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Associate Professor Hans Lukas Kieser

ARC Future Fellow

School of Humanities and Social Science (History)

Inspiring a new perspective of war

University of Newcastle Future Fellow Associate Professor Hans-Lukas Kieser looks to humanity's violent past for answers to a peaceful future.

Hans-Lukas KieserA historian and Australian Research Council Future Fellow with UON's Centre for the History of Violence, Kieser's research focuses on the demise of the Ottoman Empire, marked by the First World War. His work is essential to a better understanding of the present day conflicts in the Middle East – which he believes are directly related to unresolved questions of the past.

"My research combines a history of violence with a history of interactions – including typically modern religious factors, such as apocalyptic perspectives in all three monotheistic religions and the radical devotion to Islam," Kieser said.

His ardent belief in matters of truth makes him determined to discuss sensitive questions beyond the clichés to expose the realities of conflict.

"Students and wider society know the high impact that contemporary Middle East has had on international politics…. and it is critical that people are historically informed. Knowledge, well-researched new perspectives and prudent questions improve the level of public and political discussion. This is what I hope to inspire."

Kieser's exploration into the demise of the Ottoman Empire and the First World War began when he was a young student of history in Basal, Switzerland. It was here that he encountered refugees from crisis-ridden Turkey after the violent military coup of 1980.

"I realised that there were a lot of open questions with regard to Turkey's history, but at the same time, a striking lack of research. The approaches and concepts appeared inadequate to me for an understanding of what was going on," he said.

His resulting PhD thesis was later picked up by prestigious Turkish publisher, Iletişim – who also publish Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk.

Titled: The squandered peace. Missionaries, ethnicity and the state in the eastern provinces of Turkey 1839–1938, the book is now in its 4th edition.

"This volume has become particularly important for a new generation of historians, for human rights groups, and also for many Armenians, Alevis and Kurds because it emphasises failed, nevertheless valid, quests for peace before the end of the Ottoman Empire," Kieser said.

"A year and a half before Armenian journalist and community leader Hrant Dink was murdered in 2007; he thanked me cordially for this work during a meeting in Istanbul."

Students and wider society know the high impact that contemporary Middle East has had on international politics…. and it is critical that people are historically informed. Knowledge, well-researched new perspectives and prudent questions improve the level of public and political discussion. This is what I hope to inspire

In 2013, Kieser was awarded an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship grant to support his project: War, Violence, and Apocalyptic-Millenarianism in the Middle East: Talat Pasha and the Foundation of Modern Turkey, 1874-1921.  For this project, he will consider the demise of the Ottoman Empire in a broad international context, and analyse the relationship between state formation, political violence and genocide.

"This project will provide a significant contribution not only to the history of the Ottoman world and present day Turkey, but also to an understanding of contemporary Middle East," Kieser said.

Fieldwork for the project involves travel all over the world, including to the Middle East itself. "Together with research assistants, I will collect rich documentation in many languages that will form, together with secondary literature, the basis for the historical analysis."

In 2014 and 2015, he will also attend several scholarly and public events in relation to the centenary of the First World War and the Armenian Genocide.

"In June, there was a workshop at the University of Zurich to prepare a concise volume on the Ottoman road to total war from 1913 to 1915. Now, we are planning a panel for the 24th Australasian Association for European History conference in Newcastle for July 2015."

As he continues with his quest to uncover answers to the modern-day conflict in the Middle East and beyond, Kieser says it is truth that drives him on.

"Humbly and sceptically, I believe that good historiography is driven by a love of truth. It has to use all conceptual, methodological and material possibilities to live this love."

Inspiring a new perspective of war

Inspiring a new perspective of war

University of Newcastle Future Fellow Associate Professor Hans-Lukas Kieser looks to humanity's violent past for answers to a peaceful future

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Associate Professor Hans-Lukas Kieser is an historian of the late Ottoman Empire and Turkey, and is currently an ARC Future Fellow with the School of Humanities and Social Science in the Faculty of Education and Arts at The University of Newcastle.

