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Professor Hugh Craig

Deputy Head of Faculty

School of Humanities and Social Science (English)

Figures of speech

As unlikely as it sounds, literary scholar Professor Hugh Craig has enhanced his appreciation of Shakespeare through statistical analysis.

figures of speech

Renaissance literature expert Professor Hugh Craig is a man of letters. But the computational stylist is equally a man of numbers.

Craig is the Director of the Centre for Linguistic and Literary Computing. He has been an advocate of computer-assisted analysis of language in literature since the controversial field began to emerge in the 1980s.

He has devoted decades of research to proving that statistics can help us analyse and appreciate literary texts.

Craig says computational analysis has two applications in the field of literature: it can help authenticate authorship that is unknown or suspected to have been wrongly attributed and it can be used to build a profile of or define a writer's particular style.

"It is still controversial because people in the literary world don't like numbers, they don't trust numbers, and they don't understand how you can do something as banal as counting things in a literary context," he says.

"That is why it is fun; because it does challenge people and threaten some people. As you can imagine, I get in some pretty heated discussions."

Craig's work is based largely on frequency data and has led to several breakthrough findings in regard to Shakespearean works. Using his computational techniques he found that Shakespeare was the likely author of a number of scenes from the play The Spanish Tragedy that had previously been attributed to the playwright Ben Jonson. The results are presented in his 2009 co-edited book Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship.

He has also established that Shakespeare did not have the wide vocabulary many credited him with."There was a myth that Shakespeare had an extraordinarily large vocabulary, but our analysis shows that he didn't. His talent was in the way he used regular, ordinary words," Craig explains.

"What we did was look at the words he used and the frequency with which he used them and compared that to what other playwrights of the time were doing. Our research showed the difference in vocabulary was not striking."

Craig's research builds on the work of the centre's founder, Emeritus Professor John Burrows, who was the first to establish that simple function words such as "he", "and", "but" and "if" were rich in stylistic information when analysed using computational techniques.

Ina novel cross-disciplinary exercise, Craig employed the expertise of Professor Pablo Moscato, who heads the University's bioinformatics program, to assist in the analysis of texts. The pair undertook a joint project comparing the structure of language in Shakespeare's plays and poems, which returned interesting evidence of a vast disparity in style between the two literary disciplines.

He has also linked with University speech pathology researchers to study how computational linguistics can be applied in the health sphere.

"We are looking at how people's language changes with ageing but there are other researchers using the techniques to investigate how people's language changes with the onset of Alzheimer's. This could in turn lead to early detection if you could find a way to pick up on those changes in language use," he says.

Craig says computational analysis is not only applicable to the work of great writers. It can be used just as effectively to identify the idiosyncrasies of any individual's language.

"The miracle of language is that we all make something individual out of a common resource. Computer analysis allows us to detect those word patterns more accurately than simply relying on intuition."

figures of speech

Figures of speech

As unlikely as it sounds, literary scholar Professor Hugh Craig has enhanced his appreciation of Shakespeare through statistical analysis.

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Career Summary

Biography

Hugh Craig's research interests are in Renaissance literature and humanities computing. He teaches courses in Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Restoration literature, and Text and Technology. He has been Head of the Department of English, Head of the School of Language and Media and Head of the School of Humanities and Social Science. He is Director of the University's Centre for Literacy and Linguistic Computing, and is involved in a number of collaborations beyond Newcastle in computational stylistics. Earlier books are on Sir John Harington and Ben Jonson. His recent publications are on questions of authorship in the Renaissance. He is interested broadly in the application of computer science to the humanities, especially via the analysis of large language samples.

Research Expertise

Professor Craig works in computational stylistics, applied to Shakespeare and to Early Modern English drama generally. He has published books on Sir John Harrington and on Ben Jonson's critical heritage. Through the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing he is involved in the development of specialist software for humanities computing, including the online open-access Shakespeare Computational Stylistics Facility.

