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Associate Professor Darren Burke

Associate Professor

School of Psychology (Psychology)

Career Summary

Biography

I am an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology, based at the Ourimbah campus. I am an Experimental Psychologist, interested in the evolution of Visual, Spatial and Social abilities. Understanding how these various behavioural mechanisms evolved involves integrating data derived from studies in humans and non-humans and from research examining the neural, cognitive and social determinants of the abilities.

Research Expertise
My research has spanned a broad spectrum of experimental psychology, united by a focus on why particular mechanisms work the way they do, and how evolution may have produced them. This has involved comparing psychological mechanisms across species that have faced different evolutionary selection pressures, as well as taking a functional approach to human psychology - asking what particular psychological mechanisms are actually for. I initially applied this perspective to questions in visual perception, the area of my postgraduate training, but have since investigated spatial memory, learning without awareness, observational learning, face and object recognition and social cognition. For more information please see my lab webpage ( http://evolutionarycognition.org/ )

Teaching Expertise
I have taught in a wide range of areas in Experimental Psychology, including Perception, Cognition, Learning, Motivation and Emotion, Biological Psychology, Evolutionary Psychology, Animal Behaviour, and Research Methods, and had a brief stint (in 2009) in a Biology Department, teaching into courses on Human Physiology, Vertebrate Evolution and the Biology of Sex. I currently teach Biological Psychology at 2nd year and Critical Issues at 4th year.

Administrative Expertise
I have served on undergraduate Teaching and Learning committees at Macquarie University and the University of Wollongong, was the Departmental PR coordinator in Biology and Brain Behaviour and Evolution at Macquarie, the Deputy Chair of the Macquarie University Animal Ethics Committee, and Honours Coordinator for the new Honours program in Brain Behaviour and Evolution at Macquarie. In my current position, I have been the Student Academic Conduct Officer, and served on the University Human Research Ethics Committee. I am currently the Program Convener for the Bachelor of Psychology

Collaborations
I have a number of collaborators across a range of Australian Universities (at Macquarie University, Wollongong University, ANU, CSU, ACU, etc.) and in the UK, Hong Kong, Norway, etc.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Animal Behaviour
  • Cognition
  • Communication
  • Evolution
  • Face processing
  • Neuroscience
  • Perception

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified 15
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) 60
170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 1/08/2009 Senior Lecturer Macquarie University
Psychology
Australia
1/07/2002 - 1/12/2004 Lecturer Macquarie University
Psychology
Australia
1/07/1995 - 1/07/2002 Lecturer University of Wollongong
Psychology
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Stephen ID, Burke D, Sulikowski D, 'Carruthers on Massive Modularity', Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science, Springer, International 1-4 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_3095-1
2009 Burke D, Tomiczek C, 'Conditioning', Oxford Companion to Consciousness, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom 168-172 (2009) [B2]

Journal article (66 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Woo KL, Rieucau G, Burke D, 'Computer-animated stimuli to measure motion sensitivity: Constraints on signal design in the Jacky dragon', Current Zoology, 63 75-84 (2017) [C1]

© The Author (2016). Identifying perceptual thresholds is critical for understanding the mechanisms that underlie signal evolution. Using computer-animated stimuli, we examined v... [more]

© The Author (2016). Identifying perceptual thresholds is critical for understanding the mechanisms that underlie signal evolution. Using computer-animated stimuli, we examined visual speed sensitivity in the Jacky dragon Amphibolurus muricatus, a species that makes extensive use of rapid motor patterns in social communication. First, focal lizards were tested in discrimination trials using random-dot kinematograms displaying combinations of speed, coherence, and direction. Second, we measured subject lizards' ability to predict the appearance of a secondary reinforcer (1 of 3 different computer-generated animations of invertebrates: cricket, spider, and mite) based on the direction of movement of a field of drifting dots by following a set of behavioural responses (e.g., orienting response, latency to respond) to our virtual stimuli. We found an effect of both speed and coherence, as well as an interaction between these 2 factors on the perception of moving stimuli. Overall, our results showed that Jacky dragons have acute sensitivity to high speeds. We then employed an optic flow analysis to match the performance to ecologically relevant motion. Our results suggest that the Jacky dragon visual system may have been shaped to detect fast motion. This pre-existing sensitivity may have constrained the evolution of conspecific displays. In contrast, Jacky dragons may have difficulty in detecting the movement of ambush predators, such as snakes and of some invertebrate prey. Our study also demonstrates the potential of the computeranimated stimuli technique for conducting nonintrusive tests to explore motion range and sensitivity in a visually mediated species.

