Dr Yogavijayan Kandasamy

Dr Yogavijayan Kandasamy

Conjoint Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kandasamy works as a senior neonatologist in a tertiary perinatal centre in Townsville, Queensland. He has a research interest in renal development in neonates and Indigenous Health. He has an MBBS degree from University Malaya, Malaysia; Masters in Clinical Epidemiology and PhD from the University of Newcastle. He is a Conjoint Research Fellow with the University of Newcastle and Adjunct Professor at James Cook University. He has Specialist Registration with the Medical Board of Australia.

Keywords

  • Indigenous health
  • Neonatal medicine
  • neonatologist
  • renal development
  • retinal microvasculature

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Malay (Fluent)
  • Tamil (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111403 Paediatrics 40
111303 Vision Science 20
111401 Foetal Development and Medicine 40
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Whitehall J, Kandasamy Y, 'Growth of children in conflict', Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease 1989-2001 (2012)

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012. All rights reserved. Growth of children in regions of conflict is likely to be disrupted by lack of food and an excess of psychologica... [more]

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012. All rights reserved. Growth of children in regions of conflict is likely to be disrupted by lack of food and an excess of psychological stress and physical disease. An example of the severe effects of conflict was seen in the northeast of Sri Lanka which has suffered more than 20 years of economic sanctions and long periods of active warfare in the Tamil struggle for autonomy. An anthropometric survey in 2005 revealed 34.3% of children <5 years old in Kilinochchi, the de facto capital of the northeast, to be under-nourished compared with 13.2% in the capital of Sri Lanka, Colombo. Ultrasound measurement of the lengths of the kidneys of these children revealed a progressive fall from the mean, suggesting a renal contribution to the cardiovascular disease in developing countries. Measurements of Tamil children in the tea estates in the mountainous centre of Sri Lanka revealed even greater stunting and wasting. The mothers of these children were also stunted and many displayed signs of vitamin and mineral deficiency. The low birthweight rate of 45% confirmed an inter-generational effect of under-nutrition according to the theory of the 'developmental origins of health and disease'. The degree of stunting and wasting of Tamil children in the northeast and the tea estates is much worse than that of the other major ethnic group in Sri Lanka, the majority Sinhalese, in whom progress in nutrition has been recorded in the last 25 years. Indeed, when compared to anthropometric reports from other regions of conflict throughout the world, the under-nutrition of Tamil children in the tea estates and the northeast of Sri Lanka is revealed to be the worst. The under-nutrition in the tea estates is the worst of all reported, confirming the concept that 'silent' conflict, distant from the world's media and the pressures of international rivalry, may have a greater effect on the growth of children. The WHO database, Anthro 2006, is a useful tool in the field with which to record individual and communal anthropometry and make comparisons with an international standard. There are some technical difficulties in its use but the greatest impediment to the accurate measurement of the anthropometry of children in conflict remains neither the database nor even accuracy of measurement. The greatest impediment is access to the children.

DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-1795-9_121
2012 Kandasamy Y, 'Retinal examination in premature babies', Digital Teleretinal Screening: Teleophthalmology in Practice 177-180 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-25810-7_18

Journal article (55 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Li J, Guandalini M, Mcinnes H, Kandasamy Y, Trnka P, Moritz K, 'The impact of prematurity on postnatal growth of different renal compartments', Nephrology, (2019)

© 2019 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Aim: In humans, nephrogenesis ceases before birth, but the renal medulla compartment continues to develop after birth. We aim to evaluat... [more]

© 2019 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Aim: In humans, nephrogenesis ceases before birth, but the renal medulla compartment continues to develop after birth. We aim to evaluate the relative growth of different renal compartments in preterm babies compared with age-matched term babies, and explore the impact of premature birth on postnatal renal maturation, remodelling and possible long-term implications. Methods: This retrospective study compared the renal ultrasonographic images between preterm babies and term infants. Ultrasound images were obtained at 32 weeks (preterm), 37 weeks and at 6 months of age. Kidney volume, length, renal cortex and medulla thickness were measured and compared between preterm and term babies. Results: Preterm babies were lighter in body weight and shorter for crown-heel length at age-matched 37 weeks. All kidney growth parameters were also smaller compared with term babies. However, by 6 months of age kidney volume and length measurements were no longer significantly different between the two groups though preterm babies were still significantly lighter and shorter. The catch-up of the overall kidney growth in preterm babies was mainly attributed to the hypertrophic growth of the renal cortex while the postnatal renal medulla growth was disrupted. This trend continued as the renal cortical thickness became significantly larger while the medulla became smaller in preterm babies at 6 months of age, compared with age-matched term baby. Conclusions: In preterm babies, the renal cortical region undergoes accelerated growth after birth while the renal medulla growth lags behind. Further investigations will be necessary to determine whether this has a negative impact on renal function later in life.

