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Dr Mark Harvey

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science (Linguistics)

Connecting language and landscape

When it comes to language, how well do we actually understand the structure of syllables and words? Dr Mark Harvey's 2015 Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project aims to determine this through the documentation of a severely endangered Indigenous language.

Dr Mark Harvey

"We will focus on the Kaytetye language because of its unusual structure. We believe this work will show that current models of syllable and word structure may require significant revision," Harvey said.

Harvey, who is a member of the Faculty of Education and Arts' Endangered Language Documentation, Theory and Application (ELDTA) research group, will consider the implications of Kaytetye sound structure for general theories of phonology, and more importantly, for ideas about universals in language. The project will also preserve Indigenous heritage through the extensive documentation of Kaytetye – which is a severely endangered language.

Field work for the project will be undertaken with the Kaytetye community in Neutral Junction Station (Artarre) in the Northern Territory. Here, the Kaytetye language is notbeing acquired by children, and there are no fluent speakers younger than 30.

Indigenous communities are concerned that cultural and linguistic knowledge is not being successfully transmitted within Indigenous communities and to the general Australian community

"Indigenous communities are concerned that cultural and linguistic knowledge is not being successfully transmitted within Indigenous communities and to the general Australian community," Harvey said.

"Recent studies have shown that engaging with traditional language and culture improves health and wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For these reasons, the successful maintenance of Indigenous cultural identities is a priority target for both Indigenous communities and all levels of Australian government."

Harvey is also working on a 2014 ARC Discovery Project, titled, Reconstructing Australia's linguistic past: Are all Australian languages related to one another?

As the title suggests, the project focuses on whether all Australian languages are, in fact, derived from a common source language or what is better known in scientific circles as proto-Australian.

This will be determined through an analysis of the endangered Aboriginal language Yanyuwa. Harvey will look at implications of 'yes' and 'no' responses to a series of questions relating to Australia's pre-history and general queries of human pre-history. It also involves the extensive documentation of the language, which is spoken by the Yanyuwa people around the settlement of Borroloola (Yanyuwa burrulula) in the Northern Territory of Australia.

"This research will provide a descriptive grammar of Yanyuwa, a book evaluating the proto-Australian hypothesis, and articles discussing the significance of the success or failure of the hypothesis for theories of the general human past," Harvey said.

Over the past 30 years of his career, Harvey has also focused much of his research on Aboriginal social organisation.

"I differ from other analysts and propose that the clan and kinship system are not internally consistent, but should be analysed as on-going and variable compromises between other more consistently maintained and sometimes conflicting patterns," Harvey explained.

"The most consistently maintained system in Aboriginal social organisation is not clans or kinship systems but rather constructions of the landscape. My investigations are based on extensive site mapping work with Aboriginal people. I have detailed the specific ways in which these constructions anchor discussions of land ownership (clans, tribes) and kinship, particularly marriage."

A third ARC-funded project sees Harvey is working closely with the University of Ballarat to develop a clear understanding of Indigenous spatial knowledge to support the Australian tourism industry. This investigation involves discerning the Indigenous meanings of places, animals and plants; a study known as ethnobiology, which examines the dynamic relationships among peoples, biota and environments throughout the history of time. This information will then be shared in a range of accessible and educational materials designed for tourists and visitors.

"Research on the construction of the landscape is accorded great significance both by Aboriginal people and the research community. It is of particular concern that information collected should be archived in an easily retrievable manner, subject to culturally appropriate monitoring. This is, to date, an essentially un-investigated area of research," Harvey said.

"It is my hope that this research will help our tourism industry to grow by sharing what is a very significant part of our history."

Dr Mark Harvey

Connecting language and landscape

Dr Mark Harvey’s 2015 Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project aims to document a severely endangered Indigenous language

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

1. In the period 2001-2006, I had 11 publications in the prinicpal DEST categories (2 x A1, 6 x B1, 5 x C1). This is an average of 2 publications per year.

2. In the period 2001-2006, I was a Chief Investigator on two externally funded grants. A. ARC Discovery Grant (UNewc). (2005 - $40,000, 2006 - $35,000, 2007 $35,000). (Co-investigators: Dr M. Amberber [UNSW], Dr B. Baker [UNE]) B. Australian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies Research Grant. (2003 - $15,000) (Co-investigators - members of the Wagiman community).

3. In the period 2001-2006, I was employed as a consultant by the Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority (NT), and the Northern Land Council (Darwin). Both of these consultancies resulted in extensive reports.

