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Professor John Forbes

Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Trial Blazing Cancer Prevention

A world free of breast cancer is University of Newcastle Professor John Forbes AM's aim, and with a number of pioneering breakthroughs credited with saving millions of women's lives over his 40 year career, he is well on his way to achieving his goal.

Professor John Forbes 

Awarded the 2015 NSW Outstanding Cancer Researcher of the Year, Professor Forbes has dedicated his life to reducing breast cancer mortality rates and improving the quality of life for women with the disease.

"Today, seven women will die of breast cancer in Australia. Tomorrow, another seven. The day after, another seven. These are wives, mothers, sisters, friends and colleagues," said Professor Forbes.

"I want a world without breast cancer. No one at risk, no one getting it, no one dying from it. From the University to the hospital to our global collaborators, we're all motivated towards curing this disease," he said.

The University of Newcastle Professor of Surgical Oncology and Director of Surgical Oncology at the Calvary Mater Hospital has chaired a number of international breast cancer clinical trials as the Research Director and a founder of the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (ANZBCTG).

Prevention better than cure

Among many of his career highlights, Professor Forbes chaired the Australian and New Zealand arm of the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study (IBIS I) clinical trial, which established that tamoxifen could be used for more than just successfully treating breast cancer – it could also be used in prevention of the disease.

The breakthrough research revealed that tamoxifen could prevent half of new breast cancers and significantly reduce the rates of secondary cancer and the development of tumours in the other breast.

"This discovery meant that women at high-risk of breast cancer had another step they could take to reduce their risk, which was more than just a regular breast x-ray. They could additionally take tamoxifen to reduce that risk or even use it as an alternative to preventive mastectomy."

Professor Forbes is currently overseeing the Australiasian arm of the IBIS II trial to investigate whether the hormone therapy, anastrozole, can be used to prevent breast cancer in women who are at increased risk. The IBIS II trial also compares tamoxifen to anastrozole to see which is more effective in treatment of early forms of breast cancer.

Professor John Forbes Setting standards

While the benefits of tamoxifen have been known for over a decade in research circles, it was only during 2013 that three international organisations made independent recommendations that tamoxifen should be included in standards of care for women at high risk of breast cancer.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) made the recommendation in June 2013, based in part on Forbes and the ANZBCTG research. In July 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) followed suit.

The World Health Organization lists breast cancer as the top cancer in women in both the developed and the developing world, with more than half a million women worldwide dying from breast cancer each year.

Genetics - a new direction

As with most terminal illnesses, time is of the essence in the battle against breast cancer. Professor Forbes believes the benefit of new research in gene analysis is two-fold.

"Gene technology will not only change the accepted approach to cancer treatment, but also make trialling of treatments faster and more efficient," Professor Forbes said.

"At present, we have to recruit a high number of people for prevention trials to see whether the drugs will work," he said.

"Using genome technology will allow us to do a simple blood test that reveals a biomarker that identifies the gene or broken gene or molecular pathway that is active and identify high-risk patients. This could see clinical trials that used to take five years reduced to being done in 18 months. We will need fewer people, lower the cost of the clinical trial by as much as one-tenth, and learn much more quickly which drugs work and which ones don't."

"We are rapidly unravelling molecular pathways to find critically important targets that can switch cancer cells off or destroy cancer cells. From there we aim to refine, define and analyse those molecular markers and build targeted therapies."

Learning more about the genetics of cancer will also help determine which patients are likely to get side-effects from different treatments, marking another step towards tailored and personalised medication.

A lump in the breast is not a fatal illness

Professor Forbes is also a driver of a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Historically cancer treatment has started with the removal of the tumour and then chemotherapies to treat any stray cancerous cells and hormone therapy to prevent recurrence. Professor Forbes questions this logic.

"A lump in the breast is not a fatal illness. People don't die from a lump in the breast. The spread of the cancer is the killer," Professor Forbes said.

"The problem with cutting the tumour out is that we never know if the treatment is working, but we know if it has failed when the patient gets a reoccurrence. It is an old-fashioned approach in today's society and there may be better ways. "

The alternative is neo-adjuvant (or pre-surgical) treatment which involves starting with the chemotherapy and hormone treatment first, monitoring its effects on the tumour and then doing the surgical removal. This allows treating physicians to measure the change in the tumour often reflected in the tumour decreasing in size and shows whether the drug is working more quickly or whether a different drug needs to be used.

This approach would also shave years off translation from research to the front-line, according to Forbes, who adds that "while this is not rocket science – it is an enormous shift in thinking globally."

Trial blazer

Under Professor Forbes guidance, the ANZBCTG, Australia's only independent collaborative breast cancer clinical trials research group, has contributed substantially over the past 35 years to major international clinical trials. This research has established the benefits of drugs like tamoxifen and anastrozole which is a new class of drugs known as aromatase inhibitors.

A premier centre of excellence for breast cancer research, the ANZBCTG involves multicentre clinical trials and collaborates with more than 600 researchers in 84 institutions across Australia and New Zealand.

"If there is an important new discovery that is ready for clinical testing, there is a high likelihood that the University of Newcastle and the ANZBCTG will be involved," Professor Forbes said.

"The University of Newcastle and ANZBCTG make a major contribution to world research and create opportunities for young researchers to work with us. Building this next generation of researchers started yesterday, is continuing now and is important tomorrow."

To Forbes, the valuable of global collaboration is paramount in making advances. As he says, "collaboration is all about sharing knowledge, sharing ideas and resources, sharing the frustrations and ultimately, sharing the successes."

"Through our collaborations, the University of Newcastle is on the cutting edge of global research. We're part of the Australian focus for investigating new treatments for breast cancer. With one in eight Australian women developing breast cancer before the age of 85 years, the University and the ANZBCTG activities are crucial in gaining Australian women access to potentially better treatments."

Professor John Forbes

Trial Blazing Cancer Prevention

A world free of breast cancer is University of Newcastle Professor John Forbes AM's aim, and with a number of pioneering breakthroughs credited with saving millions of women's lives over his 40 year career, he is well on his way…

Read more

Man on a mission

Professor John Forbes believes a cure for breast cancer is not only possible, it is inevitable.

The work of Professor John Forbes and his research colleagues has saved the lives of countless women over the past three decades. But the internationally renowned researcher is not ready to hang up his trademark white lab coat and rest on his laurels just yet.

A world without breast cancer is Forbes' aim and as a founder and Director of Research for the Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (ANZ BCTG), he believes that this objective is achievable.

"Unquestionably, we are winning the war, " the University of Newcastle Professor of Surgical Oncology says. The statistical evidence shows that.

"It is simply a matter of having good people, reliable information, paying attention to the quality of the science, interpreting carefully and being receptive to new ideas."

Forbes is a decorated oncologist and academic who has been named one of the top 10 researchers in the world in all fields (Thomson Scientific, 2007), holds executive positions on breast cancer committees nationally and internationally and has overseen more than 750 publications from the ANZ BCTG.

Breast cancer is still the most common cancer among Australian women but mortality rates have dropped by approximately 20 per cent over the past 20 years. The work of the ANZ BCTG, and the group's international collaborators, has been instrumental in that result.

Now, Forbes believes new directions in research involving gene analysis could lead to even greater outcomes and completely change the accepted approach to cancer treatment.

"Over the past 30 years, we have been progressively refining the process of identifying types of cancers and specific treatments, " he says.

"Thirty years ago everyone received the same drug. Now, we can classify breast cancer into at least six different types and we have a range of drugs we can use, alone or in combination, to treat them.

"Increasingly we will be able to sample a tumour, do a whole genome analysis, find the abnormalities and deliver a specific therapy."

The ANZ BCTG is part of a large international trial starting this year that will for the first time test neoadjuvant (or pre-surgical) drug therapies on women with newly diagnosed breast tumours that demonstrate particular gene abnormalities.

Neoadjuvant drug treatment has in the past been used infrequently, and largely for the purpose of shrinking a particularly large tumour before surgery, but Forbes believes it also has the benefit of allowing doctors to ascertain whether a prescribed treatment is working before they remove a lump.

"Today, there are many women who will not know that their drug treatment has failed until they get a relapse," he says.

"The paradigm, which hasn't changed Professor John Forbes in front of the Calvary Mater Hospitalin 30 years, is to diagnose breast cancer, remove the lump, then treat the patient with drugs. However, if we start with the drug treatment, there is an opportunity to learn whether or not that treatment is working before the lump is removed."

Forbes says the neoadjuvant approach will also enhance the process of discovery, allowing scientists to observe how tumours respond to different drugs, which will lead to better targeted treatments.

Forbes was a key instigator in the establishment of the clinical trials group in Melbourne in 1978. At the time, he had recently returned from the UK where he had been working with pioneering breast cancer researcher Michael Baum, the creator of Britain's first clinical trials group. Forbes recognised the need in Australia for a similar large-scale, internationally collaborative approach to testing the effects of drug treatments.

The ANZ BCTG was involved in early global breast cancer trials that established the benefits of chemotherapy and hormone treatments, in particular the drug tamoxifen, in post-operative care. It was breakthrough research that Forbes credits with saving "many thousands, if not millions, of lives" of breast cancer sufferers around the world.

When Forbes moved to Newcastle in 1987 to take up a Chair in Surgical Oncology, the first academic post of its kind in Australia, the ANZ BCTG operations office shifted with him.

More than 50 people now work from the group's operations base at the Mater Calvary Hospital, not far from the University's Callaghan campus. It also has an administrative office in Darby Street, Newcastle. However, the group's network spans approximately 500 researchers and support staff across Australia and collaborations with research groups in 15 countries.

More than 15,000 Australian women have participated in trials that the ANZ BCTG has led or participated in, including many from Newcastle.

Forbes and his team have contributed substantially over the past decade to major international trials that have established the benefits of drugs known as aromatase inhibitors (primarily Arimidex®) in reducing the risk of relapse in postmenopausal women with certain types of hormone-sensitive cancers.

Forbes chaired the global IBIS-I (International Breast Cancer Intervention Study) trial, which showed that tamoxifen could prevent cancer in women at high risk of getting the disease, and is co-chairing the follow-up IBIS-II trial, which is investigating whether the drug anastrozole can have the same preventative effect.

But it is the success of his team, rather than individual accolades, in which he takes the greatest pride.

"Today, we have in Newcastle one of the premier breast cancer research groups in the world," he says. "This is very good for women, it is very good for Australia and I personally value the impact it has had on my career.

"The support of the University has been vital, because there is a big management side to a research program so you need people who are behind you, supporting you, constantly informing you of the opportunities.

"This University does that. It is supportive of its researchers, from the top down, and that has been an important part of our growth."

Professor Forbes is a member of the Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine. He researches in collaboration with the Hunter Medical Research Institute's (HMRI) Cancer Program. HMRI is a partnership between the University, the Hunter New England Local Health District and the community.

Visit the ANZ BCTG website

Visit the HMRI website

Visit the Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine website

John Forbes

Man on a mission

Professor John Forbes believes a cure for breast cancer is not only possible, it is inevitable.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research expertise

Professor Forbes is an internationally renowned researcher in the field of breast cancer prevention and treatment.

His experience with clinical trials in general and breast cancer trials in particular, extends from the creation of the Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (based in Newcastle, NSW), and coordination of Australias first multi-centre trial (ANZ 7801/02) in 1978, through more than 49 protocols for prevention of breast cancer and treatment of all stages of the disease. Professor Forbes has received continued NHMRC Project Grant support since 1979, and more than 600 publications have resulted from the ANZ BCTGs clinical trials program and research collaborations.

He is a Member of International Steering Committees for specific neo-adjuvant and adjuvant trials and international Advisory Boards, he is a member of numerous Editorial Boards, and a foundation member of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland), as well as the Da Costa Advisory Board for prevention research (USA). In 2007 Professor Forbes was named by Thomson Scientific as one of the top 10 researchers globally (all fields), for papers cited in peer reviewed journals.


Qualifications

  • Master of Surgery, University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery, University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Medical Science, University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • breast cancer clinical trials
  • breast cancer prevention & treatment
  • breast disease
  • breast surgery

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111599 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences not elsewhere classified 15
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 85

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2007 -  Chair ATAC International Steering Committee
United Kingdom
1/01/1987 - 1/01/2006 Director Breast Screen NSW Hunter New England
Australia
1/01/1987 -  Professor of Surgical Oncology

Surgical Science

University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/1983 - 1/01/1987 Associate Professor (First Assistant) Royal Melbourne Hospital
Australia
1/01/1975 - 1/01/1977 Fellow in Surgery Welsh National Medical School, University Hospital,Cardiff, Wales
Department of Surgery
United Kingdom

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Inaugural Member - International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland) International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland)
Switzerland
Inaugural Member, Board of Directors - ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Ltd ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Ltd
Australia
Member - NHMRC Project Grants Assessor and Panel NHMRC Committee
Australia
Life Member - Graduate Society, University of Melbourne Graduate Society, University of Melbourne
Australia
Co-Chair - International Steering Committee, IBIS (Breast Cancer Prevention) Trial (UK) International Steering Committee, IBIS (Breast Cancer Prevention) Trial
United Kingdom
Member - International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland) International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland)
Switzerland
Member - Advisory Committee, Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Group (UK) Advisory Committee, Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Group
United Kingdom
Member of Council - Breast International Group (BIG) Breast International Group (BIG)
Australia
Member - NSW Oncology Group Breast Steering Committee NSW Oncology Group Breast Steering Committee
Australia
Member - International Exemestane Study (IES), International Steering Committee International Exemestane Study (IES), International Steering Committee
Australia
Vice Chair - Scientific Advisory Committee, ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Scientific Advisory Committee, ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
Australia
Member - Scientific Advisory Committee, International Breast Cancer Study Group (Switzerland) Scientific Advisory Committee, International Breast Cancer Study Group
Switzerland
Member - American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
United States
Inaugural Member - Da Costa Breast Cancer Foundation (USA) Da Costa Breast Cancer Foundation
United States

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1994 -  Medical Director Breast Cancer Institute of Australia
Australia
1/01/1987 -  Director, Operations Office, and Group Coordinator Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group
Operations Office
Australia
1/01/1987 -  Director, Department of Surgical Oncology Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital
Department of Surgical Oncology
Australia
1/01/1987 - 1/01/2006 Director Breast Screen NSW Hunter Region & Wyong Shire
Breast Screening Program
Australia
1/01/1979 - 2/01/1979 Consultant Surgeon Peter McCallum Hospital
General Surgery & Oncology
Australia
1/01/1976 - 1/01/1977 Consultant Surgeon Velindre Radiotherapy Hospital, Cardiff, Wales
Consultative Breast Clinic
United Kingdom

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2007 Top Ten Global Researchers in Publications 2005-2006
Thomson Reuters
1968 Robert Gartley Healy Price in Medicine
University of Melbourne
1968 Exhibition in Medicine (first place)
University of Melbourne
1968 Keith Levi Memorial Scholarship for Medicine (first place)
University of Melbourne

Research Award

Year Award
2007 HMRI Excellence in Research Award
Hunter Medical Research Institute
1980 John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
1975 Nuffield Foundation: Commonwealth Travelling Fellowship in Medicine (Australia)
University of Melbourne

