Associate Professor Jason Bendall

Clinical Dean

University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (Anaesthesia and Intensive Care)

Career Summary

Biography

Associate Professor Jason Bendall is the Clinical Dean at the Manning Clinical School within the Department of Rural Health.  Jason completed his undergraduate studies in 1991 completing a honours degree in medical science before becoming a paramedic.  Jason graduated with a medical degree and (MBBS) and a PhD in medicine in 2004 subsequently specialising in anaesthesia.  Jason has undertaken further postgraduate studies in clinical epidemiology and biostatistics.

Jason's clinical and research interests include paramedicine, prehospital and retrieval medicine, clinical anaesthesia, resuscitation, trauma and acute pain management. 

Jason is the Convenor of the First Aid sub-committee of the Australian Resuscitation Council and is a member of the International Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) first aid task force.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • anaesthesia
  • biostatistics
  • clinical epidemiology
  • first aid
  • pain management
  • paramedicine
  • prehospital & retrieval medicine
  • resuscitation

Languages

  • Auslan (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110301 Anaesthesiology 60
110310 Intensive Care 20
110305 Emergency Medicine 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Clinical Dean University of Newcastle
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
12/02/2018 -  Staff Specialist in Anaesthesia John Hunter Hospital
Anaesthesia & Pain Medicine
Australia
28/11/2016 -  Commissioner

Non-executive Director ; Strategic volunteer leadership and governance role

St John Ambulance Australia | NSW
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Mikolaizak AS, Lord SR, Tiedemann A, Simpson P, Caplan G, Bendall JC, et al., 'Adherence to a multifactorial fall prevention program following paramedic care: Predictors and impact on falls and health service use. Results from an RCT a priori subgroup analysis', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 37 54-61 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ajag.12465
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2017 Mikolaizak AS, Lord SR, Tiedemann A, Simpson P, Caplan GA, Bendall J, et al., 'A multidisciplinary intervention to prevent subsequent falls and health service use following fall-related paramedic care: A randomised controlled trial', Age and Ageing, 46 200-208 (2017)

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. Background: approximately 25% of older people who fall and receive paramedic c... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. Background: approximately 25% of older people who fall and receive paramedic care are not subsequently transported to an emergency department (ED). These people are at high risk of future falls, unplanned healthcare use and poor health outcomes. Objective: to evaluate the impact of a fall-risk assessment and tailored fall prevention interventions among older community-dwellers not transported to ED following a fall on subsequent falls and health service use. Design, setting, participants: Randomised controlled trial involving 221 non-transported older fallers from Sydney, Australia. Intervention: the intervention targeted identified risk factors and used existing services to implement physiotherapy, occupational therapy, geriatric assessment, optometry and medication management interventions as appropriate. The control group received individualised written fall prevention advice. Measurements: primary outcome measures were rates of falls and injurious falls. Secondary outcome measures were ambulance re-attendance, ED presentation, hospitalisation and quality of life over 12 months. Analysis was by intentionto- treat and per-protocol according to self-reported adherence using negative binominal regression and multivariate analysis. Results: ITT analysis showed no significant difference between groups in subsequent falls, injurious falls and health service use. The per-protocol analyses revealed that the intervention participants who adhered to the recommended interventions had significantly lower rates of falls compared to non-adherers (IRR: 0.53 (95% CI: 0.32-0.87)). Conclusion: a multidisciplinary intervention did not prevent falls in older people who received paramedic care but were not transported to ED. However the intervention was effective in those who adhered to the recommendations. Trial registration: the trial is registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN 12611000503921, 13/05/2011.

DOI 10.1093/ageing/afw190
Citations Scopus - 5
2017 Simpson P, Thomas R, Bendall J, Lord B, Lord S, Close J, '¿Popping nana back into bed¿ - a qualitative exploration of paramedic decision making when caring for older people who have fallen', BMC Health Services Research, 17 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Older fallers constitute a large proportion of ambulance work, and as many as 25% are not transported to hospital following paramedic assessment.... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Older fallers constitute a large proportion of ambulance work, and as many as 25% are not transported to hospital following paramedic assessment. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making process used by paramedics when caring for older fallers. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Purposive sampling was used to recruit paramedics to participate in semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Data analysis commenced with line-by-line coding, developing into formation of theoretical categories. Theoretical sampling was then used to clarify emerging theoretical concepts, with data collection and analysis continuing until theoretical saturation was achieved. Results: A total of 33 paramedics participated in 13 interviews and 4 focus groups. When caring for older fallers, paramedic decision making is profoundly affected by ¿role perception¿, in which the individual paramedic¿s perception of what the role of a paramedic is determines the nature of the decision making process. Transport decisions are heavily influenced by a sense of ¿personal protection¿, or their confidence in the ambulance service supporting their decisions. ¿Education and training¿ impacts on decision making capacity, and the nature of that training subliminally contributes to role perception. Role perception influences the sense of legitimacy a paramedic attaches to cases involving older fallers, impacting on patient assessment routines and the quality of subsequent decisions. Conclusions: Paramedic decision making processes when caring for older people who have fallen appear to be strongly influenced by their perception of what their role should be, and the perceived legitimacy of incidents involving older fallers as constituting ¿real¿ paramedic work.

DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2243-y
Citations Scopus - 3
2015 McRae PJ, Bendall JC, Madigan V, Middleton PM, 'PARAMEDIC-PERFORMED FASCIA ILIACA COMPARTMENT BLOCK FOR FEMORAL FRACTURES: A CONTROLLED TRIAL', JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, 48 581-589 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jemermed.2014.12.016
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
2015 Reed B, Bendall JC, 'Rurality as a factor in ambulance use in health emergencies', Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, 12 (2015)

© 2015, Paramedics Australasia. All rights reserved. Introduction Ambulance use in rural and remote parts of Australia has been reported anecdotally to be lower than urban areas. ... [more]

© 2015, Paramedics Australasia. All rights reserved. Introduction Ambulance use in rural and remote parts of Australia has been reported anecdotally to be lower than urban areas. Experiences of paramedics in rural locations gave rise to questions of whether this phenomenon was occurring and to what degree. Methods Data from emergency department (ED) records was obtained from the Hunter New England Area Health Service from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009. In total, 354,909 records were obtained. These records were de-identified and analysed to determine the method of arrival to ED, specifically in high acuity patients. Results People from inner regional areas are 41.5% less likely overall and 27.7% less likely in serious health emergencies to attend EDs by ambulance compared to people in major cities. People from outer regional and remote areas are 55.1% less likely overall and 27.9% less likely in serious health emergencies to attend EDs by ambulance compared to people living in major cities. Logistic regression modelling indicated rurality was a significant factor in ambulance use in adults in areas outside major cities and in children in inner regional areas. Age was a significant predictor of ambulance demand with older people using ambulances more. Discussion This study indicates disparity between rates of ambulance use in urban and non-urban areas. The concept of unmet need should be considered as a more complex phenomenon than simply a utilisation gap and exploration of unmet need is warranted. Conclusion A clearer understanding of how rurality affects ambulance use has a number of implications for ambulance services.

Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Thomas RE, Bendall JC, 'Higher insertion success with the i-gel (R) supraglottic airway in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A randomised controlled trial', RESUSCITATION, 85 893-897 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.02.021
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2014 Simpson PM, Fouche PF, Thomas RE, Bendall JC, 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for relieving acute pain in the prehospital setting: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, 21 10-17 (2014)
DOI 10.1097/MEJ.0b013e328363c9c1
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2014 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Tiedemann A, Lord SR, Close JCT, 'EPIDEMIOLOGY OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE RESPONSES TO OLDER PEOPLE WHO HAVE FALLEN: A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE, 18 185-194 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2013.856504
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2014 Fouche PF, Simpson PM, Bendall J, Thomas RE, Cone DC, Doi SAR, 'AIRWAYS IN OUT-OF-HOSPITAL CARDIAC ARREST: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE, 18 244-256 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2013.831509
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 40
2014 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Toson B, Tiedemann A, Lord SR, Close JCT, 'PREDICTORS OF NONTRANSPORT OF OLDER FALLERS WHO RECEIVE AMBULANCE CARE', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE, 18 342-349 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2013.864355
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2014 Lord B, Bendall J, Reinten T, 'The influence of paramedic and patient gender on the administration of analgesics in the out-of-hospital setting', Prehospital Emergency Care, 18 195-200 (2014)

Objective. To determine whether analgesic administration in the out-of-hospital setting is influenced by the gender of the patient or the gender of the paramedic. Methods. This re... [more]

