Dr Lachlan Rogers

Dr Lachlan Rogers

Lecturer

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Lachlan Rogers studied mathematics and physics (including an honours year at the University of Newcastle), and after completing his PhD at ANU in 2012 he spent time working in Germany. He returned to Australia to take up an ARC Discovery Early Career Research Award fellowship at Macquarie University, and then joined the faculty at Newcastle.

Research Highlights in Glowing DIamonds

Nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond
Dr Rogers made significant contributions to understanding the physical mechanism of spin polarisation in the nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond. This property underpins the unique room-temperature access to NV spin qubits and is of fundamental importance to most technological applications of the NV centre such as quantum information processing and nano-scale biological imaging. Dr Rogers was the first to measure the “dark” decay channel which leads to spin polarisation, and resolved an apparent contradiction between room-temperature and cryogenic NV properties.

Silicon vacancy centres in diamond
Dr Rogers has been central to the development of the silicon vacancy (SiV) centre in diamond as the second most promising colour
centre to date for technological applications. He identified fundamental properties of the SiV physical and electronic structure, demonstrated the generation of indistinguishable photons from distinct SiV centres, and developed all-optical access to the SiV electronic spin.

This SiV research theme was highly esteemed by the physics research community. The American Physics Society highlighted one publication with a Viewpoint commentary in Physics (vol 7, p93, 2014) which specifically illuminated the broad significance: “Because the SiV center seems to avoid many of the pitfalls of NV, it seems likely that many diamond researchers will realign their activities to explore this new playground. Skeptics of the potential of diamonds for quantum applications may also find themselves drawn to SiV’s attractions.”

Germanium vacancy centres in diamond
Dr Rogers was involved with the first production and measurement of the germanium vacancy (GeV) centre. He achieved coherent control of the GeV electronic spin, characterising the coherence properties and pioneered microwave control of spin in the inversion-symmetric diamond colour centre family [4]. He demonstrated quantum nonlinear optics with GeV centres in nanoscale fabricated diamond waveguides, highlighting the suitability of this colour centre for quantum optics applications.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian National University

Keywords

  • diamond
  • laser
  • physics
  • quantum
  • spectroscopy

Languages

  • English (Mother)
  • German (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
020699 Quantum Physics not elsewhere classified 50
020604 Quantum Optics 30
020499 Condensed Matter Physics not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/3/2017 - 28/6/2020 DECRA Research Fellow Macquarie University
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Australia

Invitations

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2019 Diamond and novel colour centres for engineered sensing applications
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (27 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Geordy J, Rogers LJ, Rogers CM, Volz T, Gilchrist A, 'Bayesian estimation of switching rates for blinking emitters', New Journal of Physics, 21 (2019)

© 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd on behalf of the Institute of Physics and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Single quantum light emitters are valuable res... [more]

© 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd on behalf of the Institute of Physics and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Single quantum light emitters are valuable resources for engineered quantum systems. They can function as robust single-photon generators, allow optical control of single spins, provide readout capabilities for atomic-scale sensors, and provide interfaces between stationary and flying qubits. Environmental factors can lead to single emitters exhibiting 'blinking', whereby the fluorescence level switches between on and off states. Detailed characterisation of this blinking behaviour including determining the switching rates is often a powerful way to gain understanding about the underlying physical mechanisms. While simple thresholds can be used to identify the on and off intervals and thus extract the rates from the time-series of counts for bright emitters with low background noise, such approaches become difficult for emitters fluorescing at low levels, high noise, or switching at fast rates. We develop a Bayesian approach capable of inferring switching rates directly from the time-series. This is able to deal with high levels of noise and fast switching in fluorescence traces. Moreover, the Bayesian inference also yields a robust picture of the parameter uncertainties, providing a benefit also for bright emitters in low-noise settings. The technique can be adapted to identify the underlying states as well as extracting the rates of switching. Finally, our method is applicable to a broad range of systems that show behaviour analogous to a blinking emitter.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/ab1dfd
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Balasubramanian P, Metsch MH, Reddy P, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, Doherty MW, Jelezko F, 'Discovery of ST1 centers in natural diamond', Nanophotonics, (2019)

© 2019 Marcus W. Doherty et al., published by De Gruyter, Berlin/Boston 2019. The ST1 center is a point defect in diamond with bright fluorescence and a mechanism for optical spin... [more]

© 2019 Marcus W. Doherty et al., published by De Gruyter, Berlin/Boston 2019. The ST1 center is a point defect in diamond with bright fluorescence and a mechanism for optical spin initialization and readout. The center has impressive potential for applications in diamond quantum computing as a quantum bus to a register of nuclear spins. This is because it has an exceptionally high readout contrast, and unlike the well-known nitrogen-vacancy center, it does not have a ground state electronic spin that decoheres the nuclear spins. However, its chemical structure is unknown, and there are large gaps in our understanding of its properties. We present the discovery of ST1 centers in natural diamond. Our experiments identify interesting power dependence of the center's optical dynamics and reveal new electronic structure. We also present a theory of its electron-phonon interactions, which we combine with previous experiments, to shortlist likely candidates for its chemical structure.

