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Emeritus Professor Stephen Nicholas

Emeritus Professor

Newcastle Business School

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Nicholas is a Emeritus Professor of International Business at University of Newcastle. He was elected to the Academy of the Social Science in Australia in 1997. Professor Nicholas is a High-end Foreign Expert of the State Administration for Foreign Experts and Tianjin 1000 Talents Expert, China, located at Tianjin Normal University. In 2016 Professor Nicholas was awarded the Mayor of Tianjin's HaiHe Friendship Medal. He is currently a Visiting Professor, Beijing Foreign Studies University and Visiting Professor Guangdong University of Foreign Studies. He was Yunshan Chair Professor at the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (2012-2015) and Guest Professor at Beijing Normal University (2011-2014)  and Nanjing University of Finance and Economics (2010-2014). Professor Nicholas is a member of the Board of Trustees of Guangdong University of Foreign Studies; Member of Council and Chair of Academic Board, TOP Education Institute, Sydney and previously Chair of the Governing Council, Williams Business College, Sydney. He served as the Inaugural President of the Australian-New Zealand International Business Academy; President of the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand; and Member of the International Economic History Association Executive. He has been Visiting Professor at Nagoya University, Research Fellow at the Australian National University, a Visiting Fellow at Economics, Reading University and a visitor at the London School of Economics, Business History Unit. Professor Nicholas's research focuses on the development of whole societies with a focus on how a society interacts with its economic (business firms and unions), political (political parties and non-government organisations) and social (families and churches) organisations to ensure economic development while maintaining the right of individuals to exercise economic, social and political choices. His current research includes studies of restructuring of foreign subsidiaries in Tianjin-Beijing-Hebei, Guangdong and Shandong provinces and the health and well-being of China's population and labour force. Professor Nicholas has significant consulting experience with such major players as Rio Tinto, National Australia Bank, GM-Holden, Ford, IBM, Westpac and the Federal and State governments in Australia. Professor Nicholas has published over 120 refereed journal articles, book chapters and edited books in international business, knowledge and diversity management, international human resource management, and business history, economic history and anthroprometric history. His recent publications include Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Journal of Business Research, International Studies in Management and Organizations, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Business History, Journal of Economic History and Oxford Economic Papers.

Research Expertise
International business; Business strategy; Restructuring of Chinese and foreign firms in China; Chinese university education reform; Primary health care in China; New institutional economics; Foreign direct investment in Australia; Foreign direct investment in China; Business history; Anthroprometric history; Econometric history; British industrial revolution and late-Victorian economic history; Australian convict history

Teaching Expertise
International business; business strategy; management; British business and economimc history

Qualifications

  • PhD (Honorary Doctorate), Superior College Lahore - Pakistan
  • Artium Baccalaurei, University of Syracuse - USA
  • Master of Arts, University of Iowa - USA

Keywords

  • Foreign Direct Investment
  • Multinational Enterprises
  • economic history
  • health policy
  • industrial organisation and policy
  • international business and strategy

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111717 Primary Health Care 20
150308 International Business 60
140209 Industry Economics and Industrial Organisation 20

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
8/02/2016 - 8/02/2019 1000 Tianjin Talent Expert Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin
China
19/03/2015 - 19/02/2018 High-end Foreign Expert: State Administration for Foreign Experts Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin
China
1/02/2015 - 19/04/2018 Visiting Professor Guangdong University of Foreign Studies
China
1/12/2011 -  Emeritus Professor University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
8/07/2011 - 8/06/2014 Visting Professor Beijing Normal University
China
1/01/2011 -  Member, Board of Trustees Guangdong University of Foreign Studies
China
1/01/2011 - 1/01/2014 YunShan Chair Professor Guangdong University of Foreign Studies
China
1/01/2010 - 1/01/2018 Guest Professor Beijing Foreign Studies University
China
1/01/2010 -  Honorary Associate of the Graduate School of Government The University of Sydney
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/01/2013 Guest Professor Nanjing University of Finance and Economics
China
1/07/2006 - 1/07/2012 Executive Member Pacific Asia Consortium of International Business Education and Research
United States
1/03/2005 - 1/12/2011 Pro Vice Chancellor University of Newcastle
Business and Law
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/03/2006 Head of School

International Business

The University of Sydney
Economics and Political Science
Australia
1/04/1998 - 1/07/1998 Visiting Professor Nagoya University
Japan
1/01/1998 -  Director The University of Melbourne
Centre- International Business
Australia
1/01/1998 - 1/10/2003 President Australia-NZ International Business Academy
Australia
1/01/1997 -  Membership - Academy of Social Sciences of Australia Academy of Social Sciences of Australia
Australia
1/01/1994 -  President Economic History Society of Australia and NZ
Australia
1/01/1994 -  Executive Member International Economic History Association
Switzerland
1/01/1994 -  President Economic History Society of Australia and NZ
Australia
1/01/1993 - 1/01/2003 Head of School The University of Melbourne
Economic History
Australia
1/01/1985 - 1/07/1993 Assistant Professor The University of New South Wales
Economic History
Australia
1/01/1980 - 1/07/1985 Senior Lecturer The University of New South Wales
Economic History
Australia
1/01/1975 - 1/07/1980 Lecturer The University of New South Wales
Economic History
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2013 - 1/07/2020 Member, Governing Council and Chair Academic Board TOP Education Institute, Sydney
Australia

Invitations

External Reviewer - Departments

Year Title / Rationale
2001 XXXX
Organisation: University of Auckland Description: Assess international business in the Business School as member of international Panel
2001 XXXX
Organisation: University of Auckland Description: Assess international business in the Business School as member of international Panel
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Nicholas SJ, Research on the Impact of Global Economic Integration and Information Networking on Sustainable Corporate Development, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing (2014) [A3]
2010 Nicholas SJ, Managing Business Organizations: Knowledge and the External Environment, macmillan publishers india ltd, Delhi, 435 (2010)
2009 Cheng JLC, Maitland E, Nicholas SJ, Managing Subsidiary Dynamics Headquarters Role, Capability Development, and China Strategy, Emerald Group Publishing, Bingley, UK, 247 (2009) [A3]
2008 Ranjan J, Thakur RR, Sahay BS, Nicholas SJ, Innovation in Information and Communication Technology, Macmillan Publishers India, New Dehli, India, 346 (2008) [A3]
2008 Sahay BS, Ranjan J, Thakur RR, Nicholas SJ, Redefining Business Horizons, Macmillan Publishers India, New Delhi, India, 644 (2008) [A3]
2008 Thakur RR, Ranjan J, Sahay BS, Nicholas SJ, Innovation in Management Practices, Macmillan Publishers India, New Delhi, India, 642 (2008) [A3]
2002 Maitland E, Nicholas S, Multinationals from Small Open Economies in International Studies of Management and Organization (2002) [A3]
Show 4 more books