DOI 10.1093/cz/zow074
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Stephen ID, Burke D, Sulikowski D, 'Tinbergen's "four questions" provides a formal framework for a more complete understanding of prosocial biases in favour of attractive people', Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40 (2017)

© Cambridge University Press 2017. We adopt Tinbergen's (1963) "four questions" approach to strengthen the criticism by Maestripieri et al. of the non-evolutionary... [more]

© Cambridge University Press 2017. We adopt Tinbergen's (1963) "four questions" approach to strengthen the criticism by Maestripieri et al. of the non-evolutionary accounts of favouritism toward attractive individuals, by showing which levels of explanation are lacking in these accounts. We also use this approach to propose ways in which the evolutionary account may be extended and strengthened.

DOI 10.1017/S0140525X16000650
2017 Burke D, Sulikowski D, Stephen I, Brooks R, 'Inconsistent with the data: Support for the CLASH model depends on the wrong kind of latitude', Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40 (2017)
DOI 10.1017/S0140525X16001242
2016 Elsworthy N, Burke D, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical and psychomotor performance of Australian football and rugby league officials during a match simulation', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 34 420-428 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1057208
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2016 Russell F, Burke D, 'Conditional same/different concept learning in the short-beaked echidna ( Tachyglossus aculeatus )', Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 105 133-154 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jeab.185
2015 Wagstaff DL, Sulikowski D, Burke D, 'Sex-differences in preference for looking at the face or body in short-term and long-term mating contexts', Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 13 1-17 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author(s). Previous research has demonstrated that while women prefer to look at the face of men regardless of relationship context, men preferentially look at women&a... [more]

© 2015 The Author(s). Previous research has demonstrated that while women prefer to look at the face of men regardless of relationship context, men preferentially look at women's bodies for short-term (over long-term) relationship judgments. The current study examined how self-rated mate value and 'mating intelligence' correlate with the subjective importance of information from the face or body. In addition, given the apparent sex differences in these judgments, we investigated whether either sex is aware of how the opposite-sex prioritizes this. Participants were 266 undergraduate students/volunteers who completed an online survey, measuring preferences for information from the face or body in short-term or long-term contexts, and a range of self-rated mate value measures. Information from the body was more important in short-term contexts for men (but not women), and correlated positively with mating strategy measures. While both sexes overestimated the opposite-sex's preference for looking at the body, women accurately perceived men's differential investment in face or body across contexts, whereas men assumed that women make decisions similarly to themselves. Women might benefit more than men from awareness of opposite-sex preferences as this could afford the enhancement or reduction of cues to sexual availability.