DOI 10.1515/nanoph-2019-0148
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2019 Rogers LJ, Wang O, Liu Y, Antoniuk L, Osterkamp C, Davydov VA, et al., 'Single Si-V-centers in low-strain nanodiamonds with bulklike spectral properties and nanomanipulation capabilities', Physical Review Applied, 11 (2019)

© 2019 American Physical Society. We report on the isolation of single negatively-charged-silicon-vacancy (Si-V-) centers in nanodiamonds. We observe the fine structure of single ... [more]

© 2019 American Physical Society. We report on the isolation of single negatively-charged-silicon-vacancy (Si-V-) centers in nanodiamonds. We observe the fine structure of single Si-V-centers with reduced inhomogeneous ensemble linewidth below the excited-state splitting, stable optical transitions, good polarization contrast, and excellent spectral stability under resonant excitation. On the basis of our experimental results, we develop an analytical strain model where we extract the ratio between strain coefficients of excited and ground states as well the intrinsic zero-strain spin-orbit splittings. The observed strain values are as low as the best values in low-strain bulk diamond. We achieve our results by means of H-plasma treatment of the diamond surface and in combination with resonant and off-resonant excitation. Our work paves the way for indistinguishable, single-photon emission. Furthermore, we demonstrate controlled nanomanipulation by an atomic-force-microscope cantilever of one-A nd two-dimensional alignments with an accuracy of about 10 nm, as well as new tools including dipole rotation and cluster decomposition. Combined, our results show the potential to utilize Si-V-centers in nanodiamonds for controlled interfacing via optical coupling of individually-well-isolated atoms for bottom-up assemblies of complex quantum systems.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevApplied.11.024073
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2017 Bhaskar MK, Sukachev DD, Sipahigil A, Evans RE, Burek MJ, Nguyen CT, et al., 'Quantum Nonlinear Optics with a Germanium-Vacancy Color Center in a Nanoscale Diamond Waveguide', Physical Review Letters, 118 (2017)

© 2017 American Physical Society. We demonstrate a quantum nanophotonics platform based on germanium-vacancy (GeV) color centers in fiber-coupled diamond nanophotonic waveguides. ... [more]

© 2017 American Physical Society. We demonstrate a quantum nanophotonics platform based on germanium-vacancy (GeV) color centers in fiber-coupled diamond nanophotonic waveguides. We show that GeV optical transitions have a high quantum efficiency and are nearly lifetime broadened in such nanophotonic structures. These properties yield an efficient interface between waveguide photons and a single GeV center without the use of a cavity or slow-light waveguide. As a result, a single GeV center reduces waveguide transmission by 18±1% on resonance in a single pass. We use a nanophotonic interferometer to perform homodyne detection of GeV resonance fluorescence. By probing the photon statistics of the output field, we demonstrate that the GeV-waveguide system is nonlinear at the single-photon level.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.223603
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 104
2017 Siyushev P, Metsch MH, Ijaz A, Binder JM, Bhaskar MK, Sukachev DD, et al., 'Optical and microwave control of germanium-vacancy center spins in diamond', Physical Review B, 96 (2017)

© 2017 authors. Published by the American Physical Society. A solid-state system combining a stable spin degree of freedom with an efficient optical interface is highly desirable ... [more]

© 2017 authors. Published by the American Physical Society. A solid-state system combining a stable spin degree of freedom with an efficient optical interface is highly desirable as an element for integrated quantum-optical and quantum-information systems. We demonstrate a bright color center in diamond with excellent optical properties and controllable electronic spin states. Specifically, we carry out detailed optical spectroscopy of a germanium-vacancy (GeV) color center demonstrating optical spectral stability. Using an external magnetic field to lift the electronic spin degeneracy, we explore the spin degree of freedom as a controllable qubit. Spin polarization is achieved using optical pumping, and a spin relaxation time in excess of 20µs is demonstrated. We report resonant microwave control of spin transitions, and use this as a probe to measure the Autler-Townes effect in a microwave-optical double-resonance experiment. Superposition spin states were prepared using coherent population trapping, and a pure dephasing time of about 19ns was observed at a temperature of 2.0 K.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.081201
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 69
2017 Binder JM, Stark A, Tomek N, Scheuer J, Frank F, Jahnke KD, et al., 'Qudi: A modular python suite for experiment control and data processing', SoftwareX, 6 85-90 (2017)

© 2017 The Authors Qudi is a general, modular, multi-operating system suite written in Python 3 for controlling laboratory experiments. It provides a structured environment by sep... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Qudi is a general, modular, multi-operating system suite written in Python 3 for controlling laboratory experiments. It provides a structured environment by separating functionality into hardware abstraction, experiment logic and user interface layers. The core feature set comprises a graphical user interface, live data visualization, distributed execution over networks, rapid prototyping via Jupyter notebooks, configuration management, and data recording. Currently, the included modules are focused on confocal microscopy, quantum optics and quantum information experiments, but an expansion into other fields is possible and encouraged.