Administrative Expertise
In 2002 I was the inaugural Head, School of Language and Media, formed after a university-wide restructure, and remained in that role until a second restructure, in 2005, when I became Dean of Arts and the first Head, School of Humanities and Social Science. This School had around 70 full-time academic staff, operated across two campuses and had 19 disciplines including Social Work and Speech Pathology. I resigned this position at the end of 2007. Currently my workload is around 50% research and 50% research administration as Director of the Humanities Research Institute at Newcastle.

Collaborations
Professor Craig works in computational stylistics, applied to Shakespeare and to Early Modern English drama generally. He has published books on Sir John Harrington and on Ben Jonson's critical heritage. Through the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing he is involved in the development of specialist software for humanities computing, including the online open-access Shakespeare Computational Stylistics Facility.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Oxford - UK
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Authorship
  • Computational Stylistics
  • Drama
  • Early Modern
  • English Literature
  • Jane Austen
  • Literary Studies
  • Renaissance Drama
  • Shakespeare
  • Stylistics
  • Text Mining

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
020399 Classical Physics not elsewhere classified 10
200499 Linguistics not elsewhere classified 10
200599 Literary Studies not elsewhere classified 80

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 - 1/12/2012 Director, Humanities Research Institute University of Newcastle
Education and Arts
Australia

Invitations

External Examiner

Year Title / Rationale
1999 External examiner
Organisation: School of English, University of New South Wales Description: External examiner for all Honours theses for the department. Offered marks and attended meetings at UNSW.

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2007 ARC D and Linkage
Organisation: ARC Description: ARC OzReader (current)
2007 Digital Humanities Summer Institute
Organisation: University of Victoria, BC Description: Return fares to Canada, expenses and an honorarium (equivalent to companion fare) paid for a Master Class on Textual Analysis and a lecture, June 2007
2005 Papers from Computing Arts 2004@Newcastle, Literary and Linguistic Computing 20.4
Organisation: University of Newcastle Description: Invited guest editor
2005 External chair referee
Organisation: University of Western Sydney Description: Wrote report as external professor on application for promotion to Professor in the College of Arts at UWS
2004 External member of chair committee
Organisation: University of Sydney Description: Wrote report and attended committee as external professor on committee to consider an application for promotion to Professor of English in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Sydney.
2004 Hudson Strode Lecture
Organisation: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa Description: Invited lecturer in series sponsored by the Hudson Strode Foundation. Foundation paid fares and expenses to and from Australia.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Bishop T, Huang A, Hirsch BD, Craig H, The Shakespearean International Yearbook, Ashgate, Surrey, 230 (2014) [A3]
2009 Craig DH, Kinney AF, Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 234 (2009) [A3]

Chapter (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Hirsch BD, Craig H, '"Mingled Yarn": The State of Computing in Shakespeare 2.0', The Shakespearean International Yearbook, Ashgate, Surrey 3-36 (2014) [B1]
2014 Hirsch BD, Craig H, '"Mingled Yarn": The State of Computing in Shakespeare 2.0', The Shakespearean International Yearbook, Ashgate, Surrey 3-36 (2014) [B1]
2013 Craig DH, 'The Date of Sir Thomas More', Shakespeare Survey: Volume 66, Working with Shakespeare, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 38-54 (2013)
2012 Craig DH, Burrows JF, 'A collaboration about a collaboration: The authorship of King Henry VI, Part Three', Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities: A Volume in Honour of Harold Short, on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday and his Retirement, September 2010, Ashgate, Farnham, Surrey 27-65 (2012) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Craig H, Burrows J, 'A collaboration about a collaboration: The authorship of King Henry VI, part three', Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities: A Volume in Honour of Harold Short, on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday and his Retirement, September 2010, Ashgate Publishing Ltd 27-66 (2012)
2011 Craig H, 'Authorship', The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare, Oxford University Press, Oxford 15-30 (2011) [B1]
2009 Craig DH, 'The three parts of Henry VI', Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 40-77 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511605437.004
Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Craig DH, 'The 1602 additions to The Spanish Tragedy', Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 162-180 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511605437.009
Citations Scopus - 7
2009 Craig DH, Kinney AF, 'Methods', Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 15-39 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511605437.003
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Craig DH, Kinney AF, 'Introduction', Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1-14 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511605437.002
2009 Ferguson AJ, Craig DH, Spencer EL, 'Exploring the potential for corpus-based research in speech-language pathology', Selected Proceedings of the 2008 HCSNet Workshop on Designing the Australian National Corpus: Mustering Languages, Cascadilla Press, Somerville, Massachusetts 30-36 (2009) [B1]
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer
2004 Craig DH, 'Stylistic Analysis and Authorship Studies', A Companion to Digital Humanities, Blackwell Publishing, United Kingdom 273-288 (2004) [B1]
1999 Craig DH, 'Jonsonian chronology and the styles of 'A Tale of a Tub'', Re-Presenting Ben Jonson: Text, Performance, History, Macmillan, London 210-232 (1999) [B1]
1998 Craig DH, '"Jonson, the antimasque and the 'rules of flattery'"', The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 176-196 (1998) [B1]
Show 11 more chapters