DOI 10.1556/2050.2015.0003
2015 Sulikowski D, Burke D, Havlícek J, Roberts SC, 'Head Tilt and Fertility Contribute to Different Aspects of Female Facial Attractiveness', Ethology, 121 1002-1009 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eth.12412
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Sulikowski DR, Burke DC, 'Noisy miners plan ahead: cryptic signalling of reward location impairs search for nectar, but not for invertebrates', Animal Behaviour, 102 149-155 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.01.005
Citations Scopus - 5
2015 Favelle S, Tobin A, Piepers D, Burke D, Robbins RA, 'Dynamic composite faces are processed holistically', Vision Research, 112 26-32 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2015.05.002
Citations Scopus - 4
2015 Sulikowksi D, Burke DC, 'From the lab to the world: The paradigmatic assumption and the functional cognition of avian foraging', Current Zoology, 61 328-340 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
2014 Strutt PA, Campbell LE, Burke D, Elmer S, 'High anxiety levels are associated with divergent empathising and systemising tendencies', Cogent Psychology, 1 1-10 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23311908.2014.981973
Co-authors Linda E Campbell
2014 Elsworthy N, Burke D, Scott BR, Stevens CJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical and decision-making demands of Australian football umpires during competitive matches.', Journal of strength and conditioning research, 28 3502-3507 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0000000000000567
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2014 Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'Threat is in the Sex of the Beholder: Men Find Weapons Faster than do Women', Evolutionary Psychology, 12 913-931 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Burke DC, 'Why isn't everyone an Evolutionary Psychologist', Frontiers in Psychology, 5 1-8 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Hughes MA, Sulikowski D, Burke D, 'Correlations between spatial skills: A test of the hunter-gatherer hypothesis', Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 12 19-44 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1556/JEP.12.2014.1.2
2014 Haythorpe KM, Burke D, Sulikowski D, 'The native versus alien dichotomy: relative impact of native noisy miners and introduced common mynas', Biological Invasions, 16 1659-1674 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10530-013-0598-5
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Elsworthy N, Burke DC, Dascombe BJ, 'Factors relating to the decision-making performance of Australian football officials', International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 14 401-410 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2013 Burke D, Sulikowski D, 'The Evolution of Holistic Processing of Faces', Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00011
Citations Scopus - 5
2013 Bennetts RJ, Kim J, Burke D, Brooks KR, Lucey S, Saragih J, Robbins RA, 'The Movement Advantage in Famous and Unfamiliar Faces: A Comparison of Point-Light Displays and Shape-Normalised Avatar Stimuli', Perception, 42 950-970 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1068/p7446
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Burke DC, Nolan C, Hayward WG, Russell R, Sulikowski D, 'Is there an own race preference in attractiveness', Evolutionary Psychology, 11 855-972 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'Win shifting in nectarivorous birds: Selective inhibition of the learned win-stay response', Animal Behaviour, 83 519-524 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2012 Haythorpe KM, Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'Relative levels of food aggression displayed by Common Mynas when foraging with other bird species in suburbia', Emu, 112 129-136 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, 'Judging approachability on the face of it: The influence of face and body expressions on the perception of approachability', Emotion, 11 514-523 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/a0022571
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 36
2011 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, 'Social judgments are influenced by both facial expression and direction of eye gaze', Social Cognition, 29 415-429 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2011 Sulikowski DR, Burke DC, 'Movement and memory: Different cognitive strategies are used to search for resources with different natural distributions', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 65 621-631 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00265-010-1063-4
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2011 Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'Win-shift and win-stay learning in the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)', Journal of Comparative Psychology, 125 143-149 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/a0023249
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2010 Burke DC, Sulikowski D, 'A new viewpoint on the evolution of sexually dimorphic human faces', Evolutionary Psychology, 8 573-585 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2010 Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'When a place is not a place: Encoding of spatial information is dependent on reward type', Behaviour, 147 1461-1479 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1163/000579510X521564
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2010 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, McGrillen K, Miller L, 'Orbitofrontal cortex lesions result in abnormal social judgements to emotional faces', Neuropsychologia, 48 2182-2187 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.04.010
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
2010 Sulikowski D, Burke DC, 'Reward type influences performance and search structure of an omnivorous bird in an open-field maze', Behavioural Processes, 83 31-35 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.beproc.2009.09.002
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2010 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, Atkinson CM, McArthur G, 'Switching associations between facial identity and emotional expression: A behavioural and ERP study', NeuroImage, 50 329-339 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.11.071
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Carmen Atkinson
2009 Woo K, Burke D, Peters R, 'Motion sensitivity of the Jacky dragon, Amphibolurus muricatus: random-dot kinematograms reveal the importance of motion noise for signal detection', Animal Behaviour, 77 307-315 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2008.10.011
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2009 Campbell J, Burke D, 'Evidence that identity-dependent and identity-independent neural populations are recruited in the perception of five basic emotional facial expressions.', Vision Research, 49 1532-1540 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2009.03.009
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
2008 Tomiczek C, Burke D, 'Is implicit learning perceptually inflexible? New evidence using a simple cued reaction-time task.', Learning and Motivation, 39 95-113 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.lmot.2007.07.001
Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Woo K, Burke D, 'Technique for measuring speed and visual motion sensitivity in lizards.', Psicologica: journal of methodology and experimental psychology, 29 135-151 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2007 Burke D, Taubert J, Higman T, 'Are face representations viewpoint dependent? A stereo advantage for generalising across different views of faces', Vision Research, 47 2164-2169 (2007) [C1]

Almost all previous studies of face recognition have found that matching the same face depicted from different viewpoints incurs both reaction time and accuracy costs. This has be... [more]

Almost all previous studies of face recognition have found that matching the same face depicted from different viewpoints incurs both reaction time and accuracy costs. This has been interpreted as evidence that the underlying neural representations of faces are viewpoint-specific, but such a conclusion depends on the experimental data being an accurate reflection of real-world viewpoint generalisation. An equally plausible explanation for poor viewpoint generalisation in experimental situations is that important information that is normally used to generalise across views in real-world settings is not available in the experiment. Stereoscopic information about the three-dimensional structure of the face is systematically misleading in nearly all previous investigations of face recognition, since a face depicted on a computer monitor contains explicit stereoscopic information that the face is flat. The current experiment demonstrates that viewpoint costs are reduced by depicting the face with stereoscopic three-dimensionality (compared to a synoptically presented face), raising the possibility that the viewpoint costs found in face recognition experiments might be a better reflection of the information that is typically unavailable in the experimental stimuli than of the underlying neural representation of facial identity. Crown Copyright © 2007.

DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2007.04.018
Citations Scopus - 25
2007 Favelle SK, Burke D, 'Attention to configurai information in change detection for faces', Perception, 36 1353-1367 (2007) [C1]

In recent research the change-detection paradigm has been used along with cueing manipulations to show that more attention is allocated to the upper than lower facial region, and ... [more]

In recent research the change-detection paradigm has been used along with cueing manipulations to show that more attention is allocated to the upper than lower facial region, and that this attentional allocation is disrupted by inversion. We report two experiments the object of which was to investigate how the type of information changed might be a factor in these findings by explicitly comparing the role of attention in detecting change to information thought to be 'special' to faces (second-order relations) with information that is more useful for basic-level object discrimination (first-order relations). Results suggest that attention is automatically directed to second-order relations in upright faces, but not first-order relations, and that this pattern of attentional allocation is similar across features. © 2007 a Pion publication.

DOI 10.1068/p5517
Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Sulikowski D, Burke D, 'Food-specific spatial memory biases in an omnivorous bird', Biology Letters, 3 245-248 (2007) [C1]

The tendency of nectarivorous birds to perform better on tasks requiring them to avoid previously rewarding locations (to win-shift) than to return to them (win-stay) has been exp... [more]

The tendency of nectarivorous birds to perform better on tasks requiring them to avoid previously rewarding locations (to win-shift) than to return to them (win-stay) has been explained as an adaptation to the depleting nature of nectar. This interpretation relies on the previously untested assumption that the win-shift tendency is not associated with food types possessing a different distribution. To test this assumption, we examined the specificity of this bias to different food types in an omnivorous honeyeater, the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala). As predicted, we found that the win-shift bias was sensitive to foraging context, manifesting only in association with foraging for nectar, not with foraging for invertebrates. © 2007 The Royal Society.

DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2007.0122
Citations Scopus - 21
2006 Favelle S, Hayward W, Burke D, Palmisano S, 'The configural advantage in object change detection persists across depth rotation.', Attention Perception and Psychophysics, 68 1243-1253 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.3758/BF03193725
2006 Favelle SK, Hayward WG, Burke D, Palmisano S, 'The configural advantage in object change detection persists across depth rotation', Perception and Psychophysics, 68 1254-1263 (2006)

Although traditionally there has been a debate over whether object recognition involves 3-D structural descriptions or 2-D views, most current approaches to object recognition inc... [more]

Although traditionally there has been a debate over whether object recognition involves 3-D structural descriptions or 2-D views, most current approaches to object recognition include the representation of object structure in some form. An advantage for the processing of structural or configural information in objects has been recently demonstrated using a change detection task (Keane, Hayward, & Burke, 2003). We report two experiments that extend this finding and show that configural information dominates change detection performance regardless of an object's orientation. Experiment 1 demonstrated the advantage that configural information has over shape and part arrangement information in change detection across four different object rotations in depth. Experiment 2 showed that this advantage occurs for both categorical and coordinate configural changes. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that configural information is a critical feature of object representations and that this information is utilized effectively in object recognition across changes in viewpoint. Copyright 2006 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 3
2006 Wenderoth P, Burke D, 'Testing the tilt-constancy theory of visual illusions', Perception, 35 201-213 (2006) [C1]

Prinzmetal and Beck (2001) Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 27 206-217) argued that a subset of visual illusions is caused by the same mechanis... [more]

