in a business school. Foundational marketing was selected as an appropriate course in which to embed these particular skills due to their importance to students' academic and later marketing careers. Pre- and posttest methodology was used in the study to identify students' views on their own generic skills' development. Changes to student self-reported skills development are validated using cross check questions. The overall findings of the study confirm the literature reporting successful outcomes of embedding generic skills into course curricula, however some interesting contradictions particularly in the area of referencing skills and student recognition of plagiarism are found. © Common Ground.

DOI 10.18848/1447-9494/cgp/v20i01/48677
Co-authors Kym Cowley, Vivien Mccomb
2012 Dean AM, Rolland SE, 'Using an age-based lens to test the antecedents of value in retail', Der Markt: International Journal of Marketing, 50 85-100 (2012) [C1]
2012 Rehman M, Dean AM, Pires G, 'A research framework for examining customer participation in value co-creation: Applying the service dominant logic to the provision of living support services to oncology day-care patients', International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research, 3 226-243 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Guilherme Pires
2009 Dean AM, Rainnie A, 'Frontline employees' views on organizational factors that affect the delivery of service quality in call centers', Journal of Services Marketing, 23 326-337 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/08876040910973431
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
2009 Wong A, Dean AM, 'Enhancing value for Chinese shoppers: The contribution of store and customer characteristics', Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 16 123-134 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jretconser.2008.11.004
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 13
2007 Dean AM, 'The impact of the customer orientation of call center employees on customers' affective commitment and loyalty', Journal of Service Research, 10 161-173 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1094670507309650
Citations Scopus - 81Web of Science - 74
2006 Suen B, Dean AM, Mcguire L, 'Service quality in community pharmacies - comparing perceptions of customers and staff', Australian Pharmacist, 25 650-656 (2006) [C1]
2006 Little MM, Dean AM, 'Links between service climate, employee commitment and employees' service quality capability', Managing Service Quality, 16 460-476 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/09604520610686133
Citations Scopus - 60
2004 Dean AM, 'Rethinking customer expectations of service quality: Are call centers different?', Journal of Services Marketing, 18 60-78 (2004) [C1]

Reported studies on call centers emphasize efficiency and control, with possible implications for service priorities, customer orientation and service quality. However, there is l... [more]

Reported studies on call centers emphasize efficiency and control, with possible implications for service priorities, customer orientation and service quality. However, there is little empirical research to test assumptions from the customer¿s perspective. This study aimed to establish whether customers expected (predicted) low levels of service from a call center, how this level compared to the minimum level they considered adequate, and whether the perceived customer orientation of the call center was related to service quality expectations. Data were collected in Australia from two sources: End consumers (n = 289) of an insurance provider, and business customers (n = 325) of a bank. Key findings were similar for both samples. First, customers had very high levels of adequate (minimum) expectations, and adequate expectations behaved independently from predicted (forecast) expectations. Second, customer orientation was associated with predicted expectations but not adequate expectations. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research and managerial implications. © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

DOI 10.1108/08876040410520717
Citations Scopus - 33
2004 Dean AM, 'Links between organisational and customer variables in service delivery: Evidence, contradictions and challenges', International Journal of Service Industry Management, 15 332-350 (2004) [C1]

Studies in services management from the different perspectives of marketing, operations, human resources and psychology support the existence of a variety of links between organis... [more]

Studies in services management from the different perspectives of marketing, operations, human resources and psychology support the existence of a variety of links between organisations and their customers. The basic premise asserts that organisational characteristics and practices are linked to employee attitudes that are reflected in service quality outcomes, customer satisfaction and loyalty and, consequently, profit. Empirical studies support many of these associations and streams of research link them into linear sequences. However, the evidence is not unequivocal and this review challenges it by highlighting the complexity and non-linearity of many of the proposed links, and the existence of reciprocity between certain variables. In synthesising the evidence in relation to the proposed links, the paper also identifies conceptual and methodological issues, unanswered questions and potential future research. © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