DOI 10.1111/nep.13623
2019 August D, Hitchcock I, Tangney J, Ray RA, Kandasamy Y, New K, 'Graduated colour tape measure: Development and demonstration of this tool in a case series of neonatal skin injuries', Journal of Tissue Viability, 28 133-138 (2019)

© 2019 Tissue Viability Society Aim: This study proposed to (1) develop a metric graduated colour tool and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool for use in the assessment ... [more]

© 2019 Tissue Viability Society Aim: This study proposed to (1) develop a metric graduated colour tool and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool for use in the assessment of neonatal skin injuries. Materials/methods: Findings from wound literature informed the metric graduated colour tool's development. Tool development included consideration of colours, size (comparative to neonatal skin injuries), cost, materials, feasibility and suitability for the neonatal clinical setting. Assessment of the tool's applicability with clinical images was then tested using digital cameras with specific evaluation of image sharpness and colour. Further evaluation was conducted within a case series of neonatal skin injuries. Results: The metric graduated colour tool comprised of 15 colours, measures 60 mm, displays metric dimensions, and offers a discernible reference for clinical images and injury/wound bed comparison. Images collected appeared enhanced with clear wound edges compared to previous methods. Four neonates who acquired skin injuries were included in the case series for which the tool provided reliable metric and colour comparison of epidermal stripping, extravasation, birth injury, and pressure injury. When used to compare injury assessments for series subjects measurements of both increased and decreased severity were obtained. Conclusion: A metric and colour tool can be used in conjunction with digital photographs to enhance objective assessment of neonatal skin injuries/wounds. The metric and colour tool provides the foundation for vital skin injury assessment and documentation essentials including injury bed colour, size and consideration of depth of damage.

DOI 10.1016/j.jtv.2019.04.004
2019 Kandasamy Y, Rudd D, Smith R, Hartley L, De Boever P, 'Retinal microvascular development in the first two years', Microvascular Research, 125 1-4 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mvr.2019.04.005
Co-authors Roger Smith
2019 Kandasamy Y, Rudd D, Lumbers ER, Smith R, 'Female preterm indigenous Australian infants have lower renal volumes than males: A predisposing factor for end-stage renal disease?', Nephrology, 24 933-937 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors Nephrology published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Aim: Indigenous Australians have an increased ri... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Nephrology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Aim: Indigenous Australians have an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indigenous women have a higher rate of CKD than men. In a cohort of Indigenous and non-Indigenous preterm neonates, we assessed total renal volume (TRV) (a proxy indicator for nephron number). We hypothesized that there would be no difference in renal volume between these two groups at term corrected (37 weeks gestation). Methods: Normally grown preterm neonates less than 32 weeks of gestation were recruited and at term corrected dates, the neonates underwent renal ultrasonography (TRV measurements), urine microalbumin-creatinine ratio and serum analysis for Cystatin C measurement for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculation. Results: One hundred and five neonates (38 Indigenous; 67 non-Indigenous) were recruited. Indigenous neonates were significantly more premature and of lower birth weight. At term corrected age, Indigenous neonates had a significantly smaller TRV (18.5 (4.2) vs 21.4 (5.1) cm3; P = 0.027) despite no significant difference in body weight. Despite having a smaller TRV, there was no significant difference in eGFR between Indigenous and Non-indigenous neonates (47.8 [43.2¿50.4] vs 46.2 [42.6¿53.3] ml/min per 1.73 m2; P = 0.986). These infants achieve similar eGFR through hyperfiltration, which likely increases their future risk of CKD. There was no difference in microalbumin-creatinine ratio. Female Indigenous neonates, however, had significantly smaller TRV compared with Indigenous male neonates (15.9 (3.6) vs 20.6 (3.6) cm3; P = 0.006), despite no difference in eGFR, birth weight, gestational age, and weight at term corrected. Conclusion: The difference in TRV is likely to be an important risk factor for the difference in morbidity and mortality from renal disease reported between male and female Indigenous adults.

DOI 10.1111/nep.13520
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, E Lumbers
2019 Kilcullen M, Kandasamy Y, Watson D, Cadet-James Y, 'Decisions to consent for autopsy after stillbirth: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experiences.', Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol, (2019)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.13052
2019 Haakons K, Ireland S, Kandasamy Y, 'The use of nitric oxide in premature neonates: A 15-year retrospective chart review', Journal of Pediatric and Neonatal Individualized Medicine, 8 (2019)

© 2018, Hygeia Press di Corridori Marinella. Aim: We aim to describe some characteristics of premature neonates which may predict response to inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). Methods: ... [more]

© 2018, Hygeia Press di Corridori Marinella. Aim: We aim to describe some characteristics of premature neonates which may predict response to inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). Methods: Neonates < 37 weeks without congenital abnormalities who received a single episode of iNO between January 2002 to December 2016 were included in this retrospective chart review. For the purposes of this study, we defined a response to iNO as being any reduction in fraction of inhaled oxygen (FiO2) at the time of iNO weaning. Results: 52 infants with a 57.7% overall survival were included. There was no significant difference in survival between gender or birth weight groups. Responders were found to be of older gestational age (p = 0.045), had a longer duration of iNO treatment (p = 0.004), longer time to weaning (p = 0.014) and earlier initiation of treatment (p = 0.010). Infants < 1,000 g were less likely to respond to iNO therapy (p = 0.006) and had a higher FiO2 at weaning (p = 0.037). Gender had no effect on response to iNO therapy (p = 0.176). Infants with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) were treated for longer prior to weaning (p = 0.025), treated for longer overall (p = 0.005) and had a lower FiO2 at weaning (p = 0.018). There was no significant correlation between methaemoglobin level and duration of iNO (R = -0.08; p = 0.57). Conclusions: We found that premature infants with birth weight > 1,000 g and older gestational age were more likely to respond to iNO therapy. Our findings also suggest that infants with PPROM may benefit from the use of iNO for respiratory distress. As a result, these findings support the individualized use of iNO in select premature infants whose premorbid characteristics deem them more likely to have a positive response.