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2007 The Walter & Eliza Hall Institute Postgraduate Lecture Series Seminar
Organisation: as above
2007 Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer - 10th International Conference
Organisation: as above
2007 Breast International Group Scientific Meeting
Organisation: Breast International Group
2007 Breast Cancer Summit, Mumbai
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2006 3rd PacRim Breast & Prostate Cancer Mtg, Fraser Island, Qld
Organisation: as above
2006 Hunter Medical Research Institute Cancer Conference, Newcastle
Organisation: Hunter Medical Research Institute/Uni of Newcastle
2006 Asia-Pacific Breast Cancer Summit
Organisation: Novartis
2006 ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Annual Scientific Mtg, Cairns
Organisation: ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
2006 Korean Breast Cancer Society Symposium, Cheju Island
Organisation: Korean Breast Cancer Society
2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Mtg, Atlanta
Organisation: American Society of Clinical Oncology
2006 Breast Cancer International Research Group Investigator's Mtg, Atlanta
Organisation: Breast Cancer International Research Group
2006 Invited Lecture Series, Beijing, Guangzhou, & Hangzhou
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2006 6th International Surgical Update
Organisation: as above
2006 Breast Cancer Summit, Shanghai
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2005 Breast Cancer Round Table Mtg, Houston, Texas
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2005 ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Annual Scientific Mtg, Perth, WA
Organisation: ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
2005 Taiwan Oncology Joint Cancer Conference, Taipei
Organisation: Taiwan Oncology Group
2005 2nd PacRim Breast & Prostate Cancer Conference, Palm Springs, CA
Organisation: as above
2005 Leaders in BreastCARE Inaugural Meeting, Athens
Organisation: as above
2005 New Perspectives for Women with Breast Cancer Symposium
Organisation: as above
2004 Australian Breast Cancer Conference, Melbourne
Organisation: unknown
2004 Hunter Medical Research Institute Cancer Conference, Newcastle
Organisation: Hunter Medical Research Institute/Uni of Newcastle
2004 2nd National Breast Cancer Conference for Women with Breast Cancer, Melbourne
Organisation: National Breast Cancer Centre
2004 Familial Cancer Conference: Research & Practice, Sth Stradbroke Is, Qld
Organisation: unknown
2004 Sydney Breast Cancer Trials International Symposium, Sydney
Organisation: unknown
2004 Asia Pacific Summit Mtg, Shangahi
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2004 Mt Alvernia Annual Medical Advances Conference
Organisation: Mt Alvernia Hospital
2004 National Cancer Centre Mtg
Organisation: National Cancer Centre, Singapore
2003 Global Breast Cancer Summit, Madrid
Organisation: unknown
2003 ACINDES Experts Mtg, Buenas Aires
Organisation: Association for Health Research & Development
2003 ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Annual Scientific Mtg, Adelaide
Organisation: ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
2003 Evista Scientific Advisory Board Mtg, Chicago, Il
Organisation: unknown
2003 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Annual Scientific Mtg, Brisbane
Organisation: Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
2003 AstraZeneca Satellite Symposium, St Gallen
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2002 29th Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Conference, Sydney
Organisation: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia
2002 Salick Annual Research Group Conference, Berkeley, CA
Organisation: Salick Research Group
2002 Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Research Symposium, Sydney
Organisation: unknown
2002 ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Annual Scientific Mtg, Sanctuary Cove
Organisation: ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
2002 Familial & Genetic Aspects of Cancer Conference, Barossa Valley
Organisation: unknown
2002 BASO Breast Group Conference, Solihull
Organisation: BASO Breast Group
2002 3rd European Breast Cancer Conference, Barcelona
Organisation: as above
2002 European Group Breast Cancer Screening Scientific Mtg, Barcelona
Organisation: European Breast Cancer Screening Group
2002 Faslodex Study 25 Investigators Mtg, Barcelona
Organisation: unknown
2002 AstraZeneca Education Mtg, Sydney
Organisation: AstraZeneca
2002 Breast Cancer Endocrine Conference, Narita
Organisation: Japan Breast Cancer Society
2001 7th International Conference on Adjuvant Therapy of Primary Breast Cancer, St Gallen
Organisation: as above
2001 2nd Novartis Workshop - Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer, Gleneagles
Organisation: Novartis
2001 ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group Annual Scientific Mtg, Hamilton Island
Organisation: ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group
2001 Breast Cancer Consultative Conference, San Antonio
Organisation: AstraZeneca
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Forbes JF, 'Overview and Future Perspectives of Primary Breast Cancer', Local and Systemic Management of Primary Breast Cancers, Kyoto University Press, Kyoto 3-17 (2010)
2007 Forbes JF, 'Antiestrogens', Endocrine Therapies in Breast Cancer, Oxford University Press, Oxford 29-36 (2007) [B1]
2006 Perez EA, Forbes JF, 'Introduction', 1-1 (2006)
DOI 10.1053/j.seminoncol.2006.03.023
2003 Forbes JF, 'Breast cancer', Evidence-Based Oncology, BMJ, London 429-464 (2003) [B1]
2002 Forbes JF, 'Tamoxifen and Advanced Breast Cancer: an Overview', Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer, Marcell Dekker, New York 17-31 (2002)
1997 Forbes JF, 'Current Role of the Surgeon in Collaborating with Medical Oncologists', Textbook of Breast Cancer: a Clinical Guide to Therapy, Dunitz, London 77-94 (1997)
1996 Forbes JF, 'Screening for Breast Cancer and Treatment of Early Lesions (ductal carcinoma in situ): Summary', Adjuvant Therapy of Breast Cancer V, Springer, Berlin 155-157 (1996)
Show 4 more chapters

Journal article (215 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Cawthorn S, Hamed H, Holli K, Howell A, Forbes JF, 'Tamoxifen for prevention of breast cancer: Extended long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I breast cancer prevention trial', The Lancet Oncology, 16 67-75 (2015)

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer... [more]

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer in the first 10 years of follow-up. We report the long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I trial, in which the participants and investigators remain largely masked to treatment allocation. Methods: In the IBIS-I randomised controlled trial, premenopausal and postmenopausal women 35-70 years of age deemed to be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive oral tamoxifen 20 mg daily or matching placebo for 5 years. Patients were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups by telephone or fax according to a block randomisation schedule (permuted block sizes of six or ten). Patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment by use of central randomisation and coded drug supply. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of breast cancer (invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ), analysed by intention to treat. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess breast cancer occurrence and mortality. The trial is closed to recruitment and active treatment is completed, but long-term follow-up is ongoing. This trial is registered with controlledtrials.com, number ISRCTN91879928. Findings: Between April 14, 1992, and March 30, 2001, 7154 eligible women recruited from genetics clinics and breast care clinics in eight countries were enrolled into the IBIS-I trial and were randomly allocated to the two treatment groups: 3579 to tamoxifen and 3575 to placebo. After a median follow up of 16·0 years (IQR 14·1-17·6), 601 breast cancers have been reported (251 [7·0%] in 3579 patients in the tamoxifen group vs 350 [9·8%] in 3575 women in the placebo group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·71 [95% CI 0·60-0·83], p<0·0001). The risk of developing breast cancer was similar between years 0-10 (226 [6·3%] in 3575 women in the placebo group vs 163 [4·6%] in 3579 women in the tamoxifen group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·72 [95% CI 0·59-0·88], p=0·001) and after 10 years (124 [3·8%] in 3295 women vs 88 [2·6%] in 3343, respectively; HR 0·69 [0·53-0·91], p=0·009). The greatest reduction in risk was seen in invasive oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (HR 0·66 [95% CI 0·54-0·81], p<0·0001) and ductal carcinoma in situ (0·65 [0·43-1·00], p=0·05), but no effect was noted for invasive oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (HR 1·05 [95% CI 0·71-1·57], p=0·8). Interpretation: These results show that tamoxifen offers a very long period of protection after treatment cessation, and thus substantially improves the benefit-to-harm ratio of the drug for breast cancer prevention.

DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)71171-4
Citations Scopus - 5
2015 Stirzaker C, Zotenko E, Song JZ, Qu W, Nair SS, Locke WJ, et al., 'Methylome sequencing in triple-negative breast cancer reveals distinct methylation clusters with prognostic value.', Nat Commun, 6 5899 (2015)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms6899
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2015 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Cawthorn S, Hamed H, Holli K, Howell A, Forbes JF, 'Tamoxifen for prevention of breast cancer: extended long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I breast cancer prevention trial', LANCET ONCOLOGY, 16 67-75 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)71171-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2015 Dowsett M, Sestak I, Buus R, Lopez-Knowles E, Mallon E, Howell A, et al., 'Estrogen Receptor Expression in 21-Gene Recurrence Score Predicts Increased Late Recurrence for Estrogen-Positive/HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.', Clin Cancer Res, 21 2763-2770 (2015)
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-2842
2015 Pundavela J, Roselli S, Faulkner S, Attia J, Scott RJ, Thorne RF, et al., 'Nerve fibers infiltrate the tumor microenvironment and are associated with nerve growth factor production and lymph node invasion in breast cancer', Molecular Oncology, (2015)

Infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by nerve fibers is an understudied aspect of breast carcinogenesis. In this study, the presence of nerve fibers was investigated in a co... [more]

Infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by nerve fibers is an understudied aspect of breast carcinogenesis. In this study, the presence of nerve fibers was investigated in a cohort of 369 primary breast cancers (ductal carcinomas in situ, invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas) by immunohistochemistry for the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Isolated nerve fibers (axons) were detected in 28% of invasive ductal carcinomas as compared to only 12% of invasive lobular carcinomas and 8% of ductal carcinomas in situ (p=0.0003). In invasive breast cancers, the presence of nerve fibers was observed in 15% of lymph node negative tumors and 28% of lymph node positive tumors (p=0.0031), indicating a relationship with the metastatic potential. In addition, there was an association between the presence of nerve fibers and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in cancer cells (p=0.0001). Invitro, breast cancer cells were able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and this neurotrophic activity was partially inhibited by anti-NGF blocking antibodies. In conclusion, infiltration by nerve fibers is a feature of the tumor microenvironment that is associated with aggressiveness and involves NGF production by cancer cells. The potential participation of nerve fibers in breast cancer progression needs to be further considered.

DOI 10.1016/j.molonc.2015.05.001
Co-authors John Attia, Rick Thorne, Hubert Hondermarck, Marjorie Walker, Rodney Scott, Phillip Jobling
2015 Moore HC, Unger JM, Phillips KA, Boyle F, Hitre E, Porter D, et al., 'Goserelin for ovarian protection during breast-cancer adjuvant chemotherapy.', N Engl J Med, 372 923-932 (2015)
DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa1413204
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
2015 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Cawthorn S, Hamed H, Holli K, Howell A, Forbes JF, 'Tamoxifen for prevention of breast cancer: Extended long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I breast cancer prevention trial', The Lancet Oncology, 16 67-75 (2015) [C1]

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer... [more]

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer in the first 10 years of follow-up. We report the long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I trial, in which the participants and investigators remain largely masked to treatment allocation. Methods: In the IBIS-I randomised controlled trial, premenopausal and postmenopausal women 35-70 years of age deemed to be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive oral tamoxifen 20 mg daily or matching placebo for 5 years. Patients were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups by telephone or fax according to a block randomisation schedule (permuted block sizes of six or ten). Patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment by use of central randomisation and coded drug supply. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of breast cancer (invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ), analysed by intention to treat. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess breast cancer occurrence and mortality. The trial is closed to recruitment and active treatment is completed, but long-term follow-up is ongoing. This trial is registered with controlledtrials.com, number ISRCTN91879928. Findings: Between April 14, 1992, and March 30, 2001, 7154 eligible women recruited from genetics clinics and breast care clinics in eight countries were enrolled into the IBIS-I trial and were randomly allocated to the two treatment groups: 3579 to tamoxifen and 3575 to placebo. After a median follow up of 16·0 years (IQR 14·1-17·6), 601 breast cancers have been reported (251 [7·0%] in 3579 patients in the tamoxifen group vs 350 [9·8%] in 3575 women in the placebo group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·71 [95% CI 0·60-0·83], p<0·0001). The risk of developing breast cancer was similar between years 0-10 (226 [6·3%] in 3575 women in the placebo group vs 163 [4·6%] in 3579 women in the tamoxifen group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·72 [95% CI 0·59-0·88], p=0·001) and after 10 years (124 [3·8%] in 3295 women vs 88 [2·6%] in 3343, respectively; HR 0·69 [0·53-0·91], p=0·009). The greatest reduction in risk was seen in invasive oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (HR 0·66 [95% CI 0·54-0·81], p<0·0001) and ductal carcinoma in situ (0·65 [0·43-1·00], p=0·05), but no effect was noted for invasive oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (HR 1·05 [95% CI 0·71-1·57], p=0·8). Interpretation: These results show that tamoxifen offers a very long period of protection after treatment cessation, and thus substantially improves the benefit-to-harm ratio of the drug for breast cancer prevention.

DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)71171-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2014 Avery-Kiejda KA, Braye SG, Forbes JF, Scott RJ, 'The expression of Dicer and Drosha in matched normal tissues, tumours and lymph node metastases in triple negative breast cancer', BMC CANCER, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-253
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2014 Juraskova I, Butow P, Bonner C, Bell ML, Smith AB, Seccombe M, et al., 'Improving decision making about clinical trial participation - a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for women considering participation in the IBIS-II breast cancer prevention trial', British Journal of Cancer, (2014) [C1]

Background:Decision aids may improve informed consent in clinical trial recruitment, but have not been evaluated in this context. This study investigated whether decision aids (DA... [more]

Background:Decision aids may improve informed consent in clinical trial recruitment, but have not been evaluated in this context. This study investigated whether decision aids (DAs) can reduce decisional difficulties among women considering participation in the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study-II (IBIS-II) trial. Methods:The IBIS-II trial investigated breast cancer prevention with anastrazole in two cohorts: women with increased risk (Prevention), and women treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Australia, New Zealand and United Kingdom participants were randomised to receive a DA (DA group) or standard trial consent materials (control group). Questionnaires were completed after deciding about participation in IBIS-II (post decision) and 3 months later (follow-up). Results:Data from 112 Prevention and 34 DCIS participants were analysed post decision (73 DA; 73 control); 95 Prevention and 24 DCIS participants were analysed at follow-up (58 DA; 61 control). There was no effect on the primary outcome of decisional conflict. The DCIS-DA group had higher knowledge post decision, and the Prevention-DA group had lower decisional regret at follow-up. Conclusions:This was the first study to evaluate a DA in the clinical trial setting. The results suggest DAs can potentially increase knowledge and reduce decisional regret about clinical trial participation.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 3 June 2014; doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.144 www.bjcancer.com.

DOI 10.1038/bjc.2014.144
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Forbes JF, Dowsett M, Knox J, Cawthorn S, et al., 'Anastrozole for prevention of breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women (IBIS-II): an international, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial', LANCET, 383 1041-1048 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62292-8
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 48
2014 Huober J, Cole BF, Rabaglio M, Giobbie-Hurder A, Wu J, Ejlertsen B, et al., 'Symptoms of endocrine treatment and outcome in the BIG 1-98 study', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 143 159-169 (2014) [C1]

There may be a relationship between the incidence of vasomotor and arthralgia/myalgia symptoms and treatment outcomes for postmenopausal breast cancer patients with endocrine-resp... [more]

There may be a relationship between the incidence of vasomotor and arthralgia/myalgia symptoms and treatment outcomes for postmenopausal breast cancer patients with endocrine-responsive disease who received adjuvant letrozole or tamoxifen. Data on patients randomized into the monotherapy arms of the BIG 1-98 clinical trial who did not have either vasomotor or arthralgia/myalgia/carpal tunnel (AMC) symptoms reported at baseline, started protocol treatment and were alive and disease-free at the 3-month landmark (n = 4,798) and at the 12-month landmark (n = 4,682) were used for this report. Cohorts of patients with vasomotor symptoms, AMC symptoms, neither, or both were defined at both 3 and 12 months from randomization. Landmark analyses were performed for disease-free survival (DFS) and for breast cancer free interval (BCFI), using regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Median follow-up was 7.0 years. Reporting of AMC symptoms was associated with better outcome for both the 3- and 12-month landmark analyses [e.g., 12-month landmark, HR (95 % CI) for DFS = 0.65 (0.49-0.87), and for BCFI = 0.70 (0.49-0.99)]. By contrast, reporting of vasomotor symptoms was less clearly associated with DFS [12-month DFS HR (95 % CI) = 0.82 (0.70-0.96)] and BCFI (12-month DFS HR (95 % CI) = 0.97 (0.80-1.18). Interaction tests indicated no effect of treatment group on associations between symptoms and outcomes. While reporting of AMC symptoms was clearly associated with better DFS and BCFI, the association between vasomotor symptoms and outcome was less clear, especially with respect to breast cancer-related events. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOI 10.1007/s10549-013-2792-7
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 McCarthy N, Boyle F, Zdenkowski N, Bull J, Leong E, Simpson A, et al., 'Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with sequential anthracycline-docetaxel with gemcitabine for large operable or locally advanced breast cancer: ANZ 0502 (NeoGem)', BREAST, 23 142-151 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.breast.2013.12.001
2014 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Cawthorn S, Hamed H, Holli K, Howell A, Forbes JF, 'Tamoxifen for prevention of breast cancer: Extended long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I breast cancer prevention trial', The Lancet Oncology, (2014)

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer... [more]

Background: Four previously published randomised clinical trials have shown that tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in healthy women at increased risk of breast cancer in the first 10 years of follow-up. We report the long-term follow-up of the IBIS-I trial, in which the participants and investigators remain largely masked to treatment allocation. Methods: In the IBIS-I randomised controlled trial, premenopausal and postmenopausal women 35-70 years of age deemed to be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive oral tamoxifen 20 mg daily or matching placebo for 5 years. Patients were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups by telephone or fax according to a block randomisation schedule (permuted block sizes of six or ten). Patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment by use of central randomisation and coded drug supply. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of breast cancer (invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ), analysed by intention to treat. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess breast cancer occurrence and mortality. The trial is closed to recruitment and active treatment is completed, but long-term follow-up is ongoing. This trial is registered with controlledtrials.com, number ISRCTN91879928. Findings: Between April 14, 1992, and March 30, 2001, 7154 eligible women recruited from genetics clinics and breast care clinics in eight countries were enrolled into the IBIS-I trial and were randomly allocated to the two treatment groups: 3579 to tamoxifen and 3575 to placebo. After a median follow up of 16·0 years (IQR 14·1-17·6), 601 breast cancers have been reported (251 [7·0%] in 3579 patients in the tamoxifen group vs 350 [9·8%] in 3575 women in the placebo group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·71 [95% CI 0·60-0·83], p<0·0001). The risk of developing breast cancer was similar between years 0-10 (226 [6·3%] in 3575 women in the placebo group vs 163 [4·6%] in 3579 women in the tamoxifen group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·72 [95% CI 0·59-0·88], p=0·001) and after 10 years (124 [3·8%] in 3295 women vs 88 [2·6%] in 3343, respectively; HR 0·69 [0·53-0·91], p=0·009). The greatest reduction in risk was seen in invasive oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (HR 0·66 [95% CI 0·54-0·81], p<0·0001) and ductal carcinoma in situ (0·65 [0·43-1·00], p=0·05), but no effect was noted for invasive oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (HR 1·05 [95% CI 0·71-1·57], p=0·8). Interpretation: These results show that tamoxifen offers a very long period of protection after treatment cessation, and thus substantially improves the benefit-to-harm ratio of the drug for breast cancer prevention. Funding: Cancer Research UK (UK) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia).

DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)71171-4
Citations Web of Science - 3
2014 Sestak I, Singh S, Cuzick J, Blake GM, Patel R, Gossiel F, et al., 'Changes in bone mineral density at 3 years in postmenopausal women receiving anastrozole and risedronate in the IBIS-II bone substudy: an international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.', The Lancet. Oncology, 15 1460-1468 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/s1470-2045(14)71035-6
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014 Avery-Kiejda KA, Braye SG, Mathe A, Forbes JF, Scott RJ, 'Decreased expression of key tumour suppressor microRNAs is associated with lymph node metastases in triple negative breast cancer', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy that develops in women, responsible for the highest cancer-associated death rates. Triple negative breast cancers represent... [more]

Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy that develops in women, responsible for the highest cancer-associated death rates. Triple negative breast cancers represent an important subtype that have an aggressive clinical phenotype, are associated with a higher likelihood of metastasis and are not responsive to current targeted therapies. miRNAs have emerged as an attractive candidate for molecular biomarkers and treatment targets in breast cancer, but their role in the progression of triple negative breast cancer remains largely unexplored.Methods: This study has investigated miRNA expression profiles in 31 primary triple negative breast cancer cases and in 13 matched lymph node metastases compared with 23 matched normal breast tissues to determine miRNAs associated with the initiation of this disease subtype and those associated with its metastasis.Results: 71 miRNAs were differentially expressed in triple negative breast cancer, the majority of which have previously been associated with breast cancer, including members of the miR-200 family and the miR-17-92 oncogenic cluster, suggesting that the majority of miRNAs involved in the initiation of triple negative breast cancer are not subtype specific. However, the repertoire of miRNAs expressed in lymph node negative and lymph node positive triple negative breast cancers were largely distinct from one another. In particular, miRNA profiles associated with lymph node negative disease tended to be up-regulated, while those associated with lymph node positive disease were down-regulated and largely overlapped with the profiles of their matched lymph node metastases. From this, 27 miRNAs were identified that are associated with metastatic capability in the triple negative breast cancer subtype.Conclusions: These results provide novel insight into the repertoire of miRNAs that contribute to the initiation of and progression to lymph node metastasis in triple negative breast cancer and have important implications for the treatment of this breast cancer subtype. © 2014 Avery-Kiejda et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-51
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2014 Avery-Kiejda KA, Braye SG, Forbes JF, Scott RJ, 'The expression of Dicer and Drosha in matched normal tissues, tumours and lymph node metastases in triple negative breast cancer.', BMC Cancer, 14 253 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-253
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2013 Davies C, Pan H, Godwin J, Gray R, Arriagada R, Raina V, et al., 'Long-term effects of continuing adjuvant tamoxifen to 10 years versus stopping at 5 years after diagnosis of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: ATLAS, a randomised trial', LANCET, 381 805-816 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61963-1
Citations Scopus - 256Web of Science - 225
2013 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Bonanni B, Costantino JP, Cummings S, DeCensi A, et al., 'Selective oestrogen receptor modulators in prevention of breast cancer: an updated meta-analysis of individual participant data', LANCET, 381 1827-1834 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60140-3
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 63
2013 Afentakis M, Dowsett M, Sestak I, Salter J, Howell T, Buzdar A, et al., 'Immunohistochemical BAG1 expression improves the estimation of residual risk by IHC4 in postmenopausal patients treated with anastrazole or tamoxifen: a TransATAC study', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, 140 253-262 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-013-2628-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Coleman R, de Boer R, Eidtmann H, Llombart A, Davidson N, Neven P, et al., 'Zoledronic acid (zoledronate) for postmenopausal women with early breast cancer receiving adjuvant letrozole (ZO-FAST study): final 60-month results', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, 24 398-405 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mds277
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 59
2013 Goldhirsch A, Winer EP, Coates AS, Gelber RD, Piccart-Gebhart M, Thürlimann B, et al., 'Personalizing the treatment of women with early breast cancer: Highlights of the st gallen international expert consensus on the primary therapy of early breast Cancer 2013', Annals of Oncology, 24 2206-2223 (2013) [C1]

The 13th St Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference (2013) Expert Panel reviewed and endorsed substantial new evidence on aspects of the local and regional therapies for ear... [more]

The 13th St Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference (2013) Expert Panel reviewed and endorsed substantial new evidence on aspects of the local and regional therapies for early breast cancer, supporting less extensive surgery to the axilla and shorter durations of radiation therapy. It refined its earlier approach to the classification and management of luminal disease in the absence of amplification or overexpression of the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2) oncogene, while retaining essentially unchanged recommendations for the systemic adjuvant therapy of HER2-positive and 'triple-negative' disease. The Panel again accepted that conventional clinico-pathological factors provided a surrogate subtype classification, while noting that in those areas of the world where multi-gene molecular assays are readily available many clinicians prefer to base chemotherapy decisions for patients with luminal disease on these genomic results rather than the surrogate subtype definitions. Several multi-gene molecular assays were recognized as providing accurate and reproducible prognostic information, and in some cases prediction of response to chemotherapy. Cost and availability preclude their application in many environments at the present time. Broad treatment recommendations are presented. Such recommendations do not imply that each Panel member agrees: indeed, among more than 100 questions, only one (trastuzumab duration) commanded 100% agreement. The various recommendations in fact carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the nuanced wording of the text below and in the votes recorded in supplementary Appendix S1, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment will as always involve clinical consideration of disease extent, host factors, patient preferences and social and economic constraints. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdt303
Citations Scopus - 307
2013 Lee C, Gebski VJ, Coates AS, Veillard A-S, Harvey V, Tattersall MHN, et al., 'Trade-offs in quality of life and survival with chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer: mature results of a randomized trial comparing single-agent mitoxantrone with combination cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil and prednisone', SpringerPlus, 2 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/2193-1801-2-391
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Sestak I, Kealy R, Nikoloff M, Fontecha M, Forbes JF, Howell A, Cuzick J, 'Relationships between CYP2D6 phenotype, breast cancer and hot flushes in women at high risk of breast cancer receiving prophylactic tamoxifen: results from the IBIS-I trial', British Journal of Cancer, 107 230-233 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2012 Sestak I, Harvie M, Howell A, Forbes JF, Dowsett M, Cuzick J, 'Weight change associated with anastrozole and tamoxifen treatment in postmenopausal women with or at high risk of developing breast cancer', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 134 727-734 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2085-6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
2012 Toi M, Benson JR, Winer EP, Forbes JF, Von Minckwitz G, Golshan M, et al., 'Preoperative systemic therapy in locoregional management of early breast cancer: Highlights from the Kyoto Breast Cancer Consensus Conference', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 136 919-926 (2012) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Bliss JM, Kilburn LS, Coleman RE, Forbes JF, Coates AS, Jones SE, et al., 'Disease-related outcomes with long-term follow-up: An updated analysis of the Intergroup Exemestane Study', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 30 709-717 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2010.33.7899
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 27
2012 Ewertz M, Gray KP, Regan MM, Ejlertsen B, Price KN, Thurlimann B, et al., 'Obesity and risk of recurrence or death after adjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole or tamoxifen in the Breast International Group 1-98 trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 30 3967-3975 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23
2012 Gelmon K, Gnant M, Bonneterre J, Toi M, Hudis C, Robertson JFR, et al., 'The sequential use of endocrine treatment for advanced breast cancer: Where are we?', Annals of Oncology, 23 1378-1386 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
2012 Karlsson P, Cole BF, Chua BH, Price KN, Lindtner J, Collins JP, et al., 'Patterns and risk factors for locoregional failures after mastectomy for breast cancer: An International Breast Cancer Study Group Report', Annals of Oncology, 23 2852-2858 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2011 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Pinder SE, Ellis IO, Forsyth S, Bundred NJ, et al., 'Effect of tamoxifen and radiotherapy in women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ: Long-term results from the UK/ANZ DCIS trial', The Lancet Oncology, 12 21-29 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/s1470-2045(10)70266-7
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 97
2011 Loi S, Symmans WF, Bartlett JMS, Fumagalli D, Van'T Veer L, Forbes JF, et al., 'Proposals for uniform collection of biospecimens from neoadjuvant breast cancer clinical trials: Timing and specimen types', The Lancet Oncology, 12 1162-1168 (2011) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2011 Cuzick J, Decensi A, Arun B, Brown PH, Castiglione M, Dunn B, et al., 'Preventive therapy for breast cancer: A consensus statement', The Lancet Oncology, 12 496-503 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 84
2011 Cuzick J, Warwick J, Pinney E, Duffy SW, Cawthorn S, Howell A, et al., 'Tamoxifen-induced reduction in mammographic density and breast cancer risk reduction: A nested case-control study', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 103 744-752 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djr079
Citations Scopus - 118Web of Science - 106
2011 Dowsett M, Salter J, Zabaglo L, Mallon E, Howell A, Buzdar AU, et al., 'Predictive algorithms for adjuvant therapy: TransATAC', Steroids, 76 777-780 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2011 Huober JB, Cole BF, Wu J, Giobbie-Hurder A, Rabaglio M, Mouridsen HT, et al., 'Symptoms of endocrine treatment and outcome: A retrospective analysis of the monotherapy arms of the BIG 1-98 trial', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 29 (2011) [E3]
2011 Kiely BE, Phillips K, Francis PA, Boyle FM, Forbes JF, Fox SB, et al., 'ANZ1001 SORBET: Study of Oestrogen Receptor Beta and Efficacy of Tamoxifen-A single-arm, phase II study of the efficacy of tamoxifen in triple-negative but estrogen receptor beta-positive metastatic breast cancer.', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 29 (2011) [E3]
2011 Sestak I, Harvie M, Howell A, Forbes JF, Dowsett M, Cuzick JM, 'Weight change associated with anastrozole and tamoxifen treatment in postmenopausal women with breast cancer or at high risk of developing it', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 29 (2011) [E3]
2011 Valero V, Forbes JF, Pegram MD, Pienkowski T, Eiermann W, Von Minckwitz G, et al., 'Multicenter phase III randomized trial comparing docetaxel and trastuzumab with docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab as first-line chemotherapy for patients with HER2-gene-amplified metastatic breast cancer (BCIRG 007 Study): Two highly active therapeutic regimens', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 149-156 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2010.28.6450
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 78
2011 Tang G, Cuzick J, Costantino JP, Dowsett M, Forbes JF, Crager M, et al., 'Risk of recurrence and chemotherapy benefit for patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Recurrence score alone and integrated with pathologic and clinical factors', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 4365-7372 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2011.35.3714
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 25
2011 Ring A, Sestak I, Baum M, Howell A, Buzdar A, Dowsett M, et al., 'Influence of comorbidities and age on risk of death without recurrence: A retrospective analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination Trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 4266-4272 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 27
2011 Colleoni M, Giobbie-Hurder A, Regan MM, Thurlimann B, Mouridsen H, Mauriac L, et al., 'Analyses adjusting for selective crossover show improved overall survival with adjuvant letrozole compared with tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 Study', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 1117-1124 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 51
2011 Cuzick J, Dowsett M, Pineda S, Wale C, Salter J, Quinn E, et al., 'Prognostic value of a combined estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki-67, and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Immunohistochemical Score and comparison with the Genomic Health Recurrence Score in early breast cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 4273-4278 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2010.31.2835
Citations Scopus - 201Web of Science - 183
2011 Stockler MR, Harvey VJ, Francis PA, Byrne MJ, Ackland S, Fitzharris B, et al., 'Capecitabine versus classical cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29 4498-4504 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Stephen Ackland
2011 Forbes JF, Goldhirsch A, Wood WC, Coates AS, Gelber RD, Thürlimann B, Senn HJ, 'Strategies for Subtypes - Dealing with the Diversity of Breast Cancer: highlights of the St. Gallen International Expert Consensus on the Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer 2011', Annals of Oncology, 22 1376-1347 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdr304
Citations Scopus - 924
2011 Viale G, Regan MM, Dell'Orto P, Mastropasqua MG, Maiorano E, Rasmussen BB, et al., 'Which patients benefit most from adjuvant aromatase inhibitors? Results using a composite measure of prognostic risk in the BIG 1-98 randomized trial', Annals of Oncology, 22 2201-2207 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdq738
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 25
2011 Toi M, Winer EP, Inamoto T, Benson JR, Forbes JF, Mitsumori M, et al., 'Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: Highlights from the Kyoto Consensus Conference', Annals of Surgical Oncology, 18 2885-2892 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1245/s10434-011-1666-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2011 Regan MM, Neven P, Giobbie-Hurder A, Goldhirsch A, Ejlertsen B, Mauriac L, et al., 'Assessment of letrozole and tamoxifen alone and in sequence for postmenopausal women with steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: The BIG 1-98 randomised clinical trial at 8.1 years median follow-up', Lancet Oncology, 12 1101-1108 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 86
2011 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Baum M, Buzdar A, Howell A, Dowsett M, Forbes JF, '10-year analysis of the ATAC trial: Wrong conclusion? - Authors' reply', The Lancet Oncology, 12 217 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/s1470-2045(11)70050-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2010 Forbes JF, Tang G, Cuzick J, Wale C, Costantino JP, Crager M, et al., 'Recurrence risk of node-negative and ER-positive early-stage breast cancer patients by combining recurrence score, pathologic, and clinical information: A meta-analysis approach', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 28 s509 (2010) [E3]
2010 Pinder SE, Duggan C, Ellis IO, Cuzick J, Forbes JF, Bishop H, et al., 'A new pathological system for grading DCIS with improved prediction of local recurrence: Results from the UKCCCR/ANZ DCIS Trial', British Journal of Cancer, 103 94-100 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605718
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 30
2010 Tang G, Cuzick J, Wale C, Costantino JP, Crager M, Shak S, et al., 'Recurrence risk of node-negative and ER-positive early-stage breast cancer patients by combining recurrence score, pathologic, and clinical information: A meta-analysis approach', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 28 (2010) [E3]
2010 Sestak I, Distler W, Forbes JF, Dowsett M, Howell A, Cuzick J, 'Effect of body mass index on recurrences in Tamoxifen and Anastrozole treated women: An exploratory analysis from the ATAC trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 28 3411-3415 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2009.27.2021
Citations Scopus - 101Web of Science - 95
2010 Dowsett M, Cuzick J, Ingle J, Coates A, Forbes JF, Bliss J, et al., 'Meta-analysis of breast cancer outcomes in adjuvant trials of aromatase inhibitors versus Tamoxifen', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 28 509-518 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2009.23.1274
Citations Scopus - 306Web of Science - 273
2010 Dowsett M, Cuzick J, Wale C, Forbes JF, Mallon EA, Salter J, et al., 'Prediction of risk of distant recurrence using the 21-gene recurrence score in node-negative and node-positive postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with anastrozole or tamoxifen: A TransATAC Study', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 28 1829-1834 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2009.24.4798
Citations Scopus - 186Web of Science - 167
2010 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Baum M, Buzdar A, Howell A, Dowsett M, Forbes JF, 'Effect of anastrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer: 10-year analysis of the ATAC trial', The Lancet Oncology, 11 1135-1141 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(10)70257-6
Citations Scopus - 260Web of Science - 229
2009 Mouridsen H, Giobbie-Hurder A, Goldhirsch A, Thurlimann B, Paridaens R, Smith I, et al., 'Letrozole therapy alone or in sequence with Tamoxifen in women with breast cancer', New England Journal of Medicine, 361 766-776 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa0810818
Citations Scopus - 254Web of Science - 214
2009 Thurlimann B, Price KN, Gelber RD, Holmberg SB, Crivellari D, Colleoni M, et al., 'Is chemotherapy necessary for premenopausal women with lower-risk node-positive, endocrine responsive breast cancer? 10-Year update of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 11-93', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 113 137-144 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-008-9912-9
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
2009 Pagani O, Gelber S, Simoncini E, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Price KN, Gelber RD, et al., 'Is adjuvant chemotherapy of benefit for postmenopausal women who receive endocrine treatment for highly endocrine-responsive, node-positive breast cancer? International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VII and 12-93', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 116 491-500 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-008-0225-9
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
2009 Rabaglio M, Sun Z, Price KN, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Hawle H, Thurlimann B, et al., 'Bone fractures among postmenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer treated with 5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial', Annals of Oncology, 20 1489-1498 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdp033
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 61
2009 Green MD, Francis PA, Gebski V, Harvey V, Karapetis C, Chan A, et al., 'Gefitinib treatment in hormone-resistant and hormone receptor-negative advanced breast cancer', Annals of Oncology, 20 1813-1817 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdp202
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
2008 Juraskova I, Butow P, Lopez A, Seccombe MA, Coates A, Boyle F, et al., 'Improving informed consent: Pilot of a decision aid for women invited to participate in a breast cancer prevention trial (IBIS-II DCIS)', Health Expectations, 11 252-262 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1369-7625.2008.00498.x
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 26
2008 Sestak I, Cuzick J, Sapunar F, Eastell R, Forbes JF, Bianco AR, Buzdar AU, 'Risk factors for joint symptoms in patients enrolled in the ATAC trial: A retrospective, exploratory analysis', Lancet Oncology, 9 866-872 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/s1470-2045(08)70182-7
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 82
2008 Atac Trialists' Group, Forbes JF, 'Effect of anastrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer: 100-month analysis of the ATAC trial', Lancet Oncology, 9 45-53 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/s1470-2045(07)70385-6
Citations Scopus - 89Web of Science - 96
2008 Forbes JF, Buchanan D, Coates A, Piccart M, Trudeau M, Saghir N, et al., 'International Trends and Challenges in Breast Cancer as Perceived by Leaders in Medicine, Public Policy and Advocacy', American Journal of Clinical Oncology: cancer clinical trials, 31 510 (2008)
2008 Bernhard J, Zahrieh D, Zhang JJ, Martinelli G, Basser R, Hurny C, et al., 'Quality of life and quality-adjusted survival (Q-TWiST) in patients receiving dose-intensive or standard dose chemotherapy for high-risk primary breast cancer', British Journal of Cancer, 98 25-33 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604092
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2008 Gao J, Warren R, Warren-Forward H, Forbes JF, 'Reproducibility of visual assessment on mammographic density', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 108 121-127 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-007-9581-0
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward
2008 Crivellari D, Sun Z, Coates AS, Price KN, Thurlimann B, Mouridsen H, et al., 'Letrozole compared with tamoxifen for elderly patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer: The BIG 1-98 trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 26 1972-1979 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2007.14.0459
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 64
2008 Dowsett M, Allred C, Knox J, Quinn E, Salter J, Wale C, et al., 'Relationship between quantitative estrogen and progesterone receptor expression and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) status with recurrence in the arimidex, tamoxifen, alone or in combination trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 26 1059-1065 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2007.12.9437
Citations Scopus - 231Web of Science - 209
2008 Leyland-Jones BR, Ambrosone CB, Bartlett J, Ellis MJC, Enos RA, Raji A, et al., 'Recommendations for collection and handling of specimens from group breast cancer clinical trials', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 26 5638-5644 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2007.15.1712
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 48
2007 Juraskova I, Butow P, Lopez AL, Seccombe MA, Boyle F, McCarthy N, Forbes JF, 'Improving informed consent in clinical trials: Successful piloting of a decision aid', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25 1443-1444 (2007) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2007 Bernhard J, Zahrieh D, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Hurny C, Gelber RD, Forbes JF, et al., 'Adjuvant chemotherapy followed by goserelin compared with either modality alone: The impact on amenorrhea, hot flashes, and quality of life in premenopausal patients--The International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25 263-270 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2005.04.5393
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 29
2007 Coates AS, Keshaviah A, Thurlimann B, Mouridsen H, Mauriac L, Forbes JF, et al., 'Five years of letrozole compared with tamoxifen as initial adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer: Update of study BIG 1-98', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25 486-492 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2006.08.8617
Citations Scopus - 591Web of Science - 530
2007 Mouridsen H, Keshaviah A, Coates AS, Rabaglio M, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Sun Z, et al., 'Cardiovascular adverse events during adjuvant endocrine therapy for early breast cancer using letrozole or tamoxifen: Safety analysis of BIG 1-98 Trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25 5715-5722 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/jco.2007.12.1665
Citations Scopus - 77Web of Science - 56
2007 Thurliumann B, Crivellari D, Forbes JF, Gelber RD, Goldhirsch A, Wallgren A, et al., 'The role of the number of uninvolved lymph nodes in predicting locoregional recurrence in breast cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25 2019-2026 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2006.09.8152
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
2007 Mauriac L, Keshaviah A, Debled M, Mouridsen H, Forbes JF, Thurlimann B, et al., 'Predictors of early relapse in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 trial', Annals of Oncology, 18 859-867 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdm001
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 92
2007 The International Breast Cancer Study Group, Forbes JF, 'Effects of a treatment gap during adjuvant chemotherapy in node-positive breast cancer: Results of International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trials 13-93 and 14-93', Annals of Oncology, 18 1177-1184 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdm091
2007 Forbes JF, 'Controversies in the use of sentinel nodes in the elderly', BREAST, 16 S5-S6 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/S0960-9776(07)70042-5
Citations Web of Science - 1
2007 Santen RJ, Boyd NF, Chlebowski RT, Cummings S, Cuzick J, Dowsett M, et al., 'Critical assessment of new risk factors for breast cancer: considerations for development of an improved risk prediction model', Endocrine-Related Cancer, 14 169-187 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1677/ERC-06-0045
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 81
2007 Cuzick J, Forbes JF, Sestak I, Cawthorn S, Hamed H, Holli K, Howell A, 'Long-term results of tamoxifen prophylaxis for breast cancer-96-month follow-up of the randomized IBIS-I trial', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 99 272-282 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djk049
Citations Scopus - 290Web of Science - 258
2007 Easton DF, Search Collaborators Including, Forbes JF, 'Genome-wide association study identifies novel breast cancer susceptibility loci', Nature, 447 1087-1093 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/nature05887
Citations Scopus - 1359
Co-authors Rodney Scott
2007 Coombes R, Kilburn L, Snowdon C, Paridaens R, Coleman R, Jones S, et al., 'Survival and safety of exemestane versus tamoxifen after 2-3 years' tamoxifen treatment (Intergroup Exemestane Study): a randomised controlled trial', Lancet, 369 559-570 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(07)60200-1
Citations Scopus - 564Web of Science - 503
2006 Perez EA, Forbes JF, 'From tamoxifen to letrozole: Changing paradigms for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer - Introduction', SEMINARS IN ONCOLOGY, 33 S1-S1 (2006)
DOI 10.1053/j.seminoncol.2006.03.023
2006 Forbes JF, 'The Use of Early Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy: Contributions From the BIG 1-98 Letrozole Trial', Seminars in Oncology, 33 S2-S7 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1053/j.seminoncol.2006.03.026
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2006 Duffy S, Jackson TL, Lansdown M, Philips K, Wells M, Pollard S, et al., 'The ATAC ('Arimidex', tamoxifen, alone or in combination) adjuvant breast cancer trial: First results of the endometrial sub-protocol following 2 years of treatment', Human Reproduction, 21 545-553 (2006)