DOI 10.1016/j.softx.2017.02.001
Citations Scopus - 25
2016 Jantzen U, Kurz AB, Rudnicki DS, Schäfermeier C, Jahnke KD, Andersen UL, et al., 'Nanodiamonds carrying silicon-vacancy quantum emitters with almost lifetime-limited linewidths', New Journal of Physics, 18 (2016)

© 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Colour centres in nanodiamonds are an important resource for applications in quantum sensing, biological imaging... [more]

© 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Colour centres in nanodiamonds are an important resource for applications in quantum sensing, biological imaging, and quantum optics. Here we report unprecedented narrow optical transitions for individual colour centres in nanodiamonds smaller than 200 nm. This demonstration has been achieved using the negatively charged silicon vacancy centre, which has recently received considerable attention due to its superb optical properties in bulk diamond. We have measured an ensemble of silicon-vacancy centres across numerous nanodiamonds to have an inhomogeneous distribution of 1.05 nm at 5 K. Individual spectral lines as narrower than 360 MHz were measured in photoluminescence excitation, and correcting for apparent spectral diffusion yielded an homogeneous linewidth of about 200 MHz which is close to the lifetime limit. These results indicate the high crystalline quality achieved in these nanodiamond samples, and advance the applicability of nanodiamond-hosted colour centres for quantum optics applications.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/18/7/073036
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 41
2016 Rogers L, Jelezko F, 'Quantum optics: Robust light-controlled qubits', Nature Photonics, 10 147-148 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/nphoton.2016.29
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Romach Y, Müller C, Unden T, Rogers LJ, Isoda T, Itoh KM, et al., 'Spectroscopy of surface-induced noise using shallow spins in diamond', Physical Review Letters, 114 (2015)

© 2015 American Physical Society. We report on the noise spectrum experienced by few nanometer deep nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond as a function of depth, surface coating, ma... [more]

© 2015 American Physical Society. We report on the noise spectrum experienced by few nanometer deep nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond as a function of depth, surface coating, magnetic field and temperature. Analysis reveals a double-Lorentzian noise spectrum consistent with a surface electronic spin bath in the low frequency regime, along with a faster noise source attributed to surface-modified phononic coupling. These results shed new light on the mechanisms responsible for surface noise affecting shallow spins at semiconductor interfaces, and suggests possible directions for further studies. We demonstrate dynamical decoupling from the surface noise, paving the way to applications ranging from nanoscale NMR to quantum networks.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.017601
Citations Scopus - 107Web of Science - 104
2015 Rogers LJ, Doherty MW, Barson MSJ, Onoda S, Ohshima T, Manson NB, 'Singlet levels of the NV

© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. The characteristic transition of the NV- centre at 637 nmis between 3A2 and 3E triplet states. There are also in... [more]

© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. The characteristic transition of the NV- centre at 637 nmis between 3A2 and 3E triplet states. There are also intermediate 1A1 and 1E singlet states, and the infrared transition at 1042 nmbetween these singlets is studied here using uniaxial stress. The stress shift and splitting parameters are determined, and the physical interaction giving rise to the parameters is considered within the accepted electronic model of the centre. It is established that this interaction for the infrared transition is due to a modification of electronelectron Coulomb repulsion interaction. This is in contrast to the visible 637 nm transition where shifts and splittings arise from modification to the one-electron Coulomb interaction. It is also established that a dynamic JahnTeller interaction is associated with the singlet 1E state, which gives rise to a vibronic level 115 cm-1 above the 1E electronic state. Arguments associated with this level are used to provide experimental confirmation that the 1A1 is the upper singlet level and 1E is the lower singlet level.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/17/1/013048
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
2015 Jahnke KD, Sipahigil A, Binder JM, Doherty MW, Metsch M, Rogers LJ, et al., 'Electron-phonon processes of the silicon-vacancy centre in diamond', New Journal of Physics, 17 (2015)

© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. We investigate phonon induced electronic dynamics in the ground and excited states of the negatively charged sil... [more]

© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. We investigate phonon induced electronic dynamics in the ground and excited states of the negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV-) centre in diamond. Optical transition linewidths, transition wavelength and excited state lifetimes are measured for the temperature range 4 K-350 K. The ground state orbital relaxation rates are measured using time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Amicroscopic model of the thermal broadening in the excited and ground states of the SiV- centre is developed. A vibronic process involving single-phonon transitions is found to determine orbital relaxation rates for both the ground and the excited states at cryogenic temperatures.Wediscuss the implications of our findings for coherence of qubits in the ground states and propose methods to extend coherence times of SiV- qubits.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/17/4/043011
Citations Scopus - 107Web of Science - 104
2015 Shershulin VA, Sedov VS, Ermakova A, Jantzen U, Rogers L, Huhlina AA, et al., 'Size-dependent luminescence of color centers in composite nanodiamonds', Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science, 212 2600-2605 (2015)

© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Luminescence properties of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) and silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers were investigated for the series of O-te... [more]

© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Luminescence properties of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) and silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers were investigated for the series of O-terminated composite nanodiamonds consisting of a high-pressure¿high-temperature (HPHT) diamond core and a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond outer layer of different thickness. It was found that emission of NV and SiV centers cease to ¿feel¿ the diamond surface at a distance of 12 and 4 nm, respectively, from it. This finding determines minimum sizes of O-terminated nanodiamonds in which stable single photon emitters could be formed based on NV and SiV centers. Suggested composite diamond nanostructure are optimal for design of two-color luminescent markers. The studied diamond nanoparticles present composite structure of ¿core-outer layer¿ type. The core is 20 nm HPHT diamond containing NV centers, whereas outer diamond layer containing SiV centers is formed by CVD synthesis.

