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Career Summary

Biography

I graduated from Newcastle Law School in 2004, and my PhD was awarded in 2011. Since 2005, I have been engaged in research relating to the collective human right to self-determination, with particular focus on Indigenous peoples in Australia and Irish nationalists in the North of Ireland. My doctoral research explores the self-determination claims of peoples who live a contemporary colonial experience, and I argue that the right of self-determination retains a mission of decolonisation in the twenty-first century. I also conduct research in the fields in public international law, human rights (particularly self-determination), law and society, women's rights, refugee rights, Indigenous legal issues, Indigenisation of curriculum and teaching and learning in law.

I have published in relation to self-determination, Indigenous land rights, and women's security. In 2014, I am working on articles relating to the Indigenisation of curricula, self-determination in the context of peace and violence, accountability under international law and the rights of Indigenous peoples, and the use of qualitative socio-legal research in international law.

Since 2013, I have served as undergraduate program convenor in Newcastle Law School, working alongside excellent colleagues to ensure the quality and continuous improvement of our innovative and experiential degree programs. My teaching specialities are Public International Law, Indigenous Peoples, Issues and the Law, Human Rights and Legal Theory. 

Qualifications

  • PhD (Law), University of Newcastle, 18/12/2011
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle, 15/02/2002
  • Bachelor of Laws (Honours), University of Newcastle, 13/12/2004

Research

Research keywords

  • Colonialism and international law
  • Human rights
  • Indigenisation
  • Indigenous legal issues
  • Legal theory
  • Public international law
  • Self-determination

Research expertise

My doctoral research relates to the collective human right of self-determination in international law. I have taken a novel approach to self-determination, exploring the right in the context of contemporary, anti-colonial claims. Contemporary claimant groups able to demonstrate a colonial experience include Indigenous peoples in Australia and Irish nationalists in the North of Ireland. I argue that this colonial experience must be addressed in order that contemporary self-determination claims may be dealt with honestly and fairly. Further, a new approach to self-determination claims, based on the human rights framework as a whole, is required.

I am also currently collaborating with my colleague Dr Tamara Young on research relating to the Indigenisation of curricula in law and business schools. This research has potential to translate to a range of jurisdictions and organisations concerned with curricular justice and educating students for social justice, as well as improving higher education outcomes for Indigenous students.

Previous research collaborations have related to the effectiveness of Indigenous Land Use Agreements as a means of promoting the realisation of land rights for Indigenous peoples, and the role of international law in protecting and promoting women's security in post-conflict societies.

I have supervised three students in the completion of their Honours dissertations in Law:

Ruth Hudson, 'Trafficked, Traded, Turned Away: A Critical Evaluation of Australian Law in Relation to Trafficked Women' (2008)

Charlotte Buckton, 'Evading the Rising Tide: Development of an International Instrument to Protect Peoples Displaced by Climate Change' (2011)

James Willoughby, 'The Hart-Fuller debate lacks conflict' (2013)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
180114Human Rights Law50
180119Law And Society30
180116International Law (Excl. International Trade Law)20

Memberships

Committee/Associations (relevant to research).

  • Member - Australian and New Zealand Society of International Law
  • Member - International Law Association, Australian branch
  • Member - Law and Society Association of Australian and New Zealand
  • Collaborative Research Network on collective human rights

Appointments

Co-Chair
Faculty of Business and Law Academic Women's Network (Australia)
01/06/2011
Undergraduate Program Convenor
Newcastle Law School (Australia)
01/04/2013

Awards

Research Award.

2010Faculty of Business and Law Research Higher Degree Best Publication Award
University of Newcastle (Australia)
Amy Maguire, ‘The Role of International Law in the Protection of Women’s Security’ in Brett Bowden, Hilary Charlesworth and Jeremy Farrall (Eds.), Great Expectations: The Role of International Law in Restructuring Societies after Conflict, Cambridge University Press, 2009, pp.218-243.

Collaboration

Alongside my colleague Dr Tamara Young, I am engaged in collaborative research relating to the Indigenisation of curricula in Law and Business schools. I also maintain an international Collaborative Research Network, with a focus on collective human rights.

Administrative

Administrative expertise

Undergraduate Program Convenor, Newcastle Law School

Founding convenor of the Newcastle Law School Staff Research Network

Founder and former co-chair of the Faculty of Business and Law Women's Network

Founder and convenor of an international Collaborative Research Network on collective human rights

Coordinator of the Newcastle Law School submissions project to the National Human Rights Consultation (2008-9)

Organiser of the Newcastle Bill of Rights Symposium (2008)

Teaching

Teaching keywords

  • Indigenous Peoples, Issues and the Law
  • Legal Theory
  • Public International Law

Teaching expertise

Public International Law

Indigenous Peoples, Issues and the Law

Human Rights

Legal Theory

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Highlighted Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2009Maguire AM, ''Security starts with the law': The role of international law in the protection of women's security post-conflict', The Role of International Law in Rebuilding Societies After Conflict: Great Expectations, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 218-243 (2009) [B1]
2008Maguire AM, 'Law protecting rights: Restoring the law of self-determination in the neo-colonial world', Law Text Culture, 12 12-39 (2008) [C1]
2013Maguire AM, 'Contemporary Anti-colonial Self-determination Claims and the Decolonisation of International Law', Griffith Law Review, 22 238-268 (2013)

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Click on a category title below to expand the list of citations for that specific category.

Chapter (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2009Maguire AM, ''Security starts with the law': The role of international law in the protection of women's security post-conflict', The Role of International Law in Rebuilding Societies After Conflict: Great Expectations, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 218-243 (2009) [B1]

Journal article (5 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Maguire AM, 'Contemporary Anti-colonial Self-determination Claims and the Decolonisation of International Law', Griffith Law Review, 22 238-268 (2013)
2010Howard-Wagner D, Maguire AM, ''The Holy Grail' or 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly'?: A qualitative exploration of the ILUAs agreement-making process and the relationship between ILUAs and native title', Australian Indigenous Law Review, 14 71-85 (2010) [C1]
2008Maguire AM, 'Law protecting rights: Restoring the law of self-determination in the neo-colonial world', Law Text Culture, 12 12-39 (2008) [C1]
2006Hamber B, Hillyard P, Maguire AM, McWilliams M, Robinson G, Russell D, Ward M, 'Discourses in transition: Re-imaging women's security', International Relations, 20 487-502 (2006) [C1]
2006Maguire AM, 'Murdering myths: The story behind the death penalty (Book review)', British Journal of Criminology, 46 532-534 (2006) [C3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants1
Total funding$24,920

- Indicates that the researcher may be seeking students for this project.

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.

2011 (1 grants)

The Right to Self-Determination in International Law: A study of the colonial experiences of Irish nationalists and Indigenous peoples in Australia$24,920
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Amy Maguire
SchemeRole
Equity Research FellowshipChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$24,92020112011
GNo:G1000910
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Research Supervision

Number of current supervisions1
Total current UoN PhD EFTSL0.15

For supervisions undertaken at an institution other that the University of Newcastle, the institution name is listed below the program name.

Current Supervision

CommencedProposed
Completion
ProgramSupervisor TypeResearch Title
20142022PhD (Law)Co-SupervisorNo Rights, No Representation, No Voice: The Representation and Advocacy of Unaccompanied Minors and Separated Children in Australia
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Dr Amy Maguire

Work Phone(02) 4921 5374
Email
PositionLecturer
Newcastle Law School
Faculty of Business and Law
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Office
MC159c,
McMullin Building,
Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan NSW 2308
Australia
URL:www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/amy-maguire