Objective. To determine whether analgesic administration in the out-of-hospital setting is influenced by the gender of the patient or the gender of the paramedic. Methods. This retrospective cohort study of patient care records included adult patients (age > 15 years) with moderate to severe pain (verbal numerical rating score 4-10) treated by paramedics between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. Data extracted included patient pain severity score, analgesia provided by paramedics, and gender of the treating paramedic. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics, ¿2test, and logistic regression. The primary outcome measures were the effect of patient and paramedic gender on analgesic administration. Results. The study population comprised 42,051 patients, median age of 57 years (38-75); 50.4% were female and 51% were administered an analgesic agent. For the outcome of receiving any analgesia, neither patient gender nor paramedic gender was predictive (p = NS). In a multivariate model for the outcome of receiving any analgesia, patient gender, paramedic gender, and the interaction between patient and paramedic gender were all nonsignificant (p = NS). For the outcome of receiving opioid analgesia (i.e., morphine or fentanyl), male patients were at greater odds of receiving an opioid (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.29-1.79, p < 0.0001). Paramedic gender was not predictive of whether an opioid was given (p = NS). Conclusions. The gender of the paramedic did not appear to influence the odds of analgesic administration. Female patients were less likely to receive opioids. Paramedic gender does not explain this finding. © 2014 National Association of EMS Physicians.

DOI 10.3109/10903127.2013.856502
Citations Scopus - 8
2014 Long D, Bendall J, Bower A, 'Out-of-hospital administration of corticosteroids to patients with acute asthma: A case study and literature review', Australasian Journal of Paramedicine, 6 (2014)

© 2008, Paramedics Australasia, All rights reserved. Objectives: Asthma is an important health problem in Australia with more than 2.2. million Australians currently diagnosed wit... [more]

© 2008, Paramedics Australasia, All rights reserved. Objectives: Asthma is an important health problem in Australia with more than 2.2. million Australians currently diagnosed with Asthma. Asthma is associated with significant mortality and frequent use of emergency medical services. The objectives of this paper were to: a) present a case study of a near-fatal episode of severe acute asthma in which the patient was administered corticosteroids by an Ambulance Service of New South Wales Extended Care Paramedic; b) review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of acute asthma as well as current pharmacotherapy in asthma management; and c) conduct a literature search and critical appraisal of existing evidence supporting the out-of-hospital administration of corticosteroids for acute asthma by paramedics.Methods: The purpose of the literature search was to identify comparative studies of adult patients with ¿acute¿ asthma treated by paramedics with corticosteroids prior to arrival at the emergency department (ED) to evaluate whether this intervention is associated with improved outcomes. A literature search of databases included the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Cochrane Reviews Issue 4 2008), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Clinical Trials), Medline (1950-November 2008), EMBASE and CINAHL. A pre-hospital filter was applied to increase the sensitivity of the searches as appropriate. MeSH headings included exp/asthma, exp/hydrocortisone, exp/prednisone, exp/prednisolone and exp/glucocorticoids. Searched text words included asthma, hydrocortisone, prednisone and prednisolone. Titles and abstracts of interest were inspected to identify relevant articles with the full text of selected articles retrieved. Identified papers were independently appraised by two reviewers.Results: Only two original studies were identified. The first was a retrospective comparative study of adult patients with moderate to severe asthma who received 125 mg methylprednisolone prior to transport to hospital or after arrival in the ED. The second study was a retrospective chart review to determine whether the out-of-hospital administration of systemic steroids to asthmatic patients had any effect on hospital admission rates.Conclusion: Corticosteroids have been widely used in the hospital setting for many years in the treatment of acute asthma and there is good evidence to support their early administration in an ED setting. Out-of-hospital studies provide only weak evidence of benefit. There is insufficient evidence of adequate quality to determine if corticosteroids should be routinely used by paramedics. A prospective randomised controlled trial is needed to determine the true value of early corticosteroid administration in the ambulance setting.

2013 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Tiedemann A, Lord SR, Close JCT, 'Provision of Out-of-hospital Analgesia to Older Fallers With Suspected Fractures: Above Par, but Opportunities for Improvement Exist', ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, 20 761-768 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/acem.12190
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2013 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Patterson J, Tiedemann A, Middleton PM, Close JCT, 'Epidemiology of ambulance responses to older people who have fallen in New South Wales, Australia', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 32 171-176 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2012.00621.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2013 Price R, Bendall JC, Patterson JA, Middleton PM, 'What causes adverse events in prehospital care? A human-factors approach', EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, 30 583-588 (2013)
DOI 10.1136/emermed-2011-200971
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2013 Mikolaizak AS, Simpson PM, Tiedemann A, Lord SR, Caplan GA, Bendall JC, et al., 'Intervention to prevent further falls in older people who call an ambulance as a result of a fall: a protocol for the iPREFER randomised controlled trial', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 13 (2013)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-360
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2012 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Patterson J, Middleton PM, 'Beliefs and expectations of paramedics towards evidence-based practice and research', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 10 197-203 (2012)

Objective: The objective of this cross-sectional online survey was to better understand the beliefs of paramedics towards research and evidence-based practice and their expectatio... [more]