DOI 10.7363/080115
2018 Kandasamy Y, Hartley L, Rudd D, Smith R, 'The lack of association between vascular endothelial growth factor and retinopathy of prematurity in an observational study', Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, 31 2202-2208 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between prematurity, vascular endotheli... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between prematurity, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), VEGFR-1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1)) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Methods: A cohort of 53 neonates (gestation <28 weeks) was recruited into this study and peripheral venous samples for VEGF and sFLT-1 measurement were obtained between gestational ages 320¿326 weeks. Results: The mean birth weight for the preterm neonates was 850 (178) g and the median gestational age was 26.4 [24.7¿27.4] weeks. The median VEGF-A level was 1348 [608¿2216] pg/mL and the median sFLT-1 level was 178 [103¿244] pg/mL. Thirty-three neonates (33/53) developed various stages of ROP during their stay in the neonatal unit but only five neonates developed severe (stage 3) ROP needing treatment. The neonates with ROP were smaller (birth weight 801 (111) vs. 990 (175) g; p <.0001), more preterm (gestation 25.4 [24.2¿26.0] vs. 27.1 [26.8¿27.9] weeks; p <.0001) and received supplemental oxygen for a longer duration (1140 [218¿1813] vs. 04 [40¿434] hours; p=.012). There was no statistically significant difference in the VEGF-A level or sFLT-1 levels between those who developed ROP and those who did not. There was a positive correlation between VEGF and both birth weight and gestation, respectively. There was no correlation between sFLT1 and birth weight or gestation. VEGF-A/sFLT-1 ratio in babies treated for ROP was significantly lower compared to those not treated (2.8 [1.0¿5.7] vs. 9.9 [5.6¿13.7]; p =.04). A logistic regression model identified gestational age to be a statistically significant predictor of ROP (odds ratio 0.03 (0.001¿0.550); p =.019). Conclusions: There is no direct correlation between systemic VEGF-A or sFLT-1 plasma levels and severity of ROP in extremely preterm neonates. The link between VEGF and ROP remains to be fully understood.

DOI 10.1080/14767058.2017.1338261
Co-authors Roger Smith
2018 August DL, New K, Ray RA, Kandasamy Y, 'Frequency, location and risk factors of neonatal skin injuries from mechanical forces of pressure, friction, shear and stripping: A systematic literature review', Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 24 173-180 (2018)

© 2017 Introduction: Recognition of neonatal skin injuries from mechanical forces and their risk factors are limited and vague. Aim: To identify frequency, locations and risk fact... [more]

© 2017 Introduction: Recognition of neonatal skin injuries from mechanical forces and their risk factors are limited and vague. Aim: To identify frequency, locations and risk factors for neonatal skin injuries from pressure, friction, shear and/or stripping. Methods: Joanna Briggs Institute Systematic Review process was used to search and review articles from Ovid (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Scopus databases and Cochrane Library published from 1990 to 2017. Results: Of the 1545 papers originally identified, 76 full text articles were examined, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were more likely to identify skin injuries from various etiologies (n = 7), pressure (n = 4) and stripping (n = 4). Prevalence of neonatal skin injury ranged from 9.25 to 43.1%. Risk factors included medical devices, gestational age and weight. Conclusion: Neonatal skin injuries from mechanical forces occur more frequently and differ in location from adults. Future studies need to identify modifiable risk factors and use consistent skin injury classifications applicable to neonates.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnn.2017.08.003
Citations Scopus - 2
2018 Kandasamy Y, Rudd D, Smith R, Lumbers ER, Wright IM, 'Extra uterine development of preterm kidneys.', Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany), 33 1007-1012 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00467-018-3899-1
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith, E Lumbers
2018 Vu HD, Dickinson C, Kandasamy Y, 'Sex Difference in Mortality for Premature and Low Birth Weight Neonates: A Systematic Review', American Journal of Perinatology, 35 707-715 (2018)

© 2018 Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.. All rights reserved. Objective Advances in neonatology have made possible the survival of neonates with lower gestational ages and birth we... [more]

© 2018 Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.. All rights reserved. Objective Advances in neonatology have made possible the survival of neonates with lower gestational ages and birth weights. Nevertheless, findings remain of a sex difference in mortality for premature and low birth weight (LBW) neonates with male sex often associated with poorer outcome (the male disadvantage). Through literature review, this article will seek clarification of the existing evidence regarding the association between sex and mortality at discharge from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) for premature and LBW neonates. Methods A systematic review was conducted in Medline and Google Scholar with subsequent search of study reference lists. Results The database search yielded 349 articles and an additional 11 were identified from study reference lists. A final 32 studies were reviewed. Of these, 26 studies demonstrated worse male mortality outcome and 6 studies reported no sex difference in mortality. Conclusion The majority of reviewed studies found poorer male mortality outcome. A small number of studies maintained a null association between sex and mortality. This indicates male premature and LBW neonates experience higher risk of mortality by discharge compared with females, an observation which may inform clinical decision making in the NICU.

DOI 10.1055/s-0037-1608876
Citations Scopus - 6
2017 Brennan S, Schneider M, Watson D, Kandasamy Y, Rudd D, 'The renal parenchyma-evaluation of a novel ultrasound measurement to assess fetal renal development: protocol for an observational longitudinal study', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019369
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Kandasamy Y, Hartley L, Smith R, 'Retinal microvascular plasticity in a premature neonate', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 8 284-286 (2017) [C1]

© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2017. Dilation and abnormal tortuosity of retinal vessels are the hallma... [more]

© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2017. Dilation and abnormal tortuosity of retinal vessels are the hallmarks of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in premature infants. The stages of ROP are defined by vessel appearance at the interface between the vascular and avascular retinal areas. Deregulated signaling pathways involving hypoxia-inducible factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in the pathogenesis of ROP. VEGF-antagonists are increasingly being used as 'off-label medication' to treat this condition, with some success. We present Baby SM (female), who was born prematurely at 24 weeks gestation in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit, and with a birth weight of 640 g. On screening at 35 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA), she was noted to have ROP, which became severe by 37 weeks PMA. She received one dose of intravitreal VEGF antagonist (Bevacizumab), resulting in a decrease in vessel tortuosity and dilation. However, repeat imaging at 4 weeks showed a re-emergence of vessel tortuosity. We believe the observed changes demonstrate an inherent retinal microvascular plasticity in premature neonates. With improved survival of extremely premature neonates and the availability of retinal imaging technology, we are now able to observe this plasticity.