DOI 10.1108/09564230410552031
Citations Scopus - 65
2002 Dean AM, Kiu C, 'Performance monitoring and quality outcomes in contracted services', International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, 19 396-413 (2002) [C1]

The increased use of contracting for service delivery involves new challenges in ensuring that quality is maintained. Performance monitoring involves both efficiency (costs) and e... [more]

The increased use of contracting for service delivery involves new challenges in ensuring that quality is maintained. Performance monitoring involves both efficiency (costs) and effectiveness (quality) measures; however, there is little guidance from the literature to indicate the best approaches in different contexts. This paper therefore reports on an exploratory study in which approaches to performance monitoring, and respondents' views on best practice, were explored in contracted services. Key findings are that organisations rely on inspections by their own employees or contractor checklists, but that these practices are in conflict with their views on best practice. However, the respondents agreed that performance monitoring has a large effect on quality outcomes. Using both the literature and the study, a model has been developed that provides managers with a framework for improving their performance and quality monitoring practices, and highlights areas for future academic research. © MCB UP Ltd.

DOI 10.1108/02656710210421571
Citations Scopus - 26
2002 Dean A, Morgan D, Tan TE, 'Service quality and customers willingness to pay more for travel services', Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing, 12 95-110 (2002) [C1]

Increasingly sophisticated and price conscious consumers have combined with forces of globalisation and electronic commerce to create new challenges for travel agents. To maintain... [more]

Increasingly sophisticated and price conscious consumers have combined with forces of globalisation and electronic commerce to create new challenges for travel agents. To maintain efficiency and profitability, travel agents need to know the links between service quality and customers¿ willingness to pay more (WTPM). These links are explored through measuring customer perceptions (N = 122) of service quality, loyalty and WTPM. The results revealed firstly that while many consumers were able to pay more for travel services, fewer were willing to do so. Secondly, overall service quality and its underlying dimensions were positively associated with selected WTPM items. These findings support and extend previous studies on the service quality-behavioural intentions link and provide practical implications for the travel industry in relation to a differentiated price and service strategy. © 2002, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1300/J073v12n02_06
Citations Scopus - 20
2002 Dean A, 'Service quality in call centres: Implications for customer loyalty', Managing Service Quality,Vol. 12, No. 6, pp. 414-423., 414-423 (2002) [C1]
2001 Dean A, Terziovski M, 'Quality practices and customer/supplier management in Australian service organizations', Total Quality Management, 12 611-621 (2001) [C1]

There have been many research studies conducted in the Australian manufacturing industry to test the relationship between quality management practices and organizational performan... [more]

There have been many research studies conducted in the Australian manufacturing industry to test the relationship between quality management practices and organizational performance. However, there is a significant gap in the literature of similar studies in the services sector. This paper therefore reports on a cross-sectional study conducted in the A ustralian services sector in which the extent of implementation of quality management practices with customers and suppliers, and the links between specific practices and performance outcomes are considered. The sample for the study (N = 141) is drawn from small to medium-sized service organizations. Overall, the findings indicate that quality management practices are not widely implemented with customers and suppliers in services. However, when the relationship between specific quality practices with customers and suppliers, and performance outcomes are explored by Multiple Regression Analysis, the most significant predictor of improved systems, improved responsiveness, increased quality of service and improved competitive advantage, is the involvement of suppliers in system change and improvement. Other significant factors include the use of customer satisfaction surveys, and the existence of strategic alliances. The implication of these findings for managers in service organizations, who are seeking more value from their customer/supplier interface, is that organizations should involve suppliers in their system changes and improvement projects.