Background: Tamoxifen treatment results in a doubling of the risk of endometrial cancer after 1-2 years of treatment and a quadrupling after 5 years. Anastrozole, a third-generati... [more]

Background: Tamoxifen treatment results in a doubling of the risk of endometrial cancer after 1-2 years of treatment and a quadrupling after 5 years. Anastrozole, a third-generation aromatase inhibitor, with superior efficacy to tamoxifen, may also offer tolerability benefits in terms of effects on the endometrium. Methods and results: A sub-protocol of the ATAC trial compared the incidence/type of intrauterine changes following treatment with these agents in a subgroup of patients (n = 285) from the main trial. After 2 years anastrozole treatment, endometrial thickness remained = 5 mm (baseline: 3.0 mm); in patients receiving tamoxifen, endometrial thickness increased by 3.2 mm to 7.0 mm, with a similar trend in the combination group. At baseline, 26/285 patients (9.1%) had endometrial abnormalities, most commonly polyps. After 2 years the number of endometrial abnormalities appeared lower with anastrozole treatment compared with tamoxifen although these differences were not statistically significant (odds ratio: 0.44; 95% confidence interval 0.146, 1.314; P = 0.14). Most abnormalities occurred within the first year of treatment (anastrozole: 4/6; tamoxifen: 7/10; combination: 10/16; total: 21/32). Fewer patients in the anastrozole group (1.4%) required medical intervention (tamoxifen 12.5%; combination 13.6%). Conclusions: Fewer endometrial abnormalities occurred during 2 years treatment with anastrozole compared with tamoxifen although statistical significance was not reached in this sub-protocol analysis. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/dei322
Citations Scopus - 45
2006 Buzdar A, Chlebowski R, Cuzick J, Duffy S, Forbes JF, Jonat W, Ravdin P, 'Defining the role of aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant endocrine treatment of early breast cancer', Current Medical Research and Opinion, 22 1575-1585 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1185/030079906X120940
Citations Scopus - 23
2006 Forbes JF, 'The Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group: Some contributions to breast cancer trials', Cancer Forum, 30 118-121 (2006)

The Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group was formed in 1978 after the first adjuvant therapy trials were published. This commenced a new era of clinical trials and th... [more]

The Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group was formed in 1978 after the first adjuvant therapy trials were published. This commenced a new era of clinical trials and the commencement of substantial global collaboration, particularly with the International Breast Cancer Study Group. The Australia New Zealand Group is currently conducting 46 trials encompassing prevention and early and advanced disease. In the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group model the elected Board of Directors is responsible for legal and financial affairs, the Scientific Advisory Committee sets the research agenda and the Operations Office is responsible for conduct of the research program. The Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group Statistical Centre is contracted out to the National Health and Medical Research Centre Clinical Trials Centre. The Australia New Zealand Group has had peer reviewed research funding (National Health and Medical Research Council) since 1979 and has contributed to more than 400 peer reviewed publications. The research program has always been based on quality science and multidiscipline collaboration. The Breast Cancer Institute of Australia was established to foster education and involvement of consumers in research. Important contributions have already been made by Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group researchers to the documented falls in breast cancer mortality and further improvements can be expected from new targeted therapy trials.

2006 Sestak I, Kealy R, Edwards R, Forbes JF, Cuziack J, 'Influence of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Tamoxifen-Induced Vasomotor Symptoms', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 24 3991-3996 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2005.04.3745
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2006 Carl-Magnus R, Forbes JF, Crivellari D, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Coates AS, 'Randomized Trial Comparing Axillary Clearance Versus No Axillary Clearance in Older patients With Breat Cancer: First Results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 10-93', journal of Clinical Oncology, 24 337-344 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2005.01.5784
Citations Scopus - 137Web of Science - 107
2006 Cuzick J, Forbes JF, Howell A, 'Re: Tamoxifen for the prevention of breast cancer: Current status of the national surgical adjuvant breast and bowel project P-1 study (Letter)', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 98 643 (2006) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2006 Forbes JF, Mourisden HT, Keshavia A, Mauriac L, Paridaens R, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Goldhirsch A, 'BIG 1-98: A Randomized double-blind Phase III Study Comparing Letrozole and Tamoxifen given in Sequence vs. Alone as Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Postmenopausal Women with Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 24 10s (2006)
2006 Juraskova I, Butow P, Lopez AL, Seccombe M, Forbes J, 'Improving informed consent to clinical trials: A pilot of a decision aid for women invited to participate in a breast cancer prevention trial (IBIS-II)', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 15 S280-S281 (2006)
2005 Forbes JF, Early Breast Cancer Trialists' CGE, 'Effects of radiotherapy and of differences in the extent of surgery for early breast cancer on local recurrence and 15-year survival: An overview of the randomised trials', Lancet, 366 2087-2106 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2247
2005 Forbes JF, 'Effects of Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy for Early Breast Cancer on Recurrence and 15-year Survival: an Overview of the Randomized Trials', The Lancet, 365 1687-1717 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(05)66544-0
2005 Forbes JF, 'Results of the ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination) Trial After Completion of 5 years' Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer', The Lancet, 365 60-62 (2005) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 1239
2005 Cuzick J, Howell A, Forbes JF, 'Early stopping of clinical trials (Commentary)', Breast Cancer Research, 7 181-183 (2005) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2005 Colleoni M, Li S, Gelber RD, Coates AS, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Price KN, et al., 'Timing of CMF chemotherapy in combination with tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with breast cancer: role of endocrine responsiveness of the tumor', Annals of Oncology, 16 716-725 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdi163
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
2005 Forbes JF, 'Letrozole vs. Tamoxifen as Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Postmenopausal Women with Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer. BIG 1-98: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Phase III Study', The Breast, 14 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0960-9776(05)80005-0
2005 Forbes JF, Cuzick J, 'Systemic Adjuvant Therapies for Early Breast Cancer: 15-year Results for Recurrence and Survival', Medical Journal of Australia, 183 447-448 (2005) [C2]
2005 Thurlimann B, Kehsaviah A, Coates A, Mouridsen H, Mauriac L, Forbes JF, et al., 'A Comparison of Letrozole and Tamoxifen in Postmenopausal Women with Early Breast Cancer', New England Journal of Medicine, 353 2747-2758 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa052258
Citations Scopus - 1037Web of Science - 898
2004 Bernhard J, Zahrieh D, Coates AS, Gelber RD, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Murray E, et al., 'Quantifying trade-offs: Quality of life and quality-adjusted survival in a randomised trial of chemotherapy in postmenopausal patients with lymph node-negative breast cancer', British Journal of Cancer, 91 1893-1901 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6602230
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2004 Cuzick J, Buzdar A, Baum M, Bianco R, Coleman R, Constenla M, et al., 'Adjuvant use of anastrozole in breast cancer', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 22 1524-1526 (2004)
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2004.99.165
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 4
2003 Baum M, Buzdar A, Cuzick J, Forbes J, Houghton J, Howell A, Sahmoud T, 'Anastrozole Alone or in Combination with Tamoxifen versus Tamoxifen Alone for Adjuvant Treatment of Postmenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination) Trial Efficacy and Safety Update Analyses', Cancer, 98 1802-1810 (2003)

BACKGROUND. The first analysis of the ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination) trial (median follow-up, 33 months) demonstrated that in adjuvant endocrine therapy for po... [more]