DOI 10.1017/S2040174416000817
Co-authors Roger Smith
2017 Brennan S, Kandasamy Y, 'Ultrasound Imaging of the Renal Parenchyma of Premature Neonates for the Assessment of Renal Growth and Glomerulomegaly', Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 43 2546-2549 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.06.033
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2017 Brennan S, Watson D, Rudd D, Schneider M, Kandasamy Y, 'Evaluation of fetal kidney growth using ultrasound: A systematic review', European Journal of Radiology, 96 55-64 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Purpose To determine the role of ultrasound imaging in evaluating fetal kidney growth. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE databases were electronically search... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Purpose To determine the role of ultrasound imaging in evaluating fetal kidney growth. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE databases were electronically searched for studies between 1996 and January 2017 and limited to English language. Studies were included if they reported on an ultrasound technique to assess fetal kidney growth and they were not a case report or case series. There was independent selection of studies by two reviewers in consensus with one other reviewer. Data were extracted by one reviewer in consensus with two other reviewers. Results A total of 1785 articles were identified. The full text of 39 of these were assessed for eligibility for inclusion. Twenty-eight studies were then included in the review. Standard two dimensional (2D) fetal renal measurements are easy to perform, however, this review identified that most studies had some methodological limitations. The disadvantage with 2D and three dimensional (3D) fetal renal volumes are that they include the entire kidney and good reproducibility of 3D volumes has not yet been demonstrated. Currently there is limited research on fetal kidney growth in the setting of abnormal fetal growth. Research focussing directly on fetal kidney parenchyma and blood flow is scarce. Conclusions Some nomograms of 2D and 3D fetal kidney size and volume have been developed. Kidney length is the most popular single fetal kidney measurement; however, it does not seem to be a good indicator of growth. In IUGR fetuses, kidney length remained similar to appropriately grown fetuses whereas AP and TS dimensions were significantly decreased. New ultrasound techniques focusing on the parenchyma of the kidney and perfusion to the kidney should be explored as they may provide more meaningful information on kidney development in the fetus and future kidney function.

DOI 10.1016/j.ejrad.2017.09.017
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2017 August D, Kandasamy Y, 'The effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on fetal and neonatal skin maturation', Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 45 969-975 (2017)

© 2017 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. The use of antenatal glucocorticoids in women with preterm labor has dramatically improved outcomes for premature infants. The m... [more]

© 2017 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. The use of antenatal glucocorticoids in women with preterm labor has dramatically improved outcomes for premature infants. The most commonly used antenatal glucocorticoids are betamethasone and dexamethasone. Glucocorticoids accelerate fetal lung growth by several mechanisms, including the maturation of type II pneumocytes enabling surfactant production. Furthermore, the lipids in the lung share similarity with those in the skin. Therefore, antenatal administration of glucocorticoids may have effects on the structure and function of the developing epidermal barrier in fetuses and neonates. We performed a systematic review to characterize these effects, identifying 11 studies (six animal and five human studies). Five out of the six animal studies used a rodent model for investigating the effects of antenatally administered glucocorticoids, while the other used an ovine model. Antenatally administered glucocorticoids accelerated skin maturation in animal studies, but studies of human fetuses found conflicting results. None of the reviewed studies compared the effects of different types of glucocorticoids. More human studies are needed to fully understand the effects of antenatal steroids. However, as the antenatal use of glucocorticoids in preterm pregnancies has become part of standard clinical practice, it would be unethical to carry out a large randomized controlled trial. We may have to rely on animal models to improve our understanding of the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on the fetal and neonatal skin maturation.

DOI 10.1515/jpm-2016-0338
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Kandasamy Y, Rudd D, Smith R, 'The relationship between body weight, cystatin C and serum creatinine in neonates', Journal of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, 10 419-423 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: Serum creatinine (SCr) measurement to determine glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in neonates has many pitfalls... [more]

© 2017 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: Serum creatinine (SCr) measurement to determine glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in neonates has many pitfalls. Cystatin C (CysC) appears to be a more reliable biomarker. METHODS:We investigated the effect of birth weight on SCr and CysC measurements in a cohort of 74 infants, consisting of both term and ex-premature infants at term postmenstrual age. SCr and Cys C measurements were carried out at the same time. RESULTS: Eighty six infants were recruited into this study out of which complete data were available in 80 infants. The cohort consists of both term and premature infants at term PMA (31 terms and 49 preterms). The median SCr level was 17 [12-26] umol/L and mean CysC level was 1.64 [0.27] mg/L. SCr had a significant correlation with weight (r = 0.3; P = 0.011), whereas serum CysC had no correlation with the infant's weight (r = 0.01; P = 0.95). There were no statistically significant difference in SCr and CysC between male and female infants. CONCLUSION: Unlike CysC, SCr had a significant correlation with birth weight. SCr based GFR measurement may cause a delay in diagnosis of acute kidney injury in smaller neonates.