Journal article (37 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Craig H, Antonia A, 'Six authors and the saturday review: A quantitative approach to style', Victorian Periodicals Review, 48 67-86 (2015)
2015 Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig H, Colyvas K, Hankey GJ, Flicker L, 'Propositional idea density in older men's written language: findings from the HIMS study using computerised analysis.', Clin Linguist Phon, 29 85-101 (2015)
DOI 10.3109/02699206.2014.956263
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer, Kim Colyvas
2014 Arefin AS, Vimieiro R, Riveros C, Craig H, Moscato P, 'An information theoretic clustering approach for unveiling authorship affinities in Shakespearean era plays and poems.', PloS one, 9 e111445 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0111445
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pablo Moscato
2014 Ferguson A, Spencer E, Craig H, Colyvas K, 'Propositional Idea Density in women's written language over the lifespan: Computerized analysis', Cortex, 55 107-121 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.05.012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer, Kim Colyvas
2014 Antonia A, Craig H, Elliott J, 'Language chunking, data sparseness, and the value of a long marker list: Explorations with word n-grams and authorial attribution', Literary and Linguistic Computing, 29 147-163 (2014) [C1]

The frequencies of individual words have been the mainstay of computer-assisted authorial attribution over the past three decades. The usefulness of this sort of data is attested ... [more]