DOI 10.1002/pssa.201532204
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2015 Teraji T, Yamamoto T, Watanabe K, Koide Y, Isoya J, Onoda S, et al., 'Homoepitaxial diamond film growth: High purity, high crystalline quality, isotopic enrichment, and single color center formation', Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science, 212 2365-2384 (2015)

© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim With optical/electronic devices of the next generation in mind, we provide a guideline for the growth of homoepitaxial diam... [more]

© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim With optical/electronic devices of the next generation in mind, we provide a guideline for the growth of homoepitaxial diamond films that possess higher crystalline quality, higher chemical purity, and a higher carbon isotopic ratio. A custom-built microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system was constructed to achieve these requirements. To improve both the purity and crystalline quality of homoepitaxial diamond films, an advanced growth condition was applied: higher oxygen concentration in the growth ambient. Under this growth condition for high-quality diamond, a thick diamond film of =30 µm was deposited reproducibly while maintaining high purity and a flat surface. Then, combining this advanced growth condition for non-doped diamond with a unique doping technique that provides parts-per-billion order doping, single-color centers of either nitrogen-vacancy or silicon-vacancy centers that show excellent properties were formed. The new idea of using these color centers as a probe for detecting tiny amounts of impurities was presented. These advanced growth and characterization techniques are expected to open up new fields of diamond research that require extremely low-impurity concentration, for use in power devices and quantum information devices.

DOI 10.1002/pssa.201532449
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 34
2015 Teraji T, Yamamoto T, Watanabe K, Koide Y, Isoya J, Onoda S, et al., 'Homoepitaxial diamond film growth: High purity, high crystalline quality, isotopic enrichment, and single color center formation (Phys. Status Solidi A 11/2015)', Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science, 212 (2015)
DOI 10.1002/pssa.201570471
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Iwasaki T, Ishibashi F, Miyamoto Y, Doi Y, Kobayashi S, Miyazaki T, et al., 'Germanium-Vacancy Single Color Centers in Diamond', Scientific Reports, 5 (2015)

Atomic-sized fluorescent defects in diamond are widely recognized as a promising solid state platform for quantum cryptography and quantum information processing. For these applic... [more]

Atomic-sized fluorescent defects in diamond are widely recognized as a promising solid state platform for quantum cryptography and quantum information processing. For these applications, single photon sources with a high intensity and reproducible fabrication methods are required. In this study, we report a novel color center in diamond, composed of a germanium (Ge) and a vacancy (V) and named the GeV center, which has a sharp and strong photoluminescence band with a zero-phonon line at 602 nm at room temperature. We demonstrate this new color center works as a single photon source. Both ion implantation and chemical vapor deposition techniques enabled fabrication of GeV centers in diamond. A first-principles calculation revealed the atomic crystal structure and energy levels of the GeV center.

DOI 10.1038/srep12882
Citations Scopus - 130Web of Science - 132
2014 Sipahigil A, Jahnke KD, Rogers LJ, Teraji T, Isoya J, Zibrov AS, et al., 'Indistinguishable photons from separated silicon-vacancy centers in diamond', Physical Review Letters, 113 (2014)

© 2014 Published by American Physical Society. We demonstrate that silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers in diamond can be used to efficiently generate coherent optical photons with excel... [more]

© 2014 Published by American Physical Society. We demonstrate that silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers in diamond can be used to efficiently generate coherent optical photons with excellent spectral properties. We show that these features are due to the inversion symmetry associated with SiV centers. The generation of indistinguishable single photons from separated emitters at 5 K is demonstrated in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference experiment. Prospects for realizing efficient quantum network nodes using SiV centers are discussed.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.113602
Citations Scopus - 179Web of Science - 175
2014 Rogers LJ, Jahnke KD, Metsch MH, Sipahigil A, Binder JM, Teraji T, et al., 'All-optical initialization, readout, and coherent preparation of single silicon-vacancy spins in diamond', Physical Review Letters, 113 (2014)

© Published by the American Physical Society. The silicon-vacancy (SiV-) color center in diamond has attracted attention because of its unique optical properties. It exhibits spec... [more]

© Published by the American Physical Society. The silicon-vacancy (SiV-) color center in diamond has attracted attention because of its unique optical properties. It exhibits spectral stability and indistinguishability that facilitate efficient generation of photons capable of demonstrating quantum interference. Here we show optical initialization and readout of electronic spin in a single SiV- center with a spin relaxation time of T1=2.4±0.2ms. Coherent population trapping (CPT) is used to demonstrate coherent preparation of dark superposition states with a spin coherence time of T2=35±3ns. This is fundamentally limited by orbital relaxation, and an understanding of this process opens the way to extend coherence by engineering interactions with phonons. Hyperfine structure is observed in CPT measurements with the Si29 isotope which allows access to nuclear spin. These results establish the SiV- center as a solid-state spin-photon interface.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.263602
Citations Scopus - 132Web of Science - 122
2014 Rogers LJ, Jahnke KD, Doherty MW, Dietrich A, McGuinness LP, Müller C, et al., 'Electronic structure of the negatively charged silicon-vacancy center in diamond', Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, 89 (2014)