Chapter (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Boyle BP, Mitchell R, Nicholas S, Maitland E, Zhao S, 'Subsidiary Political Ties: Institutions, Autonomy and Restructuring in China.', Entrepreneurship, Organisational Change and Employment Management, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing 243-254 (2017) [B1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2017 Fu J, Nicholas S, 'What Determinens the Internationalization-Performance Relationship of Chinese Firms?', Entrepreneurship, Organizational Change and Employment Management, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing 233-243 (2017)
2017 Fu J, Nicholas S, 'What Determinens the Internationalization-Performance Relationship of Chinese Firms?', Entrepreneurship, Organizational Change and Employment Management, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing 233-243 (2017)
2014 McGovern J, Nicholas S, Boyle BP, 'The Decision-Making Processes in Multinational Enterprises: How Headquarters Make Strategic Change for Their Chinese Subsidiaries', Research on the Impact of Global Economic Integration and Information Networking on Sustainable Corporate Development, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing 175-185 (2014) [B1]
Co-authors Brendan Boyle
2014 Boyle BP, Mitchell R, Nicholas S, McDonnell A, 'Competitive Strategy in a Changing Global Education Industry', Research on the Impact of Global Economic Integration and Information Networking on Sustainable Corporate Development, Nanjing University Press, Nanjing 186-194 (2014) [B1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2009 Wang Y, Nicholas SJ, 'New perspectives on subsidiaries in the transition economy of China', Managing Subsidiary Dynamics: Headquarters Role, Capability Development, and China Strategy, Emerald Group Publishing, Bingley, UK 165-188 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1108/S1571-5027(2009)0000022012
2008 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle BP, 'Cross-cultural team performance', Innovation in Management Practices, Macmillan Publishers India, New Delhi, India 281-289 (2008) [B1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2008 Maitland E, Nicholas SJ, 'Liability of foreignness: Role of formal and informal institutions in India and China', Innovation in Management Practices, Macmillan Publishers India, New Delhi, India 273-280 (2008) [B1]
2007 Nicholas SJ, Maitland E, 'Private sector development: How business interacts with informal institutions', Informal Institutions: How Social Norms Help or Hinder Development, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris, France 109-129 (2007) [B1]
2003 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'NIE: An Organising Framework for OLI?', International Business and the Eclectic Paradigm: Developing the OLI Framework, Routledge, London, United Kingdom 47-54 (2003) [B1]
2003 Nicholas S, 'Heights and Living Standards of English Workers During the Early Years of Industrialization', The industrial revolution, Houghton Mifflin, London, United Kingdom 1770-1815 (2003) [B2]
2003 Devinney TM, Midgley DF, Venaik S, 'Managerial beliefs, market contestability and dominant strategic orientation in the eclectic paradigm', International Business and the Eclectic Paradigm: Developing the OLI Framework 134-151 (2003)
DOI 10.4324/9780203576427
Citations Scopus - 9
2002 Nicholas S, 'Japanese Business in Australia', , Routledge, London, 225-227 (2002) [B1]
2002 Nicholas S, 'Subcontracting System', , Routledge, London, 422-425 (2002) [B1]
2002 Nicholas S, 'International Business Research: Steady-states, Dynamics and Globalisation', , Routledge, London/NewYork, 7-27 (2002) [B1]
2001 Nicholas S, 'Patterned Growth? The Dynamics of Multinational Expansion', , Edward Elgar Publishers, Northampton/ Cheltenham, 28-52 (2001) [B1]
2001 Nicholas S, 'Do Incentives Attract Japanese FDI to Singapore and the Region?', , Edward Elgar Publishers, Northampton/ Cheltenham, 129-150 (2001) [B1]
Show 14 more chapters

Journal article (69 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Zhu D, Guo N, Wang J, Nicholas S, Wang Z, Zhang G, et al., 'Socioeconomic inequality in Hepatitis B vaccination of rural adults in China', Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, 14 464-470 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Taylor & Francis. Hepatitis B (HB) vaccination is the most effective way to prevent HB virus infection. While measures taken to control the prevalence of HB have achi... [more]

© 2018 Taylor & Francis. Hepatitis B (HB) vaccination is the most effective way to prevent HB virus infection. While measures taken to control the prevalence of HB have achieved significant results, HB prevalence in rural China among adults remains problematic. This study sheds new light on the determinants of HB vaccine uptake and its inequality according to socioeconomic status in rural areas of China. We interviewed 22,283 adults, aged 18¿59¿years, from 8444 households, in 48 villages from 8 provinces. Vaccination status was modeled by using two logistic models: whether take at least one HB vaccine and whether to complete the entire vaccination regime. The Erreygers' concentration index (E CI ) was used to quantify the degree of inequality and the decomposition approach was used to uncover the determinants of inequality in vaccine uptake. We found that the coverage rate of HB vaccination is 20.2%, and the completion rate is 16.0%. The E CI of at least one dose (0.081) and three doses (0.076) revealed a substantial pro-rich inequality. Income contributed the largest percentage to HB vaccination inequalities (52.17% for at least one dose and 52.03% for complete vaccinations). HB awareness was another important cause of inequality in HB vaccination (around 30%). These results imply that rich had a greater tendency to vaccinate and inequality favouring the rich was almost equal for the complete three doses. While the factors associated with HB vaccination uptake and inequalities were multifaceted, income status and HB awareness were the main barriers for the poor to take HB vaccine by adults in rural China.