The frequencies of individual words have been the mainstay of computer-assisted authorial attribution over the past three decades. The usefulness of this sort of data is attested in many benchmark trials and in numerous studies of particular authorship problems. It is sometimes argued, however, that since language as spoken or written falls into word sequences, on the 'idiom principle', and since language is characteristically produced in the brain in chunks, not in individual words, n-grams with n higher than 1 are superior to individual words as a source of authorship markers. In this article, we test the usefulness of word n-grams for authorship attribution by asking how many good-quality authorship markers are yielded by n-grams of various types, namely 1-grams, 2-grams, 3-grams, 4-grams, and 5-grams. We use two ways of formulating the n-grams, two corpora of texts, and two methods for finding and assessing markers. We find that when using methods based on regularly occurring markers, and drawing on all the available vocabulary, 1-grams perform best. With methods based on rare markers, and all the available vocabulary, strict 3-gram sequences perform best. If we restrict ourselves to a defined word-list of function-words to form n-grams, 2-grams offer a striking improvement on 1-grams. © The Author 2013.Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ALLC. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/llc/fqt028
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Alexis Antonia
2014 Crabb P, Antonia A, Craig H, 'Who wrote ¿A Visit to the Western Goldfields¿? Using computers to analyse language in historical research', History Australia, 11 177-193 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Alexis Antonia
2013 Bryant L, Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig H, Colyvas K, Worrall L, 'Propositional Idea Density in aphasic discourse', Aphasiology, 27 992-1009 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2013.803514
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson, Kim Colyvas
2013 Marsden J, Budden D, Craig H, Moscato P, 'Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0066813
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Pablo Moscato
2013 Hugh C, 'The Quest for "Cardenio": Shakespeare, Fletcher, Cervantes, and the Lost Play ed. by David Carnegie and Gary Taylor (review)', Comparative Drama, 47 266-268 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1353/cdr.2013.0025
2012 Burrows JF, Craig DH, 'Authors and characters', English Studies, 93 292-309 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012 Craig DH, 'George Chapman, John Davies of Hereford, William Shakespeare, and A Lover's Complaint', Shakespeare Quarterly, 63 147-174 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/shq.2012.0025
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Spencer EL, Craig DH, Ferguson AJ, Colyvas KJ, 'Language and ageing - Exploring propositional density in written language - Stability over time', Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 26 743-754 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson
2012 Craig DH, 'Word and self estranged in English texts, 1550-1660, [Book Review]', Parergon, 29 261-263 (2012) [C3]
2012 Craig DH, 'Shakespeare's Foreign Worlds: National and Transnational Identities in the Elizabethan Age [Review]', European Legacy:Toward New Paradigms, 17 402-403 (2012) [C3]
2011 Craig DH, 'Shakespeare's vocabulary: Myth and reality', Shakespeare Quarterly, 62 53-74 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/shq.2011.0002
Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Craig DH, 'A and an in English Plays, 1580-1639', Texas Studies in Literature and Language, 53 273-293 (2011) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 2
2011 Drew J, Craig DH, 'Did Dickens write 'temperate temperance'?: An attempt to identify authorship of an anonymous article in All the Year Round', Victorian Periodicals Review, 44 267-290 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/vpr.2011.0022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Craig DH, Whipp R, 'Old spellings, new methods: Automated procedures for indeterminate linguistic data', Literary and Linguistic Computing, 25 37-52 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/llc/fqp033
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2010 Craig DH, 'Style, statistics and new models of authorship', Early Modern Literary Studies, 1-15 (2010) [C1]
2009 Rosso OA, Craig DH, Moscato PA, 'Shakespeare and other English Renaissance authors as characterized by Information Theory complexity quantifiers', Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 388 916-926 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physa.2008.11.018
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Pablo Moscato
2008 Craig DH, ''Speak, that I may see thee': Shakespeare characters and common words', Shakespeare Survey, 61 281-288 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/CCOL9780521898881.021
Citations Scopus - 4
2007 Craig H, 'Stylistic Analysis and Authorship Studies 271-288 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/9780470999875.ch20
2006 Jordan EE, Craig DH, Antonia A, 'The Bronte Sisters and the Christian Remembrancer: A Pilot Study in the Use of the 'Burrows Method' to Identify the Authorship of Unsigned Articles in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press', Victorian Periodicals Review, 39 21-45 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/vpr.2006.0024
Co-authors Alexis Antonia
2005 Craig DH, 'Guest Editor's Introduction', Literary and Liguistic Computing, 20 381 (2005) [C2]
2005 Craig DH, 'Words that Count : Essays on Early Modern Authorship in Honor of MacDonald P. Jackson', Shakespeare Quarterly, 56 496-498 (2005) [C3]
2002 Craig DH, 'Common-words frequencies, Shakespeare's style, and the Elegy by W. S', Early Modern Literary Studies, 8.1 42 paragraphs (2002) [C1]
2001 Craig DH, ''An Image of the Times': Ben Jonson's Revision of "Every Man in His Humour"', English Studies, 82 14-33 (2001) [C1]
DOI 10.1076/enst.82.1.14.9608
2001 Burrows JF, Craig DH, 'Lucy Hutchinson and the Authorship of Two Seventeenth-Century Poems: A Computational Approach', The Seventeenth Century, 16 259-282 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10
2001 Craig DH, ''She Learned Romance as She Grew Older' - "Persuasion" as the 'Natural Sequel' to "Sense and Sensibility"', Sensibilities, 23 5-19 (2001) [C1]
2000 Craig DH, 'Grammatical modality in English plays from the 1580s to the 1640s', English Literary Renaissance, 30 32-54 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2000 Craig DH, 'Is the author really dead? An empirical study of authorship in English Renaissance drama', Empirical Studies of the Arts, 18 119-134 (2000) [C1]
1999 Craig H, 'Contrast and change in the idiolects of Ben Jonson characters', Computers and the Humanities, 33 221-240 (1999)