4. I was seconded to the Yirra Bandoo Aboriginal Corporation for Jan 01 Dec 03 and Jul 04 Dec 04 to prepare materials on Gulumoerrgin, the Aboriginal language of Darwin. This secondment was funded by a grant from the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Commission, which was principally to provide for my employment.

Research Expertise
1. Descriptive Linguistic Research There are two strands to my research in this area. One is the production of grammars and dictionaries in paper format. The other is the production of materials in digital/electronic format the cutting edge of descriptive research. I have supervised the production of an online dictionary. I have produced a detailed database transcription and digitisation of 72hrs of Gulumoerrgin audio material.

2. Theoretical Linguistic Research My research has concentrated on two areas: historical linguistics, and complex predicate and word structures. I have undertaken extensive research on one of the principal issues in Australian historical linguistics - the relationships among the languages of central north and north-west Australia - the area of greatest linguistic differentiation. My research on complex predicate and word structures focuses on a conceptual equation, one verbal word = one predicate = one clause, which is central to both modern and traditional grammatical theories. Thus an English sentence such as I let the kids go to town is analysed as bi-clausal, with each of the two verbs let and go being a predicate and having its own clause. However, in other languages including many Aboriginal languages, apparently equivalent structures are mono-clausal, challenging the verbal word = predicate = clause equation and thereby grammatical theories. Joint research with ARC co-investigators has shown that mono-clausal structures do not constitute a unitary category. Rather some structures involve a single complex predicate, but others involve multiple predicates. Further many structures must be analysed as involving two different parts-of-speech. Theoretical models of verb, predicate, and clause therefore require revision.

3. Anthropological Research My research has focused on some central concepts in the analysis of Aboriginal social organisation clan, kinship system. There has been much debate over the validity of these concepts. Most analysts agree, however, in treating these systems as internally consistent. I differ from other analysts and propose that they are not internally consistent, but should be analysed as on-going and variable compromises between other more consistently maintained and sometimes conflicting patterns. Much of the debate has arisen from a failure to recognise this. The most consistently maintained system in Aboriginal social organisation is not clans or kinship systems but rather constructions of the landscape. I have detailed the specific ways in which these constructions anchor discussions of land ownership (clans, tribes) and kinship (particularly marriage). My analyses are based on extensive site mapping work with Aboriginal people. Research on the construction of the landscape is accorded great significance both by Aboriginal people and the research community. It is of particular concern, that information collected should be archived in an easily retrievable manner, subject to culturally appropriate monitoring. This is, to date, an essentially uninvestigated research area. I have produced a draft electronic gazetteer, which is a pioneer in this field. I aim to archive all of my landscape fieldwork research in electronic gazetteers. I also aim to engage with other researchers to develop appropriate archival standards for this new research domain.

Teaching Expertise
1. Curriculum Development. There have been significant changes to the make-up of the student clientele since I joined the discipline in 1994. We have acquired extensive service teaching responsibilities for both Education and Speech Pathology. In order to accommodate our changing clientele, we have undertaken three major curriculum reviews.I played an extensive role in all three reviews.

2. On-line assessment. There are a number of large classes in the linguistics discipline (up to 500 students). We now undertake nearly all assessment on-line for larger classes. I instigated and directed the adoption of on-line assessment in these classes. This involved considerable collaborative interaction with the specialists in overall charge of on-line education.

Administrative Expertise
Linguistics is one of the larger disciplines in the Faculty of Arts & Education. I have been the discipline convenor since Jan 2006. I have expertise in the following. 1. Program Delivery I have co-ordinated our program offerings. This is a complex exercise. In addition to providing a linguistics program, we must satisfy service teaching requirements for Speech Pathology at the Callaghan campus, and Education at Callaghan, Ourimbah and Port Macquarie campuses.

2. Casual staff management. Delivery of the discipline program involves extensive employment of casual staff, particularly in the large 1st year offerings. 3. Workload statistics The discipline convenor's job involves oversight of the discipline teaching workload statistics.