DOI 10.1080/09544120120060097
Citations Scopus - 10
2001 Yu YT, Dean A, 'The contribution of emotional satisfaction to consumer loyalty', International Journal of Service Industry Management, 12 234-250 (2001) [C1]

Many customer satisfaction studies have concluded that there is a significant relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty, but this finding has been questioned in that ... [more]

Many customer satisfaction studies have concluded that there is a significant relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty, but this finding has been questioned in that most of the studies focus on measuring the cognitive component of customer satisfaction. This study includes the cognitive component, but focuses on the affective component. It explores the role of emotions in satisfaction, and then compares the predictive ability of the cognitive and affective elements. Key findings are that both positive and negative emotions, and the cognitive component of satisfaction correlate with loyalty. Regression analysis indicates that the affective component serves as a better predictor of customer loyalty than the cognitive component. Further, the best predictor of both overall loyalty and the most reliable dimension of loyalty, positive word of mouth, is positive emotions. Thhe theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

DOI 10.1108/09564230110393239
Citations Scopus - 305
2000 Dean A, 'Managing Change Initiatives: JIT Delivers but BPR Fails', Knowledge and Process Management, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 11-19., 11-19 (2000) [C1]
2000 Dean AM, Webster L, 'Simulations in distance education: Progress towards an evaluation instrument', International Journal of Phytoremediation, 21 344-360 (2000) [C1]

This article reports on a study in which an interactive computer-based learning resource consisting of a tutorial with a decision support system and simulations, is evaluated in t... [more]

This article reports on a study in which an interactive computer-based learning resource consisting of a tutorial with a decision support system and simulations, is evaluated in the context of a distance education business degree course. The primary purpose of the study was to develop and test an instrument for evaluation of the learning resource, with particular reference to simulations. The instrument adds further dimensions to factors such as learner support and engagement, to incorporate elements of motivation and transfer. Consequently, the scales that comprise the instrument include three key areas: features of the computer package, the effect on students¿ motivation, and the impact on their ability to transfer knowledge to the workplace. As a result of the analysis, a reliable and valid evaluation instrument that includes components of these three areas is provided. It is expected that other researchers will be able to develop and refine this instrument to evaluate various forms of computer-based educational resources. © 2000, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/0158791000210209
Citations Scopus - 2
1999 Dean AM, 'The applicability of servqual in different health care environments', Health Marketing Quarterly, 16 1-21 (1999) [C1]

This paper reports on a study that investigates the applicability of a modified SERVQUAL instrument as a means of measuring service quality in two types of health service environm... [more]

This paper reports on a study that investigates the applicability of a modified SERVQUAL instrument as a means of measuring service quality in two types of health service environments; medical care and health care (incorporating medical, social, cognitive and emotional elements). The research confirms a four factor structure that is stable for both environments, and similar to the service quality dimensions recognised in the literature. However, the relative importance of the dimensions of quality is inconsistent for the two types of health services. These results confirm the suggestion that importance values should be part of the measurement tool. Finally, the extra diagnostic advantage achieved by the use of gap scores to measure service quality, when compared to perception only scores is demonstrated. © 1999 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1300/J026v16n03_01
Citations Scopus - 55
1999 Wong Ooi Mei A, Dean AM, White CJ, 'Analysing service quality in the hospitality industry', Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 9 136-143 (1999) [C1]

Examines the dimensions of service quality in the hospitality industry by extending the SERVQUAL scale to include eight new items that specifically pertain to the hospitality indu... [more]

Examines the dimensions of service quality in the hospitality industry by extending the SERVQUAL scale to include eight new items that specifically pertain to the hospitality industry, subsequently referred to as HOLSERV. A total of 1,000 questionnaires were distributed at five mid-luxury hotels in Australia during July to October 1998 and a response rate of 15.5 per cent achieved. Key findings of the study are that service quality is represented by three dimensions in the hospitality industry, relating to employees (behaviour and appearance), tangibles and reliability, and the best predictor of overall service quality is the dimensions referred to as ¿employees¿. The findings also show that the one-column format questionnaire provides a valid and reliable, but much shorter, survey. The major implication for managers is that improvements in the behaviour and appearance of their employees is most likely to enhance consumer perceptions of service quality. © 1999, MCB UP Limited