DOI 10.1080/21645515.2017.1396401
2017 Zhong Y, Wang J, Nicholas S, 'Gender, childhood and adult socioeconomic inequalities in functional disability among Chinese older adults', International Journal for Equity in Health, 16 1-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12939-017-0662-3
2017 Zhu D, Guo N, Wang J, Nicholas S, Chen L, 'Socioeconomic inequalities of outpatient and inpatient service utilization in China: Personal and regional perspectives', International Journal for Equity in Health, 16 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: China's health system has shown remarkable progress in health provision and health outcomes in recent decades, however inequality in health ... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: China's health system has shown remarkable progress in health provision and health outcomes in recent decades, however inequality in health care utilization persists and poses a serious social problem. While government pro-poor health policies addressed affordability as the major obstacle to equality in health care access, this policy direction deserves further examination. Our study examines the issue of health care inequalities in China, analyzing both regional and individual socioeconomic factors associated with the inequality, and provides evidence to improve governmental health policies. Methods: The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) 1991-2011 data were used to analyze the inequality of health care utilization. The random effects logistic regression technique was used to model health care utilization as the dependent variable, and income and regional location as the independent variables, controlling for individuals' age, gender, marital status, education, health insurance, body mass index (BMI), and period variations. The dynamic trend of 1991-2011 regional disparities was estimated using an interaction term between the regional group dummy and the wave dummy. Results: The probability of using outpatient service and inpatient services during the previous 4 weeks was 8.6 and 1.1% respectively. Compared to urban residents, suburban (OR: 0.802, 95% CI: 0.720-0.893), town (OR: 0.722, 95% CI: 0.648-0.804), rich (OR: 0.728, 95% CI: 0.656-0.807) and poor village (OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.698-0.868) residents were less likely to use outpatient service; and rich (OR: 0.609, 95% CI: 0.472-0.785) and poor village (OR: 0.752, 95% CI: 0. 576-0.983) residents were less likely to use inpatient health care. But the differences between income groups were not significant, except the differences between top and bottom income group in outpatient service use. Conclusion: Regional location was a more important factor than individual characteristics in determining access to health care. Besides demand-side subsidies, Chinese policy makers should pay enhanced attention to health care resource allocation to address inequity in health care access.

DOI 10.1186/s12939-017-0706-8
2017 Wang W, Maitland E, Nicholas S, Loban E, Haggerty J, 'Comparison of patient perceived primary care quality in public clinics, public hospitals and private clinics in rural China', International Journal for Equity in Health, 16 1-9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12939-017-0672-1
2016 Mitchell R, Boyle B, Nicholas S, Maitland E, Zhao S, 'Boundary conditions of a curvilinear relationship between decision comprehensiveness and performance: The role of functional and national diversity', JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, 69 2801-2811 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.12.049
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2016 Boyle BP, NIcholas S, Mitchell R, 'The Value of International Assignees¿ Knowledge of Interpersonal Networks: Knowledge of People, Networks and Politics and Knowledge Flows in Multinational Enterprises', Management International Review, 56 425-454 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11575-016-0278-7
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2016 Liu R, Li Y, Wangen KR, Maitland E, Nicholas S, Wang J, 'Analysis of hepatitis B vaccination behavior and vaccination willingness among migrant workers from rural China based on protection motivation theory', Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 12 1155-1163 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/21645515.2015.1123358
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Chen R, Li Y, Wangen KR, Nicholas S, Maitland E, Wang J, 'Hepatitis B birth dose vaccination rates among children in Beijing: A comparison of local residents and first and second generation migrants', Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 12 1141-1148 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/21645515.2015.1131370
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Leng A, Li Y, Wangen KR, Nicholas S, Maitland E, Wang J, 'Hepatitis B discrimination in everyday life by rural migrant workers in Beijing', Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 12 1164-1171 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/21645515.2015.1131883
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Yu L, Wang J, Wangen KR, Chen R, Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'Factors associated with adults' perceived need to vaccinate against hepatitis B in rural China', Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 12 1149-1154 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/21645515.2015.1132964
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Wang W, Shi L, Yin A, Mao Z, Maitland E, Nicholas S, Liu X, 'Primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China', BioMed Research International, 2015 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2015/206709
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Wang W, Shi L, Yin A, Mao Z, Maitland E, Nicholas S, Liu X, 'Contribution of primary care to health: an individual level analysis from Tibet, China.', Int J Equity Health, 14 107 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0255-y
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Wang W, Shi L, Yin A, Mao Z, Maitland E, Nicholas S, Liu X, 'Primary care quality between Traditional Tibetan Medicine and Western Medicine Hospitals: A pilot assessment in Tibet', International Journal for Equity in Health, 14 (2015)

© 2015 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Introduction: This paper assesses both patients' perspectives on the differences in primary care quality between traditional Tib... [more]

© 2015 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Introduction: This paper assesses both patients' perspectives on the differences in primary care quality between traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) hospitals and western medicine (WM) hospitals and the efficacy of the government's investment in these two Prefecture-level primary care structures in Tibet. Method: A validated Tibetan version of the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT-T) was used to collect data on 692 patients aged over 18 years old, who reported the sampling site was their regular source of health care. T-tests were performed to compare the separate and total primary care attributes between WM hospitals and TTM hospitals. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of the health care setting with primary care attributes while controlling for socio-demographic, health service use and health status characteristics. Results: Compared to WM hospitals, the results showed that TTM hospitals had patients who were older (15.8 % versus 8.4 % over 60 years); with lower education levels (66.0 % versus 35.8 % with below junior high school ) and income levels (46.9 % versus 26.5 % with annual household income below 30,000RMB); more likely to be married (79.2 % versus 60.5 %); made less frequent health care visits; and had higher self-rated health status. Overall, patients assessed the primary care performance in TTM hospitals significantly higher (80.0) than WM hospitals (74.63). There were no differences in health care assessment by patient gender, age, income, education, marital status and occupation. Conclusions: TTM patients reported better primary care experiences than patients using WM hospitals, which validated the government's investment in traditional Tibetan medicine.

DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0174-y
2014 Wang W, Shi L, Yin A, Lai Y, Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'Development and Validation of the Tibetan Primary Care Assessment Tool', BioMed Research International, 2014 1-7 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2014/308739
Citations Scopus - 11
2012 Boyle BP, McDonnell A, Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, 'Managing knowledge in internationalizing universities through foreign assignments', International Journal of Educational Management, 26 303-312 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2012 Wang Y, Wang J, Maitland E, Zhao Y, Nicholas SJ, Lu M, 'Growing old before growing rich: Inequality in health service utilization among the mid-aged and elderly in Gansu and Zhejiang Provinces, China', BMC Health Services Research, 12 1-11 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
2012 Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Sharing and developing knowledge of organization culture during international assignments', International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, 12 361-378 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1470595812440151
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2011 Chien-Ta Ho B, Nicholas SJ, Ranjan J, 'Editorial: Special Issue on Innovations in Redefining Business Horizons', International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management (IJECRM), 4 1-3 (2011) [C3]
2011 Mitchell RJ, Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, 'Cross-cultural group performance', Learning Organization, 18 94-101 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/09696471111103704
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2011 Chien-Ta Ho B, Nicholas SJ, Ranjan J, 'Guest editorial', The Learning Organization, 18 (2011) [C3]
2009 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle BP, 'The role of openness to cognitive diversity and group processes in knowledge creation', Small Group Research, 40 535-554 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1046496409338302
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2009 Mitchell RJ, Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, 'The impact of goal structure in team knowledge creation', Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 12 639-651 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1368430209340568
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2008 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, Boyle B, 'The impact of cognitive conflict on team performance', Asia Pacific Management Review, 13 625-634 (2008)

The results of research on diversity in teams suggest that it offers both a great opportunity for organisations as well as an enormous challenge. However, current research is plag... [more]

The results of research on diversity in teams suggest that it offers both a great opportunity for organisations as well as an enormous challenge. However, current research is plagued by a lack of overall consistency, indicating that the relationship between diversity and team performance is not well understood. This study examines the components of cognitive conflict in order to assess whether construct operationalisation may explain this inconsistency. Analysis of the existing operationalisations of cognitive conflict reveals that it incorporates both disagreement about information and reasoning, and debate of rival hypotheses or recommendations. We propose that functional diversity leads to cognitive disagreement but not debate, and that debate enhances knowledge creation, with which cognitive disagreement shows no relationship. Our results support these hypotheses, which provide a powerful explanation for the contrary results found by researchers investigating cognitive conflict. Given that extant measures of cognitive conflict include scale items which measure both debate and cognitive disagreement, cognitive conflict may be viewed as an aggregate measure of these two distinct constructs. This study contributes to research on diversity and conflict by providing an explanation for contrary results, and by providing and a detailed operationalisation of cognitive conflict and its component constructs. It also contributes to research into creativity and innovation by providing insight into the dynamics underpinning knowledge sharing and creation.

Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Liang F, Nicholas SJ, 'Exploring Subsidiary Strategic Roles in a Transitional Economy: Evidence from China', Journal of Global Business Issues, 1 101-114 (2007) [C1]
2007 Liang F, Nicholas SJ, 'Knowledge transfer through appropriate location selection: An empirical investigation in China', Journal of Asia Business Studies, 1 45-54 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Wang Y, Nicholas SJ, 'The formation and evolution of non-equity strategic alliances in China', Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 24 131-150 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10490-006-9034-z
Citations Scopus - 13
2006 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, 'Knowledge creation through boundary-spanning', Knowledge Management Research and Practice, 4 310-318 (2006) [C1]

This paper contributes to our understanding of the process of knowledge creation in organisations. Based on a process model, the paper develops propositions relating to factors fa... [more]

This paper contributes to our understanding of the process of knowledge creation in organisations. Based on a process model, the paper develops propositions relating to factors facilitating knowledge creation in cross-functional work teams. These propositions relate to the constructs of cognitive diversity, transactional memory, trans-specialist knowledge and their contribution to new knowledge development through knowledge boundary spanning. © 2006 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1057/palgrave.kmrp.8500113
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2006 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, 'Knowledge Creation in Groups: The Value of Cognitive Diversity, Transactive Memory, and Openmindedness Norms', Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management, 4 67-74 (2006) [C1]
2006 Wang Y, Nicholas S, 'Transferring Knowledge: How Managers Make Credible Commitments, Relational Safeguards and Dispute Resolution in Non-Equity Alliances', Nanjing University Business Studies Review, - 125-138 (2006) [C1]
2005 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, 'Knowledge creation in groups: The value of cognitive diversity, transactive memory, and openmindedness Norms', Proceedings of the European Conference on Knowledge Management, ECKM, 326-333 (2005)

This paper contributes to our understanding of knowledge creation by developing a comprehensive model of the knowledge creating process in organisational work teams. It subsequent... [more]

This paper contributes to our understanding of knowledge creation by developing a comprehensive model of the knowledge creating process in organisational work teams. It subsequently synthesises contemporary theory across research streams to develop hypotheses relating to three factors capable of facilitating the knowledge development process - cognitive diversity, transactional memory and openmindedness norms. In combination, the conceptual rationale and empirical support act to substantiate three key relationships in the knowledge creation process.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2005 Wang Y, Nicholas S, 'Knowledge transfer, knowledge replication, and learning in non-equity alliances: Operating contractual joint ventures in China', Management International Review, 45 99-118 (2005) [C1]

Knowledge transfer and learning within non-equity strategic alliances is an under-researched area. Based on interview data, this paper studies knowledge transfer, replication and ... [more]

Knowledge transfer and learning within non-equity strategic alliances is an under-researched area. Based on interview data, this paper studies knowledge transfer, replication and learning in contractual joint ventures (CJVs), a major form of foreign investment in China. Using a quasi-hierarchical organization structure, CJVs replicated part of their Hong Kong parent's know-how, which depended on local Chinese managers' learning intent and learning ability. Hong Kong partners also learned from managing the CJV and operating in China's local environment. © Gabler Verlag 2005.

Citations Scopus - 31
2005 Maitland E, Rose EL, Nicholas S, 'How firms grow: Clustering as a dynamic model of internationalization', Journal of International Business Studies, 36 435-451 (2005) [C1]

This paper provides a methodology for identifying the dynamics of international firm expansion, demonstrating systematic evidence of both 'toe in the water' and concentr... [more]