The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiVâ) center in diamond is a promising single-photon source for quantum communications and information processing. However, the center&apos... [more]

The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiVâ) center in diamond is a promising single-photon source for quantum communications and information processing. However, the center's implementation in such quantum technologies is hindered by contention surrounding its fundamental properties. Here we present optical polarization measurements of single centers in bulk diamond that resolve this state of contention and establish that the center has a â¿©111â¿ aligned split-vacancy structure with D3d symmetry. Furthermore, we identify an additional electronic level and evidence for the presence of dynamic Jahn-Teller effects in the center's 738-nm optical resonance.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.235101
Citations Scopus - 105Web of Science - 104
2014 Dietrich A, Jahnke KD, Binder JM, Teraji T, Isoya J, Rogers LJ, Jelezko F, 'Isotopically varying spectral features of silicon-vacancy in diamond', New Journal of Physics, 16 (2014)

© The Author(s) 2014. The silicon-vacancy centre (SiV-) in diamond has exceptional spectral properties for single-emitter quantum information applications. Most of the fluorescenc... [more]

© The Author(s) 2014. The silicon-vacancy centre (SiV-) in diamond has exceptional spectral properties for single-emitter quantum information applications. Most of the fluorescence is concentrated in a strong zero phonon line (ZPL), with a weak phonon sideband extending for 100 nm that contains several clear features. We demonstrate that the ZPL position can be used to reliably identify the silicon isotope present in a single SiV- centre. This is of interest for quantum information applications since only the 29Si isotope has nuclear spin. In addition, we show that the sharp 64 meV phonon peak is due to a local vibrational mode of the silicon atom. The presence of a local mode suggests a plausible origin of the measured isotopic shift of the ZPL.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/16/11/113019
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 53
2014 Tamura S, Koike G, Komatsubara A, Teraji T, Onoda S, McGuinness LP, et al., 'Array of bright silicon-vacancy centers in diamond fabricated by low-energy focused ion beam implantation', Applied Physics Express, 7 115201 (2014)

© 2014 The Japan Society of Applied Physics Among promising color centers for single-photon sources in diamond, the negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV%) has 70% of its emissi... [more]

© 2014 The Japan Society of Applied Physics Among promising color centers for single-photon sources in diamond, the negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV%) has 70% of its emission to the zero-phonon line (ZPL), in contrast to the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-), which has a broad spectrum. Fabricating single centers of useful defect complexes with high yield and excellent grown-in defect properties by ion implantation has proven to be challenging. We have fabricated bright single SiV- centers by 60-keV focused ion beam implantation and subsequent annealing at 1000 °C with high positioning accuracy and a high yield of 15%.

DOI 10.7567/APEX.7.115201
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 42
2014 Rogers LJ, Jahnke KD, Teraji T, Marseglia L, Müller C, Naydenov B, et al., 'Multiple intrinsically identical single-photon emitters in the solid state', Nature Communications, 5 (2014)

Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics techno... [more]

Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single-photon emitters are required. However, typical solid-state single-photon sources are inherently dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here we demonstrate bright silicon vacancy (SiV') centres in low-strain bulk diamond, which show spectral overlap of up to 91% and nearly transform-limited excitation linewidths. This is the first time that distinct single-photon emitters in the solid state have shown intrinsically identical spectral properties. Our results have impact on the application of single-photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ncomms5739
Citations Scopus - 164Web of Science - 153
2013 Manson NB, Beha K, Batalov A, Rogers LJ, Doherty MW, Bratschitsch R, Leitenstorfer A, 'Assignment of the NV0 575-nm zero-phonon line in diamond to a 2E-2A

The time-averaged emission spectrum of single nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond gives zero-phonon lines of both the negative charge state at 637 nm (1.945 eV) and the neutral ch... [more]

The time-averaged emission spectrum of single nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond gives zero-phonon lines of both the negative charge state at 637 nm (1.945 eV) and the neutral charge state at 575 nm (2.156 eV). This occurs through photoconversion cycling between the two charge states. Due to strain in the diamond the zero-phonon lines of both charge states are split and it is found that the splitting and polarization of the two zero-phonon lines are the same. From this observation and consideration of the electronic structure of the nitrogen-vacancy center it is concluded that the excited state of the neutral center has A2 orbital symmetry. The assignment of the 575-nm transition to a 2E-2A2 transition has not been established previously. © 2013 American Physical Society.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.155209
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2009 Batalov A, Jacques V, Kaiser F, Siyushev P, Neumann P, Rogers LJ, et al., 'Low Temperature Studies of the Excited-State Structure of Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond', Physical Review Letters, 102 (2009)

We report a study of the E3 excited-state structure of single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond, combining resonant excitation at cryogenic temperatures ... [more]

