Associate Professor Lisa Lampe

Associate Professor Lisa Lampe

Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Education

Lisa completed her undergraduate medical degree at the University of Western Australia. She joined the Family Medicine Program (as it was known then) to train for General Practice, but after several interesting years felt increasingly drawn to the psychological aspects of medicine. Accordingly she joined the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Fellowship Training Program, gaining her Fellowship in 1992. She completed a PhD at the University of Sydney in 2017.

Professional expertise

In 1992, in her senior registrar year, Lisa joined the Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety Disorders (CRUfAD) at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney. Clinical responsibility for the social phobia treatment program led to a career long interest in this and related anxiety disorders. Her affiliation with CRUfAD continued until 2006. This setting provided opportunities for involvement in world class clinical research and treatment, and expert clinical supervision enabled Lisa to develop her CBT skills to a high level of expertise. CRUfAD, established and led by Scientia Professor Gavin Andrews, AO, presented a model of evidence-based treatment, clinical research, staff support and collaboration that has greatly influenced not just Lisa, but a generation of researchers and clinicians.

After gaining her FRANZCP in 1993, Lisa began some part-time private practice in addition to continued work at CRUfAD. She developed an Anxiety Treatment Program for Evesham Clinic, modelled on that at CRUfAD, and has recently been supported to develop an an anxiety treatment clinic within Hunter New England Mental Health which will have a key focus on teaching.

Lisa joined the Mental Health Review Tribunal as a part-time member in 2002, and was recently re-appointed to continue as a member.

In 2006 Lisa closed her private practice and completed a series of locum appointments, including some very rewarding experiences in Launceston, Tasmania and other regional settings.

Contemporaneously with her academic appointments from 2008 onwards, Lisa has been appointed as a Staff Specialist (Academic) within local health services. These roles combined teaching, research support and clinical responsibilities.

Academic expertise

Lisa was a tutor and later lecturer in the Master of Psychological Medicine Program at the University of NSW from 1996 until discontinuation of the program in 2002. Thereafter she maintained a teaching association with UNSW as a conjoint lecturer.

In 2008, Lisa decided to move to a full-time academic position and was appointed as a Senior Lecturer at the Northern Clinical School of the University of Sydney Medical School. Working at USyd was a very enriching experience, due to the high calibre of academic and professional staff, all willing to share their expertise.

Also in 2008 Lisa joined the Committee for Examinations (CFE) in the RANZCP. She fulfilled roles as Deputy Chair of the Written Examination Subcommittee and Deputy Chair of the CFE before being elected Chair in 2012. Through her role as Block Coordinator of psychiatry teaching at USyd and Chair of the CFE, Lisa became interested in assessment. Skilled and innovative experts in assessment at both USyd and the RANZCP, keen to share their experience, fuelled this interest and created opportunities to build knowledge and expertise.

Family reasons prompted a move to the Hunter New England region and the availability of an exciting academic opportunity in the Joint Medical Program within the Faculty of Medicine and Public Health provided the perfect opportunity to complete the move. In the JMP, Lisa has a role as Year 2 Coordinator at UON for the new MD Joint Medical Program.

Other academic highlights include:

  • membership of working parties reviewing the diagnostic criteria for social phobia and creating the RANZCP clinical practice guidelines for social phobia, panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder.
  • co-authorship of two textbooks on anxiety disorders, one of which has been translated into six languages.
  • contribution to the development of an online training course on the nature, recognition and treatment of anxiety disorders.

Community affiliations and public education

Lisa has an enduring history of links with consumer and carer organisations. She is a member of the Anxiety Disorders Reference Committee of the Mental Health Association of NSW and has frequently spoken at educational sessions at the invitation of consumer and carer groups. She has participated in a number of public radio and TV programs on anxiety, is sole author of a book on managing anxiety and co-author of a book on managing depression and anxiety for the general public.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Western Australia

Keywords

  • anxiety disorders
  • assessment
  • cognitive behaviour therapy
  • medical education
  • psychiatry

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy) 60
130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Professor Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
10/03/2008 - 17/04/2017 Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry

Lisa contributed to the work of the Sydney Medical School in several roles and through membership of a number of committees. She was the Coordinator of the Psychiatry clinical block with responsibility for teaching and assessments. Based at Northern Clinical School, she was a member and later Chair of the Student Support Committee. She was a member of the Admissions Committee for the Sydney Medical School and various committees responsible for oversight of the medical program. Lisa initiated online delivery of psychiatry lectures, developed a webinar on personality disorders, and introduced innovations in learning activities, such as peer-led teaching.

The University of Sydney
Sydney Medical School
Australia
1/01/1999 - 31/12/2001 Lecturer

Lecturer in the Master of Psychological Medicine program, open to medical graduates.

University of New South Wales
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
14/05/2012 -  Chair, Committee for Examinations

Lisa was appointed to the Committee for Examinations (CFE) in 2008, and in 2012 was elected as Chair of the Committee. The CFE develops and oversees the centrally administered summative assessments in the RANZCP 2012 Fellowship Program. This includes an MCQ-type paper (computer-based), an Essay-style written paper (moving to computer in 2018), the Psychotherapy Written Case (in which candidates document a supervised case of psychotherapy), the Scholarly Project (an account of a research undertaking), and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Lisa works closely with the Examinations Team to review the performance of each examination, and this ongoing collaboration, together with the opportunity while at the University of Sydney to work closely with the Assessment Unit, has given her a keen interest and high level of expertise in assessment.

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
1/01/2002 -  Part-time member

The Mental Health Review Tribunal is a specialist quasi-judicial body

constituted under the Mental Health Act 2007. It has a wide range of

powers that enable it to conduct mental health inquiries, make and

review orders, and to hear some appeals, about the treatment and care of

people with a mental illness. My role is as a psychiatrist member of civil division panels which comprise a lawyer, psychiatrist and suitably qualified community member. Through this work I contribute to the care of persons with serious mental illness and gain an appreciation of treatment in a range of locations around NSW.

Mental Health Review Tribunal
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
17/04/2017 -  Staff Specialist (Academic) Hunter New England Local Health District
Mental Health
Australia
1/06/2008 - 31/03/2017 Staff Specialist (Academic)

My role including teaching and supervision of trainees in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) Fellowship Training Program, and a clinical role as consultant psychiatrist in the Wahroonga Rehabilitation Service, a multidisciplinary team providing specialist mental health rehabilitation in the community .

Northern Sydney Local Health District
Mental Health Drug and Alcohol Service
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
17/04/2017 -  Specialist Coordinator of Training

Hunter New England Training in Psychiatry (HNET) exists within the Hunter New England Local Health District and provides a formal education course to trainee psychiatrists enrolled in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) Fellowship Training Program. HNET is the only regional based psychiatry training program in Australia and New Zealand and its trainees have an enviable record of success in the RANZCP examinations. HNET has appointed a number of Coordinators of Training who have specialist areas of expertise within psychiatry. My areas of expertise are assessments and cognitive behaviour therapy.

Hunter New England Training in Psychiatry
Australia

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2011 Three Minute Thesis
The University of Sydney

Teaching Award

Year Award
2011 Northern Clinical School Teaching Award for Psychological Medicine
Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lampe L, Malhi GS, 'Avoidant personality disorder: Current insights', Psychology Research and Behavior Management, 11 55-66 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Lampe and Malhi. Avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) is a relatively common disorder that is associated with significant distress, impairment, and disability. It is a chro... [more]

© 2018 Lampe and Malhi. Avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) is a relatively common disorder that is associated with significant distress, impairment, and disability. It is a chronic disorder with an early age at onset and a lifelong impact. Yet it is underrecognized and poorly studied. Little is known regarding the most effective treatment. The impetus for research into this condition has waxed and waned, possibly due to concerns regarding its distinctiveness from other disorders, especially social anxiety disorder (SAD), schizoid personality disorder, and dependent personality disorder. The prevailing paradigm subscribes to the ¿severity continuum hypothesis¿, in which AVPD is viewed essentially as a severe variant of SAD. However, areas of discontinuity have been described, and there is support for retaining AVPD as a distinct diagnostic category. Recent research has focused on the phenomenology of AVPD, factors of possible etiological significance such as early parenting experiences, attachment style, temperament, and cognitive processing. Self-concept, avoidant behavior, early attachments, and attachment style may represent points of difference from SAD that also have relevance to treatment. Additional areas of research not focused specifically on AVPD, including the literature on social cognition as it relates to attachment and personality style, report findings that are promising for future research aimed at better delineating AVPD and informing treatment.

DOI 10.2147/PRBM.S121073
2018 Fernando I, Lampe L, 'Case formulation using pattern-based formulation (PBF) methodology: clinical case 4.', Australas Psychiatry, 1039856218789785 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1039856218789785
2018 Fernando I, Rajasuriya M, Lampe L, 'Pattern-based formulation: clinical case 5.', Australas Psychiatry, 1039856218804348 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1039856218804348
2017 Fritz K, Russell AMT, Allwang C, Kuiper S, Lampe L, Malhi GS, 'Is a delay in the diagnosis of bipolar disorder inevitable?', Bipolar Disorders, 19 396-400 (2017)

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Objective: A diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) is often preceded by an initial diagnosis of depressio... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Objective: A diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) is often preceded by an initial diagnosis of depression, creating a delay in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of BD. Although previous research has focused on predictors of a diagnosis change from depression to BD, the research on this delay in diagnosis is sparse. Therefore, the present study examined the time taken to make a BD diagnosis following an initial diagnosis of major depressive disorder in order to further understand the patient characteristics and psychological factors that may explain this delay. Method: A total of 382 patients underwent a clinical evaluation by a psychiatrist and completed a series of questionnaires. Results: Ninety patients were initially diagnosed with depression with a later diagnosis of BD, with a mean delay in diagnostic conversion of 8.74 years. These patients who were later diagnosed with BD were, on average, diagnosed with depression at a younger age, experienced more manic symptoms, and had a more open personality style and better coping skills. Cox regressions showed that depressed patients with diagnoses that eventually converted to BD had been diagnosed with depression earlier and that this was related to a longer delay to conversion and greater likelihood of dysfunctional attitudes. Conclusion: The findings from the present study suggested that an earlier diagnosis of depression is related to experiencing a longer delay in conversion to BD. The clinical implications of this are briefly discussed, with a view to reducing the seemingly inevitable delay in the diagnosis of BD.

DOI 10.1111/bdi.12499
Citations Scopus - 7
2016 Lampe L, 'Avoidant personality disorder as a social anxiety phenotype: risk factors, associations and treatment', CURRENT OPINION IN PSYCHIATRY, 29 64-69 (2016)
DOI 10.1097/YCO.0000000000000211
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2016 Kealy-Bateman W, Kotze B, Lampe L, 'When should I attempt my centrally administered summative assessments in the RANZCP competency-based training program?', Australasian Psychiatry, 24 615-619 (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1039856216671649
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Lampe L, Sunderland M, 'Social phobia and avoidant personality disorder: Similar but different?', Journal of Personality Disorders, 29 115-130 (2015)

© 2015 The Guilford Press. Avoidant personality disorder (AvPD) is regarded as a severe variant of social phobia (SP), consistent with a dimensional model. However, these conclusi... [more]

© 2015 The Guilford Press. Avoidant personality disorder (AvPD) is regarded as a severe variant of social phobia (SP), consistent with a dimensional model. However, these conclusions are largely drawn from studies based on individuals with SP, with or without comorbid AvPD. The present study hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between AvPD and SP that are undermined by limiting research to participants with SP. The authors sought to test this hypothesis by comparing three groups¿SP only, AvPD only, and SP+AvPD¿using data extracted from an epidemiological sample of 10,641 adults aged 18 years and over. Screening questions were used in the epidemiological survey to identify ICD-10 personality disorders; from this the author developed a proxy measure for DSM-IV AvPD. Axis 1 diagnoses, including DSM-IV SP, were identified using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). In this sample, the majority of those with AvPD did not also have SP: The authors found 116 persons with AvPD only, 196 with SP only, and 69 with SP+AvPD. There was little difference between any of the groups on sex, marital status, employment, education, or impairment variables. The SP+AvPD group reported more distress and comorbidity than the SP only and AvPD only groups, which did not differentiate from each other. More feared social situations were endorsed in the SP only group compared to the AvPD only group. Although the finding of few differences between SP only and AvPD only groups among the variables measured in this epidemiological survey fails to provide support for the hypothesis of qualitative differences, the finding that the AvPD only group appears more similar to the SP only group than to the SP+AvPD group also fails to provide support for the alternative continuity hypothesis. The greater distress and additional comorbidity with depression associated with SP+AvPD may be due to the additional symptom load of a second disorder rather than simply representing a more severe variant of social phobia. The use of a proxy for AvPD is a limitation of the study. Future studies should focus on broader clinical variables that have been proposed as qualitatively different between these disorders, and on the possible genetic and environmental factors that might help explain such differences.

DOI 10.1521/pedi_2013_27_079
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2015 Lampe L, 'Social anxiety disorders in clinical practice: Differentiating social phobia from avoidant personality disorder', Australasian Psychiatry, 23 343-346 (2015)

Objective: To outline the problems around overlap between social phobia (SAD) and avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) and provide guidelines that may assist clinicians to differe... [more]

Objective: To outline the problems around overlap between social phobia (SAD) and avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) and provide guidelines that may assist clinicians to differentiate these conditions. Conclusions: A constellation of symptoms can be identified that may distinguish AVPD from SAD, with key features being a strong and pervasively negative self-concept, a view of rejection as equating to a global evaluation of the individual as being of little worth and a sense of not fitting in socially that dates from early childhood. It is important to identify the presence of AVPD in order to anticipate potential problems with engagement and retention in therapy, to target treatment interventions and optimise outcome.

DOI 10.1177/1039856215592319
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Pham TD, Oyama-Higa M, Truong CT, Okamoto K, Futaba T, Kanemoto S, et al., 'Computerized assessment of communication for cognitive stimulation for people with cognitive decline using spectral-distortion measures and phylogenetic inference', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015)

© 2015 Pham et al. Therapeutic communication and interpersonal relationships in care homes can help people to improve their mental wellbeing. Assessment of the efficacy of these d... [more]

© 2015 Pham et al. Therapeutic communication and interpersonal relationships in care homes can help people to improve their mental wellbeing. Assessment of the efficacy of these dynamic and complex processes are necessary for psychosocial planning and management. This paper presents a pilot application of photoplethysmography in synchronized physiological measurements of communications between the care-giver and people with dementia. Signal-based evaluations of the therapy can be carried out using the measures of spectral distortion and the inference of phylogenetic trees. The proposed computational models can be of assistance and cost-effectiveness in caring for and monitoring people with cognitive decline.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0118739
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2014 Kuiper S, Fritz K, Tanious M, Bargh D, Coulston C, Curran G, et al., 'Psychiatric tertiary referral and clinical decision making', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 48 219-223 (2014)
DOI 10.1177/0004867413518442
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Malhi GS, Coulston CM, Fritz K, Lampe L, Bargh DM, Ablett M, et al., 'Unlocking the diagnosis of depression in primary care: Which key symptoms are GPs using to determine diagnosis and severity', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 48 542-547 (2014)

Objective: Diagnosing depression in primary care settings is challenging. Patients are more likely to present with somatic symptoms, and typically with mild depression. Use of ass... [more]

Objective: Diagnosing depression in primary care settings is challenging. Patients are more likely to present with somatic symptoms, and typically with mild depression. Use of assessment scales is variable. In this context, it is uncertain how general practitioners (GPs) determine the severity of depressive illness in clinical practice. The aim of the current paper was to identify which symptoms are used by GPs when diagnosing depression and when determining severity. Method: A total of 1760 GPs participated in the RADAR Program, an educational program focusing on the diagnosis and management of clinical depression. GPs identified a maximum of four patients whom they diagnosed with depression and answered questions regarding their diagnostic decision-making process for each patient. Results: Overall, assessment of depression severity was influenced more by somatic symptoms collectively than emotional symptoms. Suicidal thoughts, risk of self-harm, lack of enjoyment and difficulty with activities were amongst the strongest predictors of a diagnosis of severe depression. Conclusions: The conclusions are threefold: (1) collectively, somatic symptoms are the most important predictors of determining depression severity in primary care; (2) GPs may equate risk of self-harm with suicidal intent; (3) educational initiatives need to focus on key depressive subtypes derived from emotional, somatic and associated symptoms. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2013.

DOI 10.1177/0004867413513342
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2014 Malhi GS, Fritz K, Coulston CM, Lampe L, Bargh DM, Ablett M, et al., 'Severity alone should no longer determine therapeutic choice in the management of depression in primary care: Findings from a survey of general practitioners', Journal of Affective Disorders, 152-154 375-380 (2014)

Background The treatment of depression in primary care remains suboptimal for reasons that are complex and multifactorial. Typically GPs have to make difficult decisions in limite... [more]

Background The treatment of depression in primary care remains suboptimal for reasons that are complex and multifactorial. Typically GPs have to make difficult decisions in limited time and therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the management of depression of varying severity and the factors associated with treatment choices. Method Nested within a primary care educational initiative we conducted a survey of 1760 GPs. The GPs each identified four patients with clinical depression whom they had treated recently and then answered questions regarding their diagnosis and management of each patient. Results Comorbid anxiety, sadness and decreased concentration appeared to direct the management of depression toward psychological therapy, whereas comorbid pain and a patient's overall functioning, such as the ability to do simple everyday activities, directed the initiation of pharmacological treatment. The use of antidepressants with a broader spectrum of actions (acting on multiple neurotransmitters) increased from mild to severe depression, whereas this did not occur with the more selective agents. SSRIs were prescribed more frequently compared with all other antidepressants, irrespective of depression severity. Limitations GPs chose the RADAR programme and therefore they were potentially more likely to have an interest in mental health compared to GPs who did not participate. Conclusions GPs do not appear to be determining pharmacological treatment based on depression subtype and specificity, but rather on the basis of the total number of symptoms and overall severity. While acknowledging important differences between primary care and specialist practice, it is suggested that guidelines to assist GPs in matching treatment to depression subtype may be of practical assistance in decision-making, and the delivery of more effective treatments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.040
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Malhi GS, Lampe L, Coulston CM, Tanious M, Bargh DM, Curran G, et al., 'Mixed state discrimination: A DSM problem that won×', Journal of Affective Disorders, 158 8-10 (2014)

Background DSM's replacement of 'mixed episodes' with 'mixed features' has ironically created a specifier, which potentially lacks specificity because it ... [more]

Background DSM's replacement of 'mixed episodes' with 'mixed features' has ironically created a specifier, which potentially lacks specificity because it overlooks two key symptoms: psychomotor agitation and distractibility. Therefore, the present study examined the presence of psychomotor agitation and distractibility across the mood disorder spectrum. Methods Two hundred patients were diagnosed and assigned to one of three groups (depression, bipolar spectrum disorder (BDspectrum) and bipolar disorder) based on clinical evaluation by a psychiatrist. On the basis of MDQ scores, the depression group was then further subdivided into two groups: unipolar depression (UP) and mixed depression (UPmix). These four groups were then compared to examine the relative distribution of psychomotor agitation and distractibility. Participants underwent a clinical evaluation by a psychiatrist and completed a series of questionnaires. Results Increased distraction, racing thoughts, and increased irritability were the most commonly reported manic symptoms amongst the unipolar depression group. Further, UPmix and BDspectrum had significantly higher psychomotor agitation and distractibility than the other two groups. Limitations The present study depended on self-report measures and did not include standardised measures of distractibility and psychomotor agitation. Future research needs to examine pure unipolar patients without any manic symptoms to clarify further how different this group would be from those with mixed features. Conclusions The present findings suggest that distractibility and psychomotor agitation may represent the core of mixed states, as they are more common in patients with mixed depression and bipolar spectrum disorder than patients diagnosed with unipolar depression and bipolar I disorder. Future research and clinical implications are discussed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.01.008
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
2014 Malhi GS, Fritz K, Coulston CM, Lampe L, Bargh DM, Ablett M, et al., 'Severity alone should no longer determine therapeutic choice in the management of depression in primary care: Findings from a survey of general practitioners', JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, 152 375-380 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.040
Citations Web of Science - 1
2013 Lampe L, Coulston CM, Berk L, 'Psychological management of unipolar depression', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 127 24-37 (2013)

Objective: To be used in conjunction with 'Pharmacological management of unipolar depression' [Malhi et al. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;127(Suppl. 443):6-23] and 'Lif... [more]

Objective: To be used in conjunction with 'Pharmacological management of unipolar depression' [Malhi et al. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;127(Suppl. 443):6-23] and 'Lifestyle management of unipolar depression' [Berk et al. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;127(Suppl. 443):38-54]. To provide clinically relevant recommendations for the use of psychological treatments in depression derived from a literature review. Method: Medical databases including MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for pertinent literature, with an emphasis on recent publications. Results: Structured psychological treatments such as cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal therapy (IPT) have a robust evidence base for efficacy in treating depression, even in severe cases of depression. However, they may not offer benefit as quickly as antidepressants, and maximal efficacy requires well-trained and experienced therapists. These therapies are effective across the lifespan and may be preferred where it is desired to avoid pharmacotherapy. In some instances, combination with pharmacotherapy may enhance outcome. Psychological therapy may have more enduring protective effects than medication and be effective in relapse prevention. Newer structured psychological therapies such as mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy lack an extensive outcome literature, but the few published studies yielding positive outcomes suggest they should be considered options for treatment. Conclusion: Cognitive behaviour therapy and IPT can be effective in alleviating acute depression for all levels of severity and in maintaining improvement. Psychological treatments for depression have demonstrated efficacy across the lifespan and may present a preferred treatment option in some groups, for example, children and adolescents and women who are pregnant or postnatal. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/acps.12123
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 11
2013 Kuiper S, Mclean L, Fritz K, Lampe L, Malhi GS, 'Getting depression clinical practice guidelines right: Time for change?', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 128 24-30 (2013)

Objective: As part of a series of papers ['Chronobiology of mood disorders' Malhi & Kuiper. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;128(Suppl. 444):2-15; and 'It's time ... [more]

Objective: As part of a series of papers ['Chronobiology of mood disorders' Malhi & Kuiper. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;128(Suppl. 444):2-15; and 'It's time we managed depression: The emerging role of chronobiology' Malhi et¿al. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;128(Suppl. 444):1] examining chronobiology in the context of depression, this article examines recent western clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the treatment of depression with respect to the recommendations they make, in particular as regards chronobiological treatments, and briefly considers the implications of their methodology and approach. Method: Five international treatment guidelines, which had been published in the past 5¿years, were identified, representing North American and European views. Chosen guidelines were reviewed by the authors, and the relevant recommendations were distributed for discussion and subsequent synthesis. Results: Most current guidelines do not address chronobiology in detail. Chronotherapeutic recommendations are tentative, although agomelatine is considered as an option for major depression and bright light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Sleep deprivation is not routinely recommended. Conclusion: Recommendations are limited by the lack of reliable therapeutic markers for chronotherapeutics. Current evidence supports use of light therapy in seasonal depression, but in non-seasonal depression there is insufficient evidence to support reliance on chronotherapeutics over existing treatment modalities. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

DOI 10.1111/acps.12176
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2013 Lampe LA, Hagiwara T, 'Man vs. machine: Utility of a computerized structured diagnostic tool in clinical practice', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47 190-191 (2013)
DOI 10.1177/0004867412451346
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Lampe L, Jenkins K, 'OCI examination, RANZCP', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47 1089-1090 (2013)
DOI 10.1177/0004867413490037
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Walter G, Soh NLW, Jaconelli SN, Lampe L, Malhi GS, Hunt G, 'Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health', Postgraduate Medical Journal, 89 311-315 (2013)

Purpose To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at univ... [more]

Purpose To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at university, knowledge and use of student support services, and experience of stresses of daily life. Study design From March to September 2011, medical students at an Australian university were invited to complete an anonymous online survey. Results 475 responses were received. Students rated study and examinations (48.9%), financial concerns (38.1%), isolation (19.4%) and relationship concerns (19.2%) as very or extremely stressful issues. Knowledge of available support services was high, with 90.8% indicating they were aware of the university's medical centre. Treatment rates were modest (31.7%). Students' concerns about their mental state were generally low, but one in five strongly felt they needed to conceal their emotional problems. Conclusions Despite widespread awareness of appropriate support services, a large proportion of students felt they needed to conceal mental and emotional problems. Overall treatment rates for students who were greatly concerned about their mental and emotional state appeared modest, and, although comparable with those of similarly aged community populations, may reflect undertreatment. It would be appropriate for universities to address stressors identified by students. Strategies for encouraging distressed students to obtain appropriate assessment and treatment should also be explored. Those students who do seek healthcare are most likely to see a primary care physician, suggesting an important screening role for these health professionals.

DOI 10.1136/postgradmedj-2012-131343
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2013 Coulston CM, Bargh DM, Tanious M, Cashman EL, Tufrey K, Curran G, et al., 'Is coping well a matter of personality? A study of euthymic unipolar and bipolar patients', Journal of Affective Disorders, 145 54-61 (2013)

Background: Euthymic bipolar disorder (BD) patients often demonstrate better clinical outcomes than remitted patients with unipolar illness (UP). Reasons for this are uncertain, h... [more]

Background: Euthymic bipolar disorder (BD) patients often demonstrate better clinical outcomes than remitted patients with unipolar illness (UP). Reasons for this are uncertain, however, personality and coping styles are each likely to play a key role. This study examined differences between euthymic BD and UP patients with respect to the inter-relationship between personality, coping style, and clinical outcomes. Methods: A total of 96 UP and 77 BD euthymic patients were recruited through the CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney, and assessed by a team comprising Psychiatrists and Psychologists. They underwent a structured clinical diagnostic interview, and completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, stress, personality, coping, social adjustment, self-esteem, dysfunctional attitudes, and fear of negative evaluation. Results: Compared to UP, BD patients reported significantly higher scores on levels of extraversion, adaptive coping, self-esteem, and lower scores on trait anxiety and fear of negative evaluation. Extraversion correlated positively with self-esteem, adaptive coping styles, and negatively with trait anxiety and fear of negative evaluation. Trait anxiety and fear of negative evaluation correlated positively with eachother, and both correlated negatively with self-esteem and adaptive coping styles. Finally, self-esteem correlated positively with adaptive coping styles. Limitations: The results cannot be generalised to depressive states of BD and UP, as differences in the course of illness and types of depression are likely to impact on coping and clinical outcomes, particularly for BD. Conclusions: During remission, functioning is perhaps better 'preserved' in BD than in UP, possibly because of the protective role of extraversion which drives healthier coping styles. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2012.07.012
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 18
2013 Lampe L, 'Drug treatment for anxiety', Australian Prescriber, 36 186-189 (2013)

Antidepressants are recommended as firstline when pharmacotherapy is required for anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective in all anxiety disorders... [more]

Antidepressants are recommended as firstline when pharmacotherapy is required for anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective in all anxiety disorders, and selective and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors in most anxiety disorders. They are the drugs of first choice. With the exception of obsessive compulsive disorder, there is little evidence of a dose- response relationship with antidepressants and many patients will respond to standard doses. Anxiety is generally slower to respond to treatment than depression and clinicians should avoid rapid dose escalation. The outcomes are likely to be enhanced if patients receive cognitive behavioural therapy in addition to pharmacotherapy. Benzodiazepines are not the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders.

DOI 10.18773/austprescr.2013.076
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Lampe L, Fritz K, Boyce P, Starcevic V, Brakoulias V, Walter G, et al., 'Psychiatrists and GPs: Diagnostic decision making, personality profiles and attitudes toward depression and anxiety', Australasian Psychiatry, 21 231-237 (2013)

Objectives: The objective of this article is to explore diagnostic decision making around psychological symptoms presenting to general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists, ident... [more]

Objectives: The objective of this article is to explore diagnostic decision making around psychological symptoms presenting to general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists, identify attitudinal and personality factors of possible relevance in these decisions, and compare GPs and psychiatrists to help identify potential educational targets. Methods: GPs and psychiatrists attended separate peer-facilitated workshops in which two case presentations were discussed. Decision making was explored by structured questions embedded in the workshop, with responses recorded by electronic keypad technology. Participants completed demographic questionnaires and measures of personality and attitudes to depression. Results: GPs and psychiatrists accorded emphasis to different elements of the history, and assigned different diagnoses based on the same set of symptoms. Both groups relied on non-pharmacological management for milder psychological symptoms; GPs were less likely to make a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Traits of Extraversion and Agreeableness were associated with greater ease in treating depression. Conclusions: Differences in diagnostic decision making likely reflect the different contexts of specialist and generalist practice. Educational targets may include information about key symptoms to assist in diagnostic precision, but further information is needed to determine the best match between diagnostic processes, context and outcome. An awareness of the role of personality factors may help when designing education and support programs. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1039856213486210
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Wilson I, Griffin B, Lampe L, Eley D, Corrigan G, Kelly B, Stagg P, 'Variation in personality traits of medical students between schools of medicine', MEDICAL TEACHER, 35 944-948 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/0142159X.2013.827331
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2013 Jones MP, Eley D, Lampe L, Coulston CM, Malhli GS, Wilson I, et al., 'Role of personality in medical students' initial intention to become rural doctors', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 21 80-89 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12013
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Nicholas Talley
2012 Lampe L, 'Commentary on 'The role of alprazolam for the treatment of panic disorder in Australia'', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 46 273-274 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/0004867412437169
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Lampe L, 'Commentary on Bell et all., (2012): Effectiveness of computerized cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety disorders in secondary care', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 46 679-681 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/0004867412446091
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Lampe L, Shadbolt N, Starcevic V, Boyce P, Brakoulias V, Hitching R, et al., 'Diagnostic processes in mental health: GPs and psychiatrists reading from the same book but on a different page', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 20 374-378 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/1039856212458007
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2012 Soh N, Ma C, Lampe L, Hunt G, Malhi G, Walter G, 'Depression, financial problems and other reasons for suspending medical studies, and requested support services: findings from a qualitative study', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 20 518-523 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/1039856212460737
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2011 Lampe LA, 'Internet-based therapy: too good to be true?', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 45 342-U96 (2011)
DOI 10.3109/00048674.2011.560138
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011 Malhi GS, Coulston CM, Parker GB, Cashman E, Walter G, Lampe LA, Vollmer-Conna U, 'Who picks psychiatry? Perceptions, preferences and personality of medical students', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 45 861-870 (2011)
DOI 10.3109/00048674.2011.604301
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
2010 Gunewardene R, Lampe L, Ilchef R, 'Prevalence of hepatitis C in two inpatient psychiatry populations', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 18 330-334 (2010)
DOI 10.3109/10398561003763273
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2010 Lampe L, Coulston C, Walter G, Malhi G, 'Up close and personal: medical students prefer face-to-face teaching in psychiatry', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 18 354-360 (2010)
DOI 10.3109/10398561003739620
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2010 Lampe L, Coulston C, Walter G, Malhi G, 'Familiarity breeds respect: attitudes of medical students towards psychiatry following a clinical attachment', AUSTRALASIAN PSYCHIATRY, 18 348-353 (2010)
DOI 10.3109/10398561003739612
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
2009 Malhi GS, Adams D, Porter R, Wignall A, Lampe L, O'connor N, et al., 'Clinical practice recommendations for depression', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 119 8-26 (2009)

Objective: To provide clinically relevant evidence-based recommendations for the management of depression in adults that are informative, easy to assimilate and facilitate clinica... [more]

Objective: To provide clinically relevant evidence-based recommendations for the management of depression in adults that are informative, easy to assimilate and facilitate clinical decision making. Method: A comprehensive literature review of over 500 articles was undertaken using electronic database search engines (e.g. MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Cochrane reviews). In addition articles, book chapters and other literature known to the authors were reviewed. The findings were then formulated into a set of recommendations that were developed by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians who routinely deal with mood disorders. The recommendations then underwent consultative review by a broader advisory panel that included experts in the field, clinical staff and patient representatives. Results: The clinical practice recommendations for depression (Depression CPR) summarize evidence-based treatments and provide a synopsis of recommendations relating to each phase of the illness. They are designed for clinical use and have therefore been presented succinctly in an innovative and engaging manner that is clear and informative. Conclusion: These up-to-date recommendations provide an evidence-based framework that incorporates clinical wisdom and consideration of individual factors in the management of depression. Further, the novel style and practical approach should promote uptake and implementation. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2009.01382.x
Citations Scopus - 36
2009 Lampe L, 'Social anxiety disorder: Common, disabling and often untreated', Medicine Today, 10 54-64 (2009)

¿ Screen for social anxiety disorder in patients who present after frequently missing school or work, or with 'stress', depression or hazardous alcohol use. ¿ Effective ... [more]

¿ Screen for social anxiety disorder in patients who present after frequently missing school or work, or with 'stress', depression or hazardous alcohol use. ¿ Effective treatments for social anxiety disorder include cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and antidepressants; however, few affected patients receive them. ¿ For patients with social anxiety disorder, chronic illness is the rule without effective treatment. ¿ The GP has an important role in providing information about social anxiety disorder and its treatment, prescribing antidepressants when indicated, referring patients for CBT and ensuring that referred patients are receiving good quality treatment.

Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Lampe L, 'Social anxiety disorder', Medicine Today, 10 65 (2009)
2009 Malhi GS, Adams D, Lampe L, Paton M, O'Connor N, Newton LA, et al., 'Clinical practice recommendations for bipolar disorder', ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, 119 27-46 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2009.01383.x
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 72
2009 Lampe LA, 'Social anxiety disorder: recent developments in psychological approaches to conceptualization and treatment', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 43 887-898 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/00048670903179111
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2009 Lampe L, 'Going green ...', ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, 21 89-90 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1601-5215.2009.00370.x
2009 Malhi GS, Adams D, Porter R, Wignall A, Lampe L, O'Connor N, et al., 'Clinical practice recommendations for depression', ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, 119 8-26 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2009.01382.x
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 58
2008 Lampe LA, Black F, 'Panic disorder', Australian Doctor, 29-36 (2008)
2005 Lampe L, 'Antidepressants: Not just for depression', Australian Prescriber, 28 (2005)

Antidepressants can be an effective treatment option for a range of disorders other than depression. These include anxiety disorders, eating disorders and premenstrual dysphoric d... [more]

Antidepressants can be an effective treatment option for a range of disorders other than depression. These include anxiety disorders, eating disorders and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The efficacy of antidepressants in these disorders is independent of whether there is a mood disorder. However, there is an important, and sometimes superior, role for psychosocial interventions. Caution is needed in prescribing antidepressants if there is a history of bipolar disorder.

Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Lampe L, Slade T, Issakidis C, Andrews G, 'Social phobia in the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being (NSMHWB)', PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, 33 637-646 (2003)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291703007621
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 89
2002 Lampe LA, 'Social phobia: common, disabling and treatable', CURRENT OPINION IN PSYCHIATRY, 15 169-175 (2002)
DOI 10.1097/00001504-200203000-00008
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2000 Lampe LA, 'Social phobia: a review of recent research trends', CURRENT OPINION IN PSYCHIATRY, 13 149-155 (2000)
DOI 10.1097/00001504-200003000-00003
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
1998 Baillie AJ, Lampe LA, 'Avoidant personality disorder: Empirical support for DSM-IV revisions', JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS, 12 23-30 (1998)
DOI 10.1521/pedi.1998.12.1.23
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 22
1996 Lampe LA, 'A management approach to anxiety.', Australian family physician, 25 (1996)

A planned, structured and systematic approach is likely to optimise the management of anxiety disorders. Accurate diagnosis is essential to select the specific cognitive behaviour... [more]

A planned, structured and systematic approach is likely to optimise the management of anxiety disorders. Accurate diagnosis is essential to select the specific cognitive behavioural and pharmacological treatments available for certain anxiety disorders. However, many effective management strategies can be applied in general practice, using a prioritised, problem focused approach.

Show 44 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Jose J, Ip V, Chitakunye A, Long D, Zhao H, Lampe L, 'THE IMPACT OF INTOXICATION ON EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT LENGTH OF STAY FOR MENTAL HEALTH PRESENTATIONS', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2018)
2015 Lampe L, Ferguson J, 'Ranzcp 2015 Examination Information Sesion APPROACHING THE CRITICAL ESSAY QUESTION AND THE MODIFIED ESSAY QUESTIONS IN THE RANZCP WRITTEN EXAMINATION', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2015)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $435,523

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $31,572

Increasing the ease and quality of acute referrals to specialist psychiatric care and initial assessment using an internet-based application$31,572

This project aims to improve the efficiency and quality of the psychiatric triage process through the use of a web-based application. When patients with a mental health problem are referred to mental health services, they receive an initial assessment to determine how best to direct them to appropriate care - we refer to this as 'psychiatric triage'. By inviting patients and carers to provide important data while they wait to speak to a mental health clinician it is hoped to reduce both waiting and triage times. The intention is to roll this application out more widely. It can be expected to be of particular value to more rural health services which may have less access to highly trained and experienced mental health professionals - by guiding the data collection process it is hoped that better quality information will be collected for specialist mental health professionals to have available when providing advice: this is likely to result in more appropriate and better targeted care.

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team

Irosh Fernando, Lisa Lampe, Cyriac Mathew

Scheme Innovation Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20171 grants / $9,051

The Impact of Everyday Boundary Challenges for Health Professionals$9,051

Health professionals face many challenges to boundaries with colleagues, students and patients. While most are aware of the risks of serious boundary transgressions, the importance and impact of more subtle challenges seems unappreciated. Examples include asking colleagues for informal advice, being offered gifts, being both assessor and mentor of a student. Such boundary challenges have the potential to cause occupational stress and poorer outcomes for all concerned. This preliminary research seeks to review the literature and develop the foundation for an externally funded grant to explore the area further.

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team

Lisa Lampe

Scheme HMRI Brain and Mental Health Research Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20102 grants / $75,900

Medical Schools Outcomes Database and Longitudinal Tracking Project$66,000

This project used data collected routinely as part of the Medical Schools Outcomes Database and Longitudinal Tracking project. Additional data on personality style and intended area and location of practice was collected in order the study predictors of intended area of medical practice and intention to practice in a rural setting. The research team represented a number of Australian Medical Schools. 

Funding body: Medical Deans

Funding body Medical Deans
Project Team

Michael Jones, Lisa Lampe, Carissa Coulston, Gerry Corrigan, Cathy McMahon, Diann Eley, Pamela Stagg, Ian Wilson, Barbara Griffin, John Humphreys

Scheme Medical Deans
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Examiner training video for the psychiatry long case$9,900

This project aimed to create a digital resource to assist in the training of examiners for the long case in psychiatry.

Funding body: The University of Sydney

Funding body The University of Sydney
Project Team

Anthony Harris, Lisa Lampe, Gin Malhi, Rola Ajjawi

Scheme Teaching Improvement and Equipment Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20081 grants / $14,000

CBT Skills in Action Teaching DVD and CD$14,000

A DVD which shows experienced therapists demonstrating cognitive behaviour therapy techniques with simulated patients. Comes with a CD of resources.

Funding body: NSW Institute of Psychiatry

Funding body NSW Institute of Psychiatry
Project Team

Lisa Lampe, John Baird, Chris Basten, Rocco Crino, Natasha Davis, Peter McEvoy, Brian O'Grady

Scheme Education Support Fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20001 grants / $305,000

The National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being$305,000

Consortium to analyse and report the 1997 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being data.

Funding body: Department of Health and Aging

Funding body Department of Health and Aging
Project Team

Andrews JG et al including myself

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Exploring the characteristics of problem based learning and the importance of this approach as the core of medical education PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Lisa Lampe

Position

Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email lisa.lampe@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4033 5691
Fax (02) 4921 5692

Office

Room Level 5
Building McAuley Centre
Location CBMHR Mater Hospital

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