This paper provides a methodology for identifying the dynamics of international firm expansion, demonstrating systematic evidence of both 'toe in the water' and concentrated bursts of internationalization by US multinational enterprises. We use the methodology of statistical process control to analyze initial investments in host countries and develop a numerical measure of temporal clustering or bunching. Using this measure, we identify two distinct patterns of growth; whereas some firms cluster their investments over time, others do not cluster their investments. For firms that cluster, three types of clustering strategy are identified: concentrating, hibernating, and hybrid. Arguments based on internal firm architecture, experience, and learning are advanced to explain these findings. © 2005 Academy of International Business All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8400140
Citations Scopus - 29
2004 Nicholas S, Maitland E, Purcell W, 'Regional Learning Networks: Evidence from MNEs in Thailand and Australia', Management International Review, 44 87-105 (2004) [C1]
2004 Nicholas S, Purcell W, Maitland E, 'Making Investment Choices: Japanese MNEs Investing in Australia and the Region', Journal of International Business and Economics, 5 1-20 (2004) [C1]
2003 Sammartino A, O'Flynn J, Nicholas S, 'The employer perspective of indigenous (un)emplyment', Economic Papers: a journal of applied economics and policy, 22 45-60 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1759-3441.2003.tb01133.x
2002 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'Internationalisation of Australian Firms', International Studies in Management and Organizations, (2002) [C1]
2002 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'Modelling Multinationals from Small Open Economies', International Studies in Management and Organizations, 23 (2002) [C1]
2002 Nicholas S, 'Effective Diversity Management May Equal Profit for Busines', AsiaLink Magazine, 17 (2002) [C3]
2002 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'What Is Different About Australian MNEs', Insights, (2002) [C1]
2001 Whitwell G, Nicholas S, 'Weight and welfare of Australians, 1890-1940.', Australian economic history review, 41 159-175 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 20
2001 Purcell W, Nicholas S, 'Japanese Tourism Investment in Australia: Entry Choice, Parent Control and Management Practice', Tourism Management, 22 245-257 (2001) [C1]
2001 Nicholas S, Purcell W, Gray S, 'Regional clusters, location tournaments and incentives: An empirical analysis of factors attracting Japanese investment to Singapore', Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 18 395-405 (2001) [C1]

This paper develops a new model for testing the role of incentives in FDI location choice by integrating the theory of the MNE with new approaches to location theory. From the the... [more]

This paper develops a new model for testing the role of incentives in FDI location choice by integrating the theory of the MNE with new approaches to location theory. From the theory our paper derives four testable hypotheses related to the role of policy variables in the location choice of Japanese MNEs in Singapore. Specifically we test for the existence of regional investment clusters and national tournaments as key elements in the FDI location decision. We also test for differences in the incentive preferences of export-oriented versus market-oriented investors and for first investments compared to reinvestments. Using survey data from 134 Japanese MNEs our study confirmed the existence of a Southeast Asian regional investment cluster and a location tournament between regional states. Our study also found that different incentives attracted export-oriented and market-oriented investors, but there were no significant differences in the incentive preferences of first investors compared to reinvestors. The policy implications of these findings are discussed. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Citations Scopus - 8
2001 Nicholas S, Purcell W, 'Japanese subsidiaries in Australia: Work practices and subcontracting relations as learning mechanism', Singapore Economic Review, 46 119-139 (2001) [C1]

This paper tests whether Japanese subsidiaries in Australia were learning organisations. Two strands of MNE theory are presented: dynamic capability and organisational learning mo... [more]

This paper tests whether Japanese subsidiaries in Australia were learning organisations. Two strands of MNE theory are presented: dynamic capability and organisational learning models. Japanese MNEs transferred both work and subcontracting practices to their Australian subsidiaries. Statistical tests showed that there were no significant deepening in work practices or subcontracting relationships between 1993 and 1997. Our tests also revealed no long-term learning, measured by changes in work practices and subcontracting relationships for firms who had operated in Australia for more than 10 and less than 10 years. The paper advances explanations of the absence of short-term and long-term learning.

DOI 10.1142/S0217590801000255
2001 Lau K, O''Flynn J, Sammartino A, Ricciotti A, Nicholas S, 'Diversity Management: Capturing the Diversity Dividen', CEDA Bulletin, (2001) [C3]
2001 O''Flynn J, Fisher N, Sammartino A, Lau K, Ricciotti A, Nicholas S, 'The Diversity Dividend', HR Monthly, (2001) [C3]
1999 Purcell W, Nicholas S, Merrett D, Whitwell G, 'The transfer of human resource and management practice by Japanese multinationals to Australia: Do industry, size and experience matter?', International Journal of Human Resource Management, 10 72-88 (1999)

This paper examines management and HRM practices adopted by Japanese multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the transferability of Japanese HRM in the Australian host-country situat... [more]

This paper examines management and HRM practices adopted by Japanese multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the transferability of Japanese HRM in the Australian host-country situation. It also compares HRM practices of Japanese MNEs in Australia with the experience in North America and Europe and attempts to map the typology of the human resource management utilized by a range of Japanese firms operating in Australia, including large and small firms; manufacturing and non-manufacturing companies; firms with differing levels of Japanese equity and with different levels of operational experience. This paper is based on survey data from sixty-nine Japanese subsidiaries operating in the Australian manufacturing and service sectors in 1994.

DOI 10.1080/095851999340648
Citations Scopus - 20
1996 Nicholas S, Oxley D, 'Living standards of women in England and Wales, 1785-1815: New evidence from Newgate prison records', Economic History Review, 49 591-599 (1996)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1996.tb00584.x
Citations Scopus - 16
1996 Carlos AM, Nicholas S, 'Theory and history: Seventeenth-century joint-stock chartered trading companies', Journal of Economic History, 56 916-924 (1996)
DOI 10.1017/S0022050700017526
Citations Scopus - 37
1995 JOHNSON P, NICHOLAS S, 'Male and female living standards in England and Wales, 1812-1867: evidence from criminal height records', The Economic History Review, 48 470-481 (1995)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1995.tb01427.x
Citations Scopus - 43
1993 NICHOLAS S, OXLEY D, 'The living standards of women during the industrial revolution, 1795-1820', The Economic History Review, 46 723-749 (1993)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1993.tb01359.x
Citations Scopus - 67
1993 Carlos AM, Nicholas S, 'Managing the manager: An application of the principal agent model to the hudson's bay company', Oxford Economic Papers, 45 243-256 (1993)
DOI 10.1093/oxfordjournals.oep.a042090
Citations Scopus - 25
1991 Nicholas S, 'Debating business history: Location, performance and growth of british mnes', Business History, 33 116-120 (1991)
DOI 10.1080/00076799100000008
Citations Scopus - 2
1991 Nicholas S, 'Heights and Living Standards of English Workers During the Early Years of Industrialization, 1770-1815', The Journal of Economic History, 51 937-957 (1991)

We employed data on the heights of English and Irish male convicts transported to Australia to assess the living standards of workers between 1770 and 1815. Falling heights of urb... [more]