Prinzmetal and Beck (2001) Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 27 206-217) argued that a subset of visual illusions is caused by the same mechanisms that are responsible for the perception of vertical and horizontal - a theory they referred to as the tilt-constancy theory of visual illusions. They argued that these illusions should increase if the observer's head or head and body are tilted because extra reliance would then be placed on the illusion-inducing local visual context. Exactly that result had previously been reported in the case of the tilted-room and the rod-and-frame illusions. Prinzmetal and Beck reported similar increases in the tilt illusion (TI), as well as the Zöllner, Poggendorff, and Ponzo illusions. In two experiments, we re-examined the effect of head tilt on the TI. In experiment 1, we used more conventional TI stimuli, more standard experimental methods, and a more complete experimental design than Prinzmetal and Beck, and additionally extended the investigation to attraction as well as repulsion effects. Experiment 2 more closely replicated the Prinzmetal and Beck stimuli. Although we found that head tilt did increase TIs in both experiments, the increases were of the order of 1°-2°, more modest than the 7° reported by Prinzmetal and Beck. Significantly, the TI increase was larger when inducing tilts and head tilts were in the same direction than when they were in opposite directions, suggesting that the tilt-constancy theory may be oversimplified. In addition, because previous evidence renders unlikely the claim that the Poggendorff illusion can be explained simply in terms of misperceived orientation of the transversals, the question arises whether there might be some other explanation for the increase in the Zöllner, Poggendorff, and Ponzo illusions with body tilt that Prinzmetal and Beck reported.

DOI 10.1068/p5388
Citations Scopus - 2
2006 Favelle S, Palmisano S, Burke D, Hayward WG, 'The role of attention in processing configural and shape information in 3-D novel objects', Visual Cognition, 13 623-642 (2006) [C1]

Recent research suggests that there is an advantage for processing configural information in scenes and objects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which a... [more]

Recent research suggests that there is an advantage for processing configural information in scenes and objects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which attention may account for this configural advantage. In Experiment 1, we found that cueing the location of change in single object displays improved detection performance for both configural and shape changes, yet cueing attention away from the location of change was detrimental only for shape change detection. A configural advantage was present for each cueing condition. Experiments 2A and 2B examined whether the configural advantage persisted in conditions where attention was distributed more widely, using a visual search paradigm. Although searches for configural changes were faster than those for shape changes across all set sizes, both types of information appeared to be processed with similar efficiency. Overall, these results suggest that the configural advantage is independent of the location or distribution of visual attention. © 2006 Psychology Press Ltd.

DOI 10.1080/13506280544000228
Citations Scopus - 5
2005 Burke D, 'Combining disparate views of objects: Viewpoint costs are reduced by stereopsis', Visual Cognition, 12 705-719 (2005) [C1]

An issue of central concern in the object recognition literature is whether changes in the viewpoint from which an object is depicted produces systematic costs in performance, or ... [more]

An issue of central concern in the object recognition literature is whether changes in the viewpoint from which an object is depicted produces systematic costs in performance, or whether perfomance is (largely) unaffected by such changes. This issue has generated a vigorous and lengthy debate because viewpoint-dependent or viewpoint-independent performance has been seen as a reflection of the underlying object representations. The current experiment shows that the effect of viewpoint differences between objects is strongly affected by whether or not they are depicted with stereoscopic depth, a result that is predicted by neither of the main approaches to object recognition. Instead, it is proposed that viewpoint costs in object recognition experiments are a function of the extent to which the information a subject is provided with generalizes across views, without this holding any necessary implications for the nature of the underlying object representations. © 2005 Psychology Press Ltd.

DOI 10.1080/13506280444000463
Citations Scopus - 20
2003 Keane S, Hayward W, Burke D, 'Detection of three types of changes to novel objects', Visual Cognition, 10 101-127 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13506280143000014
2003 Burke D, Fulham BJ, 'An evolved spatial memory bias in a nectar-feeding bird?', Animal Behaviour, 66 695-701 (2003) [C1]

Studies have shown that nectar-feeding birds more easily learn to avoid a previously rewarding location (to win-shift) than to return to such a location (to win-stay). This patter... [more]

Studies have shown that nectar-feeding birds more easily learn to avoid a previously rewarding location (to win-shift) than to return to such a location (to win-stay). This pattern has been interpreted as evidence of an evolved adaptation to the fact that nectar is a depleting resource; however, such a conclusion requires ruling out the possibility that this tendency is a consequence of the experience of individual birds, and is more compelling if performance in the memory task reveals sensitivity to detailed features of the spatiotemporal distribution of nectar in the environment. We tested the tendency of captive-reared Regent honeyeaters, Xanthomyza phrygia, a species of nectar-feeding bird, to win-shift or win-stay at different intervisit intervals. The birds generally avoided rewarding locations after a short retention interval (10 min), but returned to these locations after a long retention interval (3 h). This behaviour tracks the replenishment rate of the flowers exploited by this species in the wild, even though the subjects were born and reared in captivity. © 2003 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1006/anbe.2003.2246
Citations Scopus - 27
2003 Palmisano S, Burke D, S Allison R, 'Coherent perspective jitter induces visual illusions of self-motion', Perception, 32 97-110 (2003) [C1]