DOI 10.3233/NPM-171719
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Roger Smith
2017 Kandasamy Y, Hartley L, Rudd D, Smith R, 'The association between systemic vascular endothelial growth factor and retinopathy of prematurity in premature infants: A systematic review', British Journal of Ophthalmology, 101 21-24 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2016-308828
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Roger Smith
2017 Kandasamy Y, Hartley L, Rudd D, 'Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Levels in Term Neonates', Journal of Child Science, 7 e151-e154 (2017)

© 2017 Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) plays an integral role in physiological and pathophysiological angiogenesis and has... [more]

© 2017 Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) plays an integral role in physiological and pathophysiological angiogenesis and has increasingly been implicated in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm infants. Application of intravitreal anti-VEGF is frequently used to treat ROP with little consideration given to the role of VEGF-A in neonatal growth and development. Previous studies have demonstrated systemic anti-VEGF persistence, reduced peripheral VEGF levels following treatment, and possible diagnostic and prognostic uses for VEGF-A determination. This study seeks to determine a normal range for serum VEGF-A (sVEGF-A) in healthy, term infants. The sVEGF-A levels were obtained from 32 neonates born at term infants (16 males and 16 females) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant correlations were found between sVEGF-A levels and time of sample collection, birth weight, or gender. The median sVEGF-A level was 976 (394-1635) pg/mL (95% confidence interval for median: 496-1,318 pg/mL). This preliminary study determines a normal range for the sVEGF-A level in healthy, term neonates. This normal range will provide a tool to assist in the diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of treatment of infants with ROP.

DOI 10.1055/s-0037-1612596
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Gowda H, Norton R, White A, Kandasamy Y, 'Late-onset Neonatal Sepsis - A 10-year Review from North Queensland, Australia', Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 36 883-888 (2017)

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. Objective: Late-onset sepsis (LOS) in neonates contributes significantly to both morbid... [more]

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. Objective: Late-onset sepsis (LOS) in neonates contributes significantly to both morbidity and mortality. To determine the incidence of LOS, risk factors for disease and the impact on subsequent hospital course, we evaluated a cohort of 6340 neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and of neonates (3-28 days) admitted from the community between January 2005 and January 2016. Methods: This was a retrospective case review of all neonates admitted with suspected LOS who had positive blood culture and/or cerebrospinal fluid cultures, for an organism determined to be a pathogen. Results: Of 6340 neonates who survived beyond 3 days, 2271 (35.8%) had 1 or more blood cultures collected for suspected LOS. Of these, 146 (6.4%) positive blood cultures were thought to represent true bacteremia. The vast majority of infections (73%) were caused by Gram-positive organisms, with coagulase-negative staphylococci accounting for 39.8% of infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis occurred predominantly in the 24-28-week age group (75.9%) and in neonates who weighed less than 1000 g (73.6%). The incubation time for positive blood cultures for Gram-negative sepsis was less (13 hours) when compared with Gram-positive sepsis (20 hours). Thrombocytopenia, elevated C-reactive protein and chorioamnionitis were consistently associated with late-onset Gram-negative sepsis (P < 0.05). Eight neonates (6%) died secondary to LOS. Conclusions: LOS contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonates and remains a challenge to clinicians. Necessary steps to reduce late-onset neonatal sepsis should be undertaken.

DOI 10.1097/INF.0000000000001568
Citations Scopus - 8
2017 Patel A, Kandasamy Y, 'Outcome of premature neonates born in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in Nairobi, Kenya', Journal of Pediatric and Neonatal Individualized Medicine, 6 (2017)

In this retrospective review, premature neonates less than 34 weeks gestation admitted to a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Nairobi, Kenya from February 2012 to Oc... [more]

In this retrospective review, premature neonates less than 34 weeks gestation admitted to a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Nairobi, Kenya from February 2012 to October 2015 were identified from medical records and database. There were 88 neonates admitted to the neonatal unit, out of which 78 survived. There were 10 pairs of twins and 1 set of triplets. The gestational age ranged from 26 weeks to 33.7 weeks gestation, with a mean gestation of 30.3 (± 1.8) weeks, and a mean birth weight of 1,508 (± 381) g. The smallest neonate who survived weighed 800 g. Smaller babies needed mechanical ventilation for a longer duration and stayed longer in NICU. Less than half of the neonates in our cohort received antenatal dexamethasone. We plan to have further discussion with the obstetricians to increase antenatal steroid use. Ten babies died during this period. With improved perinatal care in Kenya, we anticipate better survival and outcome of these preterm babies.

DOI 10.7363/060113
2016 Kandasamy Y, Kilcullen M, Watson D, 'Fetal autopsy and closing the gap', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 56 252-254 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.12421
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 August D, Kandasamy Y, 'Significance of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure for pressure injury prevalence in neonates', Journal of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, 9 23-29 (2016)

© IOS Press and the authors. Studies have highlighted that antenatal steroids could have an effect on neonatal skin maturation. This study examined if there was a relationship bet... [more]

© IOS Press and the authors. Studies have highlighted that antenatal steroids could have an effect on neonatal skin maturation. This study examined if there was a relationship between the administration of antenatal glucocorticoids for mothers and the skin injuries in their neonates. Data from skin injury audit were extracted from the neonatal database and analyzed to determine differences in the prevalence of neonates with pressure injuries [cases] whose mothers had received antenatal steroids, compared to those without pressure injuries [control]. RESULTS: Of 247 neonates audited, 77 [31%], had documented pressure injuries, 170 [69%] had no documented injury. The median birth weight and gestation were 1400 g [IQR 893-2268 g] and 30.3 weeks [IQR 26.3-40.0 weeks] respectively. Of the neonates born less than 34 weeks, 80% were exposed to antenatal steroids and were equally distributed across patient genders. Within the 77 cases, 53 [66%] were exposed to antenatal steroids compared to controls in which 88 [53%] had not. The effect between cases and controls was not statistically significant [¿2 =2.81, P =0.09]. However a difference was noted between genders, as female neonates benefited from the exposure to steroids [OR =0.317, 95% [CI 0.105-0.956], p value-0.041]. CONCLUSION: Antenatal glucocorticoids appear to be beneficial in reducing pressure injury prevalence in female neonates.