We employed data on the heights of English and Irish male convicts transported to Australia to assess the living standards of workers between 1770 and 1815. Falling heights of urban-and rural-born males after 1780 and a delayed growth spurt for 13-to 23-year-old boys revealed declining living standards among English workers during the Industrial Revolution. This conclusion was supported by the fall in English workers' heights relative to that of convicts transported from Ireland. Significant urban-rural and regional variations in English living standards were revealed by using regression techniques. © 1991, The Economic History Association. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1017/S0022050700040171
Citations Scopus - 88
1990 Nicholas S, 'Reinterpreting the convict labour market', Australian Economic History Review, 30 50-66 (1990)

The convicts transported to NSW between 1817 and 1840 were young, fit, highly literate and brought occupational skills which were broadly representative of the British and Irish w... [more]

The convicts transported to NSW between 1817 and 1840 were young, fit, highly literate and brought occupational skills which were broadly representative of the British and Irish working classes. The assignment of convict labour in the colony was efficient; skilled urban and construction tradesmen were employed in the same jobs in NSW as they had held in Britain. Domestic servants and unskilled urban workers whose skills were not suited to the needs of the colony experienced job restructuring. The organization of convict workers into teams and gangs in Australia was similar to the way work was organized in free labour Britain, and a mix of incentives and rewards characterized the extraction of work from convicts. The human capital of the transportees and the labour system within which they worked help to explain the rapid growth of the colonial economy before 1840. -from Author

Citations Scopus - 5
1990 NICHOLAS S, 'Australia: an economical prison?', The Economic History Review, 43 470-476 (1990)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1990.tb00541.x
Citations Scopus - 2
1989 Nicholas S, 'Locational choice, performance and the growth of british multinational firms', Business History, 31 122-141 (1989)
DOI 10.1080/00076798900000068
Citations Scopus - 10
1988 Carlos AM, Nicholas S, '¿Giants of an Earlier Capitalism¿: The Chartered Trading Companies as Modern Multinationals', Business History Review, 62 398-419 (1988)

Much has been written about late-nineteenth-century multinationals and their relationship to the transnational firms of the present, but both historians and economists have largel... [more]

Much has been written about late-nineteenth-century multinationals and their relationship to the transnational firms of the present, but both historians and economists have largely discounted the relevance of the earlier chartered trading companies to this discussion. In an article emphasizing transaction cost analysis and the theory of the firm, Professors Carlos and Nicholas argue that the trading companies did meet the criteria of the modern MNE¿the growth of a managerial hierarchy necessitated by a large volume of transactions and of systems to control those managers over space and time. © 1988, The President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.2307/3115542
Citations Scopus - 89
1987 Hutchinson D, Nicholas S, 'Modelling the growth strategies of british firms', Business History, 29 46-64 (1987)
DOI 10.1080/00076798700000080
Citations Scopus - 3
1987 Nicholas S, Shergold PR, 'Human capital and the pre-Famine Irish emigration to England', Explorations in Economic History, 24 158-177 (1987)

This paper analyzes the human capital resources of pre-Famine Irish emigrants to England. The data source comprises over 16,000 Irish and English convicts transported to New South... [more]

This paper analyzes the human capital resources of pre-Famine Irish emigrants to England. The data source comprises over 16,000 Irish and English convicts transported to New South Wales between 1817 and 1839. The convict indents distinguish between those convicts transported directly from Ireland (the stayers) and those Irish-born transportees convicted and sent from England (the emigrants). A comparison of the skill, literacy, and age characteristics of the stayers and emigrants suggests that Ireland lost skilled workers in the pre-Famine period. A logit micromigration model confirms the "brain-drain" hypothesis for Irish workers emigrating to Britain. Finally, the human capital of the Irish emigrants is found to compare favorably with that of the native English workers transported to Australia. © 1987.

DOI 10.1016/0014-4983(87)90010-6
Citations Scopus - 10
1987 Nicholas S, Shergold PR, 'Intercounty labour mobility during the industrial revolution: Evidence from Australian transportation records', Oxford Economic Papers, 39 624-640 (1987)
DOI 10.1093/oxfordjournals.oep.a041809
Citations Scopus - 2
1987 Nicholas S, Shergold PR, 'Internal migration in England, 1818-1839', Journal of Historical Geography, 13 155-168 (1987)

From indents of 10, 151 English men and women transported to the penal colony of New South Wales, Australia, it is possible to measure English intercounty migration between 1818 a... [more]

From indents of 10, 151 English men and women transported to the penal colony of New South Wales, Australia, it is possible to measure English intercounty migration between 1818 and 1839-a period of industrialization for which data on population movement are absent. Comparisons with the 1841 census indicate that transported convicts were broadly representative both of the English prison population and of the non-criminal working class. Almost one-third of the workers in the sample moved between counties. The working-class intercounty migrant was young, literate and skilled; the median distance travelled was 59 miles. Regional migration pathways are described. Rural workers moved more frequently than urban workers, but urban workers travelled a greater median distance than their rural counterparts. Estimating a gravity-flow migration model, migration is found to be highly sensitive to intercounty job opportunities and wage rate differentials, but relatively insensitive to distance (which acted as a deterrent to movement). While regional biases existed, the regression results imply that labour market signals were effective in transferring labour from rural to urban locations. © 1987 Academic Press Inc. (London) Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/S0305-7488(87)80144-5
Citations Scopus - 8
1985 NICHOLAS S, 'British Economic Performance and Total Factor Productivity Growth, 1870¿1940', The Economic History Review, 38 576-582 (1985)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1985.tb00390.x
Citations Scopus - 5
1984 NICHOLAS SJ, 'The Overseas Marketing Performance of British Industry, 1870-1914', The Economic History Review, 37 489-506 (1984)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00345.x
Citations Scopus - 28
1983 Nicholas S, 'Agency Contracts, Institutional Modes, and the Transition to Foreign Direct Investment by British Manufacturing Multinationals Before 1939', The Journal of Economic History, 43 675-686 (1983)

This paper analyzes the transition from agents to branch selling as alternative institutional modes for transacting abroad by pre-1939 British manufacturing multinationals. A mode... [more]

This paper analyzes the transition from agents to branch selling as alternative institutional modes for transacting abroad by pre-1939 British manufacturing multinationals. A model to explain the shift between alternative modes is specified in terms of transaction costs. Agent opportunism and contract monitoring costs are the major transaction costs. Besides transaction costs, the frequency of transactions and the accumulation of market-specific knowledge by the principal were found to be important variables. © 1983, The Economic History Association. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1017/S0022050700030308
Citations Scopus - 48
1982 Nicholas S, Shergold PR, 'The heights of British male convict children transported to Australia, 1825-1840. Part II', Australian Paediatric Journal, 18 80-83 (1982)

This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825-40 examines the hypotheses of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that transported males did not attain maximum height until 2... [more]

This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825-40 examines the hypotheses of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that transported males did not attain maximum height until 25-29 years of age; that the growth potential of male and female convicts was never achieved; and that the Australian environment had a dramatic positive impact on the stature of second-generation native-born children. It is argued that adult height was achieved by 23 years of age; that original estimates of mean adult stature were too low; and that the growth rate of 'convict stock' children has probably been exaggerated.