DOI 10.1108/09604529910257920
Citations Scopus - 173
1999 Dean AM, 'Issues and challenges in delivering hr programs by distance education', Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 37 20-38 (1999) [C1]

This paper reports on a study which determines the relative importance of factors that contribute to a high-quality program in human resources, and which explores the effectivenes... [more]

This paper reports on a study which determines the relative importance of factors that contribute to a high-quality program in human resources, and which explores the effectiveness of distance education as the vehicle for deliv ery. The study considers the views of students and their industry employers and finds that they both place most importance on the distance education product, when compared to service and outcomes; and on the acquisition of knowledge when compared to other outcomes. Key challenges that emerge include the need for providers to align programs closer to industry require ments, the need for industry to support their personnel who are engaged in education, and for students to address issues related to their personal abilities and the nature of distance education.

DOI 10.1177/103841119903700103
Citations Scopus - 4
1999 Carlisle Y, Dean A, 'Design As Knowledge Integration Capability', Creativity and Innovation Management, 8 112-121 (1999)

The design literature offers two design process models as alternatives for acquiring and using knowledge in design. The best established is the rational problem solving model whic... [more]

The design literature offers two design process models as alternatives for acquiring and using knowledge in design. The best established is the rational problem solving model which calls for technical recommendations. The reflective practitioner model is appropriate to softer, controversial issues that call for ideological prescriptions. We view these models as complementary, not alternative, strategies which can assist in understanding knowledge integration in the design process. This paper offers a more holistic perspective upon design than that commonly found in the Design Studies literature. Our conceptualisation of design as knowledge integration capability suggests that effective design decision making integrates knowledge contributions and reconciles disparate values to a common purpose. The quality of design decision making increasingly depends on the effective integration of knowledge from a range of sources. This is especially true in the knowledge intensive sectors which we have studied. We offer illustrations from biotechnology and note that technical knowledge inputs can not alone ensure a successful outcome. This has implications for the management and practice of design in multidisciplinary project teams. Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999.

DOI 10.1111/1467-8691.00125
Citations Scopus - 4
1999 Dean A, Carlisle Y, Baden-Fuller C, 'Punctuated and Continuous Change: The UK Water Industry', British Journal of Management, 10 (1999)

Punctuated change is usually defined as a discontinuity in organizational development and is traditionally associated with environmental turbulence; it is also associated with ste... [more]

Punctuated change is usually defined as a discontinuity in organizational development and is traditionally associated with environmental turbulence; it is also associated with step changes in the performance of an organization. Starting from Gersick (1991), we discuss the foundations of the punctuated-incremental change paradox, and lay out hypotheses regarding the moments when such change is adopted and its economic effect. We explore these ideas through a study of the UK water industry: a contrived macro experiment. Following privatization, the ten major companies all faced similar pressures to adjust, but adopted widely differing responses. We find that the response to privatization was not always punctuated change, and that punctuated change processes were not necessarily superior to continuous processes. We contrast our findings with Romanelli and Tushman (1994), exploring the reasons why our results are so dissimilar.

DOI 10.1111/1467-8551.10.s1.2
Citations Scopus - 20
1999 Dean A, Carbone A, Evans A, 'Transformation of Student Learners: Distinguished Teachers Reflect on Practice', Research and Development in Higher Education, 21 109-118 (1999) [C1]
1999 Wong A, Dean A, White C, 'Customers Behavioural Intentions in the Hospitality Industry', Australian journal of Hospitality Management, 6 53-60 (1999) [C1]
1999 Dean A, 'The Impact of Consumer Participation on Perceived Service Quality in Health Services', The International Journal of Customer Relationship Management, 4 299-306 (1999) [C1]
1999 Wong A, Dean A, White C, 'The Impact of Service Quality on Customer Loyalty in the Hospitality Industry', The International Journal of Customer Relationship Management, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp.81-89., 81-89 (1999) [C1]
1998 Terziovski M, Dean A, 'Best predictors of quality performance in Australian service organisations', Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 8 359-366 (1998) [C1]