BACKGROUND. The first analysis of the ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination) trial (median follow-up, 33 months) demonstrated that in adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal patients with early-stage breast cancer, anastrozole was superior to tamoxifen in terms of disease-free survival (DFS), time to recurrence (TTR), and incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). In the current article, the results of the first efficacy update, based on a median follow-up period of 47 months, are reported along with the results of an updated safety analysis, performed 7 months after the first analysis (median duration of treatment, 36.9 months). METHODS. DFS, TTR, CLBC incidence, and safety were assessed in the same patient group as in the first analysis of the ATAC trial. RESULTS. DFS estimates at 4 years remained significantly more favorable (86.9% vs. 84.5%, respectively) for patients receiving anastrozole compared with those receiving tamoxifen (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.99; P = 0.03). The benefit generated by anastrozole in terms of DFS was even greater in patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96; P = 0.014). The HR for TTR also indicated a significant benefit for patients receiving anastrozole compared with those receiving tamoxifen (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.015), with additional benefit for patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.93; P = 0.007). CLBC incidence data also continued to favor anastrozole (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.38-1.02; P = 0.062), and statistical significance was achieved in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32-0.98; P = 0.042). The updated safety analysis also confirmed the findings of the first analysis, in that endometrial cancer (P = 0.007), vaginal bleeding and discharge (P < 0.001 for both), cerebrovascular events (P < 0.001), venous thromboembolic events (P < 0.001), and hot flashes (P < 0.001) all occurred less frequently in the anastrozole group, whereas musculoskeletal disorders and fractures (P < 0.001 for both) continued to occur less frequently in the tamoxifen group. These results indicated that the safety profile of anastrozole remained consistent. CONCLUSIONS. After an additional follow-up period, anastrozole continues to show superior efficacy, which is most apparent in the clinically relevant hormone receptor-positive population. Furthermore, anastrozole has numerous noteworthy advantages in terms of tolerability compared with tamoxifen. These findings suggest that the benefits of anastrozole are likely to be maintained in the long term and provide further support for the status of anastrozole as a valid treatment option for postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive early-stage breast cancer. © 2003 American Cancer Society.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.11745
Citations Scopus - 607
2003 George WD, Houghton J, Austoker J, Bishop H, Cuzick J, Fentiman IS, et al., 'Radiotherapy and tamoxifen in women with completely excised ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand: randomised controlled trial', LANCET, 362 95-102 (2003)
Citations Web of Science - 298
2003 Cykert S, Caine GJ, Blann AD, Stonelake PS, Kehoe ST, Lip GYH, et al., 'Tamoxifen for breast-cancer prevention [3] (multiple letters)', Lancet, 361 177-178 (2003)
Citations Scopus - 1
2003 Cuzick J, O'Neill C, Howell T, Forbes J, 'Anastrozole for ductal carcinoma in situ [2]', Lancet, 362 832-833 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(03)14257-2
Citations Scopus - 1
2003 Cuzick J, Forbes JF, Howell A, 'Tamoxifen for breast-cancer prevention', Lancet, 361 178 (2003) [C3]
2003 Cuzick J, Powles T, Veronesi U, Forbes JF, Edwards R, Ashley S, Boyle P, 'Overview of the main outcomes in breast-cancer prevention trials', The Lancet, 361 296-300 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(03)12342-2
Citations Scopus - 685Web of Science - 541
2003 Aapro MS, Forbes JF, 'Three years' follow-up from the ATAC trial is sufficient to change clinical practice: A debate', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 80 3-11 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1023/a:1025455130476
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 4
2003 Wallgren A, Bonetti M, Gelber R, Goldhirsch M, Castiglione-Gertsch S, Holmberg J, et al., 'Risk factors for Locoregional Recurrence Among Breast Cancer Patients: Results from international breast cancer study group I through VII', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 21 1205-1213 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2003.03.130
Citations Scopus - 147Web of Science - 127
2002 Forbes JF, 'First Results from the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study (IBIS-I): a Randomised Prevention Trial', The Lancet, 360 817-824 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(02)09962-2
2002 Forbes JF, Gradishar W, Ravdin P, 'Choosing between endocrine therapy and chemotherapy - or is there a role for combination therapy?', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 75 S37-S44 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2002 Forbes JF, 'Management of breast cancer risk - Screening versus prophylaxis', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 38 S38-S39 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0959-8049(02)80098-3
2002 Forbes JF, 'Chemoprevention: Inside and outside trials', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 38 S43-S44 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0959-8049(02)80106-X
2002 Forbes JF, International Breast Cancer Study Group, 'Endocrine Responsiveness and Tailoring Adjuvant Therapy for Postmenopausal Lymph Node-Negative Breast Cancer: A Randomized Trial', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 94 1054-1065 (2002)
DOI 10.1093/jnci/94.14.1054
Citations Web of Science - 77
2002 Forbes JF, 'Anastrozole alone or in combination with tamoxifen versus tamoxifen alone for adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with early breast cancer: first results of the ATAC randomised trial', The Lancet, 359 2131-2139 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(02)09088-8
Citations Scopus - 1477
2001 Klijn JGM, Blamey RW, Boccardo F, Tominaga T, Duchateau L, Sylvester R, et al., 'Combined tamoxifen and luteinuzing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist versus LHRH agonist alone in premenopausal advanced breast cancer: A meta-analysis of four randomized trials', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 19 343-353 (2001)

Purpose: The logic behind the application of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists in combination with tomoxifen in premenopausal women is that LHRH agonists on th... [more]

Purpose: The logic behind the application of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists in combination with tomoxifen in premenopausal women is that LHRH agonists on the one hand suppress the tamoxifen-induced stimulation of the pituitary-ovarian function and, on the other hand, seem as effective as surgical castration. This meta-analysis combines all randomized evidence to compare the combined treatment with LHRH agonist alone with respect to overall survival, progression-free survival, and objective response in premenopausal women with advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods: Four clinical trials randomizing a total of 506 premenopausal women with advanced breast cancer to LHRH agonist alone or to the combined treatment of LHRH agonist plus tomoxifen were identified. Meto-analytic techniques were used to analyze individual patient data from these trials. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.8 years, there was a significant survival benefit (stratified log-rank test, P = .02; hazards ratio [HR] =0.78) and progression-free survival benefit (stratified log-rank test, P = .0003; HR =0.70) in favor of the combined treatment. The overall response rate was significantly higher on combined endocrine treatment (stratified Mantel Haenszel test, P = .03; odds ratio =0.67). Conclusion: The combination of LHRH agonist plus tamoxifen is superior to LHRH agonist alone in premenopausal women with advanced breast cancer. Therefore, if a premenopausal woman with advanced breast cancer is thought to be suitable for endocrine treatment, it is proposed that the combination of a LHRH agonist plus tamoxifen be considered as the new standard treatment. © 2001 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Citations Scopus - 291
2001 Millar EKA, Pepperall D, Lee CS, Forbes JF, 're: p53 protein detection in breast epithelium by immunohistochemistry', BREAST, 10 263-265 (2001)
2001 Thurlimann B, Price K, Castiglione M, Coates A, Goldhirsch A, Gelber R, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of ovarian function suppression plux tamoxifen verses the same endocrine therapy plus chemotherapy: is chemotherapynecessary for premonopausalwomen withnonde-positive, endocrine-responsive breast cancer? First results of Intern', The Breast, 10(Supplement3) 130-138 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 47
2000 Colleoni M, O'Neill A, Goldhirsch A, Gelber R, Bonetti M, Thurlimann B, et al., 'Identifying breast cancer patients at high risk for bone metastases', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 18 (23) 3925-3935 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 61
2000 Crivellari D, Bonetti M, Gastiglione-Gertsch M, Gelber R, Rudenstam C-M, Thurlimann B, et al., 'Burdens and benefits of adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluoruoracil and tamoxifen for elderly patients with breast cancer: The International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VII', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 18 (7) 1412-1422 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 242Web of Science - 187
2000 Forbes JF, Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group, 'Favourable and Unfavourable Effects on Long-Term Survival of Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: an Overview of the Randomised Trials', The Lancet, 355 1757-1770 (2000)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(00)02263-7
1999 Forbes JF, 'Sequential Randomized Studies in Metastatic Breast Cancer: CMFP vs Doxorubicin / cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone or paclitaxel', Oncology, 13 s7 (1999)
1998 Bernhard J, Hurny C, Coates AS, Peterson HF, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Gelber RD, et al., 'Factors affecting baseline quality of life in two international adjuvant breast cancer trials', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CANCER, 78 686-693 (1998)
DOI 10.1038/bjc.1998.561
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 21
1998 Powell JT, Brady AR, Brown LC, Forbes JF, Fowkes FGR, Greenhalgh RM, et al., 'Mortality results for randomised controlled trial of early elective surgery or ultrasonographic surveillance for small abdominal aortic aneurysms', LANCET, 352 1649-1655 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 733Web of Science - 526
1998 Abe O, Abe R, Enomoto K, Kikuchi K, Koyama H, Nomura Y, et al., 'Tamoxifen for early breast cancer: An overview of the randomised trials', Lancet, 351 1451-1467 (1998)

Background: There have been many randomised trials of adjuvant tamoxifen among women with early breast cancer, and an updated overview of their results is presented. Methods: In 1... [more]

Background: There have been many randomised trials of adjuvant tamoxifen among women with early breast cancer, and an updated overview of their results is presented. Methods: In 1995, information was sought on each woman in any randomised trial that began before 1990 of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no tamoxifen before recurrence. Information was obtained and analysed centrally on each of 37,000 women in 55 such trials, comprising about 87% of the worldwide evidence. Compared with the previous such overview, this approximately doubles the amount of evidence from trials of about 5 years of tamoxifen and, taking all trials together, on events occurring more than 5 years after randomisation. Findings: Nearly 8000 of the women had a low, or zero, level of the oestrogen-receptor protein (ER) measured in their primary tumour. Among them, the overall effects of tamoxifen appeared to be small, and subsequent analyses of recurrence and total mortality are restricted to the remaining women (18,000 with ER-positive tumours, plus nearly 12,000 more with untested tumours, of which an estimated 8000 would have been ER-positive). For trials of 1 year, 2 years, and about 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, the proportional recurrence reductions produced among these 30,000 women during about 10 years of follow-up were 21% (SD 3), 29% (SD 2), and 47% (SD 3), respectively, with a highly significant trend towards greater effect with longer treatment (¿12 = 52.0, 2p < 0.00001). The corresponding proportional mortality reductions were 12% (SD 3), 17% (SD 3), and 26% (SD 4), respectively, and again the test for trend was significant (¿12 = 8.8) 2p = 0.003). The absolute improvement in recurrence was greater during the first 5 years, whereas the improvement in survival grew steadily larger throughout the first 10 years. The proportional mortality reductions were similar for women with node-positive and node-negative disease, but the absolute mortality reductions were greater in node-positive women. In the trials of about 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen the absolute improvements in 10-year survival were 10.9% (SD 2.5) for node-positive (61.4% vs 50.5% survival, 2p < 0.00001) and 5.6% (SD 1.3) for node-negative (78.9% vs 73.3% survival, 2p < 0.00001). These benefits appeared to be largely irrespective of age, menopausal status, daily tamoxifen dose (which was generally 20 mg), and of whether chemotherapy had been given to both groups. In terms of other outcomes among all women studied (ie, including those with 'ER-poor' tumours), the proportional reductions in contralateral breast cancer were 13% (SD 13), 26% (SD 9), and 47% (SD 9) in the trials of 1, 2, or about 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. The incidence of endometrial cancer was approximately doubled in trials of 1 or 2 years of tamoxifen and approximately quadrupled in trials of 5 years of tamoxifen (although the number of cases was small and these ratios were not significantly different from each other). The absolute decrease in contralateral breast cancer was about twice as large as the absolute increase in the incidence of endometrial cancer. Tamoxifen had no apparent effect on the incidence of colorectal cancer or, after exclusion of deaths from breast or endometrial cancer, on any of the other main categories of cause of death (total nearly 2000 such deaths; overall relative risk 0.99 [SD 0.05]). Interpretation: For women with tumours that have been reliably shown to be ER-negative, adjuvant tamoxifen remains a matter for research. However, some years of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment substantially improves the 10-year survival of women with ER-positive tumours and of women whose tumours are of unknown ER status, with the proportional reductions in breast cancer recurrence and in mortality appearing to be largely unaffected by other patient characteristics or treatments.

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)11423-4
Citations Scopus - 3257
1998 Hui R, Ball JR, Macmillan RD, Kenny FS, Prall OWJ, Campbell DH, et al., 'EMS1 gene expression in primary breast cancer: relationship to cyclin D1 and oestrogen receptor expression and patient survival', ONCOGENE, 17 1053-1059 (1998)
DOI 10.1038/sj.onc.1202023
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 66
1998 Rees B, Kelly K, Forbes J, 'The role of nurse counsellor support groups for women diagnosed with breast cancer at hunter breast screen', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 34 S42-S42 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0959-8049(97)89481-6
1998 Forbes JF, Early Breast Cancer Trialists¿ Collaborative Group, 'Ploychemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: an Overview of the Randomized Trials', The Lancet, 352 930-942 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(98)03301-7
1997 Forbes JF, 'The incidence of breast cancer: The Global Burden, public health considerations', SEMINARS IN ONCOLOGY, 24 S20-S35 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 3
1997 Crump M, Sawka CA, DeBoer G, Buchanan RB, Ingle JN, Forbes J, et al., 'An individual patient-based meta-analysis of tamoxifen versus ovarian ablation as first line endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, 44 201-210 (1997)
DOI 10.1023/A:1005833811584
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 42
1997 CastiglioneGertsch M, Goldhirsch A, Gusterson B, Bettelheim R, Reed R, Gusset H, et al., 'Effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in combination with tamoxifen for node-positive postmenopausal breast cancer patients', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 15 1385-1394 (1997)
Citations Web of Science - 95
1997 Byrne MJ, Gebski V, Forbes J, Tattersall MHN, Simes RJ, Coates AS, et al., 'Medroxyprogesterone acetate addition or substitution for tamoxifen in advanced tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer: A phase III randomized trial', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 15 3141-3148 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
1997 Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Castiglione M, ONeill A, Thurlimann B, Rudenstam CM, et al., 'Menstrual cycle and timing of breast surgery in premenopausal node-positive breast cancer: Results of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trial VI', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, 8 751-756 (1997)
DOI 10.1023/A:1008220301866
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 25
1997 Forbes JF, 'The control of breast cancer: The role of tamoxifen', SEMINARS IN ONCOLOGY, 24 S5-S19 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 1
1996 Clover K, Redman S, Forbes J, SansonFisher R, Callaghan T, 'Two sequential randomized trials of community participation to recruit women for mammographic screening', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 25 126-134 (1996)
DOI 10.1006/pmed.1996.0038
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
1996 Clarke M, Collins R, Davies C, Godwin J, Gray R, Peto R, et al., 'Ovarian ablation in early breast cancer: Overview of the randomised trials', LANCET, 348 1189-1196 (1996)
Citations Web of Science - 335
1996 CastiglioneGertsch M, Goldhirsch A, Gusterson B, Bettelheim R, Reed R, Gussett H, et al., 'Duration and reintroduction of adjuvant chemotherapy for node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 14 1885-1894 (1996)
Citations Web of Science - 72
1996 Rainsbury D, Kirkbride P, Vallis K, Kunkler I, Tierney A, Jodrell N, et al., 'Routine follow up of breast cancer in primary care [1]', British Medical Journal, 313 1547-1548 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 3
1996 Forbes JF, Marini G, Murray S, Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Castiglione-Gertsch M, et al., 'The Effect of Adjuvant Prednisone Combined with CMF on Patterns of Relapse and Occurrence of Second Malignancies in Patients with Breast Cancer', Annals of Oncology, 7 245-250 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 15
1996 Forbes JF, Hürny C, Bernhard J, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Coates AS, Peterson HF, et al., 'Impact of Adjuvant Therapy on Quality of Life in Women with Node-positive Operable Breast Cancer', The Lancet, 347 1279-1284 (1996)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(96)90936-8
Citations Scopus - 132Web of Science - 129
1995 Forbes JF, Crivellari D, Price KN, Hagen M, Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, et al., 'Routine tests during follow-up of patients after primary treatment for operable breast cancer', Annals of Oncology, 6 769-776 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 20
1995 JONAT W, KAUFMANN M, BLAMEY RW, HOWELL A, COLLINS JP, COATES A, et al., 'A RANDOMIZED STUDY TO COMPARE THE EFFECT OF THE LUTEINIZING-HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE (LHRH) ANALOG GOSERELIN WITH OR WITHOUT TAMOXIFEN IN PREMENOPAUSAL AND PERIMENOPAUSAL PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED BREAST-CANCER', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 31A 137-142 (1995)
DOI 10.1016/0959-8049(94)00415-2
Citations Web of Science - 68
1995 Forbes JF, Goldhirsch A, Gelber R, Castiglione M, Price KN, Fey M, et al., 'The best available adjuvant treatments are within the framework of clinical trials', Israel Journal of Medical Science, 31 144-154 (1995)
1995 NIU J, SHOU NH, FORBES JF, SUN XY, HU SY, LIU FJ, 'LAPAROSCOPIC EXPLORATION OF INTRAHEPATIC AND EXTRAHEPATIC BILE-DUCTS AND T-TUBE DRAINAGE', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 65 189-193 (1995)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1995.tb00605.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
1995 Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Castiglione M, Price KN, Rudenstam C-M, Lindtner J, et al., 'The best available adjuvant treatments are within the framework of clinical trials. The International Breast Cancer Study Group', Israel Journal of Medical Sciences, 31 144-154 (1995)

The International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG, formerly the Ludwig Group) is currently conducting several trials to improve available adjuvant therapies for operable breast c... [more]

The International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG, formerly the Ludwig Group) is currently conducting several trials to improve available adjuvant therapies for operable breast cancer. Within the framework of clinical trials, treatment is available for several subpopulations of patients with operable disease. Two trials for patients with node-negative breast cancer question the efficacy of the combination of chemotherapy and endocrine manipulation. Four trials for patients with node-positive disease investigate questions of chemoendocrine therapy and of delayed reintroduction of chemotherapy after an initial cytotoxic treatment One trial for elderly patients investigates the role of axillary lymph node dissection in terms of treatment outcome and quality of life. The ongoing trials are based on the results of past investigations by the Group: seven clinical trials, conducted since 1978, tested hypotheses of timing, duration, and the combined use of chemo- and endocrine therapies. Several ancillary studies were conducted using the database amassed from these trials, including pathological findings in node-negative disease, significance of micrometastases detected by serial sectioning of axillary nodes, importance of c-erbB-2 oncogene expression for prediction of treatment responsiveness, patterns of relapse, and assessing the impact of adjuvant treatment for breast cancer on the patients' quality of life. This report presents updated results of the seven IBCSG trials conducted from 1978 to 1993 and describes the trials currently open to patient accrual.