Objective: The objective of this cross-sectional online survey was to better understand the beliefs of paramedics towards research and evidence-based practice and their expectations regarding its impact on their ability to provide patient care. Methods: An online survey of frontline paramedical staff in New South Wales, Australia, was conducted in March, 2010. Paramedics were asked to respond to five questions relating to their beliefs and expectations relating to prehospital research and evidence-based practice, using a four-point Likert scale for each. Descriptive statistics are used to describe responses to survey questions. Tests for trend between nominal and ordinal explanatory variables and ordinal survey responses were performed using c2 statistics. Results: There were 892 responses to the survey throughout the 1-month study period. The vast majority of paramedics believed prehospital research and paramedic participation in research were very important. Ninety per cent believed prehospital research would improve patient care, while 92% reported being likely to change clinical practice as a result of prehospital evidence. Paramedics with shorter lengths of service and those with tertiary education were significantly more supportive of, and had higher expectations of, research and evidence-based practice. Conclusions: Paramedics who responded to this online survey appear to have generally positive expectations of and perceptions towards evidence-based practice and research and their impact on prehospital care. Tertiary education and shorter length of service were associated with more positive expectations of, and higher level of support for, evidence-based practice. © 2012 The Authors International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2012 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

DOI 10.1111/j.1744-1609.2012.00273.x
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Chew MS, Hawthorne WJ, Bendall J, Whereat S, Huang S, Ting I, et al., 'No beneficial effects of levosimendan in acute porcine endotoxaemia', ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, 55 851-861 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2011.02436.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2011 Bendall JC, Simpson PM, Middleton PM, 'Prehospital vital signs can predict pain severity: analysis using ordinal logistic regression', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, 18 334-339 (2011)
DOI 10.1097/MEJ.0b013e328344fdf2
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2011 Bendall JC, Simpson PM, Middleton PM, 'Prehospital Analgesia in New South Wales, Australia', PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE, 26 422-426 (2011)
DOI 10.1017/S1049023X12000180
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
2011 Bendall JC, Simpson PM, Middleton PM, 'EFFECTIVENESS OF PREHOSPITAL MORPHINE, FENTANYL, AND METHOXYFLURANE IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE, 15 158-165 (2011)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2010.541980
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
2011 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, 'Prehospital non-invasive ventilation for acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema: an evidence-based review', EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, 28 609-612 (2011)
DOI 10.1136/emj.2010.092296
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
2011 Simpson PM, Bendall JC, Middleton PM, 'Review article: Prophylactic metoclopramide for patients receiving intravenous morphine in the emergency setting: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials', EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, 23 452-457 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-6723.2011.01433.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2010 Simpson PM, Goodger MS, Bendall JC, 'Delayed versus immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials', RESUSCITATION, 81 925-931 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2010.04.016
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
2010 Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Sinclair G, Dobbins TA, Bendall JC, 'EFFECTIVENESS OF MORPHINE, FENTANYL, AND METHOXYFLURANE IN THE PREHOSPITAL SETTING', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE, 14 439-447 (2010)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2010.497896
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 38
2010 Eburn M, Bendall JC, 'The provision of ambulance services in Australia: A legal argument for the national registration of paramedics', Journal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 8 4 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 9
2008 Long D, Bendall J, Bower A, 'Out-of-hospital administration of corticosteroids to patients with acute asthma: A case study and literature review', Journal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 6 (2008)

Objectives: Asthma is an important health problem in Australia with more than 2.2. million Australians currently diagnosed with Asthma. Asthma is associated with significant morta... [more]