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts, Australian National University
  • Master of Arts, Australian National University

Keywords

  • Aboriginal languages
  • Australian Aboriginal anthropology
  • Curriculum development
  • Historical linguistics
  • Morphology
  • On-line assessment
  • Phonology

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
200499Linguistics not elsewhere classified75
160199Anthropology not elsewhere classified25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/07/2007 - Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/12/2006LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/07/1994 - 1/12/1998Associate LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/01/1981 - Membership - Australian Linguistic SocietyAustralian Linguistic Society
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (11 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Amberber M, Baker B, Harvey MD, Complex Predicates. Cross-linguistic Perspectives on Event Structure, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 336 (2010) [A3]
2010Baker B, Mushin I, Harvey M, Gardner R, Indigenous Language and Social Identity: Papers in Honour of Michael Walsh, Pacific Linguistics, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, 404 (2010) [A3]
2010Amberber M, Baker B, Harvey MD, Complex Predicates. Cross-linguistic Perspectives on Event Structure, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 336 (2010) [A3]
2010Baker B, Mushin I, Harvey M, Gardner R, Indigenous Language and Social Identity: Papers in Honour of Michael Walsh, Pacific Linguistics, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, 404 (2010) [A3]
2009Fromkin V, Rodman R, Hyams N, Collins P, Amberber M, Harvey MD, An Introduction to Language, Cengage Learning, South Melbourne, VIC, 562 (2009) [A3]
2009White DL, O'Brien EA, Fejo DM, Yates RW, Goodman AA, Harvey MD, Wightman G, Warray Plants and Animals: Aboriginal Flora and Fauna Knowledge from the Upper Adelaide and Upper Finniss Rivers, Northern Australia, Department of Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts and Sport/Diwurruwurru-jaru Aboriginal Corporation, Palmerston, NT, 144 (2009) [A2]
2008Harvey MD, Proto Mirndi: A Discontinuous Language Family in Northern Australia, Pacific Linguistics Publishers, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 169 (2008) [A1]
2006Liddy LG, Martin LD, Huddlestone JG, Jululuk L, Liddy HI, McMah CG, et al., Wagiman Plants & Animals, Department of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts (Darwin) & Diwurruwurru-Jaru Katherine, Darwin, 160 (2006) [A2]
2002Harvey MD, A grammar of Gaagudju, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin/New York, 497 (2002) [A1]
2001Harvey MD, A grammar of Limilngan: a language of the Mary River region, Northern Territory, Australia, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra, 209 (2001) [A1]
1997Harvey M, Reid N, Nominal Classification in Aboriginal Australia, John Benjamins Publishing, Amsterdam and Philadelphia, 292 (1997)
Show 8 more books

Chapter (16 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Baker B, Harvey MD, 'Complex predicate formation', Complex Predicates. Cross-linguistic perspectives on event structure, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 13-47 (2010) [B1]
DOI10.1017/CBO9780511712234.003
2010Amberber M, Baker B, Harvey MD, 'Introduction', Complex Predicates. Cross-linguistic perspectives on event structure, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1-12 (2010) [B1]
DOI10.1017/CBO9780511712234.002
2010Harvey MD, 'Colonisation and Aboriginal concepts of land tenure in the Darwin region', Indigenous Language and Social Identity: Papers in Honour of Michael Walsh, Pacific Linguistics, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra 105-122 (2010) [B1]
2010Gardner R, Harvey MD, Mushin I, Baker B, 'Introduction', Indigenous Language and Social Identity: Papers in Honour of Michael Walsh, Pacific Linguistics, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra 1-12 (2010) [B1]
2008Harvey MD, 'The origin of conjugation markers in Australian languages', Morphology and Language History: In Honour of Harold Koch, John Benjamins Publishing Company, Amsterdam 123-137 (2008) [B1]
2007Amberber M, Baker B, Harvey MD, 'Complex predication and the coverb construction', Language, Description, History and Development: Linguistic Indulgence in Memory of Terry Crowley, John Benjamins Publishing Company, Amsterdam 209-219 (2007) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, 'The evolution of object enclitic paradigms in the Eastern Daly language family', The non-Pama-Nyungan Languages of Northern Australia, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra 185-201 (2003) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, Alpher B, Evans N, 'Proto Gunwinyguan verb suffixes', The Non-Pama-Nyungan Languages of Northern Australia: Comparative Studies of the Continent's Most Linguistically complex Region, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra 305-352 (2003) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, 'The evolution of verb systems in the Eastern Daly language family', The non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: comparative studies of the continent's most linguistically complex region, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra 159-184 (2003) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, 'An initial reconstruction of Proto Gunwinyguan phonology', The non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: comparative studies of the continent's most linguistically complex region, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra 205-268 (2003) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, 'Western Gunwinyguan', The non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: comparative studies of the continent's most linguistically complex region, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra 285-303 (2003) [B1]
2003Harvey MD, 'Reconstruction of pronominals among the non-Pama-Nyungan languages', The non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: comparative studies of the continent's most linguistically complex region, Pacific Lingjuistics, Canberra 475-513 (2003) [B1]
1997Harvey MD, Reid N, 'Introduction', Nominal classification in Aboriginal Australia, John Benjamins, Amsterdam and Philadelphia 1-15 (1997)
1997Harvey MD, 'Head and agreement classes: an areal perspective', Nominal classification in Aboriginal Australia, John Benjamins, Amsterdam and Philadelphia 147-163 (1997)
1997Harvey MD, 'Nominal classification and gender in Aboriginal Australia', Nominal classification in Aboriginal Australia, John Benjamins, Amsterdam and Philadelphia 17-62 (1997)
1996Harvey MD, 'Body parts in Warray', The grammar of inalienability: a typological perspective on body part terms and the part-whole relation, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin and New York 111-153 (1996)
Show 13 more chapters