The title of his Future Fellowship project is 'War, Violence, and Apocalyptic-Millenarianism in the Middle East: Talat Pasha and the Foundation of Modern Turkey, 1874-1921'.  This research project considers the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, the Ottoman entry into the First Word War on the side of the Axis powers, and the subsequent demise of the Ottoman Empire in a broad international context. It addresses matters of deep analytical importance - state formation, political violence, and genocide - and the relationship between these elements. In particular, it focuses on the Grand Vizir, Talat Pasha, the founder of the modern Turkish nation-state, and the architect of the Armenian genocide. This history is essential for a contemporary understanding of the most controversial problems - the Kurdish conflict, the Armenian question, Palestine - facing Turkey and the Middle East today.

Kieser also holds an adjunct position with the University of Zurich as a Professor of Modern History. He was an Invited Professor at Stanford University (2010), University of Michigan (2008) and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, in 2004, and has been President of the Research Foundation Switzerland-Turkey in Basel.

Research Expertise
History History of Violence History of Turkey Genocide World War I Political Violence

Teaching Expertise
History History of Violence

Collaborations
The dozen collective research projects Kieser has initiated and led in the last 15 years were all interdisciplinary and international. They involve scholars from a variety of universities and form an important pool of trusty scholarly relations. These collaborations include members of Stanford University; the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Clark University, Boston; the Départment d’Etudes Turques, Universite Marc Bloch Strasbourg; the Institute for the Study of Islam and Muslim societies around the world, both of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris; the School of History at the University of Edinburgh; the Sabanci University, Istanbul; and the Hrant Dink Foundation, Istanbul. Kieser’s research topics are publicly visible and politically relevant. They have garnered interest from the media, civil society groups and political protagonists in Switzerland, Europe and Turkey, and have led to his participation in public panel discussions, the preparation of exhibitions, and a theatre production. He has collaborated on two documentaries - 'Aghet' by Eric Friedler (2010); and 'The Armenian Genocide' by Laurence Jourdan (2004) - both broadcast by the leading European Culture channel, Arte. As the president of the Research Foundation Switzerland-Turkey, an academic think tank based in Basel, he has worked with a range of institutions, among them Swiss universities; Culturescapes; the House of Literature, Basel; the S. Fischer Foundation; and the Europa Institut, Basel.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Basel
  • Master of Arts (History), University of Basel

Keywords

  • Contemporary Middle East
  • Genocide
  • History of Turkey
  • Massacre
  • Modern History
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Political Violence
  • Protestant Theology
  • Violence Studies
  • War
  • World War I

Languages

  • Turkish (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
210310Middle Eastern and African History70
210399Historical Studies not elsewhere classified30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
14/04/2014 - 13/04/2018ARC Future FellowUniversity of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2013 - Fellow ARC
ARC - Discovery - Future Fellowships
University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/01/2011 - Adjunct ProfessorUniversity of Zurich
Department of History
Switzerland
1/01/2008 - 1/12/2009ProfessorUniversity of Freiburg, Germany
Germany
1/01/2007 - DirectorResearch Foundation Switzerland-Turkey
Switzerland
1/01/2005 - 1/12/2006ProfessorUniversity of Bamberg
Faculty of Humanities
Germany
1/01/2004 - PrivatdozentUniversity of Zurich
Department of History
Switzerland
1/01/2000 - 1/01/2004Lecturer and ResearcherUniversity of Zurich
Department of History
Switzerland

Awards

Recipient

YearAward
2012Fellowship in the School of History at the Institute for Advanced Studies
Unknown

Invitations

Distinguished Visitor

YearTitle / Rationale
2011Invited Professor
Organisation: University of Michigan
2010Visting Professor
Organisation: Stanford University
2006Invited Scholar
Organisation: Bilgi University
2004Invited Scholar
Organisation: Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Sciences Sociales

External Examiner

YearTitle / Rationale
2013PhD Thesis Committee
Organisation: Clark University in Boston
2012PhD Thesis Committee
Organisation: University of Trondheim
2012PhD Thesis Committee
Organisation: University of Munich

Keynote Speaker

YearTitle / Rationale
2011Der Völkermord an den Armeniern und die deutsche Öffentlichkeit
Organisation: Heinrich Böll Foundation Description: Keynote Address