Citations Scopus - 1
1982 Nicholas S, Shergold PR, 'The heights of British male convict children transported to Australia, 1825-1840. Part I', Australian Paediatric Journal, 18 76-79 (1982)

This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825-40 challenges the hypothesis of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that the convict boys were of very short stature. It is ar... [more]

This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825-40 challenges the hypothesis of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that the convict boys were of very short stature. It is argued that mean age-specific heights of male juveniles were from 3-9 cm taller than the earlier estimates suggest, and the transported convict boys were of similar stature to British non-convict boys of comparable socio-economic status.

Citations Scopus - 2
1982 NICHOLAS S, 'Total Factor Productivity Growth and the Revision of Post-1870 British Economic History', The Economic History Review, 35 83-98 (1982)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0289.1982.tb01188.x
Citations Scopus - 7
1982 NICHOLAS S, SHERGOLD PR, 'The heights of British male convict children transported to Australia, 1825¿1840. Part I', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 18 76-79 (1982)

ABSTRACT. This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825¿40 challenges the hypothesis of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that the convict boys were of very short statur... [more]

ABSTRACT. This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825¿40 challenges the hypothesis of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that the convict boys were of very short stature. It is argued that mean age-specific heights of male juveniles were from 3¿9 cm taller than the earlier estimates suggest, and the transported convict boys were of similar stature to British non-convict boys of comparable socio-economic status. Copyright © 1982, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.1982.tb01992.x
1982 NICHOLAS S, SHERGOLD PR, 'The heights of British male convict children transported to Australia, 1825¿1840. Part II', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 18 80-83 (1982)

ABSTRACT. This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825¿40 examines the hypotheses of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that transported males did not attain maximum hei... [more]

ABSTRACT. This survey of 7,877 indents of convict arrivals at Port Jackson 1825¿40 examines the hypotheses of Dr. Bryan Gandevia that transported males did not attain maximum height until 25¿29 years of age; that the growth potential of male and female convicts was never achieved; and that the Australian environment had a dramatic positive impact on the stature of second-generation native-born children. It is argued that adult height was achieved by 23 years of age; that original estimates of mean adult stature were too low; and that the growth rate of ¿convict stock¿children has probably been exaggerated. Copyright © 1982, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.1982.tb01994.x
Show 66 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Nicholas S, Shergold P, 'British and Irish Convicts', The Australian People:An Encyclopedia of the Nation, Its People and Their Origins (2001) [D1]