Palmisano et al (2000 Perception 29 57-67) found that adding coherent perspective jitter to constant-velocity radial flow improved visually induced illusions of self-motion (vecti... [more]

Palmisano et al (2000 Perception 29 57-67) found that adding coherent perspective jitter to constant-velocity radial flow improved visually induced illusions of self-motion (vection). This was a surprising finding, because unlike pure radial flow, this jittering radial flow should have generated sustained visual - vestibular conflicts - previously thought to always reduce/impair vection. We attempted to ascertain the essential stimulus features for this jitter advantage for vection by examining three novel types of jitter display. While adding incoherent jitter to radial flow was found to impair vection, adding coherent non-perspective jitter had little effect on this subjective experience (contrary to the notion that jitter improves vection by reducing adaptation to radial flow). Importantly, we found that coherent perspective jitter not only improves the vection induced by radial flow, but it also appears to induce modest vection by itself (demonstrating that vection can still occur when there is an extreme mismatch between actual and expected vestibular activity). These results suggest that the previously demonstrated advantage for coherent perspective jitter was due (in part at least) to jittering vection combining with forwards vection in depth to produce a more compelling overall vection experience.

DOI 10.1068/p3468
Citations Scopus - 36
2003 Palmisano S, Burke D, Allison RS, 'Erratum: Coherent perspective jitter induces visual illusions of self-motion (Perception (2003) 32 (97-110))', Perception, 32 1028 (2003)
2003 Keane SK, Hayward WG, Burke D, 'Detection of three types of changes to novel objects', Visual Cognition, 10 101-127 (2003)

In this study a change-detection paradigm is used to explore the nature of the information used to recognize three-dimensional, novel objects. In particular, whether we are sensit... [more]

In this study a change-detection paradigm is used to explore the nature of the information used to recognize three-dimensional, novel objects. In particular, whether we are sensitive to changes in part identity or configuration information. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that configural changes made to the object parts were significantly easier and quicker to detect than changes made to the shape or arrangement of object parts. Variance due to the total change in pixels did not predict performance in either of the experiments. The results of Experiment 3 showed the same pattern as Experiments 1 and 2, even though the objects used were altered to make part identity information more salient. Experiment 4 demonstrated that the physical size of the changes is not the crucial variable for this pattern of results. These findings are discussed in relation to the nature of visual representations and theories of object recognition.

Citations Scopus - 17
2002 Burke D, Hayward W, 'Two visual systems but only one theory of perception.', Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25 100-100 (2002) [C1]
2002 Burke D, Hayward WG, 'Two visual systems but only one theory of perception', Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25 100 (2002)

The parallel drawn by Norman between the dorsal and ventral systems and direct and indirect approaches is based on two misrepresentations of the direct approach - that it is conce... [more]

The parallel drawn by Norman between the dorsal and ventral systems and direct and indirect approaches is based on two misrepresentations of the direct approach - that it is concerned only with the unconscious control of action, and that it cannot explain learning. We propose a way of understanding the visual system differences from within the direct approach.

2002 Burke D, Cieplucha C, Cass J, Russell F, Fry G, 'Win-shift and win-stay learning in the short-beaked echidna ¿Tachyglossus aculeatus¿', Animal cognition, 5 79-84 (2002) [C1]

Numerous previous investigators have explained species differences in spatial memory performance in terms of differences in foraging ecology. In three experiments we attempted to ... [more]

Numerous previous investigators have explained species differences in spatial memory performance in terms of differences in foraging ecology. In three experiments we attempted to extend these findings by examining the extent to which the spatial memory performance of echidnas ¿or "spiny anteaters"¿ can be understood in terms of the spatio-temporal distribution of their prey ¿ants and termites¿. This is a species and a foraging situation that have not been examined in this way before. Echidnas were better able to learn to avoid a previously rewarding location ¿to "win-shift"¿ than to learn to return to a previously rewarding location ¿to "win-stay"¿, at short retention intervals, but were unable to learn either of these strategies at retention intervals of 90 min. The short retention interval results support the ecological hypothesis, but the long retention interval results do not.