Citations Scopus - 4
1995 ABE O, ABE R, ASAISHI K, ENOMOTO K, HATTORI T, IINO Y, et al., 'EFFECTS OF RADIOTHERAPY AND SURGERY IN EARLY BREAST-CANCER - AN OVERVIEW OF THE RANDOMIZED TRIALS', NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 333 1444-1455 (1995)
Citations Web of Science - 635
1994 GOLDHIRSCH A, GELBER RD, PRICE KN, CASTIGLIONE M, COATES AS, RUDENSTAM CM, et al., 'EFFECT OF SYSTEMIC ADJUVANT TREATMENT ON FIRST SITES OF BREAST-CANCER RELAPSE', LANCET, 343 377-381 (1994)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(94)91221-1
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 60
1994 Forbes J, Coates A, 'Clinical trials in breast cancer research and treatment', Cancer Forum, 18 81-84 (1994)

The national and international programs of the ANZBCTG cover many aspects of breast cancer control and have contributed to improved outcomes for many women. The trials provide an ... [more]

The national and international programs of the ANZBCTG cover many aspects of breast cancer control and have contributed to improved outcomes for many women. The trials provide an opportunity to contribute to important research and to take part in an ongoing education program in clinical trials and research on breast cancer. The ANZBCTG has regular scientific meetings and together with the IBCSG has contributed to over 280 scientific papers. Wide participation is encouraged and enquiries welcomed.

1994 FORBES JF, 'TOWARDS AN OPTIMAL TEACHING PROGRAM FOR SUPPORTIVE CARE', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 2 7-15 (1994)
DOI 10.1007/BF00355234
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
1994 Forbes JF, 'Surgery of early breast cancer', Current Opinion in Oncology, 6 560-564 (1994)

Randomized clinical trials evaluating local treatments for early breast cancer have provided new data on the long-term morbidity and cause-specific mortality associated with radio... [more]

Randomized clinical trials evaluating local treatments for early breast cancer have provided new data on the long-term morbidity and cause-specific mortality associated with radiotherapy combined with different types of mastectomy. The difficulty surgeons have in determining optimal integration of surgery and radiotherapy for breast preservation is demonstrated by the wide variation of radiotherapy schedules, lack of interpretable data to justify a radiotherapy 'boost,' and data from a randomized trial suggesting that radiotherapy applied only to the excision site might be sufficient. The use of cytology aspirates for tumor grading, the prognostic importance of vascular invasion, and new tumor markers and cancer cells in bone marrow at diagnosis are all reported. New data came from attempts to identify an axillary sentinel node at surgery for breast cancer. Studies of connective tissue disorders in women with silicone implants failed to find evidence of increased risk, but 3-year follow-ups confirmed that surgeons who preferred mastectomy are more likely to have anxious, depressed patients.

1994 Forbes JF, Castiglione-Gertsch M, Johnsen C, Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Rudenstam CM, et al., 'The International (Ludwig) Breast Cancer Study Group Trials I-IV: 15 Years Follow-up', Annals of Oncology, 5 717-724 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 63
1994 Forbes JF, Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Castiglione M, Price KN, Rudenstam CM, et al., 'Present and Future Projects of the International Breast Cancer Study Group', Cancer, 74 1139-1149 (1994)
Citations Scopus - 19
1994 Forbes JF, 'Management of Newly Diagnosed Early Breast Cancer and a National Approach to Breast Cancer Control', Cancer Forum, 18 72-76 (1994)
1994 Forbes JF, 'Management of newly diagnosed early breast cancer a national approach to breast cancer control: Report from the National Breast Cancer Consensus Conference', Medical Journal of Australia, 161 s1-s16 (1994)
1994 Forbes JF, Jonat W, Kaufmann M, Blamey RW, Howell A, Collins JP, et al., 'A randomised trial comparing 'Zoladex' (Goserelin) with 'Nolvadex' (Tamoxifen) as first line treatment for premenopausal advanced breast cancer', Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 33 (1994)
1994 Forbes JF, Simes RJ, Gebski V, Coates AS, Harvey V, van Hazel G, 'Quality of life (QoL) with single agent Mitozantrone (MTZ) or combination chemotherapy (CMFP) for advanced breast cancer: a randomised trial', Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 13 96 (1994)
1994 Forbes JF, Simes RJ, Gebski V, Coates AS, Harvey V, van Hazel G, 'Quality of life on single agent Mitozantrone versus Cyclophosphamide, Methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, Prednisone for advanced breast cancer', Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 13 73 (1994)
1993 Forbes JF, 'Surgery of early breast cancer', Current Opinion in Oncology, 5 966-975 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 1
1993 Forbes JF, Coates A, Simes RJ, 'Prognostic value of performance status and quality-of-life scores during chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer. The Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 11 2050 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 12
1992 FORBES JF, 'CLINICAL-TRIALS AND LOCAL TREATMENT OF EARLY BREAST-CANCER', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 62 419-421 (1992)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1992.tb07219.x
1992 CLOVER KA, REDMAN S, FORBES JF, SANSONFISHER RW, DICKINSON JA, 'PROMOTION OF ATTENDANCE FOR MAMMOGRAPHIC SCREENING THROUGH GENERAL-PRACTICE - A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF 2 STRATEGIES', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 156 91-94 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
1992 FORBES JF, 'ESTROGEN AND BREAST-CANCER - REPLY', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 157 643-644 (1992)
1992 ABE O, ABE R, ASAISHI K, ENOMOTO K, HATTORI T, INO Y, et al., 'SYSTEMIC TREATMENT OF EARLY BREAST-CANCER BY HORMONAL, CYTOTOXIC, OR IMMUNE THERAPY - 133 RANDOMIZED TRIALS INVOLVING 31000 RECURRENCES AND 24000 DEATHS AMONG 75000 WOMEN .2.', LANCET, 339 71-85 (1992)
Citations Web of Science - 853
1992 FORBES JF, 'LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY IN BREAST-CANCER', ACTA ONCOLOGICA, 31 243-250 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
1992 Coates A, Gebski V, Signorini D, Murray P, McNeil D, Byrne M, Forbes JF, 'Prognostic value of quality-of-life scores during chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 10 1833-1838 (1992)

Purpose: We observed that quality-of-life (QL) scores, collected to evaluate treatment in a randomized trial in advanced breast cancer, predicted survival duration. This report ex... [more]

Purpose: We observed that quality-of-life (QL) scores, collected to evaluate treatment in a randomized trial in advanced breast cancer, predicted survival duration. This report explores the prognostic associations between QL and survival in more detail. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial comparing intermittent and continuous therapy policies for patients with advanced breast cancer, QL was measured by linear analog self-assessment (LASA) and the Quality-of-Life Index (QLI). Baseline scores and subsequent changes were included in statistical models of survival duration, with and without other prognostic factors. Results: Physician assessment of QLI and patient LASA scores for physical well-being (PWB), mood, nausea and vomiting, appetite, and overall QL (but not pain) at the commencement of treatment were significant predictors of subsequent survival. Scores for PWB and QLI were independent of other prognostic factors. Changes in scores were also prognostically important. Both baseline and change in scores for PWB, mood, pain, and QLI after the first three treatment cycles, but before an arbitrary 180- day time point, were significantly predictive of survival beyond that time. Both QLI and PWB were prognostically independent of tumor response. Although QL improvement was correlated with tumor response, continuous therapy yielded significantly better QL scores, even in nonresponders. Conclusion: These findings support the validity of the simple QL measures used in the trial. They are compatible with the simple explanation that patients perceive disease progression before it is clinically evident, but also with a causal relationship between QL and survival duration. © 1992 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Citations Scopus - 229
1992 Forbes J, 'The surgery of early breast cancer', Current Opinion in Oncology, 4 1027-1034 (1992)
1991 Forbes JF, Foster HM, 'Optimizing palliative surgical support of cancer patients with visceral obstructions.', Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le cancer, 121 108-114 (1991)
Citations Scopus - 1
1991 Forbes JF, Allbrook D, 'Education and palliative care: a different approach.', Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le cancer, 121 414-422 (1991)
Citations Scopus - 4
1991 Low SC, Galea MH, Blamey RW, Goldhirsch A, Gelber R, Forbes J, et al., 'Timing breast cancer surgery', The Lancet, 338 691-693 (1991)
DOI 10.1016/0140-6736(91)91265-V
Citations Scopus - 33
1991 FORBES JF, 'TIMING OF BREAST-CANCER SURGERY IN THE MENSTRUAL-CYCLE AND OUTCOME', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, 2 243-243 (1991)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
1991 Forbes JF, 'Surgery for early breast cancer', Current Opinion in Oncology, 3 995-1001 (1991)
1990 COATES A, FORBES J, 'CHANGING CONCEPTS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CANCER .14. CLINICAL-TRIALS IN BREAST-CANCER IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW-ZEALAND', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 152 601-+ (1990)
Citations Web of Science - 2
1990 SMART YC, STEWART JF, BARTLETT LD, BRIEN JH, FORBES JF, BURTON RC, 'MAMMARY SERUM ANTIGEN (MSA) IN ADVANCED BREAST-CANCER', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, 16 23-28 (1990)
DOI 10.1007/BF01806572
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
1990 Forbes JF, 'Surgery for early breast cancer', Current Opinion in Oncology, 2 1015-1024 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 1
1990 FORBES JF, 'SURGERY, KINETICS AND BIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN PLANNING ADJUVANT THERAPY PROTOCOLS', EFFECTS OF THERAPY ON BIOLOGY AND KINETICS OF THE RESIDUAL TUMOR, PT A : PRE-CLINICAL ASPECTS, 354 133-146 (1990)
1989 FORBES JF, 'INCREASED RISK OF BREAST-CANCER AFTER LOW-DOSE IRRADIATION', LANCET, 1 1012-1013 (1989)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1988 COATES A, BYRNE M, BISHOP JF, FORBES JF, 'INTERMITTENT VERSUS CONTINUOUS CHEMOTHERAPY FOR BREAST-CANCER - REPLY', NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 318 1468-1468 (1988)
Citations Web of Science - 12
1988 Plotkin D, Ray M, Coates A, Byrne M, Bishop JF, Forbes JF, 'Intermittent versus continuous chemotherapy for breast cancer', New England Journal of Medicine, 318 1467-1468 (1988)
Citations Scopus - 1
1988 Forbes JF, 'Principles and potential of palliative surgery in patients with advanced cancer.', Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le cancer, 108 134-142 (1988)
Citations Scopus - 11
1988 TATTERSALL MHN, LANGLANDS AO, SIMPSON JS, FORBES JF, 'UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION ABOUT CANCER - A SURVEY IN AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL-SCHOOLS', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER & CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 24 467-471 (1988)
DOI 10.1016/S0277-5379(98)90018-9
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
1987 Coates A, Gebski V, Bishop JF, Jeal PN, Woods RL, Snyder R, et al., 'Improving the quality of life during chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer. A comparison of intermittent and continuous treatment strategies', New England Journal of Medicine, 317 1490-1495 (1987)

Since chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer is not curative, consideration of the quality of life is important in selecting a treatment regimen. We conducted a randomized tria... [more]

Since chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer is not curative, consideration of the quality of life is important in selecting a treatment regimen. We conducted a randomized trial comparing continuous chemotherapy, administered until disease progression was evident, with intermittent therapy, whereby treatment was stopped after three cycles and then repeated for three more cycles only when there was evidence of disease progression. Each approach was tested with doxorubicin combined with cyclophosphamide or with cyclophosphamide combined with methotrexate, fluorouracil, and prednisone. Intermittent therapy resulted in a significantly worse response (P = 0.02 by Mann-Whitney test), a significantly shorter time to disease progression (relative risk based on proportional-hazards model, 1.8; 95 percent confidence interval 1.4 to 2.4), and a trend toward shorter survival (relative risk, 1.3; confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.6). The quality of life was expressed as linear-analogue self-assessment scores for physical well-being, mood, pain, and appetite and as a quality-of-life index. It improved significantly during the first three cycles, when all patients received treatment. Thereafter, intermittent therapy was associated with worse scores for physical well-being (by 23 percent of scale; 95 percent confidence interval, 11 to 35 percent), mood (25 percent; 13 to 37 percent), and appetite (12 percent; 0 to 24 percent) and for the quality-of-life index as indicated by the patient (14 percent; 5 to 23 percent) and the physician (16 percent; 7 to 26 percent). Changes in the quality of life were independent prognostic factors in proportional-hazards models of subsequent survival. We conclude that, as tested, continuous chemotherapy is better than intermittent chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer.

Citations Scopus - 328
1987 Forbes JF, 'The Nisbet Symposium 1986. Early breast cancer - An overview of current and future directions', Australasian Radiology, 31 113-118 (1987)
1986 HORNE DJD, MCCORMACK HM, COLLINS JP, FORBES JF, RUSSELL IS, 'PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PHOBIC ANXIETY ASSOCIATED WITH ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 145 346-348 (1986)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
1986 FORBES JF, 'A RANDOMIZED TRIAL IN POSTMENOPAUSAL PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED BREAST-CANCER COMPARING ENDOCRINE AND CYTOTOXIC THERAPY GIVEN SEQUENTIALLY OR IN COMBINATION', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 4 186-193 (1986)
Citations Web of Science - 39
1984 FORBES JF, 'FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION CYTOLOGY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF BREAST DISEASE', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 140 181-181 (1984)
1983 FORBES JF, 'BROMOCRIPTINE FOR BREAST PAIN', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 2 540-541 (1983)
1983 SHUGG D, SHEPHERD JJ, BRAITHWAITE PA, CLUNIE GJ, FORBES JF, THOMPSON R, WOOLLEY T, 'DOCUMENTATION OF BREAST-CANCER FAMILY HISTORIES AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF FAMILY TREES FOR PEDIGREE ANALYSIS', MEDICAL AND PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY, 11 216-216 (1983)
1982 FORBES JF, 'MULTIMODALITY TREATMENT OF CANCER', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 52 341-346 (1982)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1982.tb06005.x
1982 FORBES JF, 'ADJUVANT THERAPY IN BREAST-CANCER', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 52 414-417 (1982)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1982.tb06021.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
1982 Forbes JF, 'Advanced breast cancer (and quality of life)', Clinics in Oncology, 1 917-944 (1982)

Approximately half of all patients with breast cancer will develop locally advanced or, more commonly, metastatic disease. Although local therapies - surgery and radiotherapy - ma... [more]

Approximately half of all patients with breast cancer will develop locally advanced or, more commonly, metastatic disease. Although local therapies - surgery and radiotherapy - may play an important part in management, particularly for stage II disease, systemic therapy with endocrine manipulation or cytotoxic chemotherapy is the key treatment for advanced disease. Therapy evaluation is difficult. Only prospective randomized trials allow valid comparisons of alternative regimens. Assessment of efficacy must involve not only objective measurements of therapy effects on tumour, but also patients' quality of life. Patients with advanced disease are uncommonly cured, hence the palliative intent of therapy and the consequent importance of keeping therapy toxicity to a minimum must be understood. Obtaining a response to therapy produces an important palliative effect for patients. Clinical disease occurs at an extreme end of tumour growth, however, and even when a CR is obtained extensive tumour loads may persist. Oophorectomy in premenopausal patients and tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients are the first-line endocrine therapies of choice. Even patients with ER-negative status, and certainly those with unknown status, may respond to tamoxifen and a therapy trial may reduce the period of time on more toxic therapy. There is no evidence that the higher response rates seen with cytotoxic agents are uniformly translated into survival advantages. Cytotoxic regimens with adriamycin included are probably more effective than those without. Single-agent cytotoxic therapy may still have a useful role. Combined modality therapy produces higher response rates than endocrine therapy alone. The cost is increased toxicity without clear evidence that long-term survival advantages result. Further evaluation of combined modality approaches with large patient numbers to allow subgroup analysis are required.

