Dr Vanessa Bowden

Dr Vanessa Bowden

Associate Lecturer

Learning and Teaching

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Vanessa Bowden is a sociologist in the Enabling Pathways Program whose reearch investigates the interface between our understandings of the environment with science, policy and social justice.

While we might often think of environmental issues as directed by scientific understandings, issues such as climate change reveal the complexities around our trust in science, politics and concern for the economy. Understanding the ways in which these issues intersect is a key focus of Dr Bowden’s research.

Dr Bowden is currently working with Professor Daniel Nyberg on two research projects; looking at the social dynamics of climate adaptation in Lake Macquarie, Australia and a three year ARC funded project on Energy Transitions in Australia.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Climate Change
  • Environmental Sociology
  • Politics
  • Reflexive Modernisation
  • Risk Society
  • Social Theory
  • Sociology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
441007 Sociology and social studies of science and technology 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
Learning and Teaching
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
Centre for English Language and Foundation Studies
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Bowden V, Nyberg D, Wright C, '"We're Going Under": The Role of Local News Media in Dislocating Climate Change Adaptation', ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION-A JOURNAL OF NATURE AND CULTURE, 15 625-640 (2021)
DOI 10.1080/17524032.2021.1877762
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2021 Wright C, Nyberg D, Bowden V, 'Beyond the discourse of denial: The reproduction of fossil fuel hegemony in Australia', Energy Research and Social Science, 77 (2021)

Despite growing public concern over the worsening climate crisis, tangible action to reduce carbon emissions and limit fossil fuel use remains limited. This is particularly appare... [more]

Despite growing public concern over the worsening climate crisis, tangible action to reduce carbon emissions and limit fossil fuel use remains limited. This is particularly apparent in carbon-rich nations which promote the extraction, export and use of coal, oil and gas as key drivers of economic activity. We examine this contradiction between growing public demands for climate action and the continued dominance of fossil energy in Australia, now the world's largest exporter of coal and gas. Through a qualitative analysis of media coverage and industry public relations during the period 2008¿2019, we show how the fossil fuel hegemony has been maintained and extended in the face of growing social and political critique. We identify the key discourses that the Australian fossil fuel sector has employed in reproducing hegemony and delaying action on climate change. This extends previous theorisations of moral and intellectual leadership by detailing how the fossil fuel sector embeds particular technical claims into the climate change debate. Second, we expand knowledge of political strategy to show how corporate discourses aimed at maintaining hegemony are extended through the state as an ideological promoter.

DOI 10.1016/j.erss.2021.102094
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2021 Scurr I, Bowden V, ' The revolution s never done : the role of radical imagination within anti-capitalist environmental justice activism', Environmental Sociology, (2021)

Many individuals become involved in activism due to concerns about contemporary structural conditions and likely (negative) futures arising from them. While negative perceptions a... [more]

Many individuals become involved in activism due to concerns about contemporary structural conditions and likely (negative) futures arising from them. While negative perceptions are important for driving initial involvement, visions of positive alternative futures to work towards can be crucial for motivating and shaping activist engagement. Positive visions serve as a goal as well as a potential blueprint to inform practices such that the ¿means match the ends.¿ In this paper, we explore Khasnabish and Haiven¿s concept of the ¿radical imagination¿ as a practice in sustaining and shaping social movement engagement through a shared vision of an alternative future. We emphasise the processes of organising and grounding action in practices of the present, which forms part of a ¿praxis of prefiguration¿¿informing many aspects of community building and activism. While the radical imagination shared by anti-capitalist activists is sometimes depicted as a utopian dream, we suggest that it is, rather, a hopeful imagining in constant conversation with ideological positions and organising practices, situated against and within the margins of capitalist society. These ideological commitments and future imaginings shape the ways that anti-capitalists engage with overlapping environmental and social issues and the wider landscape of political action.

DOI 10.1080/23251042.2021.1916142
2021 Bowden V, Gond J-P, Nyberg D, Wright C, 'Turning Back the Rising Sea: Theory performativity in the shift from climate science to popular authority', ORGANIZATION STUDIES, (2021)
DOI 10.1177/01708406211024558
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2021 Bowden V, Nyberg D, Wright C, ' I don t think anybody really knows : Constructing reflexive ignorance in climate change adaptation', British Journal of Sociology, 72 397-411 (2021) [C1]

Responding to the existential threat of climate change is often seen as requiring greater reflexivity. Imbued with notions of resilience and reflection, reflexivity is assumed to ... [more]

Responding to the existential threat of climate change is often seen as requiring greater reflexivity. Imbued with notions of resilience and reflection, reflexivity is assumed to contribute to pro-environmental change. However, as the need to manage climate impacts becomes more immediate, political struggles over climate adaptation have become increasingly apparent. These impacts occur most often within local communities, in the context of competing economic interests and differing interpretations of climate science. Thus while it is increasingly difficult to deny climate change, conflicting priorities can lead to ignorance. In these circumstances, how communities build and share knowledge, and negotiate responses is central. Based on a study of a vulnerable region in Australia, we identify three processes through which the local community mobilized to disrupt local climate change adaptation. These included emphasizing uncertainty about the science of climate change, encouraging fear about property prices, and repositioning property owners as victims of climate adaptation policy. We argue that this response to climate adaptation constitutes the production of reflexive ignorance, which reinforces skepticism around scientific authority and defends particular economic interests.