This paper is based on a cross-sectional study of 550 medium to large Australian service organisations to determine the effect of quality management practices on various dimension... [more]

This paper is based on a cross-sectional study of 550 medium to large Australian service organisations to determine the effect of quality management practices on various dimensions of service quality outcomes (productivity, competitive advantage, customer relationships, and employee morale). These outcomes were used as dependent variables in a series of regression analyses in order to test several hypotheses. The results demonstrate the importance of including quality in the strategic planning process, customer involvement, empowerment of the workforce, and including quality indicators as part of key performance indicators. On the other hand, integrating quality systems and procedures into the organisation had a significantly negative relationship with increases in productivity. Based on the findings of this study, we conclude that the ¿soft¿ practices based on empowerment, at all levels of the organisation, strategic planning and customer/supplier involvement are the most significant predictors of high quality service organisations. © 1998, MCB UP Limited

DOI 10.1108/09604529810235817
Citations Scopus - 28
1998 Dean A, Carlisle Y, Baden-Fuller C, 'Punctuated and Continuous Change: The UK Water Industry', British Journal of Management, 9 (1998)

Punctuated change is usually defined as a discontinuity in organizational development and is traditionally associated with environmental turbulence; it is also associated with ste... [more]

Punctuated change is usually defined as a discontinuity in organizational development and is traditionally associated with environmental turbulence; it is also associated with step changes in the performance of an organization. Starting from Gersick (1991), we discuss the foundations of the punctuated-incremental change paradox, and lay out hypotheses regarding the moments when such change is adopted and its economic effect. We explore these ideas through a study of the UK water industry: a contrived macro experiment. Following privatization, the ten major companies all faced similar pressures to adjust, but adopted widely differing responses. We find that the response to privatization was not always punctuated change, and that punctuated change processes were not necessarily superior to continuous processes. We contrast our findings with Romanelli and Tushman (1994), exploring the reasons why our results are so dissimilar.

Citations Scopus - 3
1997 Dean A, 'The Characteristics of Takeover Target Firms: The Case of the English Brewing Industry, 1945-1960', Review of Industrial Organization, 12 579-591 (1997)

The paper examines if takeovers target the "correct" firms. Using the English brewing industry (1945-1960) as a case study, size and conventional performance criteria of... [more]

The paper examines if takeovers target the "correct" firms. Using the English brewing industry (1945-1960) as a case study, size and conventional performance criteria of taken-over, independent and merging firms are assessed, and shown not to be valid target indicators. Comparison of a real estate/property utilization parameter - average asset value per "tied house" - for each firm category, shows that taken-over firms have the lowest average asset value per tied house. Low average asset value per house characterizes firms which, by failing to optimize their property assets, are poor performers. Takeover therefore, in this case, targets the "correct" firms.