DOI 10.3233/NPM-16915063
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Sproul AV, Kandasamy Y, 'Congenital hypothyroidism with seizures: A case report', Journal of Pediatric and Neonatal Individualized Medicine, 5 (2016)

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency, present at birth. It is seen in 1:4,000 births and is caused by an anatomical defect, known as thyroid dys... [more]

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency, present at birth. It is seen in 1:4,000 births and is caused by an anatomical defect, known as thyroid dysgenesis (underdevelopment or unusual location of the thyroid gland), by abnormal biosynthesis of the thyroid hormones (dyshormogenesis), inborn errors of metabolism, genetic mutations or iodine deficiency. If untreated, severe neurological impairment develops. However, newborn screening programs have improved outcomes greatly, through early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical manifestations are often subtle at birth, due to the placental transfer of thyroxine (T 4 ), thus making diagnosis in the first few days of life difficult. Increased levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and low levels of T 4 are confirmatory for this disorder. We describe the case of a baby with CH who presented with neonatal seizures: a rare clinical presentation. Our case highlights the need to eliminate CH, as a cause of seizures, so that treatment can be initiated even more promptly to optimize neurological sequelae and outcome.

DOI 10.7363/050136
2015 Kandasamy Y, Watson D, Rudd D, 'Biomarker of early glomerular injury in pre-eclampsia', Hypertension in Pregnancy, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC Objectives: Nephrin is an integral part of podocytes that together with endothelial cells and the basement form the glomerular filtration ba... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Objectives: Nephrin is an integral part of podocytes that together with endothelial cells and the basement form the glomerular filtration barrier. Placental ischemia triggers a cascade of events that ultimately result in endothelial malfunction, hypertension, podocytopathy and fetal compromise. Methods: We review the literature to determine if urine nephrin measurements could serve as a useful biomarker to detect early podocyte injury in pre-eclampsia. Results: Our search identifies eight studies published to date. The findings of these studies demonstrate that urine nephrin excretion plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during pre-eclampsia and that this is a good indicator of glomerular injury. Conclusion: There is thus an urgent need for a large multi-centre clinical study using standardized recruitment criteria to determine the full potential of this biomarker in clinical practice.

DOI 10.3109/10641955.2015.1065883
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Lumbers ER, Rudd D, 'Nephrin - a biomarker of early glomerular injury.', Biomarker Research, 2 1-8 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Roger Smith, E Lumbers
2014 Kandasamy Y, Kumar P, Hartley L, 'The effect of erythropoietin on the severity of retinopathy of prematurity', EYE, 28 814-818 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/eye.2014.95
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2014 Ireland S, Larkins S, Kandasamy Y, 'Group B Streptococcal infection in the first 90 days of life in North Queensland', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 54 146-151 (2014)

Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infection is recognised as an important cause for neonatal sepsis. Aims To describe the incidence and risk factors for invasive GBS under 90... [more]

Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infection is recognised as an important cause for neonatal sepsis. Aims To describe the incidence and risk factors for invasive GBS under 90 days of age in North Queensland from January 2002 to December 2011. Material and Methods Patients were identified with positive blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures to obtain incidence figures. The Townsville district cohort was further investigated for the presence of maternal and fetal risk factors in a retrospective case-controlled study. Results Early onset GBS continues to occur at 0.43/1000 live births, and late onset disease at 0.38/1000 live births. Early onset GBS and late onset GBS are shown to be two distinct diseases. Early onset disease is significantly different from the control group for these risk factors: previous late fetal loss, prolonged rupture of membranes, inadequate intrapartum antibiotics, abnormal cardiotocography, delivery by emergency caesarean section, lower one minute Apgar scores and need for resuscitation at delivery. Significant variables for late onset disease are earlier gestation and need for resuscitation at birth, first born babies, multiple pregnancy and birth by emergency caesarean section. The incidence of early or late onset GBS in Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders was not significantly different. Conclusions Group B Streptococcus continues to occur in North Queensland at higher than expected rates, and a new approach to its prevention should be considered. Previous fetal loss may be a risk factor which is under recognised. Babies with late onset infection appear to be significantly more preterm. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12150
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2014 Edmonds L, Ireland S, Kandasamy Y, 'A glowing 23-week gestation infant: A novel use of a Wee Sight transilluminator', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 50 839 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12560
2014 Smith J, Sproul A, Watson D, Kandasamy Y, 'Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries', Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 20 43-52 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jnn.2013.06.004
2014 August DL, Edmonds L, Brown DK, Murphy M, Kandasamy Y, 'Pressure injuries to the skin in a neonatal unit: Fact or fiction', Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 20 129-137 (2014) [C1]

Aim: Pressure related skin injuries (including ulceration, skin/epithelial stripping, and combination injuries) have historically been neglected within neonatal research. Although... [more]