DOI 10.1007/s10071-002-0131-1
Citations Scopus - 14
2001 Burke D, Everingham P, Rogers T, Hinton M, Hall-Aspland S, 'Perceptual grouping in two visually reliant species; Humans (Homo sapiens) and Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea).', Perception, 30 1093-1106 (2001) [C1]
2001 Burke D, Everingham P, Rogers T, Hinton M, Hall-Aspland S, 'Perceptual grouping in two visually reliant species: Humans (Homo sapiens) and Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea)', PERCEPTION, 30 1093-1106 (2001)
DOI 10.1068/p3239
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2000 Burke D, Roodenrys S, 'Implicit Learning in a Simple Cued Reaction-Time Task', Learning and Motivation, 31 364-380 (2000) [C1]

Implicit learning tasks usually involve the learning of complex rules. While this does reduce the likelihood of subjects becoming aware of the relationship to be learned, it also ... [more]

Implicit learning tasks usually involve the learning of complex rules. While this does reduce the likelihood of subjects becoming aware of the relationship to be learned, it also raises the possibility of explaining improved performance in terms of explicit processes. The current experiments are an attempt to develop a task which shows evidence of implicit learning, but which involves the learning of a very simple rule and so avoids these alternative explanations. In two experiments, we exposed subjects to learning trials in which a target letter (or shape) was immediately preceded by a cue letter (or shape) in otherwise random nine-letter (or 15-shape) sequences. In a test phase, subjects responded more quickly to cued than uncued targets if the learning phase had involved reliable cue-target pairings, but not following random control pairings. This was true of subjects who were classified as aware and those classified as unaware of the cue-target relationship. © 2000 Academic Press.

DOI 10.1006/lmot.2000.1062
Citations Scopus - 6
1999 Burke D, Alais D, Wenderoth P, 'Determinants of fusion of dichoptically presented orthogonal gratings', Perception, 28 73-88 (1999)

Liu, Tyler, and Schor (1992 Vision Research 32 1471-1479) reported the surprising finding that dichoptically presented orthogonal sine-wave gratings do not always produce binocula... [more]

Liu, Tyler, and Schor (1992 Vision Research 32 1471-1479) reported the surprising finding that dichoptically presented orthogonal sine-wave gratings do not always produce binocular rivalry. Gratings of high spatial frequency, and especially of low contrast, fuse to produce a stable percept of a dichoptic plaid. Using a somewhat different perceptual task, we replicated those findings and extended them. The probability of a plaid percept is higher for square-wave gratings than for sine-wave gratings, and higher still for rectangular-wave gratings with high duty cycles (with very thin light or dark bars). Experiments were conducted to test whether this duty-cycle effect was due to changes in overall luminance, or in the size of the regions of luminance congruity (which may reduce the probability of rivalry), but no such effects could account for the results. The presence of locally conflicting contour information in the two eyes was shown to be an important determinant of rivalry onset, but, since removing such regions did not eliminate rivalry, other factors also have a role to play. The spatial frequency composition of the gratings is one such factor which is consistent with all of the findings we report.

Citations Scopus - 11
1999 Burke D, Alais D, Wenderoth P, 'Determinants of fusion of dichoptically presented orthogonal gratings', Perception, 28 73-88 (1999) [C1]
1997 Alais D, Wenderoth P, Burke D, 'The size and number of plaid blobs mediate the misperception of type II plaid direction.', Vision Research, 37 143-150 (1997) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19
1996 Alais D, Burke D, Wenderoth P, 'Further evidence for monocular determinants of perceived plaid direction.', Vision Research, 36 1247-1253 (1996) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12
1994 Wenderoth P, Alais D, Burke D, van der Zwan R, 'The role of the blobs in determining the perception of drifting plaids and their motion aftereffects.', Perception, 23 1163-1169 (1994)

Motion aftereffects (MAEs) can be induced by adaptation to a pair of differently oriented drifting gratings whether the gratings are presented simultaneously, as a coherent plaid,... [more]

Motion aftereffects (MAEs) can be induced by adaptation to a pair of differently oriented drifting gratings whether the gratings are presented simultaneously, as a coherent plaid, or in alternation. The fact that the former MAEs were generally larger than the latter led to the suggestion that simultaneous adaptation involved higher-level extrastriate processes not involved in the alternating effects. In the past few years evidence has accumulated that the difference is in fact due to a low-level monocular process which can be termed the 'blob-tracking mechanism'. A review is presented of the evidence on MAEs induced by simultaneous and alternating adaptation, the evidence for the monocularity of the blob-tracking mechanism, the data which implicate the blob mechanism in the determination of MAE magnitude, perceived plaid drift direction, and in perceived plaid coherence.