Participant

YearTitle / Rationale
2013Invited Speaker
Organisation: University of Geneva
2013Invited Speaker
Organisation: University of Innsbruck
2013Invited Speaker
Organisation: Universities of Munich
2012Invited Speaker
Organisation: Human Rights Association of Istanbul
2012Invited Speaker
Organisation: University of Erfurt
2012Invited Speaker
Organisation: University of Köln
2012Invited Speaker
Organisation: Hebrew University in Jerusalem
2011Invited Speaker
Organisation: University of Potsdam

Speaker

YearTitle / Rationale
2013Invited Presenter
Organisation: Clark University
2012Invited Presenter
Organisation: Anatolia Culture Foundation Description: Presenter
2012Invited Presenter
Organisation: University of Lancaster Description: Invited Presenter
2012Invited Presenter
Organisation: Humboldt University
2010Invited Presenter
Organisation: Humboldt University Description: Speaker
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (6 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Kieser H-L, Nearest east: American millenialism and mission to the middle east, Temple University Press, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2010) [A1]
2010Kiesser H-L, Aspects of the Political Language in Turkey (19th¿20th c.), Gorgias PressLlc, Istanbul, 137 (2010)
2006Kieser H-L, Turkey Beyond Nationalism: Towards post-nationalist identities, I.B.Tauris, London, 242 (2006)
2006Kieser H-L, Turkey Beyond Nationalism: Towards post-nationalist identities, I.B.Tauris, London, 242 (2006)
2005Kieser H-L, Vorkämpfer der "Neuen Türkei", Chronos, Zurich, 197 (2005)
2000Kieser H-L, Der verpasste Friede, Chronos, Zurich, 642 (2000)
Show 3 more books

Chapter (10 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Kieser HL, 'Beatrice Rohner's work in the death camps of Armenians in 1916', Resisting Genocide: the Multiple Forms of Rescue, Oxford University Press, New York 367-382 (2014)
DOI10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199333493.001.0001
2011Kieser HL, 'The massacre of the Dersim in Turkey, in 1937-1938', Online Encyclopedia of Mass Violence, SciencePo, http://www.massviolence.org/Dersim-Massacre-1937-1938 .-. (2011)
2011Kieser HL, 'Johannes Lepsius: Theologian, humanitarian activist and historian of Völkermord. An approach to a German biography (1858-1926)', Logos im Dialogos: In der Suche nach Orthodoxie. Gedenkschrift für Hermann Goltz (1946-2010), Berlin : Lit, Berlin 209-229 (2011)
2011Kieser HL, 'From 'patriotism' to mass murder: Dr. Mehmed Resid (1873-1919)', A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire, Oxford University Press, Oxford 126-149 (2011) [B1]
2011Kieser HL, 'Marges de manoeuvres missionnaires: les stratégies américaines dans le monde ottoman', L'Islam des marges, KARTHALA Editions, Paris 129-144 (2011)
2011Kieser H-L, Bloxham D, 'Genocide', The Cambridge History of the First World War: Volume I Global War, Cambridge University Press 585-614 (2011)

In Europe the First World War marked a lethal culmination of the imperialism of the modern nation-states and the end of the great dynastic land empires that dated from the late Middle Ages. The characteristics of the conflict itself, including not just developing strategic, tactical and geopolitical considerations, but the psychological, material and socio-political consequences of total war, are vital in explaining the extremity of policies against a range of civilian populations on both sides. Nevertheless, it was the conjunction of war and pre-existing ethno-political ¿problems¿ that produced genocide and other extensive crimes perpetrated against population groups. Accordingly, the main and final focus of this chapter, which is a study of the murder of the Ottoman Armenians and other Anatolian Christians during the First World War, incorporates an account of pre-war state¿minority relations. Our contention is that there were two, related cases of outright genocide in the 1914¿18 conflict: the deportation and murder of the Armenians, or the Aghet, and the fate of the Ottoman Syriac Christian populations (sometimes called ¿Assyro-Chaldeans¿), which is known in the survivor communities as Sayfo. Use of the word ¿genocide¿ is still inflammatory in relation to the First World War, because of a lack of clarity about the applicability of the term, deliberate obfuscation and a vitiating confusion of moral, legal and historical criteria. In order to elucidate key conceptual issues, we will begin in the following section by considering its applicability to the Armenian case.