Aim: Pressure related skin injuries (including ulceration, skin/epithelial stripping, and combination injuries) have historically been neglected within neonatal research. Although anecdotal evidence, wound reviews and isolated case studies have been published; there is limited research specific to neonatal pressure injuries despite this population being, arguably, the most vulnerable patient group.The objective of this study was to investigate specific rates of neonatal skin breakdown from pressure including locations, stages, and etiology associated with tissue damage. Methods: A descriptive cohort study was conducted in North Queensland's Tertiary perinatal center over a 2-year period. Prevalence audits for pressure injuries to the skin were conducted (including epithelial stripping) and incorporated categorization of with degree of tissue breakdown between Stage 1-4. A modified risk assessment and prevalence tool was utilized in this study. Results: 247 neonatal patients were reviewed during the study period, of these infants, 77/247 were identified as having a skin injury (a prevalence rate of 31.2%). In total, 107 injuries were identified with the mean number of 1.4 injuries (range 1-4, SD 0.71). The mean gestational age was 28 weeks (range 22-41 weeks, SD 4.1 weeks) and the mean birth weight was 1155g (range 445-2678g, SD 620g). Factors identified as contributing to pressure injuries included indwelling vascular catheters (22.4%), non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure delivery devices (14.0%), oxygen saturation and temperature probes (17.8.%). 31.8% of injuries could not be associated with a specific risk factor. Conclusions: Neonates are undeniably at risk for pressure injuries however; it is still unclear which proportions of injuries are entirely preventable. Further development of a risk assessment and prevalence tool will provide practitioners with insight into the specific risk factors applicable for neonatal pressure injuries. Additional studies with larger patient groups will more accurately update practice related to pressure injury prevention and management in neonatal units; as well as critically evaluate the adverse affects of routine care processes that unintentionally harm the skin of these fragile patients. © 2013 Neonatal Nurses Association.

DOI 10.1016/j.jnn.2013.08.006
Citations Scopus - 24
2014 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IMR, Lumbers ER, 'Reduced nephron endowment in the neonates of Indigenous Australian peoples', JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL ORIGINS OF HEALTH AND DISEASE, 5 31-35 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S2040174413000494
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Lumbers, Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2013 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IMR, 'Relationship between the Retinal Microvasculature and Renal Volume in Low-Birth-Weight Babies', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY, 30 477-481 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1055/s-0032-1326993
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2013 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IMR, Lumbers ER, 'Extra-uterine renal growth in preterm infants: Oligonephropathy and prematurity', PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY, 28 1791-1796 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00467-013-2462-3
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith, E Lumbers
2013 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright I, Hartley L, 'Use of digital retinal imaging in screening for retinopathy of prematurity', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 49 E1-E5 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2012.02557.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2013 Brennan S, Kandasamy Y, 'Renal Parenchymal Thickness as a Measure of Renal Growth in Low-Birth-Weight Infants versus Normal-Birth-Weight Infants', Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 39 2315-2320 (2013)

Low birth weight (LBW, &lt;2500g) infants have a reduced number of glomeruli and nephrons and, therefore, smaller kidneys. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether... [more]

Low birth weight (LBW, <2500g) infants have a reduced number of glomeruli and nephrons and, therefore, smaller kidneys. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether renal parenchymal thickness might be a better indicator of renal growth. We carried out a pilot study over 12mo to determine whether renal parenchymal thickness could be used to detect differences in renal growth between LBW and normal birth weight (NBW, 2500-4500g) infants. Thirty-eight term infants (12 LBW and 26 NBW) underwent renal ultrasound. Parenchymal thickness, length, transverse diameter and antero-posterior diameter were measured. Mean renal parenchymal thickness was significantly lower in LBW infants than in NBW infants. Renal parenchymal thickness wasclosely correlated with an increase in renal volume (r=0.76, p<0.0001). Renal parenchymal thickness is a single measurement that could potentially be a more useful and accurate approach to monitoring renal growth in growth-restricted infants than renal volume. © 2013.

DOI 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2013.07.001
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2013 Smith J, Murphy M, Kandasamy Y, 'The IUGR infant: A case study and associated problems with IUGR infants', Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 19 46-53 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.jnn.2012.12.005
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IMR, Lumbers ER, 'Relationships between glomerular filtration rate and kidney volume in low-birth-weight neonates', JOURNAL OF NEPHROLOGY, 26 894-898 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.5301/jn.5000220
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Lumbers, Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2013 Kandasamy Y, Tanchi PPD, Edmonds LK, 'Small for Gestational Age and Low Birth Weight Term Admissions to a Tertiary Perinatal Centre in Northern Queensland, Australia', Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 17 227-231 (2013)

© 2013, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Northern Queensland is unique in that the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander (ATSI) communities is higher than ... [more]

© 2013, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Northern Queensland is unique in that the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander (ATSI) communities is higher than the rest of Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of term admissions of low birth weight (LBW; birth weight < 2,500¿g) and small for gestational age (SGA; birth weight < 10th centile) infants to a neonatal unit. All term infants (>37¿weeks of gestation) with LBW and/or SGA admitted to the neonatal unit over the last 10¿years (2002¿2011) were identified and the percentage calculated. Ethnicity was determined by the mother and that information was recorded in the patient¿s medical record. The average percentage of LBW ATSI infants was 20.2¿±¿5.7¿%, which was significantly higher (almost double) compared with the percentage of LBW non-ATSI infants (10.2¿±¿1.9¿%; p¿<¿0.001). The average percentage of SGA ATSI infants was also significantly higher than the percentage of SGA non-ATSI infants (31.8¿±¿6.0 vs. 18.6¿±¿2.8¿%, respectively; p¿<¿0.001). The mean percentage of LBW indigenous infants admitted to the neonatal unit was significantly higher than non-ATSI infants.