Journal article (14 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Harvey M, Lin S, Turpin M, Davies B, Demuth K, 'Contrastive and Non-contrastive Pre-stopping in Kaytetye', Australian Journal of Linguistics, 1-19 (2015)
DOI10.1080/07268602.2015.1023170
2013Harvey MD, 'Reconstructing long-term limits on diffusion in Australia', Anthropological Linguistics, 55 158-183 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1353/anl.2013.0007
2012Harvey MD, 'Warndarrang and Marra: A diffusional or genetic relationship?', Australian Journal of Linguistics, 32 327-360 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1080/07268602.2012.705578
2012Bundgaard-Nielsen RL, Baker BJ, Kroos C, Harvey MD, Best CT, 'Vowel acoustics reliably differentiate three coronal stops of Wubuy across prosodic contexts', Laboratory Phonology, 3 133-161 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1515/lp-2012-0009
2011Harvey MD, 'Lexical change in pre-colonial Australia', Diachronica, 28 345-381 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1075/dia.28.3.03har
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2011Harvey MD, 'Prepalatals in Arandic', Australian Journal of Linguistics, 31 79-110 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1080/07268602.2011.532858
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009Harvey MD, 'The genetic status of Garrwan', Australian Journal of Linguistics, 29 195-244 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1080/07268600902823102
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2006Harvey MD, Green I, Nordlinger R, 'From prefixes to suffixes: Typological change in Northern Australia', Diachronica: international journal for historical linguistics, XXIII 289-311 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1075/dia.23.2.04har
2002Harvey MD, 'Land tenure and naming systems in Aboriginal Australia', Australian Journal of Anthropology, 13 23-44 (2002) [C1]
2001Harvey MD, 'Oenpelli Kunwinjku kinship terminologies and marriage practices', Oceania, 72 117-142 (2001) [C1]
1999Harvey MD, 'Place Names and Land-Language Associations in the Western Top End', Australian Journal of Linguistics, Vol.19, No.2 161-195 (1999) [C1]
1999Harvey MD, Borowsky T, 'The Minimum Word in Warray', Australian Journal of Linguistics, Vol.19, No.1 89-99 (1999) [C1]
1999Borowsky T, Harvey M, 'Vowel length in Warray and weight identity', Phonology, 161-175 (1999)
1991Harvey MD, 'Glottal stop, underspecification and syllable structures among the Top End languages', Australian Journal of Linguistics, 67-105 (1991)
Show 11 more journal articles

Design (2 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2008Harvey MD, Non-Pama-Nyungan Languages: Mapping Database and Maps, ASEDA, Australia (2008) [J1]
2005Harvey MD, Place Names in Country known to Wagiman people, Archaeological Computing Laboratory, The University of Sydney, N/A (2005) [H2]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants18
Total funding$889,132

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $205,735

Kaytetye and Prosodic Theory$202,135

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Dr Myfany Turpin, Dr Michael Proctor
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1400082
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

22nd International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Naples Italy, 27-31 July 2015$3,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500692
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20143 grants / $308,000

Reconstructing Australia's linguistic past: Are all Australian languages related to one another? $276,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Dr Robert Mailhammer
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300149
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Endangered Languages Documentation, Theory and Application$30,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project TeamDoctor Bill Palmer, Doctor Mark Harvey, Doctor Aashild Naess, Doctor Catriona Malau
SchemeResearch Programme 2014
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400925
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

22nd Manchester Phonology Meeting, Manchester United Kingdom, 29-31 May 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400605
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20131 grants / $1,500

Chicago Linguistic Society, Chicago USA, 18-20 April 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300660
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20123 grants / $138,500

Aboriginal place names and ethnobiology: enhancing interpretation of indigenous culture and heritage$105,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Associate Professor Ian Clark, Dr Laura Kostanski
SchemeLinkage Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101047
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Aboriginal place names and ethnobiology: enhancing interpretation of indigenous culture and heritage$27,500