DOI10.1017/CHO9780511675669.028
2010Kieser HL, 'Germany and the Armenian Genocide', The Routledge History of the Holocaust, Taylor & Francis, New York 30-44 (2010)
2008Kieser HL, 'La missionnaire Beatrice Rohner face au génocide des Arméniens', La résistance aux génocides, Les Presses de Sciences Po, Paris 383-398 (2008)
2008Kieser HL, 'Europäische Union inklusive Türkei. Eine Antwort auf offene Fragen moderner Geschichte? [European Union including Turkey. An answer to open questions of modern history?]', Europa: ein christliches Projekt?, W. Kohlhammer Verlag, Stuttgart 83-91 (2008)
2008Kieser HL, 'Mahmut Bozkurt und die 'Revolution des Rechts' in der jungen Republik Türkei [Mahmut Bozkurt and the ¿Revolution of Law¿ in the young Republic of Turkey]', Revolution islamischen Rechts, Chronos, Zurich 49-58 (2008)
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (10 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Kieser H-L, 'Domestic Frontiers: Gender, Reform, and American Interventions in the Ottoman Balkans and the Near East', AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, 118 1490-1491 (2013) [C3]
DOI10.1093/ahr/118.5.1490Author URL
2011Kieser HL, 'Réformes ottomanes et cohabitation entre chrétiens et Kurdes (1839-1915)', Etudes rurales, 186 43-60 (2011)
2011Kieser H-L, 'World war and world revolution: Alexander Helphand-Parvus in Germany and Turkey', Kritika, 12 387-410 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 2
2010Kieser H-L, 'Ottoman reforms and cohabitation between Christians and Kurds (1839-1915)', Etudes Rurales, 186 43-60 (2010) [C1]
2009Kieser HL, 'Zion-Armenien-Deutschland. Johannes Lepsius und die ¿protestantische Internationale¿ in der spätosmanischen Welt', Armenisch-Deutsche Korrespondenz, 143 15-21 (2009)
2008Kieser HL, 'Removal of American Indians, destruction of Ottoman Armenians American missionaries and demographic engineering', European Journal of Turkish Studies, 7 .-. (2008)
2008Kieser HL, 'Der Armeniermord von 1915/16 im Spannungsfeld von Forschung und Politik', Polis. Das Magazin für Politische Bildung, 2 16-18 (2008)
2005Kieser HL, 'America and the Armenian genocide of 1915', SLAVIC REVIEW, 64 654-656 (2005)
DOI10.2307/3650170Author URL
2003Kieser H-L, 'Historical responsibility and culture of law instead of culturalism - On the historical debate about Turkey and the boundaries of Europe', Orient, 44 63-73 (2003)

This essay starts from the idea that the European Union is a contractual community united by political will, a commitment to law and historical responsibility - not by race, culture or religion, and only partly by geography. Referring to a debate on the possibility of Turkey joining the EU conducted in German language newspapers since September 2002, it refutes a generalizing historico-culturalist approach to Europeanness, and instead emphasizes the catastrophic experience of WWI and WWII as fundamental for the initiation of the European project. More than any other country Turkey, the ally of Wilhelminian Germany, had been afflicted by, and transformed during, WWI. Its elites, especially the Young Turks, were westernized in the early 20th century sense, believing in science, progress, secularist nationalism and Social Darwinism. "New Turkey" was a quasi European project of that time: an secular ethnonationalist unitarian state led by people who had embraced and wanted to implement European civilization. The Kemalists (most of them former Young Turks) abolished the Califate and the Sharia, and introduced the Swiss Civil Code. in 1926 as the core of their "Turkish (social) Revolution" Politically, the establishment of the Republic (including WWI and the War of Independence) was aimed against the Occident, culturally it wanted the West. Murderous population politics, lack of democracy, a quasi religious Turkism and a distorted history were the dead-ends of the new state. Turkey's integration into the NATO after World War II did not help overcoming them; on the contrary, it enabled the military and a few political leaders to persist in their undemocratic positions. The broad mobilization in today's Turkey for joining the EU is strongly linked to recently emerged civil society agents who look to close-by Europe rather than to the strategically motivated USA. The broad resistance against the war in Iraq bore a clear message in this direction. Despite the negative effects of the interior war against the PKK, important changes took place in Turkey since the 1990s: The word «Kurd» was no longer banned, the Kurdish reality accepted, at least as an issue to be discussed. The important heterodox Islamic groups of the Alevis (about a quarter of Turkey's population) for the first time made themselves heared in public, thus more than ever questioning the subordinating integration and financing of Sunni Islam by the so-called secular state since 1924. The last remaining, great taboo is the Armenian Genocide. This significant episode again leads back to the World Wars: At the Conference of Lausanne (1923/24) Western diplomats condoned the Young Turks' expulsion and murder of the Christians in Asia Minor's during and after World War I; they were therefore partly responsible for establishing an ethno-nationalistic paradigm for "solving" the issue of minorities which later proved to be disastrous in Central Europe and elsewhere. In order to be integrated into the EU, Turkey must fulfil the political, economical and juridical criteria, nothing else. In the long term, however, the implementation of human and minority rights can only succeed hand in hand with the unconditional elucidation of the past. A shared future with shared values needs a common, if pluralistic historical perspective. If the EU is in essence a response to the catastrophes of the World Wars, Turkey must be part of it. The road towards the EU helps and urges Turkey towards emancipating itself from a rigid nationalism, as it did many present members; but it also challenges the EU not to become a bigoted "Christian club" opposing "Islam".