Conference (39 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Zhao S, Nicholas S, Liu C, Xu X, Mao Y, 'Entrepreneurship, Organizational Change and Employment Management' (2017)
2017 Zhao S, Nicholas S, Liu C, Xu X, Mao Y, 'Entrepreneurship, Organizational Change and Employment Management' (2017)
2011 Mitchell RJ, Boyle BP, Maitland E, Nicholas SJ, Zhao S, 'How subsidiary top management teams influence strategic change and organizational performance in transition economies', Enterprise Management in a Transitional Economy and Post Financial Crisis, Nanjing (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2010 Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Expatriate assignments and the value of idiosyncratic knowledge', Managing Business Organizations, Knowledge and the External Environment, Ghaziabad, India (2010) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2010 Nicholas SJ, Ranjan J, 'Managing Business Organizations, Knowledge and the External Environment', Proceedings of the International Conference on Business and Information Technology Contemporary Research and Development, Ghaziabad, India (2010) [E4]
2010 Nicholas SJ, Ranjan J, 'Trends and Techniques in ICT', Proceedings of the International Conference on Business and Information Technology Contemporary Research and Development, Ghaziabad, India (2010) [E4]
2010 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle BP, 'Transactive memory in teams: How does it work?', Trends and Techniques in ICT, Ghaziabad, India (2010) [E1]
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2010 Nicholas SJ, Ranjan J, 'Data and Information Management', Proceedings of the International Conference on Business and Information Technology Contemporary Research and Development, Ghaziabad, India (2010) [E4]
2009 Boyce GH, Nicholas SJ, 'On dignity', CIOS: Centre for Institutional and Organisational Studies Inaugural Conference Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Gordon Boyce
2009 Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Developing knowledge of organisational culture in multinational enterprises', ANZAM: 23rd ANZAM Conference: Sustainability, Management and Marketing, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E1]
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2009 Maitland E, Nicholas SJ, Boyce GH, 'The economics of governance: Transaction cost economics and new institutional economics', Symposium on the Multiple Facets of Governance. Symposium Program, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E2]
Co-authors Gordon Boyce
2008 Boyle BP, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Expatriation research through the knowledge lens: The value of focusing on the idiosyncratic', 22nd ANZAM Conference 2008: Managing in the Pacific Century, Auckland, NZ (2008) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2007 Boyle B, Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, 'Sharing knowledge of interpersonal networks during foreign assignments and knowledge flows in multinational enterprises', AIB 2007 Annual Meeting. Conference Proceedings, Indianapolis, Indiana (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle BP, 'Goal compatibility in knowledge creation', 13th Asian Pacific Management Conference. Proceedings, Melbourne (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell, Brendan Boyle
2007 Boyle B, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Foreign assignments and knowledge flows in multinational enterprises', ANZIBA Conference 2007: Institutions and Organisations in an International Context. Papers, Newcastle, NSW (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle B, 'Individual learning in organizational groups: an alternate view of group performance', The Academy of Management 2007 Annual Meeting Proceedings, Philadelphia, PA. (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, 'When are two heads better than one?: How cognitive heterogeneity explains the impact of demographic diversity in teams', The Academy of Management 2007 Annual Meeting Proceedings, Philadelphia, PA. (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Boyle B, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Leveraging intellectual and social capital within multinational companies (MNCs) through expatriate assignments', 21st ANZAM Conference. Proceedings, Sydney (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Boyle B, Nicholas SJ, Mitchell RJ, 'Human resources and the knowledge-centred strategy literature: A strategic theoretical frame for the study of foreign assignments in multinational enterprises', ANZIBA Conference 2007: Institutions and Organisations in an International Context. Papers, Newcastle, NSW (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Rebecca Mitchell
2007 Mitchell RJ, Nicholas SJ, Boyle BP, 'The impact of cognitive conflict on team performance', 13th Asian Pacific Management Conference. Proceedings, Melbourne (2007) [E1]
Co-authors Brendan Boyle, Rebecca Mitchell
2005 Wang Y, Nicholas S, 'Transferring Knowledge: How Managers Manage Credible Commitments, Relational Safeguards and Dispute Resolution in Non-Equity Alliances in China', 5th International Symposium on Multinational Business Management - Human Resource Management in a Transitional Economy, Nanjing, China (2005) [E1]
2005 Comerton-Ford C, Kitay J, Nicholas S, Yip J, 'Managing Group Work in Public Policy Programs', The Role of Public Administration in Alleviating Poverty and Improving Governance, Kuala Lumpur, Malayasia (2005) [E1]
2004 Sammartion A, Nicholas S, O''Flynn J, 'A Resource-based Analysis of Diversity Management: Evidence from Australian Firms', -, Sweden (2004) [E1]
2004 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, 'Dynamic Capabilities and the Creation of Knowledge in Organisations: The Importance of Functional and Cognitive Diversity, and Trans-Specialist Knowledge', -, Queensland (2004) [E1]
2004 Mitchell R, Nicholas S, 'Knowledge Creating Mechanisms and Competitive Advantage: The Value of Cognitive Diversity, Transactive memory, Openmindedness Norms and Transpecialist Knowledge', -, Cairns Australia (2004) [E1]
2004 Liang F, Nicholas S, 'Managing Ongoing Inter-Partner Relationships Within International Joint Ventures: An Empirical Investigation', -, Stokholm Sweden (2004) [E1]
2004 Liang F, Nicholas S, 'Integration and Responsiveness of subsidiaries in Transitional China', -, Beijing (2004) [E1]
2004 Lian F, Nicholas S, 'Exploring a Typology of Subsidiary Strategies in a Transitional Economy', -, Stokholm Sweden (2004) [E1]
2004 Comerton-Ford C, Kitay J, Nicholas S, Yip J, 'Enhancing learning outcomes through group work', -, Singapore (2004) [E1]
2004 Liang F, Nicholas S, 'Maintaining Inter-Partner Cooperation of IJV: Evidence from China', Canberra, Australia (2004) [E1]
2003 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'International Business; Moving Beyond Management and Towards International Studies', -, Dunedin, New Zealand (2003) [E1]
2003 Maitland E, Nicholas S, 'The Challenge of International Business', -, Dunedin NZ (2003) [E1]
2003 Fan L, Nicholas S, 'Conflict and Cooperation in JVs in China', -, Melbourne, Australia (2003) [E1]
2002 Wang Y, Nicholas S, Morgan S, 'A Transaction Cost Study of Contractual Joint Ventures in China', Nanjing (2002) [E1]
2002 Nicholas S, Maitland E, Purcell W, 'Regional Learning Networks: Evidence from Japanese MNEs in Thailand and Australia', Bali Indonesia (2002) [E1]
2002 Wang Y, Nicholas S, 'Relational Subcontracting: The Case of Contractual Joint Ventures in China in W', Brisbane Australia (2002) [E1]
2002 Fan L, Nicholas S, 'Subsidiary Strategic Roles in a Transition Economy', Brisbane Australia (2002) [E1]
2002 Nicholas S, Maitland S, Purcell W, 'Inter-firm Learning in Japanese B2B Networks', Brisbane Australia (2002) [E1]
2002 A S, O''Flynn J, Nicholas S, 'Diversity Management as a Competitive Advantage: Empirical Evidence from Australian Firms', Auckland NZ (2002) [E1]
Show 36 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $976,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20061 grants / $150,000

International Business$150,000

Funding body: Transfer from University of Sydney

Funding body Transfer from University of Sydney
Project Team

Stephen nicholas

Scheme unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20021 grants / $18,000

AUSTRADE Training$18,000

Funding body Unknown
Project Team

Stephen Nicholas

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20011 grants / $55,500

Multinational Firms in Australia$55,500

Funding body: Department of Industry, Energy and Resources

Funding body Department of Industry, Energy and Resources
Project Team

Stephen Nicholas

Scheme Government-Industry-University collaboration
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20001 grants / $680,000

Divesity Management$680,000

Funding body: Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Funding body Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Project Team

Stephen Nicholas

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2002
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

19991 grants / $73,000

Foreign Investment in Australia$73,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

stephen nicholas

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed9
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Knowledge transfer in the internationalisation of higher education PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Leading Authentically in Teams: A Moderated Mediation Model PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Institutonal Approaches to Investment in China Accounting, University of Sydney Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD FDI in China Business Management, University of Sydney Co-Supervisor
2003 PhD Groups and Learning Organisation Management, University of Sydney Co-Supervisor
2003 PhD Expatriates Human Resource Management, University of Sydney Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD How Multinational Enterprises Make Decisions About Foreign Subsidiary Strategic Change: An Exploratory Study PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2007 PhD Marketing Innovations Marketing, University of Melbourne Sole Supervisor
2007 PhD Australian Diversification Economics, University of Sydney Sole Supervisor
2007 PhD International business Business Management, University of Melbourne Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Foreign direct investment in China Accounting, University of Melbourne Sole Supervisor
2003 PhD HRM Victoria's Railways Economics, University of Melbourne Co-Supervisor
2003 PhD Non-equity strategic alliances Accounting, University of Melbourne Sole Supervisor
2001 PhD Subsidiary-HQ Control Business Management, University of Melbourne Principal Supervisor
1999 PhD New Institutional Economics Economics, University of Melbourne Sole Supervisor
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Emeritus Professor Stephen Nicholas

Position

Emeritus Professor
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Contact Details

Email stephen.nicholas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7979
Fax (02) 4921 7977

Office

Room SRS03
Building Social Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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