Funding body: Northern Territory Department of Lands and Planning

Funding bodyNorthern Territory Department of Lands and Planning
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Associate Professor Ian Clark, Dr Laura Kostanski
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1201007
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Aboriginal place names and ethnobiology: enhancing interpretation of indigenous culture and heritage$6,000

Funding body: Office of Surveyor-General Victoria

Funding bodyOffice of Surveyor-General Victoria
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Associate Professor Ian Clark, Dr Laura Kostanski
SchemeLinkage Projects Partner funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200155
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20112 grants / $31,180

Understanding the sounds of Kaytetye and how to teach them.$24,495

Passing the Kaytetye language on to younger generations is a core goal for the Kaytetye community. The first step in teaching any language is teaching the sounds. Many of the sounds of Kaytetye are poorly understood, and this greatly limits teaching effectiveness. This project is the first step in a longer term plan to develop better models of Kaytetye sounds, thereby giving Kaytetye language teaching a firmer basis.
Funding body: Australian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies

Funding bodyAustralian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies
Project Team
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2012
GNo
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

Team Workshop: LP Application "Developing cultural tourism opportunities for indigenous people"$6,685

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeLinkage Pilot Research Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100599
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20101 grants / $22,670

Getting on to country: Wagiman people and their land since 1960$22,670

Funding body: Australian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies

Funding bodyAustralian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900246
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20051 grants / $110,000

Verbs and coverbs: a cross-linguistic re-analysis of part-of-speech categories$110,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Dr Mengistu Amberber, Dr Brett Baker
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0184329
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20041 grants / $47,162

Larrakia Language Project$47,162

Funding body: Yirra Bandoo Aboriginal Corporation

Funding bodyYirra Bandoo Aboriginal Corporation
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2004
Funding Finish2004
GNoG0184305
Type Of FundingNot Known
CategoryUNKN
UONY

20002 grants / $12,385

Word Classes and Word Forms in Wagiman.$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey, Dr T Borowsky
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2000
Funding Finish2000
GNoG0178810
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Annual Conference of the Australian Linguistics Society Perth, WA.$385

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2000
Funding Finish2000
GNoG0179341
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

19981 grants / $8,000

Serial vs Parallel Processing in Word-Formation: The Evidence from Australian Aboriginal Languages.$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start1998
Funding Finish1998
GNoG0177346
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

19951 grants / $4,000

A Grammar and Dictionary of the Larrikiya Language (Darwin)$4,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Mark Harvey
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start1995
Funding Finish1995
GNoG0175216
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015A descriptive grammar of Yanyuwa: a Pama-Nyungan language of Northern Australia
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2014Indigenous Spatial Heritage: Effective Mapping and Tourism Marketing for Conservation and Community Empowerment in Australia
Studies In Human Society, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2014Typology of Complex Predicates
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2011Place Oppositions in English Coronal Obstruents: An Ultrasound Study
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2010Documentation and Description of a Highly Endangered Northwest Solomonic Language
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2010Topics in a Grammar of Nehan
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2009The Influence of Religious and Cultural Attitudes on Engagement among Foreign Language Learners in Saudi Arabia
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015A Grammar of Papapana with an Investigation Into Language Contact and Endangerment
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2013Word Structure in Kisa
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2012Factors Determining the Saudi Learners' Difficulties in Attaining EFL Vocabulary
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2011The Impact of Nominal Anglicisms on the Morphology of Modern Spoken German
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
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News

The prosodic structure of Kaytetye

PhD Scholarship - The prosodic structure of Kaytetye

May 8, 2015

A scholarship opportunity is available for a PhD student to study The Prosodic structure of Kaytetye under the supervision of Dr Mark Harvey.

ARC Discovery Projects 2015

ARC Discovery Projects 2015

November 5, 2014

The Faculty of Education and Arts at the University of Newcastle (UON) has secured six Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Program grants for 2015.

University of Newcastle linguistics in top 100 world-wide

Linguistics breaks into world’s top 100

March 25, 2014

Three Faculty of Education and Arts disciplines have climbed in the most recent QS World University Rankings by Subject list. Linguistics is the star performer, increasing its ranking by 21 places to break the top 100 and rank at 88 in the world.

Stephen Logan

Linguistics, Education and Sociology star in the QS World Rankings

March 18, 2014

If you want to be at the forefront of linguistics study and research in Australia, the University of Newcastle is the place to be.

Dr Mark Harvey

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Linguistics

Contact Details

Emailmark.harvey@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4348 4050
Fax(02) 4348 4075

Office

RoomH01.64
BuildingHumanities
LocationOurimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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