2001Kieser H-L, 'Muslim heterodoxy and protestant Utopia. the interactions between Alevis and missionaries in Ottoman anatolia', Welt des Islams, 41 89-111 (2001)
DOI10.1163/157006001323146849
CitationsScopus - 6
Show 7 more journal articles

Creative Work (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2010Friedler E, Aghet (2010)

Other (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2011Kieser HL, 'Kazanilabilecek baris [A peace to win]', Birikim Dergisi ( issue.264/265 pp.78-96) (2011)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants5
Total funding$1,269,072

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $30,000

Violence Studies$30,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project TeamProfessor Philip Dwyer, Associate Professor Hans Lukas Kieser, Professor Roger Markwick, Doctor Lisa Featherstone, Doctor Michael Ondaatje, Doctor Shigeru Sato, Doctor Matthew Lewis
SchemeResearch Programme 2014
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400927
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20131 grants / $790,764

War, Violence, and Apocalyptic-Millenarianism in the Middle East: Talat Pasha and the Foundation of Modern Turkey, 1874-1921 $790,764

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Hans Lukas Kieser
SchemeFuture Fellowships
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300027
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20002 grants / $448,307

Switzerland-Turkey: lifestyles and cultural encounters (late 19th to mid 20th century)$365,307

The project explores the social and mental network between Turkey and Switzerland in the first half of the 20th century. It focuses on the aspects of "education", "lifestyles" and "cultural encounter". Switzerland's image was in that period of unsurpassable oppositeness: on the one hand declared civilian model both for the Turkish, Armenian and Kurdish elite, on the other hand stronghold of opposition and criticism of the regime. "Education" was the main reason for a stay in Switzerland, which was regarded as the citadel of European culture in Turkey. Education as well as health and law presented the light side of the late Ottoman and early republican Switzerland image represents. Meanwhile role model situated in the larger context of an Ottoman Turkey and boys looking for "Western progress". Many Ottoman students from various ethnic backgrounds chosen to Switzerland for their study, in some cases, the center of their political activities and were on record at the Cantonal Aliens Police, the University and the Ottoman diplomacy. The state itself sent, not after 1923 (founding of the Republic), students and people recovering from illness in Switzerland. The concept of "life world" - the central, overarching aspect of the project - allows not only to stay in Switzerland, cultural, social and history of mentality to understand, but also to tackle the Swiss diaspora in Turkey adequately. Some Swiss received a lesson in - always less gelingendem - multi-religious coexistence and the encounter with Islam, by temporarily or for life attracted as teachers, scholars, missionaries, engineers, foremen, bankers, traders or watchmaker in bustling cities of the Ottoman space and a partial acculturation went through. The dark side of the then Turkish-Swiss relations lay in the field of minority issues. The virulent encounter further brought parts of Switzerland with Turkey in the Armenian question and the structural design and relief organizations on the ground, z. B. in Urfa, sustainable religious and national debt and the enemy out. It did so, however, without an entrepreneurial Switzerland "on imperialist paths" (Witschi 1987), to do with considerable share of the Ottoman economy, banking and railways demolition. Ambition of the applicant is the deep structures of Swiss-Turkish relations visible and reasonable to make: ID (educational and civil models, "European culture"), confrontation (international law and human rights, religious backbonds) and - in the present project only marginally - business (economic relations). Discrepancies and coherences in both the middle eastern Helvetic-ratio as well as in Switzerland, respectively Turkish self-image should be exposed and challenged.
Funding body: Swiss National Science Foundation