Citations Scopus - 3
1982 Forbes JF, 'Breast cancer: Advanced disease', Clinics in Oncology, 1 149-175 (1982)
Citations Scopus - 1
1981 FORBES JF, 'BIOLOGICAL VERSUS STATISTICAL PLANNING OF CLINICAL-TRIALS', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 51 3-4 (1981)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1981.tb05889.x
1981 FORBES JF, 'CONSIDERATIONS FOR A CLINICIAN BEFORE SUPPORTING A CLINICAL-TRIAL', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 51 4-5 (1981)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1981.tb05890.x
1981 FORBES JF, 'HIGHLIGHTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIALS', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 1 159-160 (1981)
Citations Web of Science - 2
1981 FORBES JF, ZBAR A, TAIT B, CLUNIE GJA, 'BREAST-CANCER GENETICS - ANALYSIS OF HLA ANTIGENS IN FAMILIAL AND NON FAMILIAL PATIENTS', PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR CANCER RESEARCH, 22 341-341 (1981)
1980 LANGLANDS AO, FORBES JF, TATTERSALL MHN, 'THE TREATMENT OF LOCALLY ADVANCED BREAST-CANCER - A DISCUSSION DOCUMENT', AUSTRALASIAN RADIOLOGY, 24 307-310 (1980)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1673.1980.tb02205.x
Citations Web of Science - 3
1980 Simpson J, Forbes JF, Gill G, 'Phase III trial for advanced breast cancer', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 50 211-211 (1980)
1980 FORBES JF, 'ESTROGEN-RECEPTORS - QUALITY OR QUANTITY', LANCET, 1 828-829 (1980)
1980 THOMAS RJS, FORBES JF, 'SOMATOSTATIN IN PEPTIC-ULCER BLEEDING', LANCET, 2 200-200 (1980)
Citations Web of Science - 3
1980 Forbes J, '¿STROGEN RECEPTORS: QUALITY OR QUANTITY', The Lancet, 315 828-829 (1980)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(80)91333-1
1979 FORBES JF, 'PROGRESS IN CANCER-THERAPY FROM CLINICAL-TRIALS', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 49 287-289 (1979)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1979.tb07666.x
1979 KITCHEN PRB, ANDREWS JT, BUCKLEY JD, RUSSELL IS, LICHTENSTEIN M, MCLEAN K, FORBES JF, 'ANALYSIS OF BONE-SCINTIGRAPHY IN EARLY (OPERABLE) BREAST-CANCER', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 49 313-316 (1979)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1979.tb07671.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
1979 FORBES JF, 'COLLEGE FOUNDATION', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 49 682-683 (1979)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1979.tb06488.x
1979 Kitchen PRB, Andrews JT, Buckley JD, Russell IS, Lichtenstein M, McLean K, Forbes JF, 'An analysis of bone scintigraphy in early (operable) breast cancer', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 49 313-316 (1979)

A retrospective review of the results of bone scintigrams (scans), performed on 85 consecutive patients with operable breast cancer at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, revealed a tru... [more]

A retrospective review of the results of bone scintigrams (scans), performed on 85 consecutive patients with operable breast cancer at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, revealed a true positive scan rate of 10%. No significant association was found between positive scans and either tumour size or clinical status of axillary nodes; however, a statistically significant association was demonstrated between positive scans and the presence of pathologically involved axillary nodes. Scans were positive in nine out of 54 patients (17%) with involved nodes and in eight out of 21 (38%) with four or more involved nodes, but in none out of 24 patients with negative nodes. (P is less than 0.05). Of the 85 patients, 29 had scans showing increased uptake; 13 of these had benign disease demonstrated radiologically, and technical or reporting error accounted for another seven. This left nine true positives. Clinical metastases subsequently developed in eight of the nine scan-positive patients (89%), but in only 17 of the 76 scan-negative patients (22%), within the follow-up period (mean 16 months). (P is less than 0.0005). Seven of the eight scan-positive patients who developed clinically obvious metastases had four or more involved axillary lymph nodes. It is concluded that the finding of an unequivocally positive bone scan in a patient with clinically 'early' breast cancer strongly suggests the presence of metastases and must be considered in planning appropriate treatment. Furthermore, although the bone scan is unlikely to be positive if nodes are histologically negative, it can be an important staging investigation and prognostic index for patients who are found to be node-positive, especially if a large number of lymph nodes are invovled.

Citations Scopus - 2
1979 NESBIT RA, WOODS RL, TATTERSALL MHN, FOX RM, FORBES JF, MACKAY IR, GOODYEAR M, 'TAMOXIFEN IN MALIGNANT-MELANOMA', NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 301 1241-1242 (1979)
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 59
1978 HUGHES LE, FORBES JF, 'EARLY BREAST-CANCER .1. SURGICAL PATHOLOGY AND PREOPERATIVE ASSESSMENT', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 65 753-763 (1978)
DOI 10.1002/bjs.1800651102
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 16
1978 HUGHES LE, FORBES JF, 'EARLY BREAST-CANCER .2. MANAGEMENT', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 65 764-772 (1978)
DOI 10.1002/bjs.1800651103
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 10
1978 FORBES JF, MOORE AR, 'CONTROLLED TRIALS IN SURGERY', LANCET, 2 107-108 (1978)
1977 FORBES JF, 'APPLICATION OF CLINICAL-TRIALS TO SOLID TUMOR MANAGEMENT - INTRODUCTION', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 47 617-627 (1977)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1977.tb06593.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
1977 FORBES JF, 'GUIDELINES FOR PLANNING CLINICAL-TRIALS', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 47 628-636 (1977)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1977.tb06594.x
Citations Web of Science - 2
1977 FORBES JF, 'EARLY DETECTION OF BREAST-CANCER', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 2 786-786 (1977)
1977 FORBES JF, 'MULTIMODAL THERAPY FOR STAGE-II BREAST-CANCER', LANCET, 2 1079-1079 (1977)
1977 TEASDALE C, FORBES JF, WEBSTER DJT, HUGHES LE, 'IMMUNE COMPETENCE IN BREAST, COLO-RECTAL, AND GASTRIC CANCER - CORRELATION OF PRETREATMENT AND SEQUENTIAL FOLLOW-UP TESTS', SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, 6 753-754 (1977)
1976 TEASDALE C, FORBES JF, BAUM M, 'FAMILIAL MALE BREAST-CANCER', LANCET, 1 360-361 (1976)
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 9
1972 Forbes JF, Morris PJ, 'The use of lymph node and spleen lymphocytes for HL-A typing of cadaver kidney donors', Transplantation, 13 444-446 (1972)
Citations Scopus - 2
Show 212 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2005 Goldhirsch A, Glick JH, Gelber RD, Coates AS, Thurlimann B, Senn HJ, 'Meeting Highlights: International expert consensus on the primary therapy of early breast cancer 2005', Annals of Oncology (2005) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 766

Conference (59 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Toi M, Winer EP, Benson JR, Inamoto T, Forbes JF, von Minckwitz G, et al., 'Personalization of loco-regional care for primary breast cancer patients (part 1)', FUTURE ONCOLOGY (2015)
DOI 10.2217/fon.15.65
2015 Toi M, Winer EP, Benson JR, Inamoto T, Forbes JF, von Minckwitz G, et al., 'Personalization of loco-regional care for primary breast cancer patients (part 2)', FUTURE ONCOLOGY (2015)
DOI 10.2217/fon.15.66
2014 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'Can microRNAs impact cell migration in triple negative breast cancer?', The Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) Satellite Scientific Meeting Programme, Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2014 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Fewster S, Beckmore C, Wells K, Forbes JF, Boyle F, 'EXPLORING DECISION MAKING ABOUT NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR EARLY BREAST CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
2014 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Morten B, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL TRANSCRIPTS SPECIFIC TO TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER THAT ARE ASSOCIATED WITH LYMPH NODE METASTASIS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12335
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott, Michelle Wong-Brown
2014 Jobling JM, D'Este CA, Forbes JF, 'MAMMOGRAPHIC (BREAST) DENSITY - A BREAST CANCER RISK FACTOR WITH INCREASING CLINICAL IMPACT', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste
2014 Jobling JM, D'Este CA, Forbes JF, 'INTRAOBSERVER INTRA- AND INTER-METHOD RELIABILITY IN BREAST DENSITY MEASUREMENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste
2014 Eastell R, Sestak I, Gossiel F, Patel R, Blake G, Coleman R, et al., 'EFFECT OF AROMATASE INHIBITION ON BONE DENSITY AND BONE TURNOVER IN HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: RESULTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL BREAST CANCER INTERVENTION STUDY II (IBIS-II)', OSTEOPOROSIS INTERNATIONAL, Seville, SPAIN (2014) [E3]
2014 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'Eight microRNAs as biomarkers for metastatic spread in triple negative breast cancer', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Michelle Wong-Brown, Kelly Kiejda
2013 Avery-Kiejda KA, Mathe A, Braye SG, Forbes JF, Scott RJ, 'The expression of Dicer and Drosha in lymph node metastases of triple negative breast cancer.', 25th Lorne Cancer Conference Proceedings, Lorne, VIC, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2013 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown MW, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'Target gene identification of microRNAs associated with lymph node metastases in triple negative breast cancer.', 25th Lorne Cancer Conference Proceedings, Lorne, VIC, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Michelle Wong-Brown, Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2013 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'Integration of microRNA and gene expression profiling in triple negative breast cancer to identify possible biomarkers for metastases.', Breakthrough Breast Cancer TNBC Conference Proceedings, London, UK (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda, Michelle Wong-Brown
2013 Mathe A, Wong-Brown M, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, Avery-Kiejda KA, 'Identification of biomarkers for metastatic spread in triple negative breast cancer.', Translational Cancer Research Conference Abstract booklet, Newcastle, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda, Michelle Wong-Brown
2013 Metzger Filho O, Giobbie-Hurder A, Mallon EA, Viale G, Winer EP, Thurlimann BJK, et al., 'Relative effectiveness of letrozole alone or in sequence with tamoxifen for patients diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Chicago, IL (2013) [E3]
2013 Eastell R, Sestak I, Gossiel F, Patel R, Blake G, Coleman R, et al., 'Effect of Aromatase Inhibition on Bone Density and Bone Turnover in Healthy Postmenopausal Women: Results of the International Breast cancer Intervention Study II (IBIS-II)', JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, Baltimore, MD (2013) [E3]
2012 Kiejda KA, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott R, 'Identification of miRNAs associated with lymph node metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer', Human Genome Meeting 2012: Genetics and Genomics in Personalised Medicine. Abstract Book, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2012 Phillips K-A, Kiely BE, Francis PA, Boyle FM, Fox SB, Murphy L, et al., 'ANZ1001 SORBET: Study of estrogen receptor beta and efficacy of tamoxifen, a single arm, phase II study of the efficacy of tamoxifen in triple-negative but estrogen receptor beta-positive metastatic breast cancer', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Chicago, IL (2012) [E3]
2011 Singh S, Cuzick J, Blake GM, Mesher D, Patel R, Truscott J, et al., 'One year effect of anastrozole and risedronate on bone mineral density: First results from the IBIS-II bone sub-study', Bone, Sheffield, UK (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.bone.2010.10.064
Citations Web of Science - 1
2011 Kiejda KA, Forbes JF, Hope TL, Braye SG, Scott R, 'Differential expression of miRNAs in triple-negative breast cancer', AMATA Conference Canberra 2011 Handbook, Canberra, ACT (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2011 Kiejda KA, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott R, 'MicroRNA expression profiling in triple-negative breast cancer', Keystone Symposia on Mollecular and Cellular Biology: MicroRNAs and Non-coding RNAs and Cancer, Banff, AL (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2010 Wong-Brown M, Bowden NA, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott R, 'Microsatellite instability (I) in breast tumours', Sydney Cancer Conference 2010. Profiling Risk, Personalising Treatment and Predicting Outcomes. Conference Program and Abstract Book, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Nikola Bowden, Michelle Wong-Brown, Rodney Scott
2010 Kiejda KA, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott R, 'The relationship between p53 isofor and estrogen receptor-alpha expression in breast cancer', Sydney Cancer Conference 2010. Profiling Risk, Personalising Treatment and Predicting Outcomes. Conference Program and Abstract Book, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2009 Juraskova I, Butow P, Smith B, Seccombe MA, Coates A, Boyle FM, et al., 'Improving informed consent to prevention clinical trials: A randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for women invited to participate in IBIS-II', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01253.x
2009 Forbes JF, Mouridsen HT, Giobbie-Hurder A, Mauriac L, Paridaens R, Colleoni M, et al., 'BIG 1-98: A Randomized double-blind Phase III Study Evaluating Letrozole and Tamoxifen given in Sequence as Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Postmenopausal Women with Receptor-positive Breast Cancer', Cancer Research, San Antonio (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.SABCS-13
2009 Forbes JF, Regan MM, Colleoni M, Giobbie-Hurder A, Thurlimann B, Mouridsen H, et al., 'Adjusting for Selective Crossover in Analysis of Letrozole (Let) versus Tamoxifen (tam) in the BIG 1-98 Trial', Cancer Research, San Antonio (2009) [E3]
2009 Dowsett M, Cuzick J, Wales C, Forbes J, Mallon L, Salter J, et al., 'Risk of distant recurrence using oncotype DX in postmenopausal primary breast cancer patients treated with anastrozole or tamoxifen: a TransATAC study', CANCER RESEARCH, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 8
2009 Mackey J, Hurvitz S, Crown J, Forbes J, Roche H, Pinter T, et al., 'CIRG/TORI 010: 10-Month Analysis of a Randomized Phase II Trial of Motesanib Plus Weekly Paclitaxel as First Line Therapy in HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC)', CANCER RESEARCH, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2009 Bliss J, Kilburn L, Coleman R, Forbes JF, Coates A, Jones S, et al., 'Disease related outcome with long term follow-up: An updated analysis of the Intergroup Exemestane Study (IES)', Cancer Research, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
2009 Cuzick J, Dowsett M, Wale C, Salter J, Quinn E, Zabaglo L, et al., 'Prognostic value of a combined ER, PgR, Ki67, HER2 Immunohistochemical (IHC4) Score and comparison with the GHI Recurrence Score: Results from TransATAC', Cancer Research, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 17
2009 Cuzick J, Sestak I, Pinder S, Ellis I, Hackshaw A, Bundred N, et al., 'Beneficial effect of tamoxifen for women with DCIS: Long-term results from the UK/ANZ DCIS Trial in women with locally excised DCIS', Cancer Research, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 2
2009 Gardner H, Nuciforo P, Liu W, Lee B, Rheinhardt J, Barrett C, et al., 'PI3 kinase pathway analysis in tissue microarrays using laser capture microdissection and immunohistochemistry', Cancer Research, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
2009 Sestak I, Distler W, Forbes JF, Howell A, Cuzick J, 'Effect of body mass index on recurrence in hormone receptor positive early breast cancer: A retrospective exploratory analysis from the ATAC Trial', Cancer Research, San Antonio, TX (2009) [E3]
2009 Howell A, Forbes JF, Cuzick J, Atac Investigators, 'Initial adjuvant therapy with anastrozole - early- and late-event data from the arimidex, tamoxifen, alone or in combination (ATAC) trial in the hormone-responsive population', Breast, St Gallen, Switzerland (2009) [E3]
2009 Martin M, Hurvitz S, Kennedy J, Forbes J, Roche H, Pinter T, et al., 'CIRG/TORI 010: first analysis of a randomized phase II trial of motesanib plus weekly paclitaxel (P) as first line therapy in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC)', EJC SUPPLEMENTS, Berlin, GERMANY (2009) [E3]
2008 Sestak I, Forbes JF, Edwards R, Howell A, Cuzick J, 'Timing and severity of prominent side effects of anastrozole and tamoxifen', EJC Supplements, Berlin, Germany (2008) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2008 Forbes JF, Cuzick J, Buzdar A, Howell A, Baum M, 'ATAC: 100 month median follow-up (FU) shows continued superior efficacy and no excess fracture risk for anastrozole (A) compared with tamoxifen (T) after treatment completion', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, San Antonio, TX (2008) [E3]
2008 Grimison PS, Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group, Coates AS, Forbes JF, Cuzick J, Furnival C, et al., 'Tamoxifen (TAM) for the prevention of breast cancer: Importance of specific aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQL) to global health status in the ANZ BCTG substudy of IBIS-1 (ANZ 92P1)', Journal of Clinical Oncology, Chicago, ILL (2008) [E3]
2007 Forbes JF, Cuzick J, Buzdar A, Howell A, Baum M, 'ATAC: 100 month median follow-up (FU) shows continued superior efficacy and no excess fracture risk for anastrozole (A) compared with tamoxifen (T) after treatment completion', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, San Antonio, TX. (2007) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2007 Juraskova I, Butow P, Lopez AL, Seccombe M, Smith B, Coates A, et al., 'Improving informed consent in clinical trials: A randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for women invited to participate in a breast cancer prevention trial (IBIS-II)', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, San Antonio, TX. (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s10549-007-9793-3
2007 Pienkowski T, Pegram M, Forbes JF, Valero V, Eiermann W, Von Minckwitz G, et al., 'BCIRG 007: First overall survival analysis of randomized phase III trial of trastuzumab plus docetaxel with or without carboplatin as first line therapy in HER2 amplified metastatic breast cancer (MBC)', European Journal of Cancer Supplements (ECCO 14 Abstract Book), Barcelona, Spain (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/s1359-6349(07)70860-1
2006 Finn RS, Dering J, Ginther C, Wilson CA, Raab G, Pawlicki M, et al., 'Expression of EGFR ligands betacellulin and tenascin C are associated with molecular response following gefitinib treatment in women with primary breast cancer.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
2006 Sestak I, Forbes J, Roseann K, Edwards R, Howell A, Cuzick J, 'Comparison of side-effect profiles during active treatment versus follow-up in the IBIS-1 tamoxifen prevention study.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
2006 Gao JN, Forbes JF, Warren RML, Cuzick J, Howell A, D'Este C, Warren-Forward H, 'Change in marnmographic density after cessation of tamoxifen: results from international breast cancer intervention study I (IBIS I).', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Helen Warren-Forward
2006 Reaby LL, Forbes JF, Snyder R, Young L, Coates A, 'The Australian New Zealand breast cancer trials group (ANZ BCTG) consumer advisory panel: building a powerful fellowship to increase participation in breast cancer clinical trials.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
2006 Gao JN, Warren R, Forbes JF, Warren-Forward H, D'Este C, 'Reproducibility of visual assessment of mammographic density.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Helen Warren-Forward
2006 Stockler MR, Sourjina T, Harvey V, Frances P, Byrne M, van Hazel G, et al., 'A randomized trial of capecitabine given intermittently versus continuously versus classical CMF as first line chemotherapy for women with advanced breast cancer unsuited to more intensive treatment.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2006)
Citations Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Stephen Ackland
2006 Forbes JF, Kennedy J, Pienkowski T, Valero V, Eiermann W, Von Minckwitz G, et al., 'BCIRG 007: Randomized phase III trial of trastuzumab plus docetaxel with or without carboplatin first line in HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC): Main time to progression (TTP) analysis.', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Atlanta, GA (2006)
Citations Web of Science - 4
2006 Finn RS, Dering J, Ginther C, Press M, Forbes JF, Mackey J, et al., 'ER+ PR- breast cancer defines a unique subtype of breast cancer that is driven by growth factor signaling and may be more likely to respond to EGFR targeted therapies (oral presentation)', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2006 ASCO Annual Meeting Proceedings Part I., Atlanta, Georgia (2006) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 5
2006 Pienkowski T, Forbes J, Valero V, Eiermann W, Von Minckwitz G, Martin M, et al., 'BCIRG 007: Randomized phase III trial of trastuzumab plus docetaxel with or without carboplatin as first line therapy in HER2 amplified metastatic breast cancer (MBC)', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Istanbul, TURKEY (2006)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2006 Forbes JF, Pienkowski T, Valero V, Eiermann W, Von Minckwitz G, Martin M, et al., 'BCIRG 007: Randomized phase III trial of trastuzumab plus docetaxel with or without carboplatin first line in HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC)', Journal of Clinical Oncology (Vol 24, No 18S (June 20 Supplement), 2006: LBA516): 2006 ASCO Annual Meeting Proceedings (Post-Meeting Edition), Atlanta, Georgia (2006) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2005 Francis P, Green M, Gebski V, Harvey V, Karapetis C, Chan A, et al., 'Gefitinib has a low clinical benefit rate in advanced breast cancer patients.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, San Antonio, TX (2005)
2004 McKillop D, Raab G, Eidtmann H, Furnival A, Riva A, Forbes J, et al., 'Intratumoral and plasma concentrations of gefitinib in breast cancer patients: Preliminary results from a presurgical investigatory study (BCIRG 103)', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, New Orleans, LA (2004)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2004 Forbes JF, Seccombe MA, 'Prevention and treatment trials need different recruitment strategies: Experience from the IBIS 1 prevention trial in Australia and New Zealand.', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, New Orleans, LA (2004)
2004 Thompson JD, Warren-Forward H, Bennett M, Lai MK, Brown RL, Moran SM, Forbes JF, 'Step one of a feasibility study into the reduction of recall rates in screening mammography', Australian Institute of Radiography 1st Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy, Cairns, Australia (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward
2002 Forbes JJ, Travis E, Forbes JF, Woodhead J, Toirkens M, Knight A, 'Targeted interventions can improve rescreen compliance in a regional mammographic screening program.', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, SAN ANTONIO, TX (2002)
2002 Forbes JF, Colleoni M, Zahrieh D, Nole F, Gelber RD, Castilglione-Gertsch M, et al., 'Is Medial Breast Cancer without Axillary Node involvement really Node-Negative?', ASCO 2002 Abstracts, Orlando (2002)
2000 Ackland S, Gebski V, Wilson A, Green M, Hornery S, Dhillon H, et al., 'High Dose Epirubicin & Cyclophosphamide (HDEC) with Filgrastim versus Standard Dose (SDEC) in Advanced Breast Cancer - A Quality of Life Study by the ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group', Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA (2000) [E3]
2000 Castiglione-Gertsch M, Price K, Nasi M, Lindtner J, Erzen D, Crivellari D, et al., 'Is the addition of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Always Necessary in Node Negative (N-) Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients (Pts) Who Receive Tamoxifen (TAM)?: First Results of IBCSG Trial IX', Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA (2000) [E3]
1993 Forbes JF, Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group, 'Breast Cancer Prevention: a National Clinical Trial [invited abstract]', Proceedings of the RACS Annual Scientific Meeting 1993, Adelaide (1993)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 53
Total funding $37,259,521