Objectives: Asthma is an important health problem in Australia with more than 2.2. million Australians currently diagnosed with Asthma. Asthma is associated with significant mortality and frequent use of emergency medical services. The objectives of this paper were to: a) present a case study of a near-fatal episode of severe acute asthma in which the patient was administered corticosteroids by an Ambulance Service of New South Wales Extended Care Paramedic; b) review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of acute asthma as well as current pharmacotherapy in asthma management; and c) conduct a literature search and critical appraisal of existing evidence supporting the out-of-hospital administration of corticosteroids for acute asthma by paramedics. Methods: The purpose of the literature search was to identify comparative studies of adult patients with "acute" asthma treated by paramedics with corticosteroids prior to arrival at the emergency department (ED) to evaluate whether this intervention is associated with improved outcomes. A literature search of databases included the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Cochrane Reviews Issue 4 2008), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Clinical Trials), Medline (1950- November 2008), EMBASE and CINAHL. A pre-hospital filter was applied to increase the sensitivity of the searches as appropriate. MeSH headings included exp/asthma, exp/hydrocortisone, exp/prednisone, exp/prednisolone and exp/glucocorticoids. Searched text words included asthma, hydrocortisone, prednisone and prednisolone. Titles and abstracts of interest were inspected to identify relevant articles with the full text of selected articles retrieved. Identified papers were independently appraised by two reviewers. Results: Only two original studies were identified. The first was a retrospective comparative study of adult patients with moderate to severe asthma who received 125 mg methylprednisolone prior to transport to hospital or after arrival in the ED. The second study was a retrospective chart review to determine whether the out-of-hospital administration of systemic steroids to asthmatic patients had any effect on hospital admission rates. Conclusion: Corticosteroids have been widely used in the hospital setting for many years in the treatment of acute asthma and there is good evidence to support their early administration in an ED setting. Out-of-hospital studies provide only weak evidence of benefit. There is insufficient evidence of adequate quality to determine if corticosteroids should be routinely used by paramedics. A prospective randomised controlled trial is needed to determine the true value of early corticosteroid administration in the ambulance setting.

2005 Bendall JC, Parsell B, 'Pre-hospital trauma life support (PHTLS) advanced provider course', Journal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 3 (2005)

Overall, the course is a good product, delivering mostly useful information in a relaxed but educationally sound manner. The course is however rigid and there is only one way, the... [more]

Overall, the course is a good product, delivering mostly useful information in a relaxed but educationally sound manner. The course is however rigid and there is only one way, the PHTLS way, especially when it comes to spinal immobilisation and on scene interventions. At present, few Australian pre-hospital providers go to the extremes of immobilising the cervical spine as is the case in the US and this (personally) became a little frustrating. The course is probably most suitable and valuable for team members in rural and remote areas where there are limited resources and exposure and in as much, a system such as PHTLS principles is likely to deliver reasonable quality care. Other groups to which the course would be valuable include predominantly in-hospital care providers (including Doctors and Nurses) who may have limited experience in the out-of-hospital setting, as the course provides rapid acquisition of knowledge and skills in a compact and efficient format. In terms of practising Ambulance Paramedics and Intensive Care Paramedics, what you get out of the course will vary depending on your background and experience. Junior staff would find the course valuable. More senior staff however may or may not find the course valuable and/or enjoyable. Nevertheless, irrespective of your knowledge, experience and training, it is important to reflect on your own practice from time to time, and this course provides the opportunity to do this. There is certainly valuable content in the course and ample opportunity to consolidate skills (even if performed differently to what you are used to). There was an emphasis on principles (covered nicely in Chapter 15) [2] namely: scene assessment; primary survey (and cervical spine immobilisation) with a "treat as you go" philosophy [of note: - the PASG is still included with limited indications]; recognising time critical incidents (life threatening or multi-system injuries); minimising scene time (the Platinum 10 minutes of the Golden Hour) including "limited scene intervention" [of note: - cannulation was not generally considered part of the limited scene intervention]; initiation of rapid transport to "closest appropriate facility". Interestingly, iv access, iv fluids, secondary survey and medical history were all indicated only after initiation of rapid transport. Whilst we agree in principle with not wasting time on scene, that we, like many of out pre-hospital colleagues believe, iv access can and should be established in an opportunistic fashion where possible, and that this (in most circumstances) will not "waste time" and can be achieved (concurrently with other priorities, depending on resources) in the Platinum 10 minutes. The ability to establish two large bore cannulas enroute as the text suggests, adds (in our opinion), increased difficulty, decreased safety and a potentially more compromised patient. Obviously, if the patient is ready to be transported and iv access has not been established, then of course this should be done enroute.

Citations Scopus - 1
2005 Bendall JC, 'Sodium bicarbonate in the treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest', Journal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 3 (2005)
2001 Leong ECM, Bendall JC, Boyd AC, Einstein R, 'Sodium bicarbonate improves the chance of resuscitation after 10 minutes of cardiac arrest in dogs', RESUSCITATION, 51 309-315 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0300-9572(01)00421-X
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 16
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Simpson PM, McCabe B, Bendall JC, Cone DC, Middleton PM, 'PARAMEDIC-PERFORMED DIGITAL NERVE BLOCK TO FACILITATE FIELD REDUCTION OF A DISLOCATED FINGER', PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE (2012)
DOI 10.3109/10903127.2012.670690
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
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Associate Professor Jason Bendall

Position

Clinical Dean
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

Contact Details

Email jason.bendall@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4055 1900

Office

Room 116
Building Manning Education Centre
Location Taree

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