We report a study of the E3 excited-state structure of single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond, combining resonant excitation at cryogenic temperatures and optically detected magnetic resonance. A theoretical model is developed and shows excellent agreement with experimental observations. In addition, we show that the two orbital branches associated with the E3 excited state are averaged when operating at room temperature. This study leads to an improved physical understanding of the NV defect electronic structure, which is invaluable for the development of diamond-based quantum information processing. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.195506
Citations Scopus - 158Web of Science - 145
2009 Fu KMC, Santori C, Barclay PE, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, Beausoleil RG, 'Observation of the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in the excited states of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond', Physical Review Letters, 103 (2009)

The optical transition linewidth and emission polarization of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are measured from 5 K to room temperature. Interexcited state population relaxat... [more]

The optical transition linewidth and emission polarization of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are measured from 5 K to room temperature. Interexcited state population relaxation is shown to broaden the zero-phonon line and both the relaxation and linewidth are found to follow a T5 dependence for T<100K. This dependence indicates that the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect is the dominant dephasing mechanism for the NV optical transitions at low temperatures. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.256404
Citations Scopus - 143Web of Science - 129
2009 Neumann P, Kolesov R, Jacques V, Beck J, Tisler J, Batalov A, et al., 'Excited-state spectroscopy of single NV defects in diamond using optically detected magnetic resonance', New Journal of Physics, 11 (2009)

Using pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance techniques, we directly probe electron-spin resonance transitions in the excited-state of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color cen... [more]

Using pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance techniques, we directly probe electron-spin resonance transitions in the excited-state of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond. Unambiguous assignment of excited state fine structure is made, based on changes of NV defect photoluminescence lifetime. This study provides significant insight into the structure of the emitting 3E excited state, which is invaluable for the development of diamond-based quantum information processing. © IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschan.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/11/1/013017
Citations Scopus - 127Web of Science - 120
2009 Rogers LJ, McMurtrie RL, Sellars MJ, Manson NB, 'Time-averaging within the excited state of the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond', New Journal of Physics, 11 (2009)

The emission intensity of diamond samples containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres are measured as a function of magnetic field along the &lt;111&gt; direction for v... [more]

The emission intensity of diamond samples containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres are measured as a function of magnetic field along the <111> direction for various temperatures. At low temperatures the responses are sample and stress dependent and can be modelled in terms of the previous understanding of the 3E excited state fine structure which is strain dependent. At room temperature the responses are largely sample and stress independent, and modelling involves invoking a strain independent excited state with a single zero field spin-level splitting of 1.42 GHz. The change in behaviour is attributed to a temperature dependent averaging process over the components of the excited state orbital doublet. It decouples orbit and spin and at high temperature the spin levels become independent of any orbit splitting. One significant implication of this averaging is that it simplifies the development of room temperature applications. © IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/11/6/063007
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 59
2008 Rogers LJ, Armstrong S, Sellars MJ, Manson NB, 'Infrared emission of the NV centre in diamond: Zeeman and uniaxial stress studies', New Journal of Physics, 10 (2008)

An emission band in the infrared (IR) is shown to be associated with a transition within the negative nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. The band has a zero-phonon line at 1046 n... [more]

An emission band in the infrared (IR) is shown to be associated with a transition within the negative nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. The band has a zero-phonon line at 1046 nm, and uniaxial stress and magnetic field measurements indicate that the emission is associated with a transition between 1E and 1A 1 singlet levels. Inter-system crossing to these singlets causes the spin polarization that makes the NV - centre attractive for quantum information processing, and the IR emission band provides a new avenue for using the centre in such applications. © IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.

DOI 10.1088/1367-2630/10/10/103024
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 90
Show 24 more journal articles

Conference (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Nair SR, Rogers LJ, Jeske J, Vidal X, Wood A, Jelezko F, et al., 'Towards room-temperature laser magnetometry with NV centres in open fibre cavities', Optics InfoBase Conference Papers (2019)

© 2019 IEEE Magnetic sensing with lasing from negatively charged nitorgen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond is predicted to reach fT/vHz regime even at room temperature [1]. Stimula... [more]

© 2019 IEEE Magnetic sensing with lasing from negatively charged nitorgen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond is predicted to reach fT/vHz regime even at room temperature [1]. Stimulated emission from NV centres has already been explored as a stepping stone towards such a laser magnetometer [2, 3, 4]. Here we report the observation of amplification on the cavity transmission of an open fibre cavity formed between a fibre-miror and a macroscopic mirror, loaded with a high NV density diamond sample. On adding green laser light to optically pump the NV centres, we observe amplification on the transmitted seed wavelength close to 720 nm up to a factor around 3.

2019 Al-Baiaty Z, Hahl F, Nair SR, Rogers L, Gibson BC, Mildren RP, et al., 'Nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond for laser threshold magnetometry', Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (2019)

© COPYRIGHT SPIE. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only. High precision magnetometry is important for a range of applications from the monitoring of biolo... [more]

© COPYRIGHT SPIE. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only. High precision magnetometry is important for a range of applications from the monitoring of biologically generated magnetic fields (e.g. magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography), to navigation in GPS denied environments, to the detection of gravitational waves. Diamond containing the negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy colour centre (NV-) has emerged as a powerful room-Temperature sensing solution. Here we explore NV- centres as a laser medium for a new form of magnetometry: laser threshold magnetometry (LTM). LTM works by placing NV- inside an optical cavity and uses the coherent laser output as a potentially more sensitive readout channel than is possible using conventional (incoherent) optically detected magnetic resonance. Here we show progress towards LTM with diamond. We show twolaser excitation and stimulated emission in free space, and report progress towards diamond-cavity experiments. Our studies highlight the need for different NV- optimisation for laser applications, rather than those conventionally used for quantum information applications.