DOI 10.1111/1468-4446.12818
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2020 Bowden V, Nyberg D, Wright C, 'Truth and power: deliberation and emotions in climate adaptation processes', ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS, 30 708-726 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/09644016.2020.1850972
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2019 Bowden V, Nyberg D, Wright C, 'Planning for the past: Local temporality and the construction of denial in climate change adaptation', Global Environmental Change, 57 1-9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.101939
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Daniel Nyberg
2018 Broom A, Kenny K, Bowden V, Muppavaram N, Chittem M, 'Cultural ontologies of cancer in India', CRITICAL PUBLIC HEALTH, 28 48-58 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/09581596.2017.1288288
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
2018 Bowden VM, ''Life. Brought to you by' ...coal? Business responses to climate change in the Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia', Environmental Sociology, 4 275-285 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23251042.2017.1382032
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Broom J, Broom A, Bowden V, 'Ebola outbreak preparedness planning: a qualitative study of clinicians' experiences', PUBLIC HEALTH, 143 103-108 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.11.008
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2017 Broom A, Chittem M, Bowden V, Muppavaram N, Rajappa S, 'Illness Experiences, Collective Decisions, and the Therapeutic Encounter in Indian Oncology', QUALITATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH, 27 951-963 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1049732316648125
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2017 Kirby E, Broom A, Good P, Bowden V, Lwin Z, 'Experiences of interpreters in supporting the transition from oncology to palliative care: A qualitative study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 13 E497-E505 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12563
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2016 Leahy TS, Bowden V, 'Don't Shoot the Messenger: How Business Leaders Get Their Bearings on a Matter of Science', Journal of Sociology, 52 .219-234 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1440783313518245
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Terry Leahy
2016 Siegel P, Broom A, Bowden V, Adams J, de Barros NF, 'Attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine amongst oncology professionals in Brazil', Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 27 30-34 (2016)

Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are popular amongst cancer patients in the Brazilian context, however little is known about oncology health professionals' attit... [more]

Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are popular amongst cancer patients in the Brazilian context, however little is known about oncology health professionals' attitudes toward the role of CAM and their perspectives on the potential for integration into oncological care. In this study, drawing on a series of interviews with oncology professionals (i.e. doctors, nurses, nutritionists, pharmacologists and psychologists), we provide insight into their views on the rise, validity, and role of CAM in cancer care. The results reveal two key dynamics in relation to CAM in cancer care in Brazil. First, that doctors, nurses and other allied professionals hold considerably different views on the value and place of CAM, and in turn ascribe it varying levels of legitimacy potentially limiting integration. Second, that while some health professionals may articulate a degree of support for CAM, this is limited by perceptions of CAM as lacking efficacy and intruding on their respective jurisdictional claims. Further research is needed in the Brazilian context to explore patient and professional perspectives on experiences on CAM in cancer care, including how oncology professionals' varying positions on CAM may influence what patients are prepared to use, or discuss, in the context of cancer care.

DOI 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.04.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2010 Leahy TS, Bowden VM, Threadgold SR, 'Stumbling towards collapse: Coming to terms with the climate crisis', Environmental Politics, 19 851-868 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09644016.2010.518676
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Steven Threadgold, Terry Leahy
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Bowden VM, 'Prospects for an ecological modernisation approach to climate change - Analysing the views of business leaders in the Hunter Region', Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference: Local Lives/Global Networks, Newcastle, NSW (2011) [E3]
2009 Bowden VM, 'Fractions in a coal dependent region: How business people in the Hunter are responding to climate change', The Future of Sociology, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E1]
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $1,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $1,500

New Staff Early-Stage Researcher Scheme$1,500

Funding body: English Language and Foundation Studies Centre, University of Newcastle

Funding body English Language and Foundation Studies Centre, University of Newcastle
Scheme New Staff Early-Stage Researcher Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Solarpunk: Ideologies of Resistance, Resilience, and Hope PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Justifying Action on Climate Change: A Qualitative Analysis of Australian Climate Movement Organisations Post Paris Agreement 2015 PhD (Management), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
Edit

Dr Vanessa Bowden

Position

Associate Lecturer
Learning and Teaching
Academic Division

Contact Details

Email vanessa.bowden@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4968 6726

Office

Room Level 8
Building NeW Space Building
Location NeW Space

,
Edit