Mr Joseph Wenta

Lecturer

Newcastle Law School (Law)

Career Summary

Biography

Joseph joined Newcastle Law School as a tutor in 2008, and is currently an Associate Lecturer with teaching responsibilities in Torts, Property, and Equity and Trusts in 2010. Joseph's research interests also incorporate many areas of public law, with a primary emphasis on federal constitutional law and administrative law. Joseph is also involved with the production of the Newcastle Law Review. Research Expertise
- Constitutional law - Administrative law - Property

Teaching Expertise


Administrative Expertise


Collaborations

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Laws (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Forensic) (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Administrative Law
  • ConstitutionalLaw
  • Property

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
180199 Law not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
Newcastle Law School
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Wenta J, McDonald J, 'The Role of Law and Legal Systems in Climate Change Adaptation Policy', Research Handbook on Climate Change Adaptation Policy, Edward Elgar Publishing, United Kingdom 69-90 (2019)
DOI 10.4337/9781786432520.00011

Journal article (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Wenta J, McDonald J, McGee JS, 'Enhancing resilience and justice in climate adaptation laws', Transnational Environmental Law, 8 89-118 (2019)

© 2018 Cambridge University Press. Resilience thinking - an approach for understanding and managing change - is increasingly central to climate change adaptation law and policy. Y... [more]

© 2018 Cambridge University Press. Resilience thinking - an approach for understanding and managing change - is increasingly central to climate change adaptation law and policy. Yet the influence of adaptation law and policy on the distribution of climate impacts is often overlooked in studies of socio-ecological resilience to climate change. This article demonstrates how environmental justice scholarship helps to address this gap in the literature relating to adaptation law and resilience. Drawing on existing literature, the article identifies four principles to promote resilience and justice through climate adaptation laws. Climate adaptation laws must (i) prepare for, and respond to, change; (ii) address the distributive effects of climate change and adaptation; (iii) promote participation in adaptation processes; and (iv) cross sectors and scales. Each criterion can be implemented in part through existing legal processes, but might also be further supported by incremental law reform. Developing both resilience and justice dimensions will enhance the effectiveness of adaptation laws in addressing climate impacts.

DOI 10.1017/S2047102518000286
Citations Scopus - 2
2019 Pickering J, McGee JS, Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen SI, Wenta J, 'Global climate governance between hard and soft law: Can the Paris agreement's 'Crème Brûleé' approach enhance ecological reflexivity?', Journal of Environmental Law, 31 1-28 (2019)

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. In the face of global environmental concerns, legal institutions must cultivate a reflexive capaci... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. In the face of global environmental concerns, legal institutions must cultivate a reflexive capacity to monitor global ecological shifts and to reconfigure their practices accordingly. But, it remains unclear whether harder or softer legal norms are more capable of enhancing such ecological reflexivity. This article traces variations in harder and softer norms in two aspects of the evolution of the global climate change regime-national contributions to mitigation and review mechanisms- A nd their implications for ecological reflexivity. We find the regime's reflexivity has increased moderately and slowly over time but without a consistent shift towards harder or softer norms. The Paris Agreement's innovative approach, combining harder procedural commitments with softer substantive provisions (a 'crème brûleé'), has potential to encourage flexible responses to changing conditions within a stable, long-term architecture. However, the Agreement's softer, transparency-based compliance framework provides limited assurance that countries will make and fulfill ambitious commitments.

DOI 10.1093/jel/eqy018
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Wenta J, McGee J, Phelan L, 'Can a Regional Insurance Mechanism Enhance Resilience to Slow Onset Impacts of Climate Change', University of Tasmania Law Review, 35 23-57 (2016)
2014 McGee JS, Wenta J, 'Technology Transfer Institutions in Global Climate Governance: The Tension between Equity Principles and Market Allocation', Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law, 23 367-381 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/reel.12075
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 McGee J, Phelan L, Wenta J, 'Writing the Fine Print: Developing Regional Insurance for Climate Change Adaptation in the Pacific', Melbourne Journal of International Law, 15 444-472 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Liam Phelan
2012 Wenta JP, 'The integrity branch of government and the separation of judicial power', AIAL Forum, - 42-67 (2012) [C2]
Show 3 more journal articles
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Mr Joseph Wenta

Position

Lecturer
Newcastle Law School
Faculty of Business and Law

Focus area

Law

Contact Details

Email joseph.wenta@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6218

Office

Room Level 5, NeWSpace
Building NeWSpace
Location Newcastle City Campus

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