DOI 10.1117/12.2539583
2019 Nair SR, Rogers LJ, Jeske J, Vidal X, Wood A, Jelezko F, et al., 'Towards room-temperature laser magnetometry with NV centres in open fibre cavities', 2019 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO/Europe-EQEC 2019 (2019)

© 2019 IEEE. Magnetic sensing with lasing from negatively charged nitorgen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond is predicted to reach fT/vHz regime even at room temperature [1]. Stimul... [more]

© 2019 IEEE. Magnetic sensing with lasing from negatively charged nitorgen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond is predicted to reach fT/vHz regime even at room temperature [1]. Stimulated emission from NV centres has already been explored as a stepping stone towards such a laser magnetometer [2, 3, 4]. Here we report the observation of amplification on the cavity transmission of an open fibre cavity formed between a fibre-miror and a macroscopic mirror, loaded with a high NV density diamond sample. On adding green laser light to optically pump the NV centres, we observe amplification on the transmitted seed wavelength close to 720 nm up to a factor around 3.

DOI 10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2019.8872972
2015 Shinada T, Enrico P, Tamura S, Tanii T, Teraji T, Onoda S, et al., 'Opportunity of single atom control for quantum processing in silicon and diamond', 2014 Silicon Nanoelectronics Workshop, SNW 2014 (2015)

© 2014 IEEE. Future CMOS will require the placement of dopants in a predetermined location, namely, a single atom control. Deterministic doping method, i.e. single-ion implantatio... [more]

© 2014 IEEE. Future CMOS will require the placement of dopants in a predetermined location, namely, a single atom control. Deterministic doping method, i.e. single-ion implantation, realizes ordered arrays of single-atoms in silicon, diamond and other materials, which might provide opportunities to single-dopant transport or single-photon source beneficial to quantum processing.

DOI 10.1109/SNW.2014.7348533
Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Fu KMC, Santori C, Barclay PE, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, Beausoleil RG, 'Observation of the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in the excited states of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond', Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (2010)

The understanding of the coherence properties of photons emitted from negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is essential for the success of quantum informati... [more]

The understanding of the coherence properties of photons emitted from negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is essential for the success of quantum information applications based on indistinguishable photons. Here we study both the polarization of photons emitted from and the linewidth of photons absorbed by single NV centers as a function of temperature T. We find that for T < 100 K the main dephasing mechanism contributing to the linewidth broadening is phonon-mediated population transfer between the two excited orbital states. The observed T5 temperature dependence of the population transfer rate and linewidth is experimental evidence of a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in the excited states. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.

DOI 10.1117/12.843827
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Manson NB, Rogers LJ, McMurtrie RL, Doherty MW, Batalov A, Jacques V, 'Intrinsic properties of the NV center in diamond', Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (2010)

The object is to summarise our understanding of the negative nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond and also to highlight difficulties with current models. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The... [more]

The object is to summarise our understanding of the negative nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond and also to highlight difficulties with current models. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.

DOI 10.1117/12.843777
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2010 Santori C, Fu KMC, Barclay PE, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, Beausoleil RG, 'Key challenges for high-Q photonic circuits in diamond', 2010 23rd Annual Meeting of the IEEE Photonics Society, PHOTINICS 2010 (2010)
DOI 10.1109/PHOTONICS.2010.5699018
2010 Manson NB, Rogers LJ, Wilson EA, Wei C, 'Hole burning-EIT studies of the NV centre in diamond', Journal of Luminescence (2010)

The negative nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond is used to illustrate electromagnetically induced transparency features within a coherent hole. A hole is created in an inhomogeneo... [more]

The negative nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond is used to illustrate electromagnetically induced transparency features within a coherent hole. A hole is created in an inhomogeneously broadened electron spin transition and its spectrum modified by driving hyperfine transitions. The modified spectrum is discussed in terms of dressed states of the system, and the spectrum is shown to be in good correspondence with numerical solutions of the density matrix for the doubly driven system. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jlumin.2010.02.025
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2010 Armstrong S, Rogers LJ, McMurtrie RL, Manson NB, 'NV-NV electron-electron spin and NV-N

Features associated with the cross relaxation between spin of the ground electric state of the nitrogen vacancy centre (NV) and other impurity spins, mainly substitutional nitroge... [more]

Features associated with the cross relaxation between spin of the ground electric state of the nitrogen vacancy centre (NV) and other impurity spins, mainly substitutional nitrogen, NS, are observed as changes of the emission intensity as a function of external magnetic field. The features are attributed to NV-NV electron-electron spin interaction, NV-NS electron-nuclear spin interaction and NV electron spin interaction with simultaneous change of an NS electron and nuclear spin change.