DOI 10.1007/s10903-013-9891-8
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2013 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IMR, 'Measuring Cystatin C to Determine Renal Function in Neonates', PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 14 318-322 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/PCC.0b013e318271f4a5
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2012 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, Hartley L, 'Optic disc measurements in full term infants', British Journal of Ophthalmology, 96 662-664 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2011-300950
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith
2012 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, 'Retinal microvascular changes in low-birth-weight babies have a link to future health', Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 40 209-214 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/JPM.2011.116
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2012 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, 'Oligonephropathy of prematurity', American Journal of Perinatology, 29 115-120 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith
2012 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, Hartley L, 'Relationship between birth weight and retinal microvasculature in newborn infants', Journal of Perinatology, 32 443-447 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/jp.2011.118
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith
2012 Edmonds LK, Kandasamy Y, Lamont A, O'Connor S, 'Perinatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke in Northern Queensland', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY, 29 483-487 (2012)
DOI 10.1055/s-0032-1304832
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2011 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, 'Retinal microvasculature measurements in full-term newborn infants', Microvascular Research, 82 381-384 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ian Wright, Roger Smith
2011 Kandasamy Y, Smith R, Wright IM, Hartley L, 'Pain relief for premature infants during ophthalmology assessment', Journal of AAPOS, 15 276-280 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Roger Smith, Ian Wright
2010 Kandasamy Y, Whitehall J, Gill A, Stalewski H, 'Surgical management of gastroschisis in North Queensland from 1988 to 2007', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 46 40-44 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2009.01615.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2010 Whitehall JS, Kandasamy Y, Stalewski H, Gill A, 'Perinatal demography of gastroschisis in North Queensland', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 46 749-753 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01833.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2009 Kandasamy Y, 'Infection control during administration of parenteral nutrition in preterm babies', ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, 94 F78-F78 (2009)
DOI 10.1136/adc.2008.145284
Citations Web of Science - 4
2009 Kandasamy Y, 'Infection control during administration of parenteral nutrition in preterm babies', Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 94 (2009)
DOI 10.136/adc.2008.145284
Citations Scopus - 4
2008 Tennakoon J, Kandasamy Y, Alcock G, Koh THHG, 'Edwards syndrome with double trisomy', SINGAPORE MEDICAL JOURNAL, 49 E190-E191 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2008 Kandasamy Y, Norton R, 'Paediatric melioidosis in North Queensland, Australia', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 44 706-708 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2008.01410.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 18
2007 Kandasamy Y, Somasundaram P, 'Paediatric melioidosis with septic shock in a previously-well child', Singapore Medical Journal, 48 (2007)

We present a previously-healthy 12-year-old girl from a rural community and who was admitted to a district general hospital in Malaysia with coagulopathy and septic shock. Despite... [more]

We present a previously-healthy 12-year-old girl from a rural community and who was admitted to a district general hospital in Malaysia with coagulopathy and septic shock. Despite receiving intensive care, she succumbed to her illness. Blood cultures grew Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis is an unusual cause of paediatric Gram-negative sepsis among children in Malaysia.

Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Kandasamy Y, Somasundram P, 'A review of Orang Asli newborns admitted to a neonatal unit in a Malaysian general hospital', Singapore Medical Journal, 48 926-928 (2007)

Introduction: The Orang Asli are the indigenous population in peninsular Malaysia and are in fact a diverse sub-ethnic group with different languages. Our aim was to collect data ... [more]

Introduction: The Orang Asli are the indigenous population in peninsular Malaysia and are in fact a diverse sub-ethnic group with different languages. Our aim was to collect data on Orang Asli newborns, from western and central Pahang, that were admitted to a general hospital with paediatric specialist services. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all Orang Asli neonates admitted to the Neonatal Unit in Temerloh Hospital over a one-year period (2003). Results: There were 65 Orang Asli admissions out of a total of 1,543 admissions to our Neonatal Unit. The average birth weight was 2,569 g. The commonest indication for admission was neonatal jaundice secondary to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Ten babies were ventilated, seven for prematurity and three for mild-moderate perinatal asphyxia. There were three deaths: a baby with a lethal congenital abnormality, one with congenital rubella syndrome with cardiac failure, and a preterm baby delivered at 28 weeks gestation, with late neonatal sepsis. Conclusion: This is the first attempt to assess the health status of Orang Asli neonates in peninsular Malaysia. There are no published reports on the health status of this group of neonates. A larger multicentre study is needed to determine the exact health status of Malaysian Orang Asli newborns.

Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Kandasamy Y, Alcock G, Koh THHG, 'Lenticulostriate vasculopathy in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome', JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY, 26 780-782 (2006)
DOI 10.1038/sj.jp.7211607
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Show 52 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Smith R, Rae K, Lumbers E, Kandasamy Y, Pringle K, Weatherall L, 'Preterm birth and low birthweight in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Population', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Roger Smith, E Lumbers, Kym Rae, Kirsty Pringle
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $2,464,232

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $1,576,134

The Relationship between Maternal Health and Infant Renal Development and Function$1,576,134

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Yogavijayan Kandasamy, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Eugenie Lumbers, Conjoint Professor Ian Wright, Dr Donna Rudd, Rudd, Donna
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1800207
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20141 grants / $888,098

Kidney growth in premature and low birth weight babies$888,098

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Yogavijayan Kandasamy
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1300356
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Dr Yogavijayan Kandasamy

Position

Conjoint Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

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