DOI 10.1023/A:1007786229965
Citations Scopus - 4
1997 Dean A, 'Consumer Perceptions of Service Quality in Medical Centres', The Quality Magazine (Incorporating Quality Australia), 58-63 (1997) [C3]
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Carlson JL, Armstrong C, Sourdin T, Watts M, Dean A, 'Demontrating Return on Investment of Effective Complaint Management: A Research Synthesis and Agenda for Future Research. Proceedings of 2017 Academy of Marketing Conference.', Hull, England (2017)
Co-authors Jamie Carlson, Tania Sourdin, Martin Watts
2016 Dean AM, Griffin M, Kulczynski A, 'Applying Service Logic to Education: The Co-creation Experience and Value Outcomes', IRSSM-6: THE 6TH INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM IN SERVICE MANAGEMENT - SERVICE IMPERATIVES IN THE NEW ECONOMY: SERVICE EXCELLENCE FOR SUSTAINABILITY, Kuching, MALAYSIA (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sbspro.2016.05.383
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Alicia Kulczynski
2012 Baxter SM, Dean AM, 'Linking the customer experience with online intermediary brand image and loyalty', ANZMAC 2012 Proceedings, Adelaide, SA (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Stacey Baxter
2009 Bruff CM, Dean AM, Cheek BR, Nolan JA, 'Technology enhanced higher education: Student perceptions', 16th International Conference on Learning: Sessions, Barcelona, Spain (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Nolan
2009 Dean AM, 'Using service logic to interpret customers' experiences during call centre interactions', ANZMAC 2009 Papers, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E1]
2009 Dean AM, Cowley K, 'Creating a foundation for generic skills by embedding information literacy in commencing student assessment tasks', ANZMAC 2009 Papers, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E1]
Co-authors Kym Cowley
2009 Meshram K, Dean AM, Cowley K, 'The role of customer community in value co-creation for third places: An example of senior citizens', ANZMAC 2009 Papers, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E1]
Co-authors Kym Cowley
2009 Dean AM, Cowley K, Yung MLT, 'Embedding information literacy in commencing student assessment tasks as a foundation for generic skills', First Year in Higher Education Conference 2009: Conference Proceedings, Townsville, QLD (2009) [E1]
Co-authors Kym Cowley
2008 Bruff CM, Dean AM, Cheek BR, Nolan JA, 'Does technology use affect university students' perception of value?', Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference e-Society 2008, Algarve, Portugal (2008) [E1]
Co-authors John Nolan
2007 Bruff CM, Dean AM, Cheek BR, Nolan JA, 'Technology in higher education - Dimensions of value from a student perspective', Proceedings of E-Learn 2007: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare & Higher Education, Quebec, Canada (2007) [E1]
Co-authors John Nolan
2006 Dean AM, Webster CM, 'Comparing factors that contribute to value: The case of seniors and shopping', ANZMAC 2006 Conference Proceedings, Brisbane, Australia (2006) [E1]
2006 Wong A, Dean AM, 'Enhancing value for Chinese shoppers: Store and customer characteristics', Conference Proceedings 3rd International Conference on Contemporary Business, Leura, Australia (2006) [E1]
2006 Webster CM, Dean AM, 'Controversies in social marketing: The way forward', 3rd Australasian Nonprofit and Social Marketing Conference 2006 Proceedings, Newcastle, Australia (2006) [E1]
2006 Marimuthu M, Dean AM, 'Is trust in first time service providers german to the acceptance of new information systems?', Marketing in the new global order: challenges and opportunities, India (2006) [E1]
2006 Bruff CM, Cheek BR, Dean AM, Nolan JA, 'Different education delivery modes: Meeting students' needs', Different Educational Delivery Modes: Meeting students' need, Dublin, Ireland (2006) [E1]
Co-authors John Nolan
2005 Wong A, Dean AM, 'The Effects of Store and Customer Characteristics on Value and Loyalty', ANZMAC - Broadening the Boundaries, Fremantle, Western Australia (2005) [E1]
2005 Dean AM, 'Frontline Employees' Views on the Factors that affect the Delivery of Service Quality', ANZMAC - Broadening the Boundaries, Fremantle, Western Australia (2005) [E1]
2005 Bruff CM, Dean AM, Nolan JA, 'Student Perceptions of the Educational Quality Provided by Different Delivery Modes', Educational Integrity: Values in Teaching, Learning and Research. 2nd Asia-Pacific Educational Integrity Conference, University of Newcastle, Australia (2005) [E1]
Co-authors John Nolan
2004 Dean A, 'Managing service delivery in call centres: The need for a holistic approach', -, Beijing, China (2004) [E1]
2002 Dean AM, 'Service quality in call centres: implications for customer loyalty', Managing Service Quality: An International Journal (2002) [E1]