Funding bodySwiss National Science Foundation
Project Team
SchemeProject Funding
RoleLead
Funding Start2000
Funding Finish2004
GNo
Type Of FundingInternational - Competitive
Category3IFA
UONY

"Moderne Nahostfragen und ihre Vernetzung mit Europa und der Schweiz"$83,000

"Modern Middle East issues and their links with Europe and Switzerland"
Funding body: Fonds zur Förderung des Akademischen Nachwuchses

Funding bodyFonds zur Förderung des Akademischen Nachwuchses
Project Team
SchemeGrant
RoleLead
Funding Start2000
Funding Finish2002
GNo
Type Of FundingInternational - Competitive
Category3IFA
UONY

19981 grants / $1

"Switzerland-Turkey: life worlds and cultural encounters (late 19th to mid 20th century)"$1

The project explores the social and mental network between Turkey and Switzerland in the first half of the 20th century. It focuses on the aspects of "education", "lifestyles" and "cultural encounter".
Funding body: Swiss National Science Foundation

Funding bodySwiss National Science Foundation
Project Team
SchemeGrant
RoleLead
Funding Start1998
Funding Finish2001
GNo
Type Of FundingInternational - Competitive
Category3IFA
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2013Arab states, Arab interest groups and the anti-Zionist movement in Western Europe and the U.S., 1952 - 1979
History, University of Zurich
Co-Supervisor
2012Hrant Dink and the construction of a public Armenian identity in Turkey
History, University of Zurich
Sole Supervisor
2012The "Modern" in Turkey. An analysis of the Turkish path to modernity based on the theory of communicative action of Jürgen Habermas
History, University of Zurich
Sole Supervisor
2012Switzerland-Turkey diplomatic history
History, University of Zurich
Co-Supervisor
2011The image of man in the Turkish Constitution State
History, University of Zurich
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2012 Historical arguments in the debate on Turkey's rapprochement with the European Union in the institutions of the EU
History, University of Zurich
Principal Supervisor
2012Surviving the ordinary: The Armenians in Turkey, 1930s to 1950
History, Unknown
Consultant Supervisor
2009The Kurdish question in the context of Turkey's accession to the European Union
History, University of Zurich
Sole Supervisor
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News

Join the dots between Gallipoli and the Armenian genocide

Join the dots between Gallipoli and the Armenian genocide

April 27, 2015


Australian Research Council Future Fellow and member of Newcastle's Centre for the History of Violence, Associate Professor Hans-Lukas Kieser will be speaking at the Australasian Association for European History (AAEH) XXIV Biennial Conference, War, Violence, Aftermaths: Europe and the Wider World, to be held in Newcastle, from July 14-17 2015. Find out more about his talk below in this article originally published in The Conversation.

The Killing Field

The Killing Field

May 15, 2014

Professor Lyndall Ryan is a gentle and urbane historian who is "hopeless at the sight of blood" and doesn't care for violent movies. So how is it that she finds herself immersed in the notion of brutality?

ARC Future Fellow Professor Hans-Lukas Kieser

ARC Future Fellow Prof Dr Hans-Lukas Kieser

November 11, 2013

Prof Dr Hans-Lukas Kieser have been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship 2013-2017, War, Violence, and Apocalyptic-Millenarianism in the Middle East: Talat Pasha and the Foundation of Modern Turkey, 1874-1921

Associate Professor Hans Lukas Kieser

Position

ARC Future Fellow
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

History

Contact Details

Emailhanslukas.kieser@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Building.
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