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20143 grants / $8,480,353

Hunter Cancer Research Alliance; HCRA$5,978,356

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor John Forbes, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Conjoint Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Conjoint Professor Peter Greer, Associate Professor Christine Paul
Scheme Translational Cancer Research Centre Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301098
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Randomised phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy +/- concurrent aromatase inhibitor endocrine therapy to down-stage large oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer$2,219,383

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Prudence Francis, Associate Professor Nicholas Wilcken, Dr Nicholas Murray, Professor John Forbes, Associate Professor Andrew Redfern, Associate Professor Frances Boyle, Associate Professor Andrew Spillane
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300307
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

High Throughput Image Capture Platform for Translational Cancer Research$282,614

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor John Forbes, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Professor Marjorie Walker, Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Doctor Craig Gedye, Doctor Rick Thorne, Mr Loui Rassam, Doctor Stephen Braye
Scheme Research Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400626
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20135 grants / $633,301

Enabling Clinical Epigenetic Diagnostics: The Next Generation of Personalized Breast Cancer Care$605,301

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team Professor Matt Trau, Assoc. Prof Glenn Francis, Assoc. Prof Susan Clark, Professor John Forbes, Dr Melissa Brown, Professor Alexander Dobrovic, Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Collaborative Breast Cancer Research Grant Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201095
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

IBIS 3: Preventing late recurrence of ER positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women – a comprehensive approach$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300481
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

IBIS 3: Preventing late recurrence of ER positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women – a comprehensive approach$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Near Miss
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300655
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Mammographic Density as a Biomarker for Clinical Trial Treatment Efficacy$6,000

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Mrs Judith Jobling
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301065
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2012 EIA Impact Trial travel grant$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300371
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20123 grants / $351,660

Medilink Array digitising system$35,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100981
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Longitudinal changes in mammographic density as a biomarker for future breast cancer events$24,360

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Conjoint Professor Cate d'Este, Ms Judith Jobling
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200833
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20114 grants / $2,350,861

Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit$1,693,333

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor John Forbes, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Conjoint Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Professor Rodney Scott
Scheme Translational Cancer Research Unit
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100545
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Priority Research Centre for Cancer$555,811

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Professor John Forbes, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Doctor Nikola Bowden, Professor Gordon Burns, Conjoint Professor Jim Denham, Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Doctor Lisa Lincz, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell, Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikki Verrills
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1101013
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence Through Epithelial Mesenchymal Plasticity$56,717

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Erik Thompson, Associate Professor Gregory Goodall, Professor Christobel Saunders, Associate Professor Robin Anderson, Assoc. Prof Alpha Yap, Dr Ian Street, Professor Keith Stanley, Dr Anthony Dowling, Professor John Forbes
Scheme Collaborative Breast Cancer Research Grant Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1101075
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

p53 isoforms, a prognostic indicator in breast cancer?$45,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor John Forbes
Scheme Breast Cancer Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001006
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20102 grants / $76,616

Mammographic density as a biomarker for the efficacy of treatment of endocrine therapies used to prevent breast cancer events in randomised controlled clinical trials$55,016

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Mrs Judith Jobling
Scheme Research Scholars Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000482
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The identification of microRNA's as therapeutic targets for the treatment of advanced breast cancer$21,600

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor John Forbes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900144
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20092 grants / $1,965,000

IBIS II: A randomised phase III trail of anastrozole for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women at high risk$1,635,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Associate Professor Frances Boyle, Professor Gregory Mann, Professor Christobel Saunders, Professor Jack Cuzick
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188905
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Provision of non-physical infrastructure support to enhance the breast cancer clinical trials research activities of the ANZ BCTG and its ability to build productive research collaborations$330,000

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Associate Professor Frances Boyle, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Alan Coates
Scheme Research Infrastructure Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190219
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20085 grants / $6,964,165

Prevention of late breast cancer (BC) events in postmenopausal women with endocrine responsive BC$4,430,875

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Gregory Mann, Associate Professor Frances Boyle, Assoc. Prof Michael Green, Professor Alan Coates, Professor Jack Cuzick
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187682
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Novel strategies for prediction and control of advanced breast cancer via nanoscaled epigenetic-based biosensors$1,200,000

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor Matt Trau, Assoc. Prof Susan Clark, Dr Melissa Brown, Assoc. Prof Glenn Francis, Professor Alexander Dobrovic
Scheme Collaborative Breast Cancer Research Grant Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188685
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

HMRI Cancer Research Program - MRSP Infrastructure$1,031,290

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor John Forbes, Conjoint Professor Jim Denham, Conjoint Professor Peter Hersey, Professor Gordon Burns, Professor Adam McCluskey, Doctor Nikki Verrills
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188622
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Tailored treatments for premenopausal women with endocrine responsive breast cancer$287,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Dr Prudence Francis, Associate Professor Frances Boyle, Dr Jacqueline Chirgwin, Dr R Snyder, Professor Alan Coates
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187683
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Support Funds for two clinical breast cancer trials: LATER and IBIS II$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Sparke Helmore/NBN Television Corporate Triathlon Award for Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189429
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

20072 grants / $543,950

Cognitive Function substudy for the SOFT trial$284,450

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

A clinical trial evaluating neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women with large operable or locally advanced breast cancer$259,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Professor Michael Friedlander, Associate Professor Nicole McCarthy, Dr Anne Hamilton, Assoc. Prof Michael Green
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186405
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20063 grants / $2,202,816

Follow-up of a randomised trial of Tamoxifen or placebo for breast cancer prevention in high risk women$861,143

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Professor Jack Cuzick
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0185154
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Infrastructure support for the ANZ BCTG clinical trials program$720,530

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Project Team
Scheme Infrastructure support for clinical trials program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20056 grants / $4,255,618

Protocol development, web-based data collection and date quality assurance for all Cancer Cooperative Trials Groups$1,840,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Alan Coates, Professor John Zalcberg, Professor Max Wolf, Dr Kwun Fong, Professor John Forbes, Dr Helen Irving, Dr Guy Toner, Professor Michael Friedlander, Professor John Thompson, Dr David Ball, Professor John Simes
Scheme Enabling Grants - Clinical Trials Resources
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184628
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Enhancement of the ANZBCTG research program through the provision of infrastructure funding for essential management and operational personnel and other key activities $1,720,564

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Professor John Simes, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland
Scheme Research Infrastructure Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185068
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

IBIS II Decision Aid$264,990

Funding body Unknown
Project Team
Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Tailored treatments for pre-menopausal patients with endocrine responsive breast cancer$253,314

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr Prudence Francis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184207
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Follow-up of women on a randomised clinical trial of adjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin for node positive breast cancer$111,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr Prudence Francis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0183940
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

2005 RIBG allocation$65,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185796
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $3,566,000

NSW Tissue Bank$2,000,000

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Project Team
Scheme Enabling Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised phase III trial of anastrozole for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women at high risk$1,566,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr M Byrne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0182881
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20021 grants / $450,000

Follow-up phase of a randomised trial of Tamoxifen or placebo for breast cancer prevention in high risk women$450,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr M Byrne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0180884
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20011 grants / $510,095

Randomised trials of adjuvant cytotoxic & endocrine therapy for early N+ and N- breast cancer.$510,095

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr J Collins, Dr M Byrne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0179671
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20001 grants / $182,187

Clinical trial of adjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin for node positive breast cancer.$182,187

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr Prudence Francis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178482
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19983 grants / $1,909,422

Randomised trial of tamoxifen or placebo for breast cancer prevention in high risk women$1,541,046

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr M Byrne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177167
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Clinical trial of optimal chemotherapy in poor prognosis node positive early breast cancer$195,222

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Assoc. Prof Michael Green, Dr M Byrne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177166
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Optimal endocrine and cytotoxic adjuvant therapy for node negative operable breast cancer$173,154

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder, Dr J Collins
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177165
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19954 grants / $1,889,829

95APP. Randomised trial of tamoxifen and placebo for breast cancer prevention in high risk women.$1,476,004

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0174578
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Optimal endocrine and cytotoxic adjuvant therapy for node negative operable breast cancer.$348,825

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr R Snyder
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0174579
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Surgical Oncology$35,000

Funding body: Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs

Funding body Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG)
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175586
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

95APP. Applied biosystems 373 automated DNA sequencer and genotyper.$30,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Gordon Burns, Professor Judith Scott
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0174612
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19941 grants / $313,346

Clinical trials of adjuvant chemo and hormone therapy in early breast cancer.$313,346

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor Alan Coates, Dr M Byrne, Dr R Snyder
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0173010
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19931 grants / $51,800

93,94,95 GRANT. Randomised Trial of Local Treatment & Tamoxifen for In Situ Breast Cancer.$51,800

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Professor David Joseph, Dr J Collins, Professor Alan Coates
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0173167
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19921 grants / $293,410

Clinical trials for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.$293,410

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes, Dr M Byrne, Dr J Collins, Professor Alan Coates
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1992
Funding Finish 1992
GNo G0174266
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19913 grants / $269,092

Clinical Trials Of Adjuvant Therapy In Node Positive Breast Cancer$199,859

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0174251
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Adjuvant Therapy Trial For Node Negative Patients With Early Operable Breast Cancer$61,733

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0173951
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Treatment Of Early Pre Invasive And Invasive Breast Cancer$7,500

Funding body: Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

Funding body Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
Project Team Professor John Forbes
Scheme Foundation Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0173997
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2010 PhD Mammographic Density as a Biomarker for the Efficacy of Treatment of Endocrine Therapies Used to Prevent Breast Cancer Events in Randomised Controlled Clinical Trials
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2007 PhD The Effect of Tamoxifen on Mammographic Density in Women with High Risk of Breast Cancer
Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 203
United Kingdom 106
United States 95
Switzerland 55
Italy 51
More...
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News

Professor John Forbes

Top Research Honour

August 10, 2015

Professor John Forbes receives 2015 Premier's award for Outstanding Cancer research.

Professor John Forbes

World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds: 2014

June 23, 2014

Professor John Forbes AM has been recognised as one of the world's leading scientific researchers, with the release of Thomson Reuters list of The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds: 2014.

John Forbes

International spotlight on cancer research

October 23, 2013

Four of North America's leading cancer researchers will give keynote presentations at the international Translational Cancer Research Conference in Newcastle from tomorrow until Friday.

Professor John Forbes

Position

Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email john.forbes@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 0113
Fax (02) 4960 1539

Office

Room 2.041
Building NBN Telethon Mater Institute
Location Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital

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