DOI 10.1016/j.phpro.2010.01.223
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
2010 McMurtrie R, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, 'Effects of magnetic field on the low temperature emission of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond', Physics Procedia (2010)

Under optical illumination in the blue or green, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond emit in the red. The intensity of this emission varies slightly depending o... [more]

Under optical illumination in the blue or green, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond emit in the red. The intensity of this emission varies slightly depending on spin state occupation. Optical transitions occur predominantly without change of spin projection. However, excited m s = ±1 states can decay non-radiatively to the ground m s = 0 state via intermediary singlet states.With continuous excitation, this effect transfers most of the population to the ms = 0 state resulting in decay becoming almost entirely radiative so that optical emission is stronger than when all spin states are occupied equally. However, under optical illumination the ms = 0 polarization is reduced when an applied magnetic field induces avoided crossings between energy levels. The spin states are mixed and some population is diverted into the ms = ±1 states with consequent reduction in optical emission. The change of emission can be calculated from a rate equation model involving the spin states of the ground and excited levels plus one singlet level [5]. The spin states of the excited levels are also affected by strain and in this work we calculate the variation in optical emission with changing magnetic field for various fixed values of strain.

DOI 10.1016/j.phpro.2010.01.225
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2010 Rogers L, 'How far into the infrared can a colour centre in diamond emit?', Physics Procedia (2010)

Infrared emission has been observed for the nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) colour centre in diamond, in addition to the characteristic red emission of this centre [1]. However, this infr... [more]

Infrared emission has been observed for the nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) colour centre in diamond, in addition to the characteristic red emission of this centre [1]. However, this infrared emission zero-phonon line at 1046 nm is about four orders of magnitude weaker than the red emission. This is somewhat surprising, as a third of the population is known to decay without the red emission and the infrared emission is considered to be associated with the alternative decay path. The most obvious explanation is a competing efficient non-radiative decay. There are few reports of diamond emitting at wavelengths longer than 1000 nm. Colour centres in diamond have strong electron-phonon coupling and, of course, the phonon energies in diamond are high. These properties suggest that non-radiative decay could dominate the transition whenever the electronic energy lies in the infrared. This would be a general phenomena and would account for the weak IR emission observed for this centre. It would also account for why there are so few reports of emission from diamond in the infrared.

DOI 10.1016/j.phpro.2010.01.221
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2009 Fu KMC, Santori C, Barclay PE, Rogers LJ, Manson NB, Beausoleil RG, 'Temperature dependence of the polarization and linewidth of the optical transitions of single NV centers in diamond', Optics InfoBase Conference Papers (2009)

Polarization and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are used to measure the nitrogenvacancy center optical transition polarization and linewidth as a function of temperatur... [more]

Polarization and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are used to measure the nitrogenvacancy center optical transition polarization and linewidth as a function of temperature. Finite relaxation and line-broadening is observed even at temperatures below 25 K. © 2008 Optical Society of America.

DOI 10.1364/ls.2009.lstud3
Show 9 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $409,714

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $409,714

Designer defects in diamond for solid state quantum networks$409,714

Tiny glowing artificial atoms in coloured diamonds can be used to receive, store, and send information in a network using laser light and microwaves. Because they work at the level of individual atoms and photons, they can make use of quantum-weirdness to achieve feats that are impossible even for supercomputers on the classical internet. This project will develop a novel artificial atom in diamond that is better at connecting to other nodes in a network. Network connectivity and data distribution are increasingly important elements of today's information economy. The proposed device will make it easier to construct technologies that move beyond the limitations of existing infrastructure.

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Lachlan Rogers

Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed15
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Masters A room-temperature diamond maser Physics, Macquarie university Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD New Generation Radiation Dosimeters PhD (Physics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Masters Optically detected magnetic resonance with negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond Physics, Macquarie university Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Engineering Room-Temperature Quantum MagneticSensors with Fibre-Cavity Diamond Lasers Physics, Macquarie University Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Engineering a quantum future: exploiting properties of nanodiamond materials Physics, Macquarie university Co-Supervisor
2018 Masters Low temperature confocal spectroscopy in bright nanodiamonds Physics, Macquarie university Principal Supervisor
2018 Masters Bayesian estimation of switching rates for blinking quantum emitters Physics, Macquarie university Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Low temperature spectroscopy of GeV centres in Diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Nano-scale Raman thermometry of diamond Physics, Macquarie University Co-Supervisor
2016 Honours Photophysical properties of silicon vacancy centres in diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters Optical properties of colour centres in nanodiamonds Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters Low temperature spectroscopy of single colour centres in diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2015 Masters Low temperature spectroscopy of single colour centres in nanodiamonds Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Low temperature spectroscopy of single colour centres in diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours Temperature dependence of the negatively charged silicon vacancy zero phonon line in diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters Low temperature spectroscopy of single defects in diamond: development of coherent optical access to spin in silicon vacancy center Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters Low temperature spectroscopy on colour centres in diamond Physics, University of Ulm Co-Supervisor
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Dr Lachlan Rogers

Position

Lecturer
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email lachlan.rogers@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40557574
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