Citations Scopus - 15
1994 Alais D, Wenderoth P, Burke D, 'The contribution of 1-D motion mechanisms to the perceived direction of drifting plaids and their aftereffects', Vision Research, 34 1823-1834 (1994) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29
1994 Burke D, Alais D, Wenderoth P, 'A role for a low-level mechanism in determining plaid coherence', Vision Research, 34 3189-3196 (1994) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16
1994 Wenderoth P, Alais D, Burke D, Van Der Zwan R, 'The role of the 'blobs' in determining the perception of drifting plaids and their motion aftereffects', Perception, 23 1163-1169 (1994) [C1]
1993 Burke D, Wenderoth P, 'The effect of interactions between one-dimensional component gratings on two-dimensional motion perception', Vision Research, 33 343-350 (1993) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35
1993 Burke D, Wenderoth P, 'Determinants of two-dimensional motion aftereffects induced by simultaneously- and alternately-presented plaid components.', Vision Research, 33 351-359 (1993) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22
1989 Burke D, Wenderoth P, 'Cyclopean tilt aftereffects can be induced monocularly: Is there a purely binocular process?', Perception, 18 471-482 (1989) [C1]
1989 Burke D, Wenderoth P, 'Cyclopean tilt aftereffects can be induced monocularly: Is there a purely binocular process?', Perception, 18 471-482 (1989)
Citations Scopus - 10
Show 63 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Burke DC, Cook S, Jones C, McMillan E, 'Conditional dependence of attractiveness signals', Combined Abstracts of 2012 Australian Psychology Conferences, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2011 Burke DC, Sulikowski D, Willis M, McKone E, Favelle S, 'Is holistic/configural processing restricted to human faces', Abstracts of the 38th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Auckland (2011) [E3]
2011 Bennetts R, Robbins RA, Brooks K, Burke DC, Kim J, 'Avatars and point-light faces: Sometimes a face doesn't help recognition', The Abstracts of the 38th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Auckland (2011) [E3]
2011 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, 'Judging approachability on the face of it', The Abstracts of the 38th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Auckland (2011) [E3]
2010 Bennetts R, Burke DC, Brooks KR, Robbins RA, 'The use of dynamic cues in self and familiar face recognition', ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E1]
2010 Bennetts R, Burke DC, 'Featural and configural cues in same- and different-age face recognition of famous and unfamiliar faces', Combined Abstracts of 2010 Australian Psychology Conferences, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
2010 Burke DC, Sulikowski D, 'A new viewpoint on the evolution of sexually dimorphic human faces', Combined Abstracts of 2010 Australian Psychology Conferences, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
2010 Willis ML, Palermo R, Burke DC, McGrillen K, Miller L, 'The role of the orbitofrontal cortex in the evaluation of approachability', Combined Abstracts of 2010 Australian Psychology Conferences, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $191,784

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20121 grants / $6,784

Indian mynah (Acridotheres tristis) population expansion in the Hunter region: Underlying mechanisms and management solutions$6,784

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Associate Professor Darren Burke, Miss Kathryn Haythorpe
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101125
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

20091 grants / $185,000

The human face as an evolved signalling system$185,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Darren Burke, Dr Romina Palermo, Dr Mark Williams, Dr Simone Favelle
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190609
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current7

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.4
PhD3.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD An Investigation into the Origins and Functions of Sexual Dimorphism in Human Faces PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Psychopathy, Intelligence, Empathy and Physiological Response PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Masters Physiological, Biological and Sexual Responses and their Association with Attraction within Heterosexual Relationships M Philosophy (Psychology), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Cues and Consequences of Early Life Adversity: Life History and Decision-Making PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Role of Hormones in the Prevalence of Female Adolescent Unipolar Depression PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Empathising and Systemising in High Anxiety States: An Investigation of Anxiety as a Mechanism for Divergence in Cognitive Performance PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Here's Looking at You, Kid: Face Processing, Emotional Availability and Reflective Functioning in Mothers with Postnatal Depression PhD (Clinical Psychology), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD An Exploration of Individual Differences in Human Mating Preferences and Competitive Tactics PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Factors Influencing the Physiological and Perceptual Decision-Making Demands of Australian Football Field Umpires PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Darren Burke

Position

Associate Professor
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Psychology

Contact Details

Email darren.burke@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4349 4928
Fax (02) 4348 4145

Office

Room E1.17
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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