Studies on call centres suggest that there is a focus on efficiency at the expense of effectiveness, where effectiveness is indicated by characteristics such as customer orientati... [more]

Studies on call centres suggest that there is a focus on efficiency at the expense of effectiveness, where effectiveness is indicated by characteristics such as customer orientation, service priorities and quality. It therefore appears that customers will expect and experience low levels of service quality from call centres, with possible implications for their loyalty to the providing organisation. These issues are the focus of this study. A mail survey was conducted of recent clients of two call centres in Australia. The respondents were individual consumers in an insurance company (n = 284, 14 per cent) or business customers of a bank (n = 325, 16 per cent). Key findings are similar for the two samples. Both perceptions of quality and customer orientation of the call centre were related to loyalty to the providing organisation, and perceptions of quality partially mediated the customer orientation to loyalty relationship. The discussion includes managerial implications and potential future research. © 2002, MCB UP Limited

DOI 10.1108/09604520210451894
Citations Scopus - 72
2002 Dean A, 'Interrelationships between organisational and customer variables in service delivery: A review of evidence', Melbourne, Australia (2002) [E1]
2001 Dean A, 'Service quality in call centres: An exploration of customer expectations and their implications' (2001) [E1]
2000 Dean A, Kiu C, 'Performance monitoring in contracted services' (2000) [E1]
1995 Dean A, 'Quality in the Distance Education/Industry Training Interface', United Kingdom (1995) [E1]
Show 21 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Carlson JL, Sourdin T, Armstrong C, Watts M, Dean A, 'Return on Investment of Effective Complaints Management', . Sydney, Australia: Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals Australia (2018)
Co-authors Jamie Carlson, Tania Sourdin, Martin Watts
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $89,504

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $36,825

Complaints Handling: Return on Investment$36,825

Funding body: SOCAP Australia (Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals Australia)

Funding body SOCAP Australia (Society of Consumer Affairs Professionals Australia)
Project Team Professor Tania Sourdin, Emeritus Professor Martin Watts, Professor Jamie Carlson, Emeritus Professor Alison Dean
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601101
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20091 grants / $33,000

Commencing Students' Perception of Early Assessment$33,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Emeritus Professor Alison Dean, Mrs Katherine Lindsay, Associate Professor Kym Cowley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190148
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20063 grants / $18,443

Seniors' Membership in Community Associations and Social Well-Being$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Dr Cynthia Webster, Emeritus Professor Alison Dean, Professor Scott Holmes
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186667
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Quality of consumer experiences in seniors' market segments$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor Alison Dean
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186108
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC) 2006, Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, 4/12/2006 - 6/12/2006$1,443

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor Alison Dean
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0187027
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20051 grants / $1,236

ServSIG Research Conference, 2-4 June 2005$1,236

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor Alison Dean
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185214
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed7
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2005 PhD Call Centre project Accounting, Monash University Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD The Effects of Higher-Order Thinking Dispositions, Job-Related Learning and Creativity on Innovation Behaviour PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD How Did You Make Me Do That!? Circumventing the Activation of Persuasion Knowledge in Consumers, with Fluently Processed Semantic Associations PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD A Mixed Method Study for Examining Customer Participation in Value Co-Creation: Applying Service Dominant Logic to the Provision of Living Support Services to Day Care Oncology Patients in Pakistan PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Concert Attendee Behaviour: The Influence of Motivations, Fan Identification and Product Involvement PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2009 PhD The Role of Third Places: Investigating Social Capital, Loyalty and Value Co-creation for Seniors PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Factors Influencing Spatial Technology Adoption: A Study of Retail Businesses in Australia PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2006 PhD The Impact of Place on HRM in Call Centres Accounting, Monash University Co-Supervisor
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Emeritus Professor Alison Dean

Position

Emeritus Professor
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Focus area

Marketing

Contact Details

Email alison.dean@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room UNH305
Building University House
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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