The paper presents the results of a series of Principal Components Analyses of the frequencies of very common words in the dialogue of characters in plays by Ben Jonson. The first... [more]

The paper presents the results of a series of Principal Components Analyses of the frequencies of very common words in the dialogue of characters in plays by Ben Jonson. The first Principal Component in the data, the most important axis of differentiation, proves in each case to be a spectrum from elaborate, authoritative pronouncements to a dialogue style of reaction and interchange. Reference to other quantitative studies, literary and otherwise, suggests that a version of this axis may often be among the most important in stylistic difference generally. In Jonson it has a chronological aspect - there is a shift over his career from one end to the other - and there is often significant change within the idiolects of his characters as well. Successive segments of Volpone and Mosca's parts (they are protagonist and antagonist of Volpone, perhaps Jonson's best-known comedy) change markedly along this axis, beginning far apart but coming by the end of the play to resemble each other very closely on this measure. © 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Citations Scopus - 3
1999 Craig DH, 'Contrast and change in the idiolects of Ben Jonson characters', Computers and the Humanities, 33 221-240 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
1999 Craig DH, 'Authorial attribution and computational stylistics: if you can tell authors apart, have you learned anything about them?', Literary and Linguistic Computing, 14 103-113 (1999) [C1]
1999 Craig DH, 'The weight of numbers: common words and Jonson's dramatic style', The Ben Jonson Journal, 6 243-259 (1999) [C1]
1994 BURROWS JF, CRAIG DH, 'LYRICAL DRAMA AND THE TURBID MOUNTEBANKS - STYLES OF DIALOG IN ROMANTIC AND RENAISSANCE TRAGEDY', COMPUTERS AND THE HUMANITIES, 28 63-86 (1994)
DOI 10.1007/BF01830688
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 14
1991 Craig DH, 'Plural pronouns in Roman plays by Shakespeare and Jonson', Literary and Linguistic Computing, 6 180-186 (1991)

The paper shows that a group of Roman plays by Shakespeare and Jonson differ from a test set of other plays by the two authors in the use of plural pronouns and plural possessive ... [more]

The paper shows that a group of Roman plays by Shakespeare and Jonson differ from a test set of other plays by the two authors in the use of plural pronouns and plural possessive adjectives. In most cases the frequency of individual plural pronoun forms is significantly higher in the Roman plays. The difference seems to reflect the Roman plays' characteristic choice of the group as its dramatic focus, in battle but also in political matters more generally Twenty-six plays, thirteen by each author, are in the study, five of them Roman plays Six plural pronoun variables are used. The comedies in the test set are strongly differentiated from the Roman plays, with generally differentiated from the roman plays, with generally markedly lower frequencies of the plural variables. The pattern for tragedies is more mixed, scores in Othello are low, but Macbeth is much more like the Roman plays on these measures, with dialogue reflecting a preoccupation with group action in war and political conspiracy. © 1991 Oxford University Press.

DOI 10.1093/llc/6.3.180
Citations Scopus - 2
Show 34 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Spencer EL, Craig H, Colyvas K, 'Propositional Idea Density in written descriptions of health: Potential clinical applications', ., Tuscon, AZ (2013)
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Elizabeth Spencer
2012 Spencer EL, Ferguson AJ, Craig DH, 'Language and life stages', Digital Humanities Australasia 2012 Conference, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson
2009 Holbrook AP, Craig DH, Bourke SF, Lovat TJ, Holmes KA, Prieto-Rodriguez E, 'The content and language of PhD examiner reports', 13th Biennial Conference: EARLI 2009. Book of Abstracts, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Sid Bourke, Kathryn Holmes, Allyson Holbrook, Terry Lovat, Elena Prieto
2009 Bourke SF, Holbrook AP, Craig DH, Lovat TJ, Holmes KA, Prieto-Rodriguez E, 'Matching and understanding the context and language of PhD examiner reports', 2009 AERA Annual Meeting Online Program, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Holmes, Terry Lovat, Elena Prieto, Sid Bourke, Allyson Holbrook
2003 Craig DH, 'Computation into criticism, 1987-2001', Computing Arts 2001, Digital Resources for Research in the Humanities, University of Sydney (2003) [E2]
2003 Cole C, Craig DH, 'Computing Arts 2001', Computing Arts, Digital Resources for Research in the Humanities, University of Sydney (2003) [E4]
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 29
Total funding $1,017,022

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20132 grants / $19,470

2014 ARC/NHMRC Fellowship External Applicant Support - FEA$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Doctor Catherine Byrne, Doctor Juliette Milner-Thornton, Dr Juliette Huber
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301071
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Language and Ageing: Mapping language change with age$7,470

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Elizabeth Spencer, Professor Alison Ferguson, Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200959
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $423,000

Project EVA: an environmentally responsible facility for interdisciplinary supercomputing applications$263,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Pablo Moscato, Laureate Professor Jon Borwein, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Michael Ostwald, Professor Hugh Craig, Conjoint Professor Peter Greer, Associate Professor Stephan Chalup, Associate Professor Regina Berretta
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100627
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Patterns in Early Modern English Drama Texts: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Dramatic Genre, Repertory and Style, 1576-1642$160,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Dr Brett Hirsch
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100190
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20102 grants / $42,000

DVCR Special Grant 2010$40,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Professor Jim Albright, Professor Stephen Webb, Doctor Elyssa Joy
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000721
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ASE - Faculty of Education and Arts$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Award for Supervision Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1001029
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20083 grants / $182,986

Linguistic individuation in the plays of Shakespeare and his peers, 1576-1599$172,986

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187452
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Utilising linguistic analysis to explore text patterning in PhD examination reports$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Allyson Holbrook, Professor Hugh Craig, Emeritus Professor Sid Bourke, Emeritus Professor Terry Lovat, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189098
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Utilising linguistic analysis to explore text patterning in PhD examination reports$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Allyson Holbrook, Professor Hugh Craig, Emeritus Professor Sid Bourke, Emeritus Professor Terry Lovat, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez
Scheme Pilot Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189382
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $12,000

Shakespeare WordNet$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186679
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20052 grants / $11,300

2005 RIBG allocation$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185818
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Burrows Method and the Authorship of Unsigned Articles in Nineteenth Century Periodicals:George Eliot and The Saturday Review, A Pilot Study$4,300

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Doctor Ellen Jordan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184765
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20043 grants / $20,853

Authorial attribution using pairs of lexical words.$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183422
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Burrows' method and the authorship of unsigned articles in ninteenth century periodicals: The Christian Remembrancer, A Case Study.$9,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Doctor Ellen Jordan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183427
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, 1-3 April 2004, USA$1,853

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183888
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20032 grants / $117,008

Shakespeare, the Early Modern Theatre and Computational Stylistics.$109,008

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Professor A Kinney
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182094
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Anne Mozley and the Christian Remembrancer: A Pilot Project in Identifying the Authorship of Unsigned Articles in Nineteenth Century Periodicals.$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Doctor Ellen Jordan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182373
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20022 grants / $17,763

(SHARED) Establishment of the Australian E-Humanities Network.$12,263

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Learned Academies Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0182070
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Electronic archive and critical edition for the Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson$5,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181352
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20013 grants / $10,028

Visitor: Professor Arthur Kinney, 19 June to 31 July 2001.$4,528

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Visitor Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180648
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Humanities Computing Initiative Symposium from 2 July 2001 to 5 July 2001$3,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Conference Establishment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180955
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

World Shakespeare Congress, Spain 18-23 April 2001$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180687
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19971 grants / $6,000

Changes in the language o personal letters compared to those in English tragedy, 1580-1650.$6,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1997
Funding Finish 1997
GNo G0176685
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

19951 grants / $1,743

Ben Jonson: Text, History, Performance Conference, Leeds, England, 5-7 July 1995$1,743

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0176811
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19942 grants / $88,471

94,95,96 GRANT. A statistical study of trans-authorial aspects of language use in English Renaissance Drama$86,855

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Large Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0172908
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Annual Convention of the Modern Language Associaiton of the USA - San Diego - 27-30 December 1994$1,616

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0175048
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19932 grants / $14,400

The Generic Classification of Literary Texts by Frequencies of Very Common Words$11,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0172744
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Research Seminar 'The Court Masque'$3,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0173212
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

1 grants / $50,000

Australia-Sri Lanka Institutional collaboration in higher education - identifying strategic partnerships and priorities$50,000

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Project Team Professor Hugh Craig, Conjoint Professor David Gamage
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start
Funding Finish
GNo G1500480
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed12
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Science and Mysticism as Double Seance in the Magical Realist Fiction of Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Jane Austen and the Garden, Landscape and Nature
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Language of Other Worlds: Narrative Style in Early Science Fiction and Fantasy Texts
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Trends Regimes Collocations Co-Expressions and Trees : New Methods for Analysing Sequential Aspects of Literacy Language and Literary Data
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Aeschylus as Oral Performance : Rhythm Structure and Meaning in the Persians
Studies In Human Society, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Female Victimhood and Suicide in the Naturalistic Novel
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Creative Empathy: How Writers Turn Experience Not Their Own Into Literary Non-Fiction
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Computational Stylistics, Cognitive Grammar, and the Tragedy of Mariam: Combining Formal and Contextual Approaches in a Computational Study of Early Modern Tragedy
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Protean Pepys: Writing and Subjectivity in The Diary of Samuel Pepys
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Anonymity, Individuality and Commonality in Writing in British Periodicals - 1830 to 1890: A Computational Stylistics Approach
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 Masters The Carpet Child
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Wolfgang Iser and Literary Anthropology
Communication & Media Studies, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2007 PhD 'Bananas, Bastards and Victims'? Hybrid Reflections on Cultural Belonging in Intercountry Adoptee Narratives
Studies In Human Society, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2006 PhD Kobayashi Hideo: The Long Journey Towards Homeland, 1902 - 1945
Language and Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2006 PhD Language, Theory of Mind, And Social Behaviour in Acquired Traumatic Aphasia
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2005 Masters Anthony Powell's A Dance to the Music of Time: Searching for Secret Harmonies
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2003 Masters Villains and Villainy in Six Shakespearean Plays
Literature, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 29
United States 2
Argentina 1
United Kingdom 1
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News

Professor Hugh Craig

Humanities accolade

December 2, 2014

Professor Hugh Craig from the University of Newcastle's Centre for Linguistic and Literary Computing has been elected as a Fellow to the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

Watermelon by Nick Georgiou

Mining the creative mind

June 24, 2014

On the 24 June 2014 international researchers gathered in Newcastle for the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing Beyond Authorship Symposium.

Research Directions 2013/2014

Research Directions 2013/2014

May 16, 2014

The new edition of Research Directions from the Faculty of Education and Arts is now available.

Letters and Numbers

Letters and numbers

May 15, 2014

The director of the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing at the University of Newcastle knows it's not every English scholar's cup of Twinings, but he does love his stats.

The Conversation

Shakespeare and cancer diagnoses: how bard can it be?

July 22, 2013

By Pablo Moscato, University of Newcastle; David Budden, University of Melbourne; Hugh Craig, University of Newcastle, and John W. Marsden, University of Newcastle

Shakespeare's plays and cancer: two seemingly unrelated topics with an underlying common thread.

Professor Hugh Craig

Position

Deputy Head of Faculty
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

English

Contact Details

Email hugh.craig@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5212
Fax (02) 4921 7818

Office

Room GP1-